US3813008A - Liquid dispensing apparatus - Google Patents

Liquid dispensing apparatus Download PDF

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US3813008A
US3813008A US84864869A US3813008A US 3813008 A US3813008 A US 3813008A US 84864869 A US84864869 A US 84864869A US 3813008 A US3813008 A US 3813008A
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pressure
spigot
flow
valve
control
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V Olson
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V Olson
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B67OPENING, CLOSING OR CLEANING BOTTLES, JARS OR SIMILAR CONTAINERS; LIQUID HANDLING
    • B67DDISPENSING, DELIVERING OR TRANSFERRING LIQUIDS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B67D1/00Apparatus or devices for dispensing beverages on draught
    • B67D1/08Details
    • B67D1/12Flow or pressure control devices or systems, e.g. valves, gas pressure control, level control in storage containers

Abstract

A draft beer circuit for a series of rapidly intermittent pours, in which a flow pressure control valve is introduced between the beer keg and the spigot, adjacent the spigot, to effectively isolate the downstream portion of the beer circuit below the pressure control valve from the upstream portion, except during conditions of flow. The pressure of the fluid at the spigot is thereby maintained at flow pressure rather than spigot pressure, so that all timed pours are of constant volume.

Description

ilnite States atent 1 ()lson 1*May 28, I974 4] LIQUID DISPENSING APPARATUS 3,408,036 l0/l968 Smith et al 222/70 x 3,464,591 9/1969 Nicola [76] Invent Verne 1924'29th 3,467,279 9/1969 Upton etal 222/70 x S.W., Calgary, Alberta, Canada Notice: The portion of the term of this Primary ExaminerLloyd L. King patent subsequent to May 28, 1990, has been disclaimed. 57 ABSTRACT [22] Filed: Aug. 8, 1969 A draft beer circuit for a series of rapidly intermittent pours, in which a flow pressure control valve is intro- [21] Appl' duced between the beer keg and the spigot, adjacent the spigot, to effectively isolate the downstream por- [52] US. Cl. 222/70 on f he be r circ i below the pressure control [51] Int. Cl B670 5/08, G04c 23/38 valve from h up p except ng d [58] Field of Search 222/70, 179, 138 i n of flow. The pressure of the fluid at the spigot is thereby maintained at flow pressure rather than spigot [56] References Cited pressure, so that all timed pours are of constant vol- UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,248,009 4/1966 Sutton et al. 222/70 X 4 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures l'lOV. AC

- AIR PATENTEDNAY 28 1974 LIQUID DISPENSING APPARATUS The present invention relates to improvements in mechanism for dispensing a volumetrically predetermined amount of liquid, and particularly relates to a mechanism for dispensing a required volume of a liquid which tends to foam at or near normal atmospheric pressure.

In the vending of draft beer from brewers kegs or barrels, it has been customary to tap the keg, under pressure, through a flow line into a hand-operated spigot or bar valve, operated by a tap-man filling therefrom a glass in accordance with a fill-line marked circumferentially near the lip of the glass. Such an operation is necessarily inaccurate and slow, particularly when the tap-man is operating during periods of high activity when demand may run as high as l20 glasses of approximately 8-10 fluid ounces per minute.

Various systems have heretofore been proposed for the automation of the glass-filling operation, to provide a successively intermittent delivery at the spigot of predetermined volumes of liquid, thereby permitting the tap-man to fill rapidly a succession of glasses. Such a system is normally actuated by a manually operated switch controlling an electrical timer which actuates a solenoid operatively connected to the spigot; successive pours are made until the switch is operated to the off position,

The solenoid-operated spigot valve, actuated into the on position by the manual switch contact, successively opens and closes in response to pulses from an electronic timing means, usually of the resistorcapacitor type of circuit. In this type of time-pulse circuit, an electrical charge builds up in one or more capacitors which, in accordance with the characteristics of the circuit, discharges after reaching a determinable level, causing a current flow which is amplified to operate the spigot solenoid to the open position. A succeeding pulse will operate the spigot solenoid to the close position, and a rest interval will follow, during which the tap-man will remove the filled glass from the spigot, and substitute an empty glass, for successive filling. Because of the foaming characteristic of draft beer, it must be maintained under pressure throughout the circuit, in order to maintain the dissolved gases in solution.

A constant pressure will normally exist throughout the system while it is in static equilibrium, which pressure in the normal draft beer circuit, is approximately 40 p.s.i. gauge. However, after the spigot valve has remained open for a period of several seconds, the flow pressure at the spigot p, will reduce by the amount of the friction head throughout the system, and in subsequent intermittent pours, the fluid pressure p, at the spigot during discharge will be substantially equal to the pressure on the keg p minus the friction loss. In an example regarded as typical, a friction head of 12 p.s.i. was developed under flow conditions between keg and spigot. Accordingly, the combination of a variable spigot pressure and constant time interval will produce an inconstant volume of liquid delivered.

The principal object of the present invention, which is designed to overcome the disadvantages referred to, is to provide an improved apparatus for intermittently dispensing rapidly successive volumetrically predetermined quantities of foamable liquid, under pressure, wherein the quantity of liquid delivered is not sensitive to variations in the spigot pressure due to frictionless delivered on the first pour of the series is substantially equal to the volume delivered on each of the subsequentpours of the series, such being accomplished by the provision of a flow pressure control valve in the circuit adjacent the spigot end, which maintains the equivalent of flow pressure p, on the spigot even though liq uid is not then flowing in the system and which isolates the spigot from the higher or keg pressure p The invention, both as to its organization and method of operation, together with further objects and advantages thereof, will best be understood by reference to the following detailed specification, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a schematic partly sectional view of a draft beer dispensing spigot according to the present invention illustrating the draft beer circuit, and details of the spigot.

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of the flow pressure control valve.

Referring to the drawings, the draft beer circuit comprises generally a keg 1 l, carrying draft beer under initial static pressure p of the order of pounds per square inch gauge, which is tapped by flow'line 12 leading to the beer spigot generally designated 13. In order to maintain the drive, supplemental air under pressure is supplied from a compressor or a cylinder 14, controlled by a pressure regulator 15, to the keg II by the air flow line 16. v i

In the embodiment depicted in FIG. 1, a receiver 25 is positioned in the beer flow line 12, adjacent to the spigot 13, the purposes of which is to minimize foaming of the liquid in the line and to dampen out irregularities in the dynamics of the circuit. A flow pressure control valve generally designated 26 is located in the flow line 12 adjacent and up-stream from the receiver 25, the purpose and function of which will hereafter be explained.

The spigot 13 is of standard design, of the push-pull manual type, lateral movement of the lever 17, comprising the spigot handle, causing the valve (not illustrated) to open, as will be well understood by those familiar with the art to which this invention relates.

The manually operated spigot 13 has been altered by the removal of the handle from the lever 17, and the addition of the rotary solenoid generally designated 18 and the toggle switch 19 positioned on the top of the spigot. The rotary solenoid 18 includes a armature 20 and linkage 21 operatively connected to the spigot lever 17, so that movement of the rotary armature through 180 will be translated into lateral movement of the lever 17 from its vertical closed position to its fully opened position as indicated by the broken line 22. The armature 20 is rigidly mounted on the spigot 13 by means of mounting bracket 23, secured by retainer nut 24.

The spigot solenoid 18 is energized from an electrical timing means, indicated schematically in FIG. I at 27,

which may conveniently be of the resistor-capacitor type. In this type of time circuit, which is well known to those skilled in the art to which this invention relates, an electrical charge builds up on one or more capacitors which, in accordance with the characteristics of the circuit, discharges after reaching a variably determinable level, causing a current flow which is amplitied and modified to operate the spigot solenoid 18. Control is included in the electrical timing means 27 whereby the number of discharges, the length of each discharge and the interval between discharges of the electrical timing means is determined, such being also common to and well-known in the art to which this invention relates.

The essence of the present invention, however, resides in the provision of the flow pressure control valve 26 in the beer flow line 12, adjacent the spigot 13. The valve 26 regulates the fluid flowing under the line pressure of line 12, and is controlled from the electrical timing means 27, conveniently by the air assist end 28 of the valve 26, as indicated in FIG. 1. Control air under pressure is admitted to the diaphragm type air valve 29, controlled by the solenoid valves 30 and 30', which are energized from the electrical timing means 27, so that operation of the switch 19 to the on position to open the spigot valve 13 will also simultaneously open the flow pressure control valve 26, which latter will remain open until switch 19 is operated to the of position, whereupon the flow pressure control valve 26 will close.

Functionally, the purpose of the flow pressure control valve 26 will be seen to isolate the receiver 25 and the spigot 13 from the higher static p pressure of the keg 11, so that only the lower flowing pressure p, will prevail on the downstream side of the flow pressure control valve 26. This will be appreciated when it is understood that under flowing conditions in the example referred to, the pressure p within the keg ll of, say 40,

p.s.i.g., will drop to a flow pressure p, of 28 p.s.i.g. at the spigot 13, due to line losses. Thus, when the spigot 13 and the flow pressure control valve 26 simultaneously close, the portion of the liquid circuit between these points will be maintained at a static pressure substantially equivalent to the flow pressure p,i.e., approximately 28 p.s.i.g. in the example given; upstream from the flow pressure conrol valve 26, the higher static keg pressure p} of 40 p.s.i.g. will prevail. Thus, when the spigot is opened for a series of intermittent pours, the first pour and each subsequent pour will be made at substantially equal spigot pressures, rather than varying from static keg pressure p for the initial pour, then dropping to the substantially lower flow pressure p, for each subsequent pour of the rapidly intermittent series. Such undesirable variation in spigot pressure, when associated with equal periods of spigot valve opening, will of course result in undesirably significant variations in the volume of liquid delivered at the spigot between the first pour of a rapidly intermittent series and each subsequent pour of such series.

In operation, the operator will introduce the glass to be filled at the spigot; the timer 27 is assumed to be energized froma suitable power supply, and the operator will actuate the switch 19 in order to initiate the automatic dispensing cycle. The reduced flow pressure p,

rest. Upon the firing of the timer 27, a pulse will energize the spigot solenoid 18, causing it to rotate and thereby opening the spigot valve 17 through the linkage 21. Simultaneously with the opening of the spigot valve 17, the flow pressure control valve 26 is opened through the energizing of the solenoidoperated air relays 30 and 30' which admit air to the one side of the diaphragm valve 29, thereby opening the receiver 25 to flow pressure p, in the flow line 12. As beer in the circuit moves in response to the keg pressure p within the supply keg 11, a friction head is developed between the keg 11 and the spigot valve 13, causing a drop in pressure to the spigot pressure, which will be essentially the flow pressure p,. Subsequent firing of the timer 27 in the cycle will cause a pulse to reenergize the spigot solenoid 18 in the reverse direction thereby closing the spigot valve 17, and simultaneously closing the flow pressure control valve 26. The portion of the circuit downstream from the flow pressure control valve 26 will remain at substantially flow pressure p,, while the pressure within the circuit upstream from the control valve 26 will stabilize at the higher keg pressure p The flow of beer is thus momentarily interrupted, permitting the operator to remove the filled glass and to substitute an empty glass.

Upon the firing of the timer 17 in the next following sequence in the timer cycle, the spigot solenoid 18 is re-energized in the reverse direction, causing movement into the open position of the spigot 17; the flow pressure control valve 26 is simultaneously opened to the flow line 12; the beer in the portion of the circuit downstream from the flow pressure control valve 26 will flow under flow pressure p,, which has prevailed in that portion of the circuit, and not the higher keg pressure p In similar fashion, the timer will deliver accurately controlled quantities of beer at the spigot as long as the lever 17 is maintained'in its open position; when lever 17 is moved to its closed position following completion of a pour, the cycle is terminated, and the circuit will resume equilibrium under the two pressures p, and p prevailing on opposite sides of the flow control valve 26.

The advantages resulting from the introduction of the flow pressure control valve in the circuit, positioned adjacent the receiver 25 and the spigot 13, insulating that portion of the circuit downstream from the flow pressure control valve from the upstream portion, except during conditions of flow, will be appreciated to be the equilization of volume of all pours from the system in a relatively simple and inexpensive manner, thereby solving a problem that heretofore has restricted the introduction and use of automated beer dispensing apparatus.

Since various modifications can be made in the invention, as herein above described, and in many apparently widely different embodiments of same made within the spirit and scope of the claims without departing from such spirit and scope, it is intended that all matters in the accompanying specifications shall be interpreted as illstrative only and not in a limiting sense.

What I claim as my invention is:

1. Apparatus for automatic controlled dispensing of successive pours of draft beer, subject to foaming as it is dispensed comprising, in combination;

a source of draft beer under pressure,

a flow line connecting with said source a spigot valve connected with said flow line,

a flow pressure control valve positioned in said flow line adjacent said spigot valve,

power means for operating said flow pressure control valve and said spigot valve,

timer means operatively connected with said power means, adapted to operate successively intermittently said spigot valve and said flow pressure con trol valve substantially simultaneously, and

switch means operatively connected with said timer means whereby the operator may initiate and terminate the cycle of said successive pours.

2. Apparatus for automatic controlled dispensing of successive pours of draft beer according to claim 1 in diate said spigot valve and said flow pressure control

Claims (4)

1. Apparatus for automatic controlled dispensing of successive pours of draft beer, subject to foaming as it is dispensed comprising, in combination; a source of draft beer under pressure, a flow line connecting with said source a spigot valve connected with said flow line, a flow pressure control valve positioned in said flow line adjacent said spigot valve, power means for operating said flow pressure control valve and said spigot valve, timer means operatively connected with said power means, adapted to operate successively intermittently said spigot valve and said flow pressure control valve substantially simultaneously, and switch means operatively connected with said timer means whereby the operator may initiate and terminate the cycle of said successive pours.
2. Apparatus for automatic controlled dispensing of successive pours of draft beer according to claim 1 in which said timer means includes control means for varying the time period during which said spigot valve and said flow pressure control valve remain open and remain closed, respectively.
3. Apparatus for automatic controlled dispensing of successive pours of draft beer according to claim 1 in which a receiver is positioned in said flow line intermediate said spigot valve and said flow pressure control valve.
4. Apparatus for automatic controlled dispensing of successive pours of draft beer according to claim 2 in which a receiver is positioned in said flow line intermediate said spigot valve and said flow pressure control valve.
US3813008A 1969-08-08 1969-08-08 Liquid dispensing apparatus Expired - Lifetime US3813008A (en)

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Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4004715A (en) * 1975-05-05 1977-01-25 Auto Control Tap Of Canada Limited Fluid dispensing apparatus
US5022557A (en) * 1987-08-19 1991-06-11 Turner Charles S Computerized beverage dispensing system
US5363989A (en) * 1993-07-09 1994-11-15 Dec International, Inc. Automatic control apparatus for a beverage tap
US6761063B2 (en) * 2001-07-02 2004-07-13 Tobi Mengle True position sensor for diaphragm valves
US20070095091A1 (en) * 2005-10-27 2007-05-03 Cyr Michael P Method and apparatus for cooling beverages
US20110220683A1 (en) * 2010-03-10 2011-09-15 Mary Elizabeth Coleman Fuqua Mouthwash Dispenser
US8714413B2 (en) * 2010-03-10 2014-05-06 Mary Elizabeth Coleman Fuqua Mouthwash dispenser

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3248009A (en) * 1964-06-19 1966-04-26 Leslie Peake Entpr Inc Beer dispenser and method of dispensing
US3408036A (en) * 1966-06-06 1968-10-29 Electromatic Beer Controls Ltd Draft beer metering apparatus
US3464591A (en) * 1968-03-20 1969-09-02 Swingspout Measure Co Dual-tap beer dispensing apparatus
US3467279A (en) * 1967-02-27 1969-09-16 Douglas J Upton Fluid dispensing monitor

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3248009A (en) * 1964-06-19 1966-04-26 Leslie Peake Entpr Inc Beer dispenser and method of dispensing
US3408036A (en) * 1966-06-06 1968-10-29 Electromatic Beer Controls Ltd Draft beer metering apparatus
US3467279A (en) * 1967-02-27 1969-09-16 Douglas J Upton Fluid dispensing monitor
US3464591A (en) * 1968-03-20 1969-09-02 Swingspout Measure Co Dual-tap beer dispensing apparatus

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4004715A (en) * 1975-05-05 1977-01-25 Auto Control Tap Of Canada Limited Fluid dispensing apparatus
US5022557A (en) * 1987-08-19 1991-06-11 Turner Charles S Computerized beverage dispensing system
US5363989A (en) * 1993-07-09 1994-11-15 Dec International, Inc. Automatic control apparatus for a beverage tap
US6761063B2 (en) * 2001-07-02 2004-07-13 Tobi Mengle True position sensor for diaphragm valves
US20070095091A1 (en) * 2005-10-27 2007-05-03 Cyr Michael P Method and apparatus for cooling beverages
US7444831B2 (en) 2005-10-27 2008-11-04 Iceberg Dispensing Systems, Ltd. Method and apparatus for cooling beverages
US20110220683A1 (en) * 2010-03-10 2011-09-15 Mary Elizabeth Coleman Fuqua Mouthwash Dispenser
US8714413B2 (en) * 2010-03-10 2014-05-06 Mary Elizabeth Coleman Fuqua Mouthwash dispenser

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