US3814141A - Method of weaving on water jet loom - Google Patents

Method of weaving on water jet loom Download PDF

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US3814141A
US3814141A US33938373A US3814141A US 3814141 A US3814141 A US 3814141A US 33938373 A US33938373 A US 33938373A US 3814141 A US3814141 A US 3814141A
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weft
warp
yarn
weaving
water
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T Kobayashi
S Iribe
N Yamaguchi
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Teijin Ltd
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D15/00Woven fabrics characterised by the material or construction of the yarn or other warp or weft elements used
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D47/00Looms in which bulk supply of weft does not pass through shed, e.g. shuttleless looms, gripper shuttle looms, dummy shuttle looms
    • D03D47/28Looms in which bulk supply of weft does not pass through shed, e.g. shuttleless looms, gripper shuttle looms, dummy shuttle looms wherein the weft itself is projected into the shed
    • D03D47/32Looms in which bulk supply of weft does not pass through shed, e.g. shuttleless looms, gripper shuttle looms, dummy shuttle looms wherein the weft itself is projected into the shed by liquid jet
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C10PETROLEUM, GAS OR COKE INDUSTRIES; TECHNICAL GASES CONTAINING CARBON MONOXIDE; FUELS; LUBRICANTS; PEAT
    • C10MLUBRICATING COMPOSITIONS; USE OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES EITHER ALONE OR AS LUBRICATING INGREDIENTS IN A LUBRICATING COMPOSITION
    • C10M2207/00Organic non-macromolecular hydrocarbon compounds containing hydrogen, carbon and oxygen as ingredients in lubricant compositions
    • C10M2207/28Esters
    • C10M2207/281Esters of (cyclo)aliphatic monocarboxylic acids
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C10PETROLEUM, GAS OR COKE INDUSTRIES; TECHNICAL GASES CONTAINING CARBON MONOXIDE; FUELS; LUBRICANTS; PEAT
    • C10MLUBRICATING COMPOSITIONS; USE OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES EITHER ALONE OR AS LUBRICATING INGREDIENTS IN A LUBRICATING COMPOSITION
    • C10M2207/00Organic non-macromolecular hydrocarbon compounds containing hydrogen, carbon and oxygen as ingredients in lubricant compositions
    • C10M2207/28Esters
    • C10M2207/282Esters of (cyclo)aliphatic oolycarboxylic acids
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C10PETROLEUM, GAS OR COKE INDUSTRIES; TECHNICAL GASES CONTAINING CARBON MONOXIDE; FUELS; LUBRICANTS; PEAT
    • C10MLUBRICATING COMPOSITIONS; USE OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES EITHER ALONE OR AS LUBRICATING INGREDIENTS IN A LUBRICATING COMPOSITION
    • C10M2207/00Organic non-macromolecular hydrocarbon compounds containing hydrogen, carbon and oxygen as ingredients in lubricant compositions
    • C10M2207/28Esters
    • C10M2207/283Esters of polyhydroxy compounds
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C10PETROLEUM, GAS OR COKE INDUSTRIES; TECHNICAL GASES CONTAINING CARBON MONOXIDE; FUELS; LUBRICANTS; PEAT
    • C10MLUBRICATING COMPOSITIONS; USE OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES EITHER ALONE OR AS LUBRICATING INGREDIENTS IN A LUBRICATING COMPOSITION
    • C10M2207/00Organic non-macromolecular hydrocarbon compounds containing hydrogen, carbon and oxygen as ingredients in lubricant compositions
    • C10M2207/28Esters
    • C10M2207/286Esters of polymerised unsaturated acids
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C10PETROLEUM, GAS OR COKE INDUSTRIES; TECHNICAL GASES CONTAINING CARBON MONOXIDE; FUELS; LUBRICANTS; PEAT
    • C10MLUBRICATING COMPOSITIONS; USE OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES EITHER ALONE OR AS LUBRICATING INGREDIENTS IN A LUBRICATING COMPOSITION
    • C10M2215/00Organic non-macromolecular compounds containing nitrogen as ingredients in lubricant compositions
    • C10M2215/02Amines, e.g. polyalkylene polyamines; Quaternary amines
    • C10M2215/04Amines, e.g. polyalkylene polyamines; Quaternary amines having amino groups bound to acyclic or cycloaliphatic carbon atoms
    • C10M2215/042Amines, e.g. polyalkylene polyamines; Quaternary amines having amino groups bound to acyclic or cycloaliphatic carbon atoms containing hydroxy groups; Alkoxylated derivatives thereof
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C10PETROLEUM, GAS OR COKE INDUSTRIES; TECHNICAL GASES CONTAINING CARBON MONOXIDE; FUELS; LUBRICANTS; PEAT
    • C10MLUBRICATING COMPOSITIONS; USE OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES EITHER ALONE OR AS LUBRICATING INGREDIENTS IN A LUBRICATING COMPOSITION
    • C10M2215/00Organic non-macromolecular compounds containing nitrogen as ingredients in lubricant compositions
    • C10M2215/10Amides of carbonic or haloformic acids
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C10PETROLEUM, GAS OR COKE INDUSTRIES; TECHNICAL GASES CONTAINING CARBON MONOXIDE; FUELS; LUBRICANTS; PEAT
    • C10MLUBRICATING COMPOSITIONS; USE OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES EITHER ALONE OR AS LUBRICATING INGREDIENTS IN A LUBRICATING COMPOSITION
    • C10M2219/00Organic non-macromolecular compounds containing sulfur, selenium or tellurium as ingredients in lubricant compositions
    • C10M2219/04Organic non-macromolecular compounds containing sulfur, selenium or tellurium as ingredients in lubricant compositions containing sulfur-to-oxygen bonds, i.e. sulfones, sulfoxides
    • C10M2219/044Sulfonic acids, Derivatives thereof, e.g. neutral salts
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C10PETROLEUM, GAS OR COKE INDUSTRIES; TECHNICAL GASES CONTAINING CARBON MONOXIDE; FUELS; LUBRICANTS; PEAT
    • C10NINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASS C10M RELATING TO LUBRICATING COMPOSITIONS
    • C10N2240/00Specified uses or applications of lubricating compositions
    • C10N2240/62Textile oils
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D2700/00Woven fabrics; Methods of weaving; Looms
    • D03D2700/01Woven fabrics; General weaving methods
    • D03D2700/0133Woven fabrics; General weaving methods characterised by the material of warp or weft
    • D03D2700/0137Combination of different materials
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D10INDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBLASSES OF SECTION D, RELATING TO TEXTILES
    • D10BINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBLASSES OF SECTION D, RELATING TO TEXTILES
    • D10B2321/00Fibres made from polymers obtained by reactions only involving carbon-to-carbon unsaturated bonds
    • D10B2321/10Fibres made from polymers obtained by reactions only involving carbon-to-carbon unsaturated bonds polymers of unsaturated nitriles, e.g. polyacrylonitrile, polyvinylidene cyanide
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D10INDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBLASSES OF SECTION D, RELATING TO TEXTILES
    • D10BINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBLASSES OF SECTION D, RELATING TO TEXTILES
    • D10B2331/00Fibres made from polymers obtained otherwise than by reactions only involving carbon-to-carbon unsaturated bonds, e.g. polycondensation products
    • D10B2331/02Fibres made from polymers obtained otherwise than by reactions only involving carbon-to-carbon unsaturated bonds, e.g. polycondensation products polyamides
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D10INDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBLASSES OF SECTION D, RELATING TO TEXTILES
    • D10BINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBLASSES OF SECTION D, RELATING TO TEXTILES
    • D10B2331/00Fibres made from polymers obtained otherwise than by reactions only involving carbon-to-carbon unsaturated bonds, e.g. polycondensation products
    • D10B2331/04Fibres made from polymers obtained otherwise than by reactions only involving carbon-to-carbon unsaturated bonds, e.g. polycondensation products polyesters, e.g. polyethylene terephthalate [PET]

Abstract

A method for weaving a warp and a weft on a water jet loom, wherein a desized interlaced yarn with the individual constituent filaments being randomly twisted and interlaced is used as the warp and an ordinary non-interlaced yarn is used as the weft, and the weaving is carried out while maintaining the coefficient of static friction of the warp against the weft in the wet state at not more than 0.6, and the water-insolubility of the warp and the weft at 30 to 90 percent.

Description

-United States Patent [191 Iribe et al.

[ June 4, 1974 METHOD OF WEAVING ON WATER JET LOOM Inventors: Seiki Iribe; Norihisa Yamaguchi;

Tukasa Kobayashi, all of Mihara, Japan Assignee: Teijin Limited, Osaka, Japan Filed: Mar. 7, 1973 Appl. No.: 339,383

Foreign Application Priority Data Mar. 13, I972 Japan 47-25370 US. Cl 139/127 P, 139/420 R Int. Cl..... D03d 47/32 Field of Search l39/l27 R, 127 P, 383,

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS ll/l969 Carothers l39/l27 P 3,606,914 9/1971 Maiwald et al. l39/420 R Primary Examiner-Henry S. Jaudon Attorney, Agent, or FirmSherman & Shalloway 5 7 ABSTRACT A method for weaving a warp and a weft on a water jet loom, wherein a desized interlaced yarn with the individual constituent filaments being randomly twisted and interlaced is used as the warp and anordinary non-interlaced yarn is used as the weft, and the weaving is carried out while maintaining the coefficient of static friction of the warp against the weft in the wet state at not more than 0.6, and the waterinsolubility of' the warp and the weft at 30 to 90 percent.

3 Claims, 2 Drawing. Figures METHOD OF WEAVING ON WATER JET LOOM This invention relates-to a novel method for weaving on a water jet loom.

The conventional machine for weaving a filament yarn to make a fabric includes shuttle looms which have been used widely from old and shuttleless looms which have been developed relatively recently. The sluttleless looms have attractedespecial attention for their advantage of producing woven fabrics at high speed. The water jet loom, a kind of the shuttleless loom, is adapted to carry a yarn on a stream of water jetted out from a nozzle and pick it up. Since water is used, this loom is applied mainly to the weaving of hydrophobic fibers, and has attracted especial attention in the art because of their various superior performances. In a weaving operation using the water jet loom, it is generally considered necessary to employ a preweaving step in which a warp is twisted and sized in order to impart coherency to it, justas in an ordinary shuttle loom. The warp so treated is then subjected to an ordinary warping process, and woven on the loom. The pre-weaving step is intended to reduce the occurren ce of fluff or yarn breakage at the time of weaving. When a fabric produced by the above method is dyed, it is necessary to non-size the size applied to the yarn in the sizing step by scouring, in order to obtain 'a uniform dyeing. However, with the above method, itis difficult to prevent the occurrence of injuries to the fibers in the twisting step, and the employment of the complicated preweaving process itself adds greatly to the cost of production. Furthermoreflhe size applied in the'size step tends to'be removed in the subsequent weaving step, which in turn causes a reduction in the quality of the resulting fabric. Therefore, the omission of the preweaving step would be very desirable since the various troubles ascribable to this step can be removed, and the cost of production can be reduced, and naturally, the step of removing sizes can be omitted-and the scouring and dyeing step can be rationalized. Attempts have been made in the art to realize this byusing an interlaced yarn as warp. By'the interlaced yarn is meant a yarn obtained by applying fluid forces to a multifilament yarn to twist and interlace-the individual filaments of the yarn randomly, thereby to impart coherency to the yarn. From the viewpoint of imparting coherency,'interlacing between the filaments has equivalent operation and result to true twisting or sizing. The interlaced yarn itself is well known to those skilled in the art, and a method for its production is described, for example, in British Pat. specification No. 924,089. Since the interlaced yarnhas sufficient coherency even when not twisted or sized, it will be possible to subject it directly to the warping process without the preweaving step, and then weave it on a loom. Surprisingly, however, we have found that when the interlaced 1 yarn is woven on a water jet loom, non-uniformity in the density of the fabric occurs in the weft direction (the so-called tight weft phenomenon), and causes a marked reduction in the quality of the fabric.

An object of this invention is to provide a novel m hod f r weav l s n a. Waist .99.! hereb .5 9"; sity non-uniformity in the weft direction does not occur even when an interlaced yarn produced by an ordinary method is used as a warp yarn.

Another object of this invention is to provide a method for weaving on a water jet loom having high speed performances, wherein weaving can be carried out in the absence of the twisting and sizing steps and the desizing step can be omitted in deying to be carried out later on, thus leading to a markedly reduced cost of production.

According to the present invention, there is provided a method for weaving a warp and a weft on a water jet loom, wherein a non-sized interlaced yarn with the individual constituent filaments being randomly twisted and interlaced is used as the Warp and an ordinary noninterlaced yarn is used as the weft, and the weaving is carried out while maintaining the co-efficient of static friction of the warp against the weft in the Wet state at not more than 0.6, and the water-insolubility of the warp and the weft at 30 to percent.

The method of this invention will be described-below in greater detail. We have made extensive investigations into the casue of the density non-uniformity which occurs in the weft direction of the fabric when an interlaced yarn is woven on a water jet loom without being subjected to the preweaving process. This led to the discovery that since the weft is thrown by water in the picking process in the water jet loom and the weft and the warp are placed under the wet conditions, the

finish on the surfaces of the filaments of the warp and the Weft drop off, and the surface properties of the warp and the weft change remarkably; and that the frictional resistance between both yarns on their fiber surfaces becomes high and as a result, non-uniformity in the density of weft occurs.

Warps and wefts usually used in the conventional weaving processes have a water-insolubility of not more than 20 percent, and a coefficient of static friction of the warp to the weft in the wet state of 0.7 to 0.8. The water-insolubility, as used herein, is the weight percent of an finish which remains unremoved when a filament having applied thereto an finish is immersed for 1 minute in water at 25C. The coefficient of static friction of the warp to the weft in the wet state is a value measured by the Roder method which is well known in the art. According to this measurement method, a number of wefts are uniformly attached in parallel to each other to the surface of a cylindrical holder to form a friction body, and one warp ishung on this friction body in a manner such that the warp intersects the wefts at right angles. The cylindrical holder is rotated to cause friction between the warp and the wefts, and the coefficient of friction between them is measured while maintaining both the warp and the wefts in the wet state. The speed of rotation of the cylindrical holder is varied, and the coefficient of friction corresponding to the respective speed of rotation is measured. The coefficient of static friction is the value of the coefficient of friction which is obtained when the speed of rotation is extrapolated to zero.

As' previously stated, the conventional wefts and warps have relatively low water-insolubility values, and when subjected to a water jet loom, intersect each other in the wet state, which tends to causethe removal of the oil attached to the surface of the filaments, and a consequent rise in frictional resistance between them. Furthermore, by the influences of the removal of the finish on the surface of the filaments, the coefficient of friction of the warp to the weft in the wet condition mes very poor,'

On the basis of the above analysis, we have made extensive research and development work in an attempt Y 'to remove. the non-uniformity in weft density which occurs when using an interlaced yarn, and to rationalize the scouring and dyeing process. Consequently, we

have found that the above difficulties can'be overcome beweaving wefts and warps of the specified surface properties on a water jet loom, and this led to the accomplishment of the present invention.

It isessential that in the method of this invention, a non-sized interlaced yarn be used as a warp and 511' ordinary non-interlaced yarn as a weft when weaving on a water jet loom. By-the term non-sized is meant that a size such aspolyvinyl alcohol or starch generally used to impart coherency to filaments is not applied. The interlaced yarn may be produced by any known methods. The use of a non interlaced yarn as weft is a necessary condition. If an interlaced yarn were used also as the weft, the resulting fabric would have. a defect called It is also necessary that the coefficientof friction of the warp to the weft under the wet conditions should be not more than 0.6. lf this coefficicnt exceeds 0.6, the weft undergoes frictional resistance when picked during weaving on a water jet loom, and it becomes impossible to arrange the wefts regularly at the predetermined positions.,This' results in the occurrence of the non-uniformity in weft density, and the results intended by the present invention cannot be obtained. The lower limit of the coefficient of friction is not particularly critical, but preferably, it is usually about 0.4.

If the water-insolubilit y of either the weft or the warp is less than percent, the treating agent applied to the yarns is removed in great quantities by the action of water during weaving on a water jet and consequently,-

the frictional resistance between the wefts and the warps in the weaving process increases, leading to the occurrence of the non-uniformity in weft density. On the other hand, when the water-insolubility of the treat ing agent for the warp and the weft exceeds 90 percent or when the interlaced yarn as warp is sized, it is necessary to remove-the treating agent in the scouring and dyeing process, and the omission of the scouring step becomes difficult.

Since the individual .filaments of the warp used in the method of this invention are fully interlaced with each other, it is not necessary to size it prior to weaving. Furthermore, the frictional resistance between the warp and the weft is low, and the water-insolubility is more than 30 percent. Accordingly, there is a reduced proportion of the treating agent that is removed by the action'of water. Thus, during weaving on awater jet loom, the frictional coefficient between the weft and the warp is maintained low. and the occurrence of the non-uniformity in the weft density of the fabric can be prevented. Furthermoresince the water-insolubility of the weft and warp is not more than 90 percent and the warp is not sized, no special step of removing the treat-.

ing agent isrequired in the scouring and dyeing process, and it becomepossible to omit the scouring step. I Thesuitable warp and weft usedin this invention are a multifilament yarn. Suitable filaments are polyester, polyamide, and polyacrylonitrile filaments. The number of the filaments or the total denier of the multifila-.

ment yarn is not particularly limited. Usually, however, multifilament yarns having a monofilament denier of l to 5 containing 12, to 48 monofilaments are preferred.

The specified water-insolubility and frictional coefficient values of the warp and the weft used in this invention can be realized by properly choosing the finish or other treating agent to be applied to the multifilament yarn. This choice is obvious to those skilled in the art.

There are various treating agents for the warp and weft to be used in the present invention. When the treating agent is applied during spinning, the treating agent should suitably contain 60 to 90 percent of a lubricant, preferably a synthetic lubricant, and it is preferred that the lubricant should be applied so as to cover the surfaces of the filaments. Suitable lubricants are, for example, trimethylol propane tridecanoate, isotridecyl stearate, oleyl oleate, isocetyl stearate, isostearyl stearate,

and 2-ethyl hexyl palmitate. Although not a lubricant, wax and low molecular weight polyethylene are also effective for reducing the coefficient of static friction of the yarn in the wet state when used in a small amount The amount of lubricant in the entire treating agent is preferably 60 to 90 percent by weight. The amount of the wax or low molecular weight polyethylene may be several percent. As is well known in the art, another ingredient such as an emulsifier or antistatic agent may be incorporated into the treatingagent. lt is preferred that the amount of the treating agent to .be adhered to the yarn be 0.6 to 1.5 percent by weight as the total finish pick up, and 0.4 to 1.4 percent by weight as the amount of the lubricant adhered. 'The total finish pick upis measured by a method utilizing extraction with cyclohexane, and the amount of the lubricant adhered is calculated from the totalfinish pick up and the proportion of the lubricant based on the total amount of the treating agent.

The application of the treating agent to filaments is mainly performed during a yarn-making process involving spinning and drawing, and in the case of an interlaced yarn, the treating agent is applied before or after interlacing. The time of application, however, is not limited to this, and itis possible to apply the treating agent at any desired stage after drawing up to the weaving process.

The following Examples will illustrate the present invention. The non-uniformity ofweft density and the degree of dyeing uneveneness used in the Examples were evaluated by the naked eye on a scale of grades 1 to 5 using 10 samples each having a length of 46 to 50 m, and average values were calculated.

Gradel: Not perceptible at all- Grade 2: Slightly perceptible Grade 3: Perceptible to some extent Grade 4,: Considerably perceptible Grade 5: Very considerably perceptible oxide added oleyl alcohol (emulsifier) and 3% of die-- thanol oleoamide (emulsifier having antistatic properties) was applied to the yarn to a total finish pick up of 1.0% during the take-up of the yarn (the waterdrawing, the yarn was interlaced by treating with turbulent fluids through a known nozzle to form an interlaced yarn. This interlaced yarn was supplied as a warp without sizing. As a weft, there was used a drawn yarn of polycapramide (70 denier/24 filaments) obtained by a usual spinning and drawing methodwherein each of the various emulsions shown in Table 1 was applied to the filament during the take-up of the spun filaments. A plain weave taffeta was produced on a water jet loom using these warp and weft yarns.

Table 1 shows the composition of the emulsion used to produce the warp, the proportion of .theflubricant in the emulsion, the coefficient of friction of the warp to the weft in the wet state (,u the water-insolubility of the weft, the weft non-uniformity in weft density druing weaving on a water jet loom, and the dyeingunevenness of thefabric dyed without scouring.

TABLE 1 Run number 1- 2 3 P 4 h 5 B Proportion of lubricant (percent) 68 40 95 50 78 Coefficient of friction .1.) 0. 42 O. 38 0. 33 0.80 0. 48 Water-insolubility of the weft (percent). 65 22 95 46 82 Non-uniformity in weft density (grade)..- 1. 4. 0 1.0 1 5. 0 1. 0 Dyeing unevenness (grade) 1. 0 2. 0 4-0 2. 0 1. 0 Finish pick-11p (percent)- 1. 1 1. 0 0. 9 1. 0 1. 2 Mineral oiI O Trimethylol propane tridecanote 68 40 95 78 Ethylene oxide added oleyl alcohol 29 55 5 47. 17 Diethanol oleoamide-.- 3 '5 3 5 1 Invention. Comparison.

1n Runs Nos. 1 and 5 which were performed in accordance with the method of this invention, there was hardly any non-uniformity in weft-density and yarn uneveness of the fabric, and the resulting fabric had uniform good quality. In Run No. 2, the degree of density non-uniformity is high because of the low waterinsolubility of the weft, andin Run No. 4, the degree of density non-uniformity of the fabric is high because of the high [L value. In Run No. 3, the waterinsolubility of the weft is -'too high. dyeing uneveness occurs in the weft direction when the resulting fabric is I dyed without scouring. Accordingly, such a fabric must be dyed after removing the finish, and it is impossible to rationalize the'souring and dyeing process as intended by the present invention.

The degree of the density non-uniformity was evalua weft, there was used an ordinary drawn yarn of poly-caproamide (70 denier/ Zflfilaments) wherein the emulsion used in Example 1 to produce the warp was applied to the yam'to an finish pick-up of 1% (the water-in'solubility of the yarn was 46%). Using these warp and weft, weaving was performedon a water jet loom in the same way as in Example 1.

The treating conditions and the test results of the re- TAB LE 2 Run number 6 a 7 b 8 b 9 b 10 e Proportion of lubricant (percent) 6 .40 95 50 78 Coeflicient of friction (#w) 36 0. 0. 78 0. Water-insolubility of the weft (percent) 66 25 96 48 85 Non-uniformity in well; density (grade)... 1. 0 4. 0 1. 0 5. 0 1. 0 Dyeing unevenness (grade) 1. 0 2 0 4. 0 2, 0 1. 0 Finish pick-up (percent)- 0. 9 0 9 1.0 1. 0 1. 1 Mineral oil 50 Tiimethylol propane tndecanoa 68 40 78 Ethylene oxide added oleyl alcohol 29 5 47 17 Diethanol oleoamide 3 5 3 5 a Invention. b Comparison.

The results obtained are'very similar to those obtained in Example 1.

EXAMPLE 3 No. 7 was used as the warp 566 the same yarn as used in Run No. 1 as the weft.

TABLE 3 Run Nos. 1 1 12 13 14 Warp No. 7 No. 8 No. 6 No. 6 Weft No. 1 No. l No. 2 No. 3 Coefficient of 0.35 0.34 0.32 0.31

. friction (p...)

Water-insolubility (56) of the 25 96 66 66 warp Water-insolubility (9%) of the 65' 65 22 95 weft Nonuniformity in weft density 4.5 1.0 5.0 1.0 (grade) Dyeing unevenness (g ad Warp 1.0 4.0" 1.0 1.0 Weft 2.0 1.0 2.0 4.0

ated by the naked eye. The actual state of the nonuniformity can be clearly observed by the accompanying phtographs designated FIGS. 1 and 2. FIG. 1 is a microscopic photogr aph'of the fabric obtained in liun No. l which shows that the sizes of the warps and weft-s and the distances between the wefts and between the warps are uniform. FIG. 2 is a microscopic photograph of the fabric obtained by the method of Run No. 4, which shows that the sizes of the warps and the dis tances between the warps are uniform, but the sizes of the wefts and the distances between the wefts are very non-uniform. The arrows in the figures show the warp direction.

EXAMPLE 2 In a process for obtaining a poly-caproamide drawn yarn 70 denier/l6 filaments) by an ordinary spinning and drawing method, each of the various emulsions shown in Table 2 was applied to the filaments, and immediately after drawing, the yarn was interlaced using turbulent fluids through known nozzles. Without sizing,

theresulti s nt a e xa aw s ap lied 2. arn-As The results shown in Table 3 demonstrate that when V the coefficient of friction (1A,) is within the range specified in the present invention but the water-insolubility of either of the warp or the weft is too low or high, the

intended results of the invention cannot be obtained.

EXAMPLE 4 In a process for producing a drawn yarn of polyethylene terephthalate (50 denier/24 filaments) by an ordinier/24 filaments) obtained by an ordinary spinning and drawing method wherein the emulsion consisting of 50 of mineral oil, 42% of an ethylene oxide added oleyhe ther, 3% of dioctyl sulfosuccinate and 5% of Run number 15 a oleic acid triethanol 316151; to produee the warp s plied to the yarn during the take-up of the spun filament to an finish pick-up of 1% (the water -insolubility of the yarn was 50%). Using these warp and weft, weaving on a water jet loom'was performed.

The treating conditions and the test results of the reeltinafa s e shown n T qflzs w.

TABLE 4 ll Invention.

h Comparison.

The results obtained are similar to those obtained in Example i.

What we claim is:

l. A method for weaving a warp and a weft on a water jet loom, wherein a non-sized interlaced yarn with the individual constituent filaments being randomly twisted and interlaced is used as the warp and an ordinary non-interlaced yarn is used as the weft, and the weaving is carried out while maintaining the coefficient of static friction of the warp against the weft in the Wet state at not more than 0.6, and the water-insolubility of the warp and the weft at 30 to percent.

2. The method of claim 1 wherein the warp and the weft are a multifilament yarn of a polyamide, polyester or polyacrylonitrile.

3. The method of claim 2 wherein the multifilament yarn has a monofilament denier of l t05 and contains 12 to 48 monofilaments.

Claims (2)

  1. 2. The method of claim 1 wherein the warp and the weft are a multifilament yarn of a polyamide, polyester or polyacrylonitrile.
  2. 3. The method of claim 2 wherein the multifilament yarn has a monofilament denier of 1 to 5 and contains 12 to 48 monofilaments.
US33938373 1972-03-13 1973-03-07 Method of weaving on water jet loom Expired - Lifetime US3814141A (en)

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DE (1) DE2312465C3 (en)
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GB (1) GB1424815A (en)

Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4015317A (en) * 1976-02-18 1977-04-05 The Dow Chemical Company Process for sizing textile fibers for use on water jet looms
US4096890A (en) * 1974-11-12 1978-06-27 Toray Industries, Inc. Woven fabric utilizing a particular textured yarn and method for manufacturing the same
US4444292A (en) * 1981-08-12 1984-04-24 Standard Oil Company (Indiana) Method and apparatus for lubricating a machine
US5421378A (en) * 1994-03-30 1995-06-06 Milliken Research Corporation Airbag weaving on a water-jet loom using yarns
US5503197A (en) * 1994-03-30 1996-04-02 Milliken Research Corporation Method for producing high weave density airbag fabric on a water-jet loom using unsized yarns
US5858886A (en) * 1996-07-02 1999-01-12 Milliken Research Corporation Low permeability airbag fabric
EP0992402A2 (en) 1998-10-06 2000-04-12 Milliken & Company Inflatable airbag cushion
US6327759B1 (en) 1997-04-17 2001-12-11 Milliken & Company Air bag fabric possessing improved packed volume and stable air permeability
US6473948B1 (en) 1997-04-17 2002-11-05 Milliken & Company Air bag fabric possessing improved packed volume characteristics
US6672617B1 (en) 2000-09-08 2004-01-06 Milliken & Company Yarn, airbag and method
USRE38769E1 (en) 1997-04-17 2005-08-09 Milliken & Company Air bag fabric possessing improved packed volume and stable air permeability
US20070184733A1 (en) * 2006-02-07 2007-08-09 Safety Components Fabric Technologies, Inc. Water jet woven air bag fabric made from sized yarns

Families Citing this family (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPS50126976A (en) * 1974-04-01 1975-10-06

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3476155A (en) * 1968-08-26 1969-11-04 Calgon C0Rp Use of turbulence suppressing agents in water jet looms
US3606914A (en) * 1968-05-08 1971-09-21 Hoechst Ag Webbing

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3606914A (en) * 1968-05-08 1971-09-21 Hoechst Ag Webbing
US3476155A (en) * 1968-08-26 1969-11-04 Calgon C0Rp Use of turbulence suppressing agents in water jet looms

Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4096890A (en) * 1974-11-12 1978-06-27 Toray Industries, Inc. Woven fabric utilizing a particular textured yarn and method for manufacturing the same
US4015317A (en) * 1976-02-18 1977-04-05 The Dow Chemical Company Process for sizing textile fibers for use on water jet looms
US4444292A (en) * 1981-08-12 1984-04-24 Standard Oil Company (Indiana) Method and apparatus for lubricating a machine
US5421378A (en) * 1994-03-30 1995-06-06 Milliken Research Corporation Airbag weaving on a water-jet loom using yarns
US5503197A (en) * 1994-03-30 1996-04-02 Milliken Research Corporation Method for producing high weave density airbag fabric on a water-jet loom using unsized yarns
US5858886A (en) * 1996-07-02 1999-01-12 Milliken Research Corporation Low permeability airbag fabric
US6473948B1 (en) 1997-04-17 2002-11-05 Milliken & Company Air bag fabric possessing improved packed volume characteristics
US6672339B2 (en) 1997-04-17 2004-01-06 Milliken & Company Air bag fabric possessing improved packed volume characteristics
US6327759B1 (en) 1997-04-17 2001-12-11 Milliken & Company Air bag fabric possessing improved packed volume and stable air permeability
USRE38769E1 (en) 1997-04-17 2005-08-09 Milliken & Company Air bag fabric possessing improved packed volume and stable air permeability
US6402187B1 (en) 1998-10-06 2002-06-11 Milliken & Company Airbag structure
US6467806B2 (en) 1998-10-06 2002-10-22 Milliken & Company Airbag structure
EP0992402A2 (en) 1998-10-06 2000-04-12 Milliken & Company Inflatable airbag cushion
US6672617B1 (en) 2000-09-08 2004-01-06 Milliken & Company Yarn, airbag and method
US20070184733A1 (en) * 2006-02-07 2007-08-09 Safety Components Fabric Technologies, Inc. Water jet woven air bag fabric made from sized yarns
US7581568B2 (en) 2006-02-07 2009-09-01 International Textile Group, Inc. Water jet woven air bag fabric made from sized yarns

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
FR2175987B1 (en) 1975-10-31
DE2312465C3 (en) 1975-10-02
JPS4896849A (en) 1973-12-11
GB1424815A (en) 1976-02-11
FR2175987A1 (en) 1973-10-26
DE2312465A1 (en) 1973-09-27
DE2312465B2 (en) 1975-02-27

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