US3816231A - Reinforced nonwoven fabrics - Google Patents

Reinforced nonwoven fabrics Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3816231A
US3816231A US25671172A US3816231A US 3816231 A US3816231 A US 3816231A US 25671172 A US25671172 A US 25671172A US 3816231 A US3816231 A US 3816231A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
fibers
strands
warp strands
web
textile
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
P Marshall
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Fiber Technology Corp
Original Assignee
Kendall Co
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Kendall Co filed Critical Kendall Co
Priority to US25671172 priority Critical patent/US3816231A/en
Priority claimed from US37400373 external-priority patent/US3862867A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3816231A publication Critical patent/US3816231A/en
Assigned to FIBER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION reassignment FIBER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST. Assignors: KENDALL COMPANY, THE
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04HMAKING TEXTILE FABRICS, e.g. FROM FIBRES OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL; FABRICS MADE BY SUCH PROCESSES OR APPARATUS, e.g. FELTS, NON-WOVEN FABRICS; COTTON-WOOL; WADDING NON-WOVEN FABRICS FROM STAPLE FIBRES, FILAMENTS OR YARNS, BONDED WITH AT LEAST ONE WEB-LIKE MATERIAL DURING THEIR CONSOLIDATION
    • D04H5/00Non woven fabrics formed of mixtures of relatively short fibres and yarns or like filamentary material of substantial length
    • D04H5/08Non woven fabrics formed of mixtures of relatively short fibres and yarns or like filamentary material of substantial length characterised by the method of forming fleeces or layers, e.g. reorientation of fibres or yarns
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/643Including parallel strand or fiber material within the nonwoven fabric
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/643Including parallel strand or fiber material within the nonwoven fabric
    • Y10T442/646Parallel strand or fiber material is naturally occurring [e.g., cotton, wool, etc.]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/659Including an additional nonwoven fabric
    • Y10T442/666Mechanically interengaged by needling or impingement of fluid [e.g., gas or liquid stream, etc.]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/682Needled nonwoven fabric
    • Y10T442/684Containing at least two chemically different strand or fiber materials
    • Y10T442/686Containing polymeric and natural strand or fiber materials

Abstract

Textile-length fibers are subjected to a centrifugal force which orients them in a lateral direction, in which orientation they are deposited upon and mechanically engaged with a set of spacedapart warp strands to form novel nonwoven fabrics.

Description

United States Patent [191 Marshall 1 REINFORCED NONWOVEN FABRICS [75] Inventor: Preston F. Marshall, Walpole, Mass.

[73] Assignee: The Kendall Company, Walpole,v

Mass.

[22] Filed: May 25, 1972 Y 21 Appl. No.: 256,711

[56] References Cited 1 UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,266,761 12/1941 Jackson, Jr. et a1. 161/141 X June 11, 1974 3.551.265 12/1970 Jackson 161/57 3,616,129 10/1971 Sager..; 3.708.383 1/1973 Thomas et a1. 161/57 Primary Examiner-George F. Lesmes Assistant E.raminer-Wi1liam R. Dixon, Jr.

' Attorney, Agent, or Firm-John F. Ryan 57 ABSTRACT Textile-length fibers are subjected to a centrifugal force which orients them in a lateral direction, in which orientation they are deposited upon and mechanically engaged with a set of spaced-apart warp strands to form novel nonwoven fabrics.

6 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PATENTEDJun I an SHEET 10F 3 FIG.3

PATENTEDJIIN I 1 M4 SHEET 2 (1F 3 DISCUSSION OF PRIOR ART In the preparation of nonwoven fabrics wherein a substantial degree of tensile strength, toughness, and opacity are desired, as for use in disposable garments, hospital drapes, and the like, it is common practice to laminate together nonwoven fabricscomposed of textile-length fibers with other sheet material such as cellulose tissue, plastic films, paper, or other continuous sheet material. Such laminates, however, are usually deficient in tensile strength unless semi-rigid binder materials are employed in the lamination, in which case the laminate is liable to be unpleasantly stiff and papery, lacking in drape and esthetic appeal. In such cases, in order to combine adequate tensile strength with soft polymeric binder material in a product with suitable drape and conformability, recourse is frequently had to the use of an internal reinforcing layer or layers of textile yarns, spun or continuous filament.

warp strands, or disposed at an angle or angles thereto.

In order to impart stability to such an array, the multi- I ple sets of yarns are commonly bonded to each other at at least a portion of their crossover points.

Prior art yarn-reinforcing devices of this nature, however, are intricate, expensive, difficult to maintain, and are rarely capable of operating at the speed at which it is desired to produce nonwoven fabrics in order to make them economically feasible for use in disposable garments.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION two-dimensional nonwoven fabric comprising a set of spaced-apart warp strands, reinforced in the cross direction by a planar web of textile-length fibers, the textile length fibers being predominantly oriented normal to the warp strands and a portion of said fibers being mechanically engaged with said warp strands.

Further objects of the invention will be apparent from the following description and drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a product of this invention. I

FIG. 2 is a similar view of the product of FIG. 1 showing in detail the nature of the mechanical engagement of fibers and warp strands.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged view of another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 4 is a side elevation of an apparatus suitable for carrying out the process of the invention.

FIG. 5 is a top elevation of the apparatus of FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 is a side elevation of the centrifugal or horn section of FIG. 4.

Basically, the process comprises the formation of a high-velocity fluid stream of textile-length fibers, diffusion and deceleration of the fibrous stream in a chamber that is of substantial width in comparison with its thickness, to form a relatively wide but shallow fibrous stream, and then deflecting the fluid stream of fibers along a transversely extended smoothly curved surface curved in the direction of the stream, the curved surface forming what will herein be termed ahorn.

In this manner, centrifugal force is exerted on the fibers, causing them to align in a transverse direction along the curved surface and to concentrate in a narrow transversely extended band along the forward edge of the curved surface.

The above process, with a description of the apparatus and the operating parameters, is set forth in detail in copending US. Pat. application Ser. No. 248,106, filed April 27, 1972, of common assignee, and incorporated herein by reference, said application being a continuation-in-part of US. Ser. No. 196,709, filed Nov. 8, 1971.

The essence of the present invention is the interposition of a set of spaced-apart warp strands which traverse the lower edge of the centrifuge or horn, in a direction substantially normal to the flow of the narrow band of transversely aligned fibers. The spacing of the strands and the length of the fibers are so chosen that at least a portion of the fibers, traveling at high velocity as they reach the forward exit edge of the horn, become mechanically engaged with the warp strands and with each other. Thus a set of parallel warp strands, having no crosswise tensile strength per se, is converted into a nonwoven fabric, with a strand warp and a fibrous filling substantially normal thereto. The nature of the mechanical engagementwill be more fully explained below.

TECHNICAL DISCLOSURE By warp strands is meant herein a spaced-apart, noninterconnected set of supportive and reinforcing strands, of substantial tensile strength, running in the machine (M.D.) or longitudinal direction of the fabric. Exemplary but not restrictive illusrations are spun yarns, continuous filament yarns, narrow ribbons of film, fine wires, and bands of spread-apart tow comprising continuous synthetic filaments.

By textile-length fibers is meant fibers between 1% and about 6 inches in length, capable of being formed into a fluid stream of substantially individualized fibers under the influence of an air jet.

Referring to FIG. 4 there is shown a fluid-powered jet or aspirator, l0, capable of converting a top or sliver of staple-length fibers into a high-velocity fluid stream of substantially individualized fibers. Such jets, their parameters, and their function are described in detail in my copending applications Ser. Nos. 159,229, filed July 2,1971, and 164,255, filed July 20, 1971, and there are also commercially available aspirators capable of performing a similar function.

The high-velocity fluid stream of fibers is directed into the entry chamber 12, and thence is diffused into a guiding chamber 14, which, as seen by comparing FIGS. 4 and 5, reforms the fibrous stream into a stream which is wider and shallower than the diffuse stream emerging from the aspirator. The wide and shallow fibrous stream flows then through the chamber 16 and preferably to a constricting region 18, which acts as a Venturi. While not absolutely mandatory, this constriction 18 serves to iron out or minimize local disruptive pressure differences or vortices, thus evening out the flow of fibers.

From the Venturi secion 18 the fibrous stream passes into the curved centrifuge section 22, where the actual reorientation takes place. The majority of the fibers are thrown against the leading or'forward contour of the centrifuge 22, causing them to become reoriented from their previous orientation parallel to the fluid stream, or long axis of the apparatus, to a position in which they lie predominantly across or normal to the direction of fluid flow. 7

Immediately adjacent to and preferably in contact with the exit section of the horn, a warp of spaced-apart strands 25, from supply roll 23, is caused to traverse the exit section in a direction normal to the fiber flow. As seen more clearly in FIG. 6, the reoriented fibers are flowing in a narrow band traversing downwardly along the forward section of the horn. This band is customarily so narrow as to be less in width than the length of an individual fiber.

In preferred operation, the operating air pressures and apparatus configuration are such that the air velocity in the Venturi section 18 is about 88 to 176 feet per second, and at the forward edge of the exit section of the horn, where the fibers are grouped in a narrow transverse band, the air velocity is from about 44 to 88 feet per second. In this manner the fibers are strongly impelled onto the warp strands, and become mechanically engaged therewith as explained more fully below.

It should be appreciated that when the fibrous web is described as being oriented substantially normal to the warp strands, this does not mean that the fibers are laid down absolutely straight and parallel, like a row of matchsticks, since the length of the fibers being dealt with herein is so much greater than their diameter, and the fibers are so flexible, that practically without exception every fiber will lie in a twisted and cursive path, with curves and direction reversals along its path. The mean orientation of the fibers, therefore, is measured by the ratio of MD. to CD. strength of the fibrous web per se. By the statement herein that the fibers are predominantly oriented normal to the warp strands is meant that the ratio of CD. to MD. strength in the fibrous web alone is at least 4 or to I.

As desirable auxiliary equipment, means may be supplied to prevent excessive downward deflection of the warp strands as they traverse the exit section of the horn. This preferably is in the form of an air-permeable conveyor, such as a screen, 24, driven by drive rolls 36 and 38. In order to bleed off excess air, and to allow high air volumes and velocities to be employed in the horn, a conventional suction box 27 may be mounted immediately below the screen, as shown in FIG. '4.

' Also, in order to prevent leakage of air into the exit section of the horn, as shown in FIGS. 4 and 6, a sealing roll 28 may rotate across the leading edge of the exit sectionof the horn,-contacting the warp strands, and a curved plastic strip may make similar contact with the warp strands along the rear edge of the exit section.

The warp strand-textile length fiber combination may conveniently be doffed by means of take-ofi rolls 32 and 34, whence it is wound up by conventional means, not shown.

The size of the apparatus will naturally vary with the width of fabric to be produced, the volume of fiber to be processed, and with other factors. A typical set of dimensions might involve an entry chamber 12 in the form of a inch cube. The guiding chamber 14 may I taper down to a 4.5 inch depth, while widening out to 40 inches for the purpose of producing a 40 inch-wide web. The chamber 16 may be 40 inches square and 4.5 inches deep, with a capacity of 180 cubic inches.

The outlet slot of the Venturi section 18 may taper down to a depth of about 1.2 inches, ejecting a fibrous stream into the 2 inch deep opening of the centrifugal section 22. The guiding surfaces of this centrifugal section 22 are curved in a 15-inch radius through a turn, terminating in an outlet section 6 inches wide, thus giving a 240 square inch screen deposition area.

The above dimensional parameters are illustrative only, and not restrictive. Engineering details for modifications of the apparatus may be made, bearing in mind that the centrifugal force developed is proportional to the square of the velocity of the air stream, and inversely proportional to the radius of curvature.-

NATURE OF THE PRODUCT The products of this invention are in general planar nonwoven fabrics of substantial length and breadth in comparison with their thickness. As shown in FIG. 1, they comprise a set of warp strands, 40, and a superimposed web or fleece of textile-length fibers'42, lying principally on and normal to the warp strands.

As mentioned previously herein, a portion of the fibers are mechanically engaged with the warp strands. This is shown more clearly in FIG. 2, wherein it may be assumed that that portion of the fibers of FIG. 1 which are not engaged with the warp strands, but are merely lying across the strands, has been removed for clarity. The nature of the mechanical engagement with the warp strands is of three principal types. First, there is a plain interlacing, as shown at 44, where a textilelength fiber passes above certain warp strands and below certain other warp strands. Second, there is a wrapping action of one end of a fiber around a strand, as shown at 46. Third, as shown at 48, certain portions of the length of a fiber may be formed into a loop or series of loops, which loops are then at least in part wrapped around one or more wrap strands.

Additionally, there is a certain degree of entanglement and wrapping of some fibers, which are not in mechanical engagement with the warp strands as described above, with and around certain other fibers which are so engaged. It will be appreciated that the greatest degree of mechanical engagement of fibers with warp strands occurs with the fibers initially deposited on the strands, and that as more and more textile fibers are deposited, they tend to lie upon the initially deposited protion of the fleece. Light weight nonwoven fabrics of this invention, therefore, will generally show greater tensile strength per unit of fabric weight than fabrics with a heavier deposit of fibers.

In general, in the practice of this invention, a set of warp strands of, for example, spun cotton yarns, will be spaced from 0.5 to 1.5 inches apart, and will have applied thereto a fleece or web of textile-length fibers of from 1.5 to 6.0 inches in length, weighting from 5 or 6 to 60 or 70 grams per square yard. The invention will be illustrated by the following examples.

EXAMPLE I The apparatus employed was that shown in FIG. 4, wherein the warp strands were 40s 2 ply cotton yarns spaced approximately 0.75 inches apart.

The chamber 12 of FIGS. 4and 5 was fed by 4 aspirator jets of the type described as Type C in copending application Ser. No. l64,255, referred to above. The throat diameter of each jet was 0.562 inches indiameter, the taper was 2.7, and the exit section diameter was 0.600 inches. Each jet was'powered by air at 75 Psig., which, as set forth in Ser. No. 164,255, develops a maximum vacuum in the tube, of approximately 24 inches of mercury.

Each jet was fed by a 60 grain rayon sliver, l.5 denier per filament, l-9/ l 6 inches long. The total denier of the 4 ends of sliver was 153,060, and the feed rate was 4 feet per minute.

The 40 inch wide beam of cotton warp strands traversed the exit section of the horn at a speed of 8 feet per minute, in'the manner shown in FIG. 4.

The product resembled that shown in FIG. 1, with a portion of the cross-deposited fibers mechanically engaged with the warp strands, as shown in FIG. 2. The yarn-fiber product weighed 8.7 grams per square yard, of which 2.9 grams was cotton yarn and 5.8 grams was rayon fiber. When a 1-inch wide strip was cut across the 40 inch width of the fabric and suspended by one end, the strip remained integral and self-sustaining in the absence of binder, indicating internal cohesion due to fiber-yarn interengagement. If it is desired to produce stronger products, or to provide a potential adhesive property to fabrics of this invention, auxiliary binding material may be-deposited within the product by the same air-deposition process. Such binding material may be in the form of thermoplastic fibers, or thermoplastic powders, or both, and the fiber-warp strand composite may be further unified by developing the adhesive properties of the auxiliary binding material, or the composite may be laminated to another planar sheet material, as shown in the following example.

EXAMPLE 2 The same apparatus, jets, rayon sliver, and cotton warp strands were used as in Example I. In addition, two auxiliary aspirators were set up to feed into chamber 12 of FIGS. 4 and 5. These were a commercially available type, C? 200, from Clevepak Pollution Control Systems. These aspirators consist of a straight pipe approximately 9 inches long and 2.75 inches ID, with an air supply delivered through four holes 0.089 inches in diameter distributed around the periphery of the central air chamber and inclined at about 30 to the axis of the pipe. Aspirators of this type are designed to operate at from 5 to 150 Psig., depending on the degree of vacuum it is desired to establish.

One CP 200 aspirator was fed with a supply of 3 de' nier 0.25 inch long Vinyon fibers (Union Carbide trademark for a copolymer of vinyl chloride-vinyl acetate in fiber form), at Psig, delivering 6 grams of shorttherrnoplastic fiber to each square yard of product. The other CP 200 aspirator, operating at 20 Psig., delivered to each square yard of product approximately 5 grams of a thermoplastic powder, 35 mesh. 21 copolymer of polyethylene-polyethylacrylate.

The composite product, after leaving the take-off roll 32 of FIG. 4, was plied with a layer of cellulose tissue weighing 20 grams per square yard, and was passed through a 3-roll calender. The bottom steel roll was heated to about 420F: the center silicone covered roll equilibrated at about 360F., and the top steel roll at about F. The tissue side made contact with the heated steel roll, and the pressure was about 70 pounds per inch of nip.

The final composite product weighed 59 grams per square yard, of which 25 grams was rayon fiber, 20 grams tissue, 3 grams cotton yarn, 6 grams fused thermoplastic fiber, and 5 grams fused thermoplastic powder. It had a tensile strength of 6.4 pounds per inchwide strip cut to include one cotton warp strand, and a filling strength of 1.45 pounds.

Under the conditions of hot calendering, the thermoplastic fibers and thermoplastic powder granules were found, under microscopic examination, to have fused to binder globules unifying the rayon fibers, principally at their points of intersection, as shown at 50 in FIG. 3. Both thermoplastic components also served to bond the sheet of tissue to the assembly.

It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that any desired sheet material, such as film, foil, paper, or other nonwoven fabric, may be thus laminated to the basic fiber-warp strand-binder composite;

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. A nonwoven fabric comprising a set of parallel spaced-apart warp strands extending continuously in the longitudinal or machine direction of the fabric,

said set of warp strands having superimposed thereupon a web of textile-length fibers,

said web of textile-length fibers having a principal orientation substantially normal to said set of warp strands,

a portion of the fibers in said web being mechanically engaged with said parallel warp strands by passing over certain of said strands and under other of said strands,

and an additional portion of the fibers in said web being mechanically engaged with said parallel warp strands by having a portion of their length wrapped around at least a portion of the perimeters of certain of said strands.

2. The product according to claim 1 in which at least a portion of the textile-length fibers are bonded to each other by a bonding material located principally at the points of intersection of said fibers.

3. The product according to claim 2 in which the bonding material is a thermoplastic powder.

4. The product according to claim 2 in which the bonding material is a thermoplastic fiber.

5. A nonwoven laminate which comprises a set of parallel spaced-apart warp strands extending continuously in the longitudinal or machine direction of the laminate,

- 8 warp strands by having a portion oftheir length wrapped around at least a portion of the perimeters of certain of said strands, and a sheet material being adhesively united to said w'arp strands and said web of textile-length fibers.

6. The product according to claim 5 in which said sheet material is a sheet of cellulose tissue.

Claims (5)

  1. 2. The product according to claim 1 in which at least a portion of the textile-length fibers are bonded to each other by a bonding material located principally at the points of intersection of said fibers.
  2. 3. The product according to claim 2 in which the bonding material is a thermoplastic powder.
  3. 4. The product according to claim 2 in which the bonding material is a thermoplastic fiber.
  4. 5. A nonwoven laminate which comprises a set of parallel spaced-apart warp strands extending continuously in the longitudinal or machine direction of the laminate, said set of warp strands having superimposed thereon a web of textile-length fibers, said web of textile length fibers having a principal orientation substantially normal to said set of warp strands, a portion of the fibers in said web being mechanically engaged with said parallel warp strands by passing over certain of said strands and under other of said strands, an additional portion of the fibers in said web being mechanically engaged with said parallel warp strands by having a portion of their length wrapped around at least a portion of the perimeters of certain of said strands, and a sheet material being adhesively united to said warp strands and said web of textile-length fibers.
  5. 6. The product according to claim 5 in which said sheet material is a sheet of cellulose tissue.
US25671172 1972-05-25 1972-05-25 Reinforced nonwoven fabrics Expired - Lifetime US3816231A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US25671172 US3816231A (en) 1972-05-25 1972-05-25 Reinforced nonwoven fabrics

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US25671172 US3816231A (en) 1972-05-25 1972-05-25 Reinforced nonwoven fabrics
CA158,005A CA967344A (en) 1972-05-25 1972-12-04 Reinforced nonwoven fabrics
US37400373 US3862867A (en) 1972-05-25 1973-06-27 Process for producing reinforced nonwoven fabrics

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3816231A true US3816231A (en) 1974-06-11

Family

ID=22973291

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US25671172 Expired - Lifetime US3816231A (en) 1972-05-25 1972-05-25 Reinforced nonwoven fabrics

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (1) US3816231A (en)
CA (1) CA967344A (en)

Cited By (28)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3969561A (en) * 1974-09-17 1976-07-13 The Kendall Company Biaxially oriented nonwoven fabrics and method of making same
US4144368A (en) * 1973-01-16 1979-03-13 Hercules Incorporated Network structures having different cross-sections
US4228123A (en) * 1974-09-17 1980-10-14 The Kendall Company Method of making biaxially oriented nonwoven fabrics
EP0485892A1 (en) * 1990-11-14 1992-05-20 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft Striped material, process for its production and use
EP0492432A1 (en) * 1990-12-27 1992-07-01 SAVAL S.r.l. Non woven fabric and process for its production
US5294479A (en) * 1992-08-03 1994-03-15 Precision Custom Coatings, Inc. Non-woven interlining
US5866229A (en) * 1996-03-12 1999-02-02 Firma Carl Freudenburg Tuft backing
US5885399A (en) * 1993-06-17 1999-03-23 Tt Iu, S.L. Compound threads, fabrics provided therefrom and process to obtain them
US6429153B1 (en) * 1995-06-01 2002-08-06 Huesker Synthetic Gmbh & Company Textile composite material
US20030132556A1 (en) * 2002-01-15 2003-07-17 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Process and apparatus for making a reinforced fibrous absorbent member
US20030171728A1 (en) * 2002-01-15 2003-09-11 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Absorbent article with reinforced absorbent structure
US20040061264A1 (en) * 2002-09-26 2004-04-01 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Process and apparatus for air forming an article having a plurality of reinforced superimposed fibrous layers
US20040102751A1 (en) * 2002-11-27 2004-05-27 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Absorbent article with reinforced absorbent structure
US20040132369A1 (en) * 2003-01-07 2004-07-08 Head Andrew A Filament bundle reinforcement fabric
US6802834B2 (en) 2002-01-15 2004-10-12 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Absorbent article having discontinuous absorbent core
US20050014428A1 (en) * 2003-07-15 2005-01-20 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Scrim reinforced absorbent article with reduced stiffness
US6981297B2 (en) 2002-11-27 2006-01-03 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Controlled placement of a reinforcing web within a fibrous absorbent
US7594906B2 (en) 2003-07-15 2009-09-29 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Absorbent article having a stretchable reinforcement member
WO2009121979A1 (en) * 2008-04-04 2009-10-08 Hispanocatalana De Textiles, S.L. Method for producing a base lap of composite yarns comprising an untwisted cotton sheath, product obtained, and corresponding installation
US20120018371A1 (en) * 2009-03-26 2012-01-26 Pierre Lucien Cote Non-braided reinforced holow fibre membrane
US20120097604A1 (en) * 2009-06-26 2012-04-26 Pierre Lucien Cote Non-braided, textile-reinforced hollow fiber membrane
US20130153490A1 (en) * 2011-12-16 2013-06-20 Steven Kristian Pedersen Hollow fibre membrane with compatible reinforcements
US20140371700A1 (en) * 2013-06-14 2014-12-18 Covidien Lp Absorbent Articles Having Pockets and Related Methods Therefor
US8999454B2 (en) 2012-03-22 2015-04-07 General Electric Company Device and process for producing a reinforced hollow fibre membrane
US9022229B2 (en) 2012-03-09 2015-05-05 General Electric Company Composite membrane with compatible support filaments
US9221020B2 (en) 2010-09-15 2015-12-29 Bl Technologies, Inc. Method to make yarn-reinforced hollow fiber membranes around a soluble core
US9227362B2 (en) 2012-08-23 2016-01-05 General Electric Company Braid welding
US9643129B2 (en) 2011-12-22 2017-05-09 Bl Technologies, Inc. Non-braided, textile-reinforced hollow fiber membrane

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2266761A (en) * 1940-04-16 1941-12-23 American Reenforced Paper Co Fibrous sheet
US3551265A (en) * 1968-05-17 1970-12-29 Monsanto Co Dimensionally stable non-woven fabric
US3616129A (en) * 1969-04-07 1971-10-26 Kimberly Clark Co Longitudinally stretchable nonwoven material
US3708383A (en) * 1971-06-04 1973-01-02 Kimberly Clark Co Non-woven roll towel material

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2266761A (en) * 1940-04-16 1941-12-23 American Reenforced Paper Co Fibrous sheet
US3551265A (en) * 1968-05-17 1970-12-29 Monsanto Co Dimensionally stable non-woven fabric
US3616129A (en) * 1969-04-07 1971-10-26 Kimberly Clark Co Longitudinally stretchable nonwoven material
US3708383A (en) * 1971-06-04 1973-01-02 Kimberly Clark Co Non-woven roll towel material

Cited By (47)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4144368A (en) * 1973-01-16 1979-03-13 Hercules Incorporated Network structures having different cross-sections
US4228123A (en) * 1974-09-17 1980-10-14 The Kendall Company Method of making biaxially oriented nonwoven fabrics
US3969561A (en) * 1974-09-17 1976-07-13 The Kendall Company Biaxially oriented nonwoven fabrics and method of making same
EP0485892A1 (en) * 1990-11-14 1992-05-20 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft Striped material, process for its production and use
EP0492432A1 (en) * 1990-12-27 1992-07-01 SAVAL S.r.l. Non woven fabric and process for its production
US5294479A (en) * 1992-08-03 1994-03-15 Precision Custom Coatings, Inc. Non-woven interlining
US5885399A (en) * 1993-06-17 1999-03-23 Tt Iu, S.L. Compound threads, fabrics provided therefrom and process to obtain them
US6429153B1 (en) * 1995-06-01 2002-08-06 Huesker Synthetic Gmbh & Company Textile composite material
US5866229A (en) * 1996-03-12 1999-02-02 Firma Carl Freudenburg Tuft backing
US20050013888A1 (en) * 2002-01-15 2005-01-20 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Apparatus for making a reinforced fibrous absorbent member
US20030171728A1 (en) * 2002-01-15 2003-09-11 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Absorbent article with reinforced absorbent structure
US7568900B2 (en) 2002-01-15 2009-08-04 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Apparatus for making a reinforced fibrous absorbent member
US20030132556A1 (en) * 2002-01-15 2003-07-17 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Process and apparatus for making a reinforced fibrous absorbent member
US7204682B2 (en) 2002-01-15 2007-04-17 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Apparatus for making a reinforced fibrous absorbent member
US6989118B2 (en) 2002-01-15 2006-01-24 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Process for making a reinforced fibrous absorbent member
US6802834B2 (en) 2002-01-15 2004-10-12 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Absorbent article having discontinuous absorbent core
US20070248708A1 (en) * 2002-01-15 2007-10-25 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Apparatus for Making a Reinforced Fibrous Absorbent Member
US7745687B2 (en) 2002-01-15 2010-06-29 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Absorbent article with reinforced absorbent structure
US20040061264A1 (en) * 2002-09-26 2004-04-01 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Process and apparatus for air forming an article having a plurality of reinforced superimposed fibrous layers
US7094373B2 (en) 2002-09-26 2006-08-22 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Process and apparatus for air forming an article having a plurality of reinforced superimposed fibrous layers
US20040061263A1 (en) * 2002-09-26 2004-04-01 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Process and apparatus for air forming an article having a plurality of superimposed fibrous layers
US6982052B2 (en) 2002-09-26 2006-01-03 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Process and apparatus for air forming an article having a plurality of superimposed fibrous layers
US6981297B2 (en) 2002-11-27 2006-01-03 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Controlled placement of a reinforcing web within a fibrous absorbent
US20040102751A1 (en) * 2002-11-27 2004-05-27 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Absorbent article with reinforced absorbent structure
US20040132369A1 (en) * 2003-01-07 2004-07-08 Head Andrew A Filament bundle reinforcement fabric
US20050014428A1 (en) * 2003-07-15 2005-01-20 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Scrim reinforced absorbent article with reduced stiffness
US7594906B2 (en) 2003-07-15 2009-09-29 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Absorbent article having a stretchable reinforcement member
US7345004B2 (en) 2003-07-15 2008-03-18 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Scrim reinforced absorbent article with reduced stiffness
WO2009121979A1 (en) * 2008-04-04 2009-10-08 Hispanocatalana De Textiles, S.L. Method for producing a base lap of composite yarns comprising an untwisted cotton sheath, product obtained, and corresponding installation
EP2275593A1 (en) * 2008-04-04 2011-01-19 Hispanocatalana De Textiles, S.L. Method for producing a base lap of composite yarns comprising an untwisted cotton sheath, product obtained, and corresponding installation
US20110111195A1 (en) * 2008-04-04 2011-05-12 Josep Bernadas Rosello Method for producing a base lap of composite yarns comprising an untwisted cotton sheath, product obtained, and corresponding installation
EP2275593A4 (en) * 2008-04-04 2011-12-28 Hispanocatalana De Textiles S L Method for producing a base lap of composite yarns comprising an untwisted cotton sheath, product obtained, and corresponding installation
US9132390B2 (en) * 2009-03-26 2015-09-15 Bl Technologies Inc. Non-braided reinforced holow fibre membrane
CN104941459B (en) * 2009-03-26 2017-09-22 Bl 科技公司 Non-woven reinforced hollow fiber membrane
CN104941459A (en) * 2009-03-26 2015-09-30 Bl 科技公司 Non-braided reinforced hollow fiber membrane
US20120018371A1 (en) * 2009-03-26 2012-01-26 Pierre Lucien Cote Non-braided reinforced holow fibre membrane
US9061250B2 (en) * 2009-06-26 2015-06-23 Bl Technologies, Inc. Non-braided, textile-reinforced hollow fiber membrane
US20120097604A1 (en) * 2009-06-26 2012-04-26 Pierre Lucien Cote Non-braided, textile-reinforced hollow fiber membrane
US9221020B2 (en) 2010-09-15 2015-12-29 Bl Technologies, Inc. Method to make yarn-reinforced hollow fiber membranes around a soluble core
US9321014B2 (en) * 2011-12-16 2016-04-26 Bl Technologies, Inc. Hollow fiber membrane with compatible reinforcements
US20130153490A1 (en) * 2011-12-16 2013-06-20 Steven Kristian Pedersen Hollow fibre membrane with compatible reinforcements
US9643129B2 (en) 2011-12-22 2017-05-09 Bl Technologies, Inc. Non-braided, textile-reinforced hollow fiber membrane
US9022229B2 (en) 2012-03-09 2015-05-05 General Electric Company Composite membrane with compatible support filaments
US8999454B2 (en) 2012-03-22 2015-04-07 General Electric Company Device and process for producing a reinforced hollow fibre membrane
US9227362B2 (en) 2012-08-23 2016-01-05 General Electric Company Braid welding
US10369246B2 (en) * 2013-06-14 2019-08-06 Krp U.S., Llc Absorbent articles having pockets and related methods therefor
US20140371700A1 (en) * 2013-06-14 2014-12-18 Covidien Lp Absorbent Articles Having Pockets and Related Methods Therefor

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
CA967344A (en) 1975-05-13
CA967344A1 (en)

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3391048A (en) Entangled nonwoven web product from parallel laid filamentary tows
US3493452A (en) Apparatus and continuous process for producing fibrous sheet structures
US3458905A (en) Apparatus for entangling fibers
US3713942A (en) Process for preparing nonwoven fabrics
US3477103A (en) Preparation of nonwoven web structure
US3502763A (en) Process of producing non-woven fabric fleece
EP0669994B1 (en) Hydroentangled flash spun webs having controllable bulk and permeability
KR920007992B1 (en) Soft nonwoven fabric of filaments
US5993943A (en) Oriented melt-blown fibers, processes for making such fibers and webs made from such fibers
US3855045A (en) Self-sized patterned bonded continuous filament web
EP0088533B1 (en) Sorbent sheet product
US2931076A (en) Apparatus and method for producing fibrous structures
US3978648A (en) Helically wrapped yarn
CN1059939C (en) Shaped nonwoven fabric and method for making the same
US4741949A (en) Elastic polyetherester nonwoven web
US6599610B2 (en) Multiaxially stitched base material for reinforcing and fiber reinforced plastic, and method for preparing them
US4211807A (en) Reinforced non-woven fabrics and method of making same
CN1044015C (en) Abrasion resistant fibrous, nonwoven composite structure
US4622259A (en) Nonwoven medical fabric
US5227107A (en) Process and apparatus for forming nonwovens within a forming chamber
US3929542A (en) Non-woven webs of filaments of synthetic high molecular weight polymers and process for the manufacture thereof
US6106913A (en) Fibrous structures containing nanofibrils and other textile fibers
RU2366768C2 (en) Soft and voluminous copmposite materials
EP0619849B1 (en) Process for making moldable, tufted polyolefin carpet
RU2353523C2 (en) Multilayer materials laminated with ultrasound

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: FIBER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:KENDALL COMPANY, THE;REEL/FRAME:004837/0794

Effective date: 19871203

Owner name: FIBER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION,STATELESS

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:KENDALL COMPANY, THE;REEL/FRAME:004837/0794

Effective date: 19871203