US3814319A - Method and apparatus for making snow - Google Patents

Method and apparatus for making snow Download PDF

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Publication number
US3814319A
US3814319A US78956969A US3814319A US 3814319 A US3814319 A US 3814319A US 78956969 A US78956969 A US 78956969A US 3814319 A US3814319 A US 3814319A
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nozzle
snow
apparatus
particles
support member
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H Loomis
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25CPRODUCING, WORKING OR HANDLING ICE
    • F25C3/00Processes or apparatus specially adapted for producing ice or snow for winter sports or similar recreational purposes, e.g. for sporting installations; Producing artificial snow
    • F25C3/04Processes or apparatus specially adapted for producing ice or snow for winter sports or similar recreational purposes, e.g. for sporting installations; Producing artificial snow for sledging or ski trails; Producing artificial snow
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25CPRODUCING, WORKING OR HANDLING ICE
    • F25C2303/00Special arrangements or features for producing ice or snow for winter sports or similar recreational purposes, e.g. for sporting installations; Special arrangements or features for producing artificial snow
    • F25C2303/048Snow making by using means for spraying water
    • F25C2303/0481Snow making by using means for spraying water with the use of compressed air

Abstract

The disclosure is directed to the method of, and apparatus for, making snow by discharging atomized water particles at high velocity with compressed air into an ambient atmosphere of less than 32* F. The method provides the improved step of discharging the particles at an elevation of ten feet or more above the level of the surface to be covered with snow. Preferably, the discharge is accomplished at an elevation above 20 feet above the surface to be covered. The apparatus disclosed is specifically adapted to carry out the noted method.

Description

United States Patent 1191 Loomis 1 1 June 4, 1974 [54] THOD AND APPARATUS FOR MAKING 1464.625 9/1969 Carlsson 239/2 SNOW FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1 1 lnvemorl Harry Loomis Glenwood, 270 889 5/1927 Great Britain 239/210 [73] Assignee: Alfred C. Body, Shaker Heights,

Ohio a part interest Primary Examiner-M. Henson Wood, Jr. Assistant Examiner-John J. Love [22] Flled' 1969 Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Meyer, Tilberry & Body [21] Appl. No.: 789,569

[57] ABSTRACT UcSu I s I l t s on S, [51 1 III". Cl. ratus f making Snow discharging atomized water ['58] held of Search 239/2 particles at high velocity with compressed air into an 239/210 28051286 ambient atmosphere of less than 32 F. The method 169/25 137/615 provides the improved step of discharging the particles at an elevation of ten feet or more above the level of [56] References cued the surface to be covered with snow. Preferably, the UNITED STATES PATENTS discharge is accomplished at an elevation above 20 1,959,886 5/1934 Wadsworth 239/2805 feet above the surface to be covered. The apparatus 2.676471 4/1954 Pierce, Jr 239/2, S disclosed is specifically adapted to carry out the noted 3,206,126 9/1965 Thomps0n.... 169/25 X th d 3.217.748 11/1965 Harper 137/615 $301,485 1/1967 Tropeano et a1. 239/14 X 10 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PATENIEDJUN 4:914

- sum 1 nr 3 FIG. I

FIG. 2

INVENTCR. HARRY J. LOOMIS BY Maya, 744% g Body ATTORNEYS PATENTEDJUM mm I 3314.319

sum 3 BF 3 INVENTOR HARRY J. LOOM\S 42 MM, & Body ATTO RN EYS METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MAKING SNOW The present invention is directed toward the art of snow making, and, more particularly, to an improved method and apparatus for making large volumes of high quality snow suitable for skiing.

Artificial snow of the type needed for skiing is generally made by atomizing water into extremely tiny particles and discharging the particles into the ambient atmosphere at a high velocity by expanded compressed air. lf the ratio of water to compressed air is proper, and the atmospheric temperature is below 32 F, the water particles form into snow. This method of snow making is well known and its theory of operation and general limitations regarding the air-water ratios and pressures, and their relationship to ambient air temperatures are set forth at length in US. Pat. No. 2,676,471 to W. M. Pierce, Jr. and are incorporated herein by reference.

In actual practice, the noted method was carried out by portable "guns" mounted on small tripods and connected through hoses with sources of water and compressed air. Normally, as shown in the noted patent, the guns included mixing nozzles mounted at the end of an air and water supply barrel. The guns were arranged so that the nozzles discharged at approximately 2 to 3 feet above ground level. Additionally, the gun mountings permitted the angular elevation of the barrel to be varied.

This general snow making arrangement had been considered to bathe most efficient system possible; however, it did have substantial disadvantages. First, in order to obtain even coverageof the ski slopes, it was necessary to continually haul the guns to new positions on the slopes. This was backbreaking work and it was very difficult to find work crews that would do a good job regardless of the pay.

Secondly, the presence of the guns and the low level blast required that the slopes be closed to skiers during snow making operations. For this reason, much of the snow making had to be done at night. This makes the task of repositioning and tending the guns even more difficult.

Thirdly, controlling the quality of the snow was difficult. Hot compressed air traveling through the hoses lying on the snow, cooled and the moisture entrained in the air condensed. The condensation froze and the quantity of air reaching the guns was reduced. With less air reaching the gun, the snow beingproduced became too wet.

Fourthly, and most importantly, even with a highly skilled work crew and with the system operating at top efficiency under ideal atmospheric conditions, it was not possible for any one gun to produce much more than two or three inches of snow per hour. This, although satisfactory, was in many places hardly sufficient.

The present invention provides an improved method and apparatus which overcomes all the above mentioned problems. Most significantly, the invention produces snow at least 2 times more efficiently than the prior method. For example, as mentioned with the prior system it was possible with one gun to produce approximately 2 to 3 inches of snow per hour; however, with the subject invention, a single gun can produce 3 inches of snow over an area 8 times as large in the same time period. This is accomplished without substantially increasing the quantity of compressed air required.

In accordance with the present invention there is provided an improvement to the known method of making snow by atomizing water to form water particles and projecting the particles at high velocity by rapidly expanded compressed air into the ambient atmosphere above a ski trail. The improvement comprises projecting the particles at an elevation of at least ten feet above the ground level of the trail and, preferably, at an elevation in the range above twenty feet.

By discharging the water particles and compressed air at substantially greater elevations than was done heretofore, many distinct and unexpected advantages are obtained. For example, skiing can continue on the slopes while snow making is being carried out. This is so because the blast from the guns is well above the skiers. Additionally, the increased elevation permits prevailing winds to be used for distributing the snow more uniformly and over a greater area.

In addition to the above, the increased elevation of the guns allows the supply lines to be self-draining. Thus, the system experiences fewer difficulties with nozzle and supply line freeze-up.

The most important and dramatic advantage obtained by the invention is, however, a totally unexpected increase in quality and quantity of snow produced. As an example, in one test, a gun constructed in accordance with the aforementioned patent was operated at its normal 3 foot elevation and, also, at a 30 foot elevation. At the 30 foot elevation the gun producednearly double the depth of snow obtained at the 3 foot elevation and, simultaneously, covered an area 6 to 8 times greater. The same quantity of compressed air was required at both levels, but at the 30 foot level, the water quantity was, of course, increased to produce the additional quantity of snow. Additionally, a far superior snow quality was obtained at the 30 foot elevation.

The reasons for the dramatic increase in snow production brought about by the increase in gun elevation are not fully known and the results obtained appear to contradict present snow making knowledge. Although the increased elevation permits the particles to fall farther and dry out and crystallize more, the actual increase obtained in the quantity of snow produced was totally unexpected.

A further aspect of the invention is the provision of apparatus especially suited for carrying out the improved method. In particular, the apparatus includes a vertical support member adapted to extend at least 10 feet above a surface to be covered with snow. A snow producing gun unit having at least one nozzle for discharging water particles and compressed air is carried on the support member with the nozzle adapted to discharge at a level in the range of at least ten feet above the surface. Further, means are provided for supplying compressed air and water to the nozzle and additional means are provided for permitting the position of the nozzle to be shifted.

Accordingly, a primary object of the invention is the provision of an improved method and apparatus for producing large quantities of high quality snow.

A further object is the provision of a method of producing snow which, when compared with prior methods, permits a greater quantity of snow to be produced using the same amount of compressed air.

Another object of the invention is the provision ofa snow making method and apparatus which permits skiing to continue during the snow making process.

Still another object is the provision of a snow making method and apparatus which is especially suited for permanent installation on ski slopes and the like.

Yet another object is the provision of a snow making apparatus of the type described which can be easily serviced.

A still further object is the provision of a method of snow making which permits greater surface areas to be covered with a single gun unit.

These and other objects and advantages will become apparent from the following description when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a pictorial view of a ski slope provided with a plurality of snow making units formed in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention;

FIGS. 2 and 3 are enlarged pictorial views of one of the units shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a top view of the unit shown in FIGS. 2 and 3;

FIG. 5 is a side elevational view of the unit shown in FIGS. 2 and 3; and,

FIG. 6 is a pictorial view of a second embodiment of the invention.

Referring now to the drawings wherein the showings are for the purpose of illustrating the preferred embodiments of the invention only, 'and not for the purpose of limiting the same, FIG. 1 shows, in pictorial view a ski hill or slope provided with apermanent installation of snow making units 10 constructed and operated in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention. As shown, the units 10 are preferrably positioned adjacent the ski trail at spaced points therealong. Although, in the embodiment under consideration, only permanently installed units are shown, it is,

of course, to be understood that the usual tripod,

mounted portable units'could be used'for repairing and/or increasing coverageat various spots on the hill.

In particular, each of the units 10 include a vertically extending and support member 12 shown in the form of a wooden telephone or light pole. As is apparent, the support member 12 can be installed specifically for the snow making apparatus or, alternately, can be an existing pole such as a previously installed light or electric power pole.

Carried from the support member 12 is a horizontally extending support boom or'frame assembly 14. The boom assembly 14 includes a first plate member 16 which is suitably connected to the top of the pole by lag screws 18. Rigidly connected to the plate 16, such as by welding, 'are a pair of generally parallel pipe members 20 which extend horizontally outward from the pole. A rectangular metal support plate 22 is welded to the outer ends of pipes 20 and a support brace 24 extends from the underside of plate 22 to the pole 12. As best shown in FIG. 5, the support brace 24 is connected to the pole 12 by a lag screw 26.

A conventional snow making gun 28 is supported by the plate 22 and arranged to direct its discharge generally horizontally. The gun 28 is preferrably formed in accordance with the teachings of US. Pat. No. 2,676,471. As shown, the gun 28 includes a barrel 30 which is connected at its rear end to the plate 22 by a vertically extending pivot pin 32 to permit the barrel to be oscillated through a horizontal plane.

The necessary compressed air and water are supplied to the gun by flexible hoses 34 and 36, respectively. As noted in FIGS. 4 and 5, the hoses 34 and 36 extend up the pole 12 and are suitably connected thereto by small brackets 38. Referring again to FIG. 1, it is seen that the hoses 36 and 34 preferably connected with chilled water and air supply lines 36a and 340 which extend down the ski hill to a suitable source of water and compressed air such as a compressor and pumping station 40.

In order to permit the direction of the gun 28 to be adjusted or oscillated from the ground, control ropes 41, 42 and 43 are provided. The control ropes 41 and 42 are connected generally laterally of the gun and extend back to a cross-arm 44 which is welded to the rear edge of the plate 16. The cross-arm 44 extends out a substantial distance on each side of the pole l2 and has smal eyes or pulleys 46 connected at its outer ends. The guide ropes 41 and 42 extend through the pulleys, and is shown in the FIG. 3, extend down the pole into releasable engagement with cleats 50. The rope 43 is also connected to the barrel 30 and likewise extends down the pole to a cleat 50. As can be seen, this rope arrangement permits the gun 28 to be shifted to a selected angular position as shown in FIG. 4, or oscillated about the pivot 32.

Of particular importance to the present invention is the elevational position of the gun 28. As previously discussed, prior snow making gun units were positioned on short tripod units such that the distance from the ground to the discharge point or the gun nozzle was approximately 2 to 3 feet. According to the present invention the gun is preferrably raised to an elevation such that the nozzle of the gun is at least 10 feet above the ground level (i.e. level of the skiing surface) and, preferrably, in a range above 20 feet. In the specific embodiment under consideration the pole 12 has a height of approximately 25 to 30 feet. By positioning the gun at the increased elevation several advantages are obtained. First, the discharge of the gun is well above the skiing surface and permits skiing to continue during the snow making operation. Additionally, with the guns positioned at this substantial height the distribution of the snow is assisted by winds. By positioning the units to take advantage of prevailing winds, one gun unit can cover a much larger area. Additionally, the enjoyment of the skiers is inhanced by being able to ski in the gently falling, newly made snow. An additional advantage of the increased elevation is that any condensation which occurs in the air supply line is under a substantial head relative to the main header 36a and quickly flows back down without collecting in the hose 34. Consequently the supply of air is always maintained at its maximum since the condensate will not collect and freeze in the supply hoses to reduce the cross-sectional air flow area.

The increased elevationof the gun produces, in addition to the two above noted advantages a huge and to tally unexpected increase in the quantity of snow which can be produced by each gun. By raising the guns to an elevation in the range mentioned, the output per gun increases by a factor of 5 or l0 and more. This increase is accomplished using the same amount of air and merely increasing the water supplied to the gun. That is, at ground level a normal ratio of air to water under the ratio of water to air is greatly increased. Part of this increase is believed to be due to the fact that the snow has much further to fall and, consequently, dries out more before reaching the ground level; however, this alone is not sufficient to explain the increased output.

FIG. 9 shows a pictorial view of a second embodiment of the invention. This embodiment is generally the same as the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1-5 in many particulars. Accordingly, elements which are the same as elements previously discussed with reference to FIGS. 1-5 are identified with the same reference numeral differentiated by a prime suffix. A description a FIG. I-5 element is to be taken as equally applicable to the corresponding FIG. 6 element unless otherwise noted.

In particular, the FIG. 6 embodiment is designed to facilitate maintenance on the gun unit 28' by providing an arrangement whereby the gun can be readily lowered to a level where it can be serviced from the ground. As will be noted, the boom forming horizontal pipe members are preferably of a length such that they are only about 5 or 6 feet shorter than the pole 12. Additionally, they are connected to the plate l6 by hinge connections 60. As shown, this permits the gun unit 28 to be lowered to the dotted line position.

The boom is maintained in its elevated position by one or more support members 62 which are connected to plate 22 through hinge connections 64. The members 62 are preferably formed from pipe and are releasably connected at their lower ends to pole 12. The particular manner in which connection is made to the pole 12 is not important to the invention and is shown simply as bracket plates 66 that are welded to members 62 and connected to pole 12 by releasable bolts or screws 68.

The necessary air and water lines could be connected to the gun in the same manner as shown in the FIGS. 1-5; however, preferably the support pipes 62 are connected to the supply lines at their lower ends by releasable couplings 70. At their upper ends the pipes 62 are connected with the gun through short pieces of flexible hose. Consequently, the pipes 62 serve to supply air and water to the gun. To lower the gun it is only necessary to disconnect the water and air couplings 70 and release the bolts 68.-

The invention has been described in great detail sufficient to enable one of ordinary skill in the snow making art to make or use the same. Obviously, modifications and alterations of the preferred embodiment will occur to others upon a reading and understanding of this specification and it is my intention to include all such modifications and alterations as part of my invention insofar as they come within the scope of the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention. I claim:

1. In the method of making snow by atomizing water to form water particles and projecting the water particles at high velocity by rapidly expanded compressed air from a nozzle into the ambient atmosphere above a ski trail when the atmospheric temperature is below 32 F, the improvement comprising the step of projecting the particles from said nozzle while said nozzle is at an elevation of at least 10 feet above the ground level of the ski trail.

2. The improvement as defined in claim 1 wherein said particles are projected from a nozzle which is at an elevation in the range of 20 or more feet above the ground.

3. The improvement as defined in claim I wherein said particles are projected substantially horizontally.

4. The improvement as defined in claim 1 wherein said particles are projected substantially horizontally and in a variable radial direction.

5. Apparatus for producing snow comprising: a vertical support member; a snow producing gun assembly having at leastone nozzle for discharging water and compressed air, said nozzle being carried at least 10 feet above a surface to be covered with snow by means extending radially outwardly of said support member; and, means for supplying air and water to said nozzle.

6. The apparatus as defined in claim 5 including means for permitting said nozzle to be moved arcuately about a vertical pivot.

7. The apparatus as defined in claim 5 wherein the means extending radially outwardly of said support member is pivotally connected to said support member.

changing the radial direction of said nozzle.

Claims (10)

1. In the method of making snow by atomizing water to form water particles and projecting the water particles at high velocity by rapidly expanded compressed air from a nozzle into the ambient atmosphere above a ski trail when the atmospheric temperature is below 32* F, the improvement comprising the step of projecting the particles from said nozzle while said nozzle is at an elevation of at least 10 feet above the ground level of the ski trail.
2. The improvement as defined in claim 1 wherein said particles are projected from a nozzle which is at an elevation in the range of 20 or more feet above the ground.
3. The improvement as defined in claim 1 wherein said particles are projected substantially horizontally.
4. The improvement as defined in claim 1 wherein said particles are projected substantially horizontally and in a variable radial direction.
5. Apparatus for producing snow comprising: a vertical support member; a snow producing gun assembly having at least one nozzle for discharging water and compressed air, said nozzle being carried at least 10 feet above a surface to be covered with snow by means extending radially outwardly of said support member; and, means for supplying air and water to said nozzle.
6. The apparatus as defined in claim 5 including means for permitting said nozzle to be moved arcuately about a vertical pivot.
7. The apparatus as defined in claim 5 wherein the means extending radially outwardly of said support member is pivotally connected to said support member.
8. The apparatus as defined in claim 5 wherein said means extending radially is connected to said support member for movement about a horizontal pivot.
9. The apparatus of claim 7 including means for locking said radially extending means against pivotal movement relative to said support member.
10. The apparatus of claim 9 including means for changing the radial direction of said nozzle.
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Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3926369A (en) * 1973-11-30 1975-12-16 George W Pearce Controlled spraying
US4199103A (en) * 1979-01-15 1980-04-22 Dupre Herman K Adjustable snow making tower
FR2538091A1 (en) * 1982-12-17 1984-06-22 Waertsilae Oy Ab ice-making Process for mock trials
US4823518A (en) * 1985-03-08 1989-04-25 Nubs Nob, Inc. Lift mounted snowmaker
US5004151A (en) * 1989-11-20 1991-04-02 Dupre Herman K Method and apparatus for making snow
US5031832A (en) * 1990-01-26 1991-07-16 Ratnik Industries Inc. Automated snow-making system
US5102044A (en) * 1988-09-30 1992-04-07 Nkk Corporation Method for producing snow and apparatus therefor
US5154348A (en) * 1991-05-10 1992-10-13 Ratnik Industries, Inc. Snow-gun oscillation control apparatus
US5360163A (en) * 1993-05-17 1994-11-01 Dupre Herman K Adjustable snow making tower
US5400966A (en) * 1993-08-05 1995-03-28 Holimont, Inc. Machine for making artificial snow and method
US5529242A (en) * 1993-06-11 1996-06-25 Hedin; Fredrik Device for making snow
WO1996035087A1 (en) * 1995-05-05 1996-11-07 Ratnik Industries, Inc. Fanless snow gun
US5628456A (en) * 1995-09-27 1997-05-13 Dupre; Herman K. Below surface control system for snow making devices
EP0787959A1 (en) * 1996-02-02 1997-08-06 Fredrik Hedin Method and device for producing snow
US5718378A (en) * 1995-09-27 1998-02-17 Dupre; Herman K. Control system for snow making devices
US5749517A (en) * 1995-09-27 1998-05-12 Dupre; Herman K. Control system for snow making devices
US5836513A (en) * 1996-03-20 1998-11-17 Lake Effect Technologies, Inc. Apparatus for and method of making snow
US6161769A (en) * 1997-12-16 2000-12-19 Boyne Usa, Inc. Adjustable snow making tower
US7290722B1 (en) 2003-12-16 2007-11-06 Snow Machines, Inc. Method and apparatus for making snow

Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB270889A (en) * 1926-04-26 1927-05-19 Basil Hamilton Whiteford Improvements in connection with sprinklers for gardens, lawntennis and other games courts and for analogous purposes
US1959886A (en) * 1933-02-11 1934-05-22 Wadsworth Willard Portable sprinkler support
US2676471A (en) * 1950-12-14 1954-04-27 Tey Mfg Corp Method for making and distributing snow
US3206126A (en) * 1963-10-25 1965-09-14 Elkhart Brass Mfg Co Remote control fire nozzle
US3217748A (en) * 1963-06-26 1965-11-16 John D Harper Flexible insulated fluid transfer apparatus
US3301485A (en) * 1964-09-14 1967-01-31 Joseph C Tropeano Method and apparatus for making frozen particles
US3464625A (en) * 1965-01-22 1969-09-02 Atlas Copco Ab Method and means for making snow

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB270889A (en) * 1926-04-26 1927-05-19 Basil Hamilton Whiteford Improvements in connection with sprinklers for gardens, lawntennis and other games courts and for analogous purposes
US1959886A (en) * 1933-02-11 1934-05-22 Wadsworth Willard Portable sprinkler support
US2676471A (en) * 1950-12-14 1954-04-27 Tey Mfg Corp Method for making and distributing snow
US3217748A (en) * 1963-06-26 1965-11-16 John D Harper Flexible insulated fluid transfer apparatus
US3206126A (en) * 1963-10-25 1965-09-14 Elkhart Brass Mfg Co Remote control fire nozzle
US3301485A (en) * 1964-09-14 1967-01-31 Joseph C Tropeano Method and apparatus for making frozen particles
US3464625A (en) * 1965-01-22 1969-09-02 Atlas Copco Ab Method and means for making snow

Cited By (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3926369A (en) * 1973-11-30 1975-12-16 George W Pearce Controlled spraying
US4199103A (en) * 1979-01-15 1980-04-22 Dupre Herman K Adjustable snow making tower
FR2538091A1 (en) * 1982-12-17 1984-06-22 Waertsilae Oy Ab ice-making Process for mock trials
US4823518A (en) * 1985-03-08 1989-04-25 Nubs Nob, Inc. Lift mounted snowmaker
US5102044A (en) * 1988-09-30 1992-04-07 Nkk Corporation Method for producing snow and apparatus therefor
US5004151A (en) * 1989-11-20 1991-04-02 Dupre Herman K Method and apparatus for making snow
WO1991011669A1 (en) * 1990-01-26 1991-08-08 Ratnik Industries, Inc. Automated snow-making system
US5031832A (en) * 1990-01-26 1991-07-16 Ratnik Industries Inc. Automated snow-making system
US5154348A (en) * 1991-05-10 1992-10-13 Ratnik Industries, Inc. Snow-gun oscillation control apparatus
US5360163A (en) * 1993-05-17 1994-11-01 Dupre Herman K Adjustable snow making tower
US5529242A (en) * 1993-06-11 1996-06-25 Hedin; Fredrik Device for making snow
US5400966A (en) * 1993-08-05 1995-03-28 Holimont, Inc. Machine for making artificial snow and method
WO1996035087A1 (en) * 1995-05-05 1996-11-07 Ratnik Industries, Inc. Fanless snow gun
US5628456A (en) * 1995-09-27 1997-05-13 Dupre; Herman K. Below surface control system for snow making devices
US5718378A (en) * 1995-09-27 1998-02-17 Dupre; Herman K. Control system for snow making devices
US5749517A (en) * 1995-09-27 1998-05-12 Dupre; Herman K. Control system for snow making devices
EP0787959A1 (en) * 1996-02-02 1997-08-06 Fredrik Hedin Method and device for producing snow
US5836513A (en) * 1996-03-20 1998-11-17 Lake Effect Technologies, Inc. Apparatus for and method of making snow
US6161769A (en) * 1997-12-16 2000-12-19 Boyne Usa, Inc. Adjustable snow making tower
US7290722B1 (en) 2003-12-16 2007-11-06 Snow Machines, Inc. Method and apparatus for making snow

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