US3783946A - Self-contained automatic sequencing fire extinguishing system - Google Patents

Self-contained automatic sequencing fire extinguishing system Download PDF

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US3783946A
US3783946A US3783946DA US3783946A US 3783946 A US3783946 A US 3783946A US 3783946D A US3783946D A US 3783946DA US 3783946 A US3783946 A US 3783946A
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fire extinguishing
self
flow control
control valve
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J Petrinec
R Petrinec
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R Petrinec
J Petrinec
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A62LIFE-SAVING; FIRE-FIGHTING
    • A62CFIRE-FIGHTING
    • A62C35/00Permanently-installed equipment
    • A62C35/58Pipe-line systems
    • A62C35/64Pipe-line systems pressurised
    • A62C35/645Pipe-line systems pressurised with compressed gas in pipework
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A62LIFE-SAVING; FIRE-FIGHTING
    • A62CFIRE-FIGHTING
    • A62C3/00Fire prevention, containment or extinguishing specially adapted for particular objects or places
    • A62C3/07Fire prevention, containment or extinguishing specially adapted for particular objects or places in vehicles, e.g. in road vehicles
    • A62C3/08Fire prevention, containment or extinguishing specially adapted for particular objects or places in vehicles, e.g. in road vehicles in aircraft

Abstract

The invention disclosed herein is directed to a self-contained fire extinguishing system which includes a quantity of fire extinguishing material under pressure which is connected through conduit means to one or more dispensing nozzles. Control valve means are interposed in conduit means and are initially energized to cause the extinguishing material to pass through the valve means during a first initial condition and thereafter to cause subsequent sequential energization of the flow control valve means to insure that fire extinguishing characteristics are maintained for a predetermined time thereafter.

Description

United States Patent Petrinec et ai.

Jan. 8, 1974 SELF-CONTAINED AUTOMATIC SEQUENCING FIRE EXTHNGUISHING SYSTEM Inventors: Robert G. Petrinec; Joan A.

Petrinec, both of 617 S. East Ave., Oak Park, 111. 60304 Filed: Jan. 29, 1973 Appl. No.: 327,706

US. Cl. 169/2 A, 169/11 Int. Cl. A62c 35/12 Field of Search 169/1 R, 2 R, 2 A,

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 8/195] Mathisen 169/2 A 5/l970 Lindberg 169/2 R CONTROL CIRCUIT Primary Examiner-M. Henson Wood, Jr. Assistant Examiner-Michael Y. Mar Attorney-Roy H. Olson et a].

[571 ABSTRACT The invention disclosed herein is directed to a selfcontained fire extinguishing system which includes a quantity of fire extinguishing material under pressure which is connected through conduit means to one or more dispensing nozzles. Control valve means are interposed in conduit means and are initially energized to cause the extinguishing material to pass through the valve means during a first initial condition and thereafter to cause subsequent sequential energization of the flow control valve means to insure that fire extinguishing characteristics are maintained for a predetermined time thereafter;

10 Claims, Ill Drawing Figures PATENIED JAN 8 I974 CONTROL 'cmcun- SHEET 2 [IF 2 VOLTS 1 SELF-CONTATNED AUTOMATIC SEQUENCING FIRE EXTINGUKSHHNG SYSTEM BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates generally to fire extinguishing apparatus, and more particularly to selfcontained fire extinguishing apparatus. More specifically the present invention is directed to a selfcontained automatic sequencing fire extinguishing apparatus which can be used in'moving vehicles and in areas occupied by personnel.

Heretofore many fire extinguishing systems have been utilized for the primary purpose of personal safety and to minimize damage to personal property. One such common system is the use of the sprinkler nozzles strategically located throughout a building and positioned at the ceiling. Upon sensing an extreme heat condition seals melt to cause the nozzles to dispense water to extinguish afire in the area beneath the nozzles. However, this type of fire extinguishing system completely destroys any valuable water damagable equipment or goods in the area. To eliminate the possibility of water damage a fire extinguishant known as FE 1301, which is manufactured by Dupont, is sometimes used. This material has many advantages over other types of fire extinguishants.

FE l30l, sometimes referred to as Halon 1301, is a colorless, odorless, electrically nonconductive gas that is effective for extinguishing fires. A five percent concentration, by volume, is all that is needed to immediately stop most fires, thereby leaving enough oxygen in the air for people to breathe until such time as they can leave the area. FE 1301 is classified by Underwriters Laboratories, Inc., in toxicity group six. This is the group of least toxicity of the six defined by Underwriters Laboratories, Inc. One advantage of using a clear gaseous fire extinguishant is that it will not obscure vision, and hence people can leave the area through the most direct route.

Heretofore, gaseous fire extinguishant materials, such as PE 1301, were displayed as a single discharge, the quantity of which was determined by the Size of the room in which the system was used. The gaseous extinguishant generally occupied a five to percent volume of the air space to extinguish most all types of fires.

While this type of gaseous fire extinguishant material is substantially improved over the prior art materials it is of little use when blown away as a result of a moving air mass. Therefore, if the walls of the room were knocked down and the gaseous fire extinguishant material diluted with the outside atmosphere it would ultimately be reduced in concentration to a point where it would be ineffective. If this happens a fire may be ignited as a result of hot components in contact with flammable material, such as hot jet engine parts in contact with JP. four jet fuel.

When FE 1301 is used in hand operated fire extinguishing devices they are, in many instances, of no use because the personnel in the area are either in a state of panic or unconscious or, in some other way completely incapacitated. This is particularly true in fast moving vehicles such as aircraft, trains, race cars, and the like, as well as other slower moving vehicles such as automobiles, boats, etc. When people are faced with a traumatic experience of survival the fact that fire ex- 2 tinguishing equipment is available for use, is many times completely overlooked as a result of panic.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide a self-contained automatic fire extinguishing system which is energized and thereafter operated sequentially upon sensing the presence of a fire and which sequential energization is completely free of manipulation by personnel.

Another and primary object of this invention is to provide an automatic fire extinguishing system which, when operated in a sequential manner, will produce fire extinguishing properties for the longest possible time using the least amount of fire extinguishant material.

Yet another object of this invention is to provide a sequential fire extinguishing system which will apply fire extinguishant material to the outside atmosphere around a vehicle for a sufficient period of time to prevent hot engine components from igniting fuel and other flammable material in the area.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a self-contained automatic fire extinguishing system which is light in weight and can be easily included as part of mass transportation vehicles such as aircrafts, trains, etc.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide an improved self-contained automatic sequential fire extinguishing system; which is simple and inexpensive to manufacture so that the range of uses can be extended to areas such as home or personal use.

Many air crashes result in a fire which causes death to many or all of the passengers aboard. The resulting fire is caused by the inherent large quantities of fuel required for the aircraft. It is common practice to equip airports with foam equipment which is transported by trucks that can contain large quantities of water and foaming agent so that fires of this nature can be extinguished. However, this type of fire extinguishing apparatus is found only at large airports and is seldom available when needed when aircrafts crash at places other than airports. To incorporate a system of this nature as an integral part of the aircraft would add substantial weight and would be prohibitive. The necessity for large quantities of water and foaming agent would tend to reduce the payload of the aircraft substantially so that the economics involved would detract from its use.

Accordingly, it is still another object of this invention to provide a self-contained fire extinguishing system which is lightweight and which can be incorporated as an integral part of aircraft for personal safety to minimize or eliminate the possibility of fires after crashes.

An important use of the fire extinguishing system of this invention is in connection with small self-contained units to be placed, for example, adjacent Christmas trees to sense the occurrence of a fire and automatically to extinguish the fire. It is a well known fact that real Christmas trees become dried out when placed in homes and decorated during the Christmas season and therefore, present a potential fire hazard. Should a fire occur for one reason or another the Christmas tree will burst into flames rapidly and cause a large fire in a concentrated area. This fire is many times accompanied by large quantities of smoke which will cause injury or death to persons in the area. Of particuiar interest are small children who maybe playing in a room where a Christmas tree is located and which room is completely void of adults. Should a fire occur at such time the small children are many times overcome by smoke or burned to death before help can arrive.

By utilizing the fire extinguishing system of this invention this substantial hazard is greatly reduced since the fire extinguishing characteristics are automatic and sequential and in no way endanger property or personal health during the fire extinguishing function.

Briefly, the fire extinguishing system of this invention isprovided with a container having a quantity of fire extinguishing material under pressure therein, such fire extinguishing material preferably being of a liquified gas which, when released in atmosphere, reduces or eliminates the combustable properties of the atmosphere sufficiently to extinguish fires and maintain the atmosphere in a nonflammable condition. The fire extinguishing material also maintains a sufficient atmospheric condition to support life for a predetermined time interval so that personnel can be evacuated from the area safely and without injury.

The fire extinguishing system includes conduit means connected between the container of fire extinguishing material and one or more of a plurality of strategically located nozzles. The conduit means is provided with a flow valve which, in turn, is connected to a sensing means which senses various conditions such as fire, speed, and the like, and sequence means to effect the initial energization and subsequent sequential energizations of the flow control valve to maintain a fire extinguishing concentration in certain areas while still maintaining an atmospheric condition sufficient to support life.

Many other objects, features, and advantages of this invention will be more fully realized and understood from the following detailed description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein like reference numerals throughout the various views of the drawings are intended to designate similar elements or components.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic representation of an aircraft in which the fire extinguishing system of this invention can be utilized;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view of the skin of the aircraft of FIG. 1 showing separate fire extinguishing control systems for the exterior and interior of the aircraft;

FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram showing one form of control system for the external fire extinguishing system when used in the aircraft of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a schematic diagram showing one form of control system for the internal fire extinguishing system of the aircraft of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 illustrates diagrammatically one mechanical means for sequentially controlling the energization of the fire extinguishing system of this invention;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a diagrammatic representation of a Christmas tree wherein the fire extinguishing system of this invention can be utilized to sense and extinguish fires;

FIG. 8 is an enlarged sectional view of a fire extinguishing nozzle utilized in connection with the Christmas tree system of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a diagrammatic representation of the fire extinguishing system utilized with the Christmas tree of FIG. 7; and

FIG. 10 illustrates the sequence of operation of the control circuit and the associated flow control valve of the fire extinguishing system of this invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE ILLUSTRATED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to FIG. 1 there is seen an aircraft designated generally by reference numeral 10 which incorporates the novel fire extinguishing system of this invention. A fire extinguishing system 12 comprises a container 14 carrying a quantity of fire extinguishing material under pressure. The container 14 is in fluid communication with conduit means 16 which extends along the skin or inner wall surface of the aircraft and is connected to a plurality of strategically located nozzles 18. The conduit 16 is provided with flow control valve means 20 interposed between the plurality of nozzles 18 and the container 14. A condition sensing and sequential control circuit 22 is connected to the flow control valve 20 to control energization thereof so as to control the flow of fire extinguishing material from the container 14 to the nozzles 18. The condition sensing and sequential control circuit 22 may include any number of different condition sensing devices so that the fire extinguishing system of this invention will be initially energized to establish a given concentration of fire extinguishant and thereafter sequentially energized to maintain a minimum concentration of fire extinguishant for as long as possible.

For a better understanding of the invention reference is now made to FIG. 2 which is an enlarged fragmentary sectional of a portion of the skin of the aircraft of FIG. 1 showing the fire extinguishing system of this invention. Here the tank 14 is connected to a T junction 15 and therefrom to a pair of flow control valves 20a and 20b which, in turn, are connected to respective conduit means 16a and 16b; The conduit 16a includes a plurality of strategically located nozzles 18a directed outwardly of the aircraft so that the fire extinguishing material may be sprayed over and beyond the aircraft. This will extinguish and control any fire resulting from fuel in the wing tanks igniting. This external spray of fire extinguishant can be either continuous or sequential. However, when it is a sequential spray in accordance with. this invention, maximum efficiency of the amount of fire extinguishant material is obtained.

The flow control valve 20b is connected to a conduit 16b which, in turn, has a plurality of strategically located nozzles 18b directed inwardly of the aircraft so that a number of locations in the aircraft can be accommodated with fire extinguishant. The wall of the aircraft may comprise an outer wall surface 24 and an inner wall surface 26 with insulating material 27 interposed therebetween. The conduit means and 16b pass between the inner and outer walls. By so providing a pair of conduits the aircraft can be equipped with separate groups of nozzles, one group for extinguishing a fire exterior to the aircraft and another group for extinguishing fires interior to the aircraft. Therefore, a plurality of nozzles 18b may be provided along the interior surface of the aircraft.

Referring now to FIG. 3 the flow control valve 20a is electrically connected to a fire sensing circuit means, here indicated by the switch 28, to cause initial energization upon the sensing of a fire. To insure that none of the fire extinguishing material is wasted the fire sensing switch 28 is connected in series with a pair of switches 29 and 30, they being the manual and speed sensing switches respectively. Therefore, should the aircraft crash and burst into flames exterior to the passenger compartment, none of the fire extinguishing material will be deployed until such time as the speed of the aircraft decreases to a minimum speed so that the fire extinguishing material will have maximum effect over the stopped fuselage. This will ensure maximum safety to persons still remaining in the stopped fuselage. The flow control valve 20a can be sequentially controlled by either electrical or mechanical control means similar to those disclosed herein.

Referring now to FIG. 4 a manual switch 31 is connected in parallel with a heat sensing switch 32 and an infrared sensing switch 33. The heat sensing switch 32 and infrared sensing switch 33 are utilized for sensing the occurrence of a fire of substantial size inside the interior of the aircraft. This eliminates extraneous fire signals occurring as a result of passengers lighting cigarettes and the like. Other heat sensing means may be incorporated to insure that an actual fire is sensed before deploying the fire extinguishing material carried aboard the aircraft. Theparallel connected switches 31, 32 and 33 are connected to a time delay control circuit 34 which comprises a time delay relay 36 and its associated time delay normally closed contacts 37 and 38. The time delay may be of any suitable type, either electronic, electric, or numatic, to control the sequential energization of the flow control valve 20b. Therefore, upon sensing any one of a plurality of conditions which indicate that a fire has occurred in themterior of the aircraft, initial energization of the flow control valve will occur through the first time delay switch 37. The second time delay switch 38 is connected in series with its associated time delay relay. The time delay of the contacts 37 and 38 are arranged so that the time delay of the switch 37 is shorter than the time delay of the switch 38. Therefore, the valve 20b will initially energize for a predetermined time interval as determined by switch 37. When switch 37 opens the flow control valve 20b deenergizes and stops further flow of the fire extinguishing material. However, the flow control valve 20b remains deenergized until such time as switch 37 again closes. This occurs only when the time delay relay 36 is deenergized to reset the switches. This is accomplished by the opening of time delay switch 38, which as mentioned above has a longer time delay period than the switch 37. This will then provide a sequential on/off operation of the flow control valve 20b to insure that sufficient fire extinguishing material is continuously deployed within the interior of the aircraft.

While the control circuits as shown in FIG. 4 is the electrical type, it will be understood that in many instances it may be necessary to have completely manual sequencing control systems ito insure continual operation of the fire control system should the electrical system fail. One such mechanical sequential system is shown in FIG. 5 as an exemplary mechanism, it being understood that other suitable mechanical control systems may be used without departing from this invention. The mechanical sequential control device is designated generally by reference numeral 40 and includes a primary valve body 41 having an inlet and outlet thereof connected by a passage 42. The outlet 43 is provided with an O-ring 44 which forms a seal. In the illustrated embodiment a flow control sequencing wheel 46 is pivotally secured at 47 to the body 42 and is urged tightly thereagainst by a spring 4% having the opposite end thereof abutting any suitable support 49, as best seen in FIG. 6.

The flow control sequencing wheel 46 is provided with a plurality of arcuately disposed slots 50, 51, 52, 53, and 54 preferably of different arc length but all disposed on the same radius to become into alignment with the passage 42. When the sequencial control wheel 46 is rotated, counterclockwise as seen in FIG. 5, the first slot 50 passes the outlet port 43 so as to allow fire extinguishing material to pass through the valve and into the conduit system connected thereto. The length of the slot, together with the rate of rotation of the wheel 46, determine the overall time interval of the first initial burst of tire extinguishing material. Once the slot has passed, and the solid portion of the wheel following the slot engages the O-ring 44 and fire extinguishing material ceases to flow. The second slot 51 then comes in registry with the passage 42 and again fire extinguishing material will flow into the associated conduits. Again after passage of the slot 51 another solid portion of the wheel obstructs the flow of the fire extinguishing material. The other arcuately disposed slots 52, 53, and 54 perform the same function as the slot 51, but may be of different are lengths so as to provide different time intervals of the sequential bursts of fire extinguishing material.

The mechanically operated sequential control flow valve 46 is energized by a pre-wound spring motor 56, it being understood that any other suitable mechanical energizing means may be used. A pair of idler gears 57 and 58 are interposed between the spring motor 56 and the flow control sequencing wheel 46. The periphery of the flow control wheel 46 is provided with gear teeth 46a while the periphery of the spring motor 56 are provided with gear teeth 56a. A locking solenoid 60 has the solenoid plunger 61 thereof engaged with a groove 62 formed in the spring motor 56. This insures that the spring motor is not inadvertently released until such time as energization of the solenoid 60. Therefore, initial closing of a switch 63 energizes the solenoid 60 to release the locking plunger 61 and cause initial starting of the mechanical system. Once started, however, the mechanical sequential system is automatic. and will continue to operate until the complete sequence of operation has passed.

When the mechanical system as set forth in FIGS. 5 an and 6 is utilized as an automatic mechanism for aircraft it may be desirable to have a failsafe circuit associated therewith. In this instance a failsafe reversing motor 66 is manually energized by a switch 67 so that an associated gear 68 connected to the flow control sequencing wheel 46, is electrically rotated to set the wheel back to an initial starting condition. Therefore, should the system be initiated inadvertently the failsafe switch 67 can be actuated to the off position to energize the motor and reset the flow control sequencing wheel to its starting position. It will be noted however, that electrical power is only needed for initial energization and should the electrical systems fail as a result of the tire it is of no consequence to the continued operation of the fire extinguishing system when utilizing the mechanical control valve shown.

Referring now to FIG. 7 there is seen a diagrammatic representation of still another, and very important use of the automatic fire extinguishing system of this invention. It is a well known fact that cut Christmas trees, when in a dried condition, are hazardous as they tend to become quite flammablewhen placed in homes and decorated with electric lights and the like. In many instances the occurrence of an electrical short circuit, or other cause of ignition, will start the tree on fire and, in a matter of minutes, the entire tree is engulfed in flames. The control system of this invention can be incorporated in a self-contained unit 70 placed at the base of a Christmas tree 71 and a flexible or rigid telescoping or otherwise connected together conduit 72 is connected between unit 70 and a dispensing nozzle 73 located at or near the top of the tree. The preferred embodiment contemplates placing the conduit 72 up the center of the tree where it can not be seen, whereby being in no way detracting to the general appearance of the Christmas tree. A fire sensor 74 may be positioned on the control unit 70 and detects the presence of a fire. This will automatically start energization of the control circuit within the unit 70 and dispense fire extinguishing material through the nozzle 73. The fire extinguishing nozzle in this instance is also preferably a liquified gas under pressure which will disperse in the atmosphere to cause extinguishing of the fire but will maintain an atmospheric condition sufficient to support life. Therefore, should small children be in the area when a fires occurs the fire extinguishing system will automatically extinguish the fire without harming the children. 7

One illustrated embodiment of the nozzle 73 may be that as shown in FIG. 8. Here the nozzle 73 has an arcuate hood portion 76 positioned over the upper end 720 of the conduit 72, and fastened thereto by any suitable means, the hood provides a centrally depending defleeting portion 77 to cause the fire extinguishing material to impinge on the inner surface of the hood and be directed downwardly over the tree.

The fire extinguishing unit 70 has mounted therein, as seen in FIG. 9, a container 80 of fire extinguishing material under pressure connected in fluid communication with the conduit 72 through a flow control valve 81. The flow control valve 81 is connected to a control circuit 82 over a line 83. The control circuit 82 is coupled to the fire sensing unit 74 to initiate energization of the flow valve 81, and thereafter to provide either electrical or mechanical sequential energization of the valve to insure that fire extinguishing properties of the atmosphere around the fire are maintained for a maximum predetermined time interval.

For a better understanding of the sequence of operation of either the mechanical or the electrical control systems of this invention, reference is now made to FIG. which shows a series of voltage pulses along a line indicating the time. The volt pulses may also represent openings formed in the sequencing wheel 46 to show that either voltage applied or openings of the mechanical valves is contemplated for the time intervals shown. For example, the arcuate slot 50 of the valve 40, FIG. 5, can provide a flow of extinguishing material for a time interval between zero and t,. The flow of extinguishing material is terminated between time interval t and t whereupon the opening 51 of the valve 40 again causes extinguishing material to flow during the time interval t r Termination of flow of the extinguishing material is accomplished between time interval t and t,. In some instances it may be desirable to have the subsequent time intervals of flow of the extinguishing material shorter than the first few time intervals, this being desirable as a result of the previous purging of the atmosphere to a desired concentration. Therefore, the time interval t I is shown shorter than the previous time intervals. The number of time intervals for energizing the flow control valve can vary from system to system and is selected so as to provide fire extinguishing properties in an atmosphere for a maximum amount of time for the quantity of extinguishant material available.

What has been described is a simple and efficient fire extinguishing system which is automatic and which can be operated either electrically or mechanically, as desired. While the fire extinguishing system disclosed herein has a particular utility when used with aircraft and Christmas trees, it will be understood that it can be used in other vehicles such as racing cars, boats, compartments aboard ships, as well as ofiice areas, and in any environment where fire extinguishing properties are required with a minimum amount of fire extinguishant. Accordingly, many variations and modifications of this invention may be effected without departing from the spirit and scope of the novel concepts disclosed and claimed herein.

The invention is claimed as follows:

1. A self-contained automatic fire extinguishing system, comprising, in combination: container means having a quantity of fire extinguishing material under pressure therein, nozzle means to be placed at one or more strategic locations, conduit means connected between said container means and said nozzle means, flow control valve means interposed in said conduit means, condition sensing means for sensing the occurrence of a fire, and sequence means responsive to said condition sensing means to cause initial energization of said valve means for releasing the extinguishing material through said nozzle means for a given time interval and for causing subsequent sequential energization of said flow control valve means to insure that complete fire extinguishing characteristics are maintained for a predetermined time after the initial energization of said valve means.

2. The self-contained fire extinguishing system ac cording to claim 1, wherein said sequence means includes electrical control means connected to said valve means for causing electrical sequential energization thereof during said predetermined time.

3. The self-contained fire extinguishing system according to claim 1, wherein said sequence means includes electrical means to effect said initial energization of said flow control valve means and mechanical means to effect said subsequent sequential energization thereof during said predetermined time.

4. The self-contained fire extinguishing system according to claim 1, wherein said fire extinguishing material is Dupont FE 1301.

5. A self-contained automatic fire extinguishing system for moving vehicles, comprising in combination; container means having a quantity of fire extinguishing material under pressure therein,-nozzle means to be placed at one or more strategic locations within the vehicle and at one or more strategic locations at the exterior of the vehicle, conduit means connected between said container means and said nozzle means, first and second flow control valve means interposed in said conduit means, first condition sensing means for sensing the occurrence of a fire within the interior of the vehicle to cause initial energization of said flow control valve means for releasing the extinguishing material through the nozzle means and for subsequent sequential energization of said flow control valve means thereafter to insure complete fire extinguishing characteristics for a predetermined time thereafter, and second condition sensing means for sensing the movement of the vehicle for energizing said second flow control valve means to release extinguishing material to the exterior of the vehicle when the movement of the vehicle is below a predetermined minimum speed.

6. The self-contained fire extinguishing system according to claim 5, wherein said fire extinguishing material is a liquified gas under pressure which, when released through said nozzle means, decreases the combustible characteristic of the ambient atmosphere sufficient to extinguish and prevent ignition of combustible materials, but which maintains an atmospheric level sufficient to support life for at least said predetermined time interval.

7. The self-contained fire extinguishing system according to claim 6, wherein said fire extinguishing ma- 10 terial is Dupont FE 1301.

cording to claim 5, wherein said first and second condition sensing means includes electrical energization of said flow control valve meansto control initial energization thereof and to control said subsequent sequential energization thereof.

9. The self-contained fire extinguishing system according to claim 5, wherein said first and second flow control valve means includes electrical means for initial energization thereof and mechanical means for said subsequent sequential energization of said flow control valve means.

10. The self-contained fire extinguishing system according .to claim 5, wherein said nozzle means includes a plurality of discrete nozzles to be positioned along predetermined sites at the exterior skin of the moving vehicle and a plurality of discrete nozzles to be positioned at predetermined sites along the interior of the vehicle, and further including means for selectively directing the fire extinguishing material to the interior and the exterior of the vehicle depending on the conditions sensed.

Claims (10)

1. A self-contained automatic fire extinguishing system, comprising, in combination: container means having a quantity of fire extinguishing material under pressure therein, nozzle means to be placed at one or more strategic locations, conduit means connected between said container means and said nozzle means, flow control valve means interposed in said conduit means, condition sensing means for sensing the occurrence of a fire, and sequence means responsive to said condition sensing means to cause initial energization of said valve means for releasing the extinguishing material through said nozzle means for a given time interval and for causing subsequent sequential energization of said flow control valve means to insure that complete fire extinguishing characteristics are maintained for a predetermined time after the initial energization of said valve means.
2. The self-contained fire extinguishing system according to claim 1, whereiN said sequence means includes electrical control means connected to said valve means for causing electrical sequential energization thereof during said predetermined time.
3. The self-contained fire extinguishing system according to claim 1, wherein said sequence means includes electrical means to effect said initial energization of said flow control valve means and mechanical means to effect said subsequent sequential energization thereof during said predetermined time.
4. The self-contained fire extinguishing system according to claim 1, wherein said fire extinguishing material is Dupont FE 1301.
5. A self-contained automatic fire extinguishing system for moving vehicles, comprising in combination; container means having a quantity of fire extinguishing material under pressure therein, nozzle means to be placed at one or more strategic locations within the vehicle and at one or more strategic locations at the exterior of the vehicle, conduit means connected between said container means and said nozzle means, first and second flow control valve means interposed in said conduit means, first condition sensing means for sensing the occurrence of a fire within the interior of the vehicle to cause initial energization of said flow control valve means for releasing the extinguishing material through the nozzle means and for subsequent sequential energization of said flow control valve means thereafter to insure complete fire extinguishing characteristics for a predetermined time thereafter, and second condition sensing means for sensing the movement of the vehicle for energizing said second flow control valve means to release extinguishing material to the exterior of the vehicle when the movement of the vehicle is below a predetermined minimum speed.
6. The self-contained fire extinguishing system according to claim 5, wherein said fire extinguishing material is a liquified gas under pressure which, when released through said nozzle means, decreases the combustible characteristic of the ambient atmosphere sufficient to extinguish and prevent ignition of combustible materials, but which maintains an atmospheric level sufficient to support life for at least said predetermined time interval.
7. The self-contained fire extinguishing system according to claim 6, wherein said fire extinguishing material is Dupont FE 1301.
8. The self-contained fire extinguishing system according to claim 5, wherein said first and second condition sensing means includes electrical energization of said flow control valve means to control initial energization thereof and to control said subsequent sequential energization thereof.
9. The self-contained fire extinguishing system according to claim 5, wherein said first and second flow control valve means includes electrical means for initial energization thereof and mechanical means for said subsequent sequential energization of said flow control valve means.
10. The self-contained fire extinguishing system according to claim 5, wherein said nozzle means includes a plurality of discrete nozzles to be positioned along predetermined sites at the exterior skin of the moving vehicle and a plurality of discrete nozzles to be positioned at predetermined sites along the interior of the vehicle, and further including means for selectively directing the fire extinguishing material to the interior and the exterior of the vehicle depending on the conditions sensed.
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US5350019A (en) * 1986-09-05 1994-09-27 Nohmi Bosai Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Fire protection system
US6003610A (en) * 1998-02-17 1999-12-21 Kordes; Michael John Fire extinquishing system for a christmas tree
US6637518B1 (en) * 1993-07-12 2003-10-28 Invention Technologies Pty. Ltd. Fire extinguishing apparatus
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EP1547651A1 (en) * 2003-12-24 2005-06-29 Airbus Deutschland GmbH Fire extinguishing device and method in particular for cargo spaces in aircrafts
US20080271902A1 (en) * 2007-05-03 2008-11-06 Cjs Concepts, Llc Fire prevention and extinguishing system and method of using same
US7679521B1 (en) * 2007-05-01 2010-03-16 Cesar Gavia Christmas tree ornament with integrated smoke detector, heat detector, motion sensor, and fire extinguishing means
US7963343B1 (en) * 2007-08-06 2011-06-21 James Hopkins Automatic fire extinguishing system for an existing Christmas tree and associated method
DE102010025054A1 (en) * 2010-06-25 2011-12-29 Airbus Operations Gmbh Fire extinguishing system for an aircraft and method for fire fighting in a plane
US8978778B2 (en) 2010-06-25 2015-03-17 Airbus Operations Gmbh Fire extinguishing system for an airplane and method for firefighting in an airplane

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US3509942A (en) * 1966-08-15 1970-05-05 John E Lindberg System for detecting structural failure

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3893514A (en) * 1973-11-23 1975-07-08 Us Navy Suppression of fires in confined spaces by pressurization
US4643260A (en) * 1985-09-26 1987-02-17 The Boeing Company Fire suppression system with controlled secondary extinguishant discharge
US5350019A (en) * 1986-09-05 1994-09-27 Nohmi Bosai Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Fire protection system
US5040611A (en) * 1987-11-17 1991-08-20 Darchem, Ltd. Aircraft fire protection system
GB2215204A (en) * 1988-02-24 1989-09-20 James Steel Fire protection system for passenger carriers
GB2215204B (en) * 1988-02-24 1993-12-08 James Steel Fire protection system for passenger carriers
US5211246A (en) * 1989-05-30 1993-05-18 The Boeing Company Scouring method and system for suppressing fire in an enclosed area
US6637518B1 (en) * 1993-07-12 2003-10-28 Invention Technologies Pty. Ltd. Fire extinguishing apparatus
US6003610A (en) * 1998-02-17 1999-12-21 Kordes; Michael John Fire extinquishing system for a christmas tree
US20110155398A1 (en) * 2003-04-15 2011-06-30 Aerojet-General Corporation Vehicle Fire Extinguisher
US20040226726A1 (en) * 2003-04-15 2004-11-18 Holland Gary F. Vehicle fire extinguisher
US20050139366A1 (en) * 2003-12-24 2005-06-30 Alexander Scheidt Method and apparatus for extinguishing a fire in an enclosed space
US7434628B2 (en) 2003-12-24 2008-10-14 Airbus Deutschland Gmbh Method and apparatus for extinguishing a fire in an enclosed space
DE10361020B4 (en) * 2003-12-24 2010-09-30 Airbus Deutschland Gmbh Fire fighting equipment
EP1547651A1 (en) * 2003-12-24 2005-06-29 Airbus Deutschland GmbH Fire extinguishing device and method in particular for cargo spaces in aircrafts
US7679521B1 (en) * 2007-05-01 2010-03-16 Cesar Gavia Christmas tree ornament with integrated smoke detector, heat detector, motion sensor, and fire extinguishing means
US20080271902A1 (en) * 2007-05-03 2008-11-06 Cjs Concepts, Llc Fire prevention and extinguishing system and method of using same
US7963343B1 (en) * 2007-08-06 2011-06-21 James Hopkins Automatic fire extinguishing system for an existing Christmas tree and associated method
DE102010025054A1 (en) * 2010-06-25 2011-12-29 Airbus Operations Gmbh Fire extinguishing system for an aircraft and method for fire fighting in a plane
EP2399649A3 (en) * 2010-06-25 2013-05-01 Airbus Operations GmbH Fire extinguishing system for an aircraft and method for fighting fire in an aircraft
US8978778B2 (en) 2010-06-25 2015-03-17 Airbus Operations Gmbh Fire extinguishing system for an airplane and method for firefighting in an airplane

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