US3783472A - Wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit and method of installation - Google Patents

Wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit and method of installation Download PDF

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US3783472A
US3783472A US3783472DA US3783472A US 3783472 A US3783472 A US 3783472A US 3783472D A US3783472D A US 3783472DA US 3783472 A US3783472 A US 3783472A
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receptacle
compartment
hose
vacuum cleaner
main support
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J Mol
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WAL VAC Inc
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WAL VAC Inc
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Priority to US40780673 priority patent/US3849866A/en
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L5/00Structural features of suction cleaners
    • A47L5/12Structural features of suction cleaners with power-driven air-pumps or air-compressors, e.g. driven by motor vehicle engine vacuum
    • A47L5/22Structural features of suction cleaners with power-driven air-pumps or air-compressors, e.g. driven by motor vehicle engine vacuum with rotary fans
    • A47L5/38Built-in suction cleaner installations, i.e. with fixed tube system to which, at different stations, hoses can be connected
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49826Assembling or joining
    • Y10T29/49904Assembling a subassembly, then assembling with a second subassembly
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49826Assembling or joining
    • Y10T29/49947Assembling or joining by applying separate fastener
    • Y10T29/49963Threaded fastener
    • Y10T29/49964At least one part nonmetallic

Abstract

A wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit being substantially a four piece assembly and consisting of a main support frame with an integral lower rearwardly projecting cover shell having a front opening defining a receptacle compartment, upper front and rear cover shells in opposite and opposed relation releasably secured to the main support frame defining a power compartment and a front access door for the receptacle compartment front opening. The front cover shell of the power compartment is characterized by being outwardly protruding from the main support frame and having a downwardly oriented bottom surface within which there is provided a vacuum hose receptacle. Conduit means are provided to be communicant with the receptacle compartment and with the downwardly disposed hose receptacle. A mounting frame to which is mounted the main support frame, after the former is initially installed in an opening provided in the wall, is provided to be adjustably installed to compensate for wall thickness and insure flush engagement of the main support frame relative to the wall surface upon final installation.

Description

United States Patent [1 1 Jan. 8, 1974 WALL MOUNTED VACUUM CLEANER UNIT AND METHOD OF INSTALLATION Jacob C. M01, Grand Rapids, Mich. [73] Assignee: Wal Vac, Inc., Grand Rapids, Mich. [22] Filed: Jan. 14, 1972 [21] App]. No.: 217,890

Related U.S. Application Data [63] Continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 37,211, May 14,

1970, abandoned.

[75] Inventor:

Primary Examiner-J-larvey C. Hornsby Assistant ExaminerC. K. Moore AttorneyCarothers and Carothers [5 7] ABSTRACT A wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit being substantially a four piece assembly and consisting of a'main support frame with an integral lower rearwardly projecting cover shell having a front. opening defining a receptacle compartment, upper front and rear cover shells in opposite and opposed relation releasably secured to the main support frame defining a power compartment and a front access door for the receptacle compartment front opening. The front cover shell of the power compartment is characterized by being outwardly protruding from the main support frame and having a downwardly oriented bottom surface within which there is provided a vacuum hose receptacle. Conduit means are provided to be communicant with the receptacle compartment and with the downwardly disposed hose receptacle.

A mounting frame to which is mounted the main support frame, after the former is initially installed in an opening provided in the wall, is provided to be adjustably installed to compensate for wall thickness and insure flush engagement of the main support frame relative to the wall surface upon final installation.

20 Claims, 16 Drawing Figures PMENIEBJAH 8 m4 3783472 sum 2 OF 6 'INVENTOR. JACOB 0. MOL.

BY M' PATENTEDJM 8 I974 SHEET 5 BF 6 PATENTEU JAN 8 I974 SIEH 6 OF 6 WALL MOUNTED VACUUM CLEANER UNIT AND METHOD OF INSTALLATION CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS This is a continuation-in-part of patent application Ser. No; 37,211, filed May 14, 1970, and now abandonecl.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION flexible conduit connection between ambulant air draft applying means and relatively stationary air pump or supply which are generally referred to as central vacuum cleaning systems (15-314).

Central vacuum cleaning systems are by no means new in the art as evidenced by their disclosure in art in the early part of this century. These systems generally involved a single station vacuum supply and receptacle supply with a plurality of conduits supplied to various rooms of a building, each terminating in a hose receptacle. Thus, each room could be cleaned by insertion of a hose assembly into the hose receptacle in the room and activating the vacuum supply system. The hose as sembly could be moved from room to room for use with other receptacles.

More recently some central cleaning systems have taken on a new look in the manner that they are compact so as to include the vacuumsupply, bagreceptacle and hose receptacle in one unit with the unit installed in an opening prepared in a wall in oneof the rooms of a building. Also, an additional inlet conduit can be supplied for a remote hose receptacle in another room of the building. Such a unit, referred to as a wall recessed cleaning system, is generally much easier to install, not

requiring the skills of special servicemen, and is conve nient to maintain.

Such a wall recessed cleaning unit is shown in US. Pat. No. 3,422,482 (15-614) where the unit is installed in an open area of the wall so that a substantial portion of the unit is recessed in the wall and hidden from view. The unit comprises-a power compartment housing a vacuum pump and drive motor and a receptacle com partment housing a receptacle bag; all of this together with conduit means havingone end portion leading into the receptacle compartment and the other end portion leading to a hose receptacle on the front face of the unit.

One of the main problems encountered with these units is their aesthetic appearance, since the unit is to be installed in a room of the building where its front portion is readily in view to those in the room. Particularly in an office building or home, there is a need for the face of such units to be aesthetically attractive so as not to detract from the general appearance of the room. In view of the fact that the hose receptacle must naturally be positioned on the front face of the unit, it detracts from the aesthetic appearance of the unit, since the receptacle itself is not considered as attractive to the eye when appearing on a wall of the room or positioned on the front face of the unit. Thus, many at-v tempts have been made in the past to dress up the unsightly hose receptacle and to make its appearance more attractive on the front face of the unit. However, all these attempts actually fail to successfully a'ccomplish this purpose because the hose receptacle still must remain and be positioned on the front face of the unit.

Another problem encountered with these units, and a more important consideratiom is the fact that since these units arecompact and installed in a single room, it is necessary to provide a long vacuum hose assembly for floor cleaning purposes so that the. unit can be used to clean. other rooms in the building, other than the room in which the unit is installed, such as illustrated in FIG; 1 of US. Pat. No. 3,422,482. The hose of such hose assemblies are as long as 30 feet, which is an added factor in that the user positioned at the cleaning nozzleimust move andpullthe hosealongas he or she 1 moves about the. room or an adjacent room being cleaned. Obviously, this is not a factor encountered by users of portable vacuum cleaners.

Thus, any provisions that can be. made to aid one in the use and employment of such long hose assemblies when moving about theroom for cleaning purposes and also to prevent as much as possible any wear and tear on thehose assembly when being so used and employed 1 are considered and being sought so as 'to improve the overall utility of wall recessedvacuum cleaning systems.

SUMMARY OF THE. INVENTION The principalobject of the present invention is the. provision of a wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit which is aesthetically attractive, eliminating the normal appearance of the hose receptacle on. the front face of the unit, while at the same time positioning the hose receptacle such as to aid the user in the manipulation of the long hose assembly while reducingwear and tear on the V hose assembly, particularly at the point of the hose assembly connection to the hose receptacle on the unit.

In particular, the unit comprising this invention is so constructed that a portion of the front face of the. unit, particularly an upper portion thereof, is outwardly projected 'to provide for a downwardly oriented bottom surface that extends forwardly beyond the plane or main exterior surface of the unit that is substantially flush with the wall upon installation of the unit. A hose receptacle is provided in this bottom surface and conduit means is provided to have one end portion extended into the receptacle compartment and its other end portion disposed downwardly within the outwardly prpjecting portion of the unit to be communicant with the hose receptacle.

In this manner, upon connection of the hose connector of the hose assembly upwardly into the hose receptacle, the hose will be naturally directed downwardly to the floor and not outwardly as in the case of US. Pat. No. 3,422,482. In this regard, two important advantages are recognized. First, when the hose assembly is being used in an extensive cleaning application, which is not uncommon, the constant tugging and jerking on the hose due to reciprocating motion of the vacuum nozzle by the user will not bring about excessive bending and ultimate wear at the point where the hose assembly is connected to the hose receptacle. This is particularly true with respect to the point where the hose connector is securedto one end of the long hose. It can be readily understood that such hose stress much reduced where the hose receptacle is positioned to direct the hose assembly initially to the floor area of the room as compared to the hose receptacle which directs the hose assembly initially horizontally out from the wall and thus, at some point, depending upon the length of the hose connector and strength of the hose, must curve downwardly to the floor area. 7

Also, less stress or pulling strain is placed upon the hose receptacle and associated conduit means where they are adapted to be in a downwardly disposed position and not in an outwardly disposed horizontal position like those of the prior art.

In regard to what has just been said, naturally in the case where the long hose assembly is connected to a downwardly disposed hose receptacle on the unit, more of the weight of the hose is placed on the floor and not at all on the hose receptacle.

Secondly, since the unit is installed in the wall several inches f om hefl qlsqsh. as 18 whsso more the downwardly oriented hose receptacle is not normally visible to persons in the room where the unit has been installed, so that persons unfamiliar with the unit do not know the purpose of the unit, or for that matter are not conscious of its existence because of its improved aesthetic appearance. The unit, though partially exposed into the room, does not detract aesthetically from its surroundings, but rather blends with them. None of the actual functioning components are normally visible, particularly no vacuum inlets or exhaust outlets; but the hose assembly can be readily attached for cleaning purposes.

The compactness of the unit and its ability to be substantially recessed within a wall with an improved aesthetic appearance makes it particularly attractive for mobile homes, apartments and condominiums, as well as new and existing regular residential dwellings and commercial buildings because of its ease of installation.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of a wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit being of a four piece assembly consisting of a main support frame having an integral lower rearwardly projecting cover shell defining a front opening forming a receptacle compartment, an outwardly protruding front cover shell, an outwardly protruding rear cover shell, these shells forming a power compartment and an access door for hermetically sealed engagement with the receptacle compartment opening. These components of the unit can be readily fabricated individually and rapidly interconnected for assembly during manufacture or even during the time of installation, if necessary, such as in the construction of a new building. The four pieces of the assembly are releasably connected together, making it readily simple to remove them for any necessary inspection or repair to housed components. The four piece assembly houses all components included in the unit, and yet provides the features set forth in the initial object of invention. Any suitable material may be used for the construction of the four piece assembly, but the strong, durable and practically unbreakable material known under the trademark LEXAN, a polycarbonate, is preferred.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of a mounting frame to-which the main support frame of the unit is attached, wherein the mounting frame includes two frame sides each having a front face and a side face and provided with a pluralt iy of elongated slots to permit initial selective directional adjustment and orientation when mounting the mounting frame in a wall and also when securing the main support frame finally to the mounting frame. In this manner, a new and improved method of installing the unit in an opening or recess in the wall is provided to (a) permit adjustment of the mounting frame relative to the exterior surface of the wall to compensate for wall thickness and insure flush engagement of the main support frame relative to the wall surface upon final installation; and (b) permit adjustment of the main support frame relative to the mounting frame to obtain proper aligned relation as well as to insure adequate and complete coverage of the wall opening, if necessary.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of a hose receptacle to include a spring biased flap pivotally secured so as to be adapted to cover the inlet of the receptacle but providing on its underside surface an outwardly extended projection adapted to engage under an annular ridge of the hose connector of the hose assembly upon insertion of the hose connector into the hose receptacle inlet. Since the hose connector is in a downwardly oriented position when connected, the combination of the spring biased flap with its projection maintained against the hose connector under the hose connector ridge eliminates accidental removal of the hose connector when in use. However, it should be understood that with sufficiently snug or tight engagement of the hose connector within the hose receptacle and associated conduit provided for by close tolerances of those parts, the biased projection on the flap is more than sufficient assurance against any accidental disconnection. Further, the employment of this type of simple assurance eliminates the need for common interconnecting locking means, such as bayonet interlocking disclosed in US. Pat. No. 3,088,484 (137-360), for the hose receptacle and hose connector, which merely add to the costs of manufacture and frustrations in providing for simple, convenient and rapid hose connection.

Other objects and advantages appear in the following description and claims.

The accompanying drawings show, for the purpose of exemplification without limiting the invention or the claims thereto, certain practical embodiments illustrating the principles of this invention wherein:

FIG. 1 is a front perspective view showing the exposed portion of the vacuum cleaner unit comprising this invention as it appears mounted in a wall.

FIG. 2 is another front perspective view of the unit in FIG. 1, shown with a suction hose assembly connected for use.

FIG. 3 is an underside perspective view of a portion of the apparatus shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, detailing the area of the hose receptacle.

FIG. 4 is a side elevational, exploded view of the unit.

FIG. 5 is a front fragmentary elevational view taken along the line VV of FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 is a sectional elevational view of the main support member illustrated in the center of FIG. 4.

FIG. 7 is a front elevational view of the main support frame of the unit.

FIG. 8 is a top view of the power compartment rear cover shell of the unit.

FIG. 9 is a sectional view taken along the line IX-IX of FIG. 7.

FIG. 10 is an enlarged side elevational view of the conduit and hose connector of the unit as installed.

FIG. 11 is a fragmentary front elevational view of one type of mounting means to which the unit is mounted for installation in a wall.

FIG. 12 is a sectional view taken along the line XII- XII of FIG. 11.

FIG. 13 is a front perspective, exploded view of the unit and of a somewhat modified design as compared to the unit shown in the previous figures.

FIG. 14 is a back perspective, exploded view of the unit shown in FIG. 13 but also including an improved mounting frame for the unit.

FIG. 15 is a sectional view showing the hose connector of the hose assembly engaged into the hose receptacle and associated conduit.

FIG. 16 shows the mounting frame shown in FIG. 14 initially installed in an opening or recess provided in a wall.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Reference is now made to the drawings, particularly FIGS. 1, 2, 13 and 14, wherein the vacuum cleaner unit consists of the housing means 12 forming an upper power compartment 22 and a lower receptacle compartment 24. The unit is composed essentially of a four piece assembly including a main support frame 14, a rear power cover shell 16, a front power cover shell 18, and a receptacle compartment access door 20. There is also a lower rearwardly projecting cover shell 14a enclosing the rear of the receptacle compartment 24, but this is an integral part of the main support frame 14. It should be noted that the front and rear cover shells 16 and 18 form the vacuum power compartment 22.

Main support frame 14 includes a peripheral flange 14b which extends peripherally beyond all of the other components of the housing for flush engagement with the front surface of a room wall W when the unit is mounted as illustrated in FIG. 4.

All of the components of the vacuum cleaner unit 10 are attached to the main support frame 14, with this frame in turn being mounted to the wall structure by means of a mounting support usually between a pair of vertical studs in a wall. Specifically, referring to FIGS. 11 and 12, the unit is mounted between conventional wall studs identified at S and S wherein the main support frame 14 is illustrated in phantom. Frame 14 is actually attached to a pair of elongated angle brackets 30 and 30, these brackets being attached to the studs S and S, with suitable fasteners to provide a support therebetween for the vacuum unit 10. Suitable screws or other fasteners extend through a plurality of openings 34 in each of the opposite sides of main support frame 14 shown in FIG. 7 adjacent the peripheral flange 14b and are aligned with cooperative openings 36 provided in brackets 30 and 30' shown in FIG. 11.

An electrical motor 38 is mounted in the power compartment 22 and is operably connected to a vacuum pump 40 immediately therebelow in the same compartment. The motor and pump assembly are secured in position by a semicircular bracket 42 shown in FIGS. 5 and 13 to frame 14 by any suitable fasteners, with pump 40 resting inside the upwardly open cup shaped hollow portion 14c of frame 14 as shown in FIGS. 4 and 14. Pump 40 has an intake or inlet at its lower end of conventional type, with its lower end resting upon an annular gasket 44 that rests upon ledge 14d depicted in FIGS. 4 and 6 and surrounds the pump inlet to seal its periphery. Beneath this pump is a grill l4e, shown both in FIGS. 6 and 9, defining passages to enable the pump inlet to be communicant with the refuse bag receptacle chamber 25 of the receptacle compartment 24..Immediately beneath this grill is a pair of slide tracks 14f to enable a supplemental or secondary filter 99, usually in the form of natural or synthetic batting, to slide into the tracks beneath the covering of the grill 146. Such a filter 99 is shown installed in FIG. 13.

Motor 38 is of the conventional type, normally cou pled to pump 40, and having an air flow connection with the pump such that the air drawn up by pump 40 from receptacle chamber 24 passes through the pump and is exhausted up through the motor and out its upper end through the grid 16b of the rear cover shell 16 shown in FIGS. 8 and 14. Adjacent and surrounding this upper exhaust outlet of motor 38 is an annular gasket or sea] 48 shown best in FIGS. 4 and 13. Gasket 48 seals against and is held in place by the upper inside surface of removable, connectable, hollow, rear cover shell 16. Shell 16 is open on. the front and bottom, being closed on the back, top, and ends. However, openings may be provided in its back for purposes of ventilation of motor 38 as depicted at in FIG. 14. Its open front enables it to fit over the motor and other components in the power compartment 22. The end tabs 16a of the shell 16 on opposite sides thereof enable it to be connected to main support frame 14 as by screws or other suitable fasteners after the tabs 16a have been extended through vertical slots 50 of frame 14 shown in FIG. 7. Grid 16b, previously mentioned, in the top of shell 16 aligns with the exhaust outlet of motor 38 (not shown). Motor 38 is electrically powered through wiring 54 of conventional type as shown in FIGS. 5 and 13, using electrical on-off switch 56, the actuator 56' of which projects upwardly through an opening 57 provided in the front power compartment cover shell 18. Wiring 54 extends through a suitable opening in shell 16 shown in FIGS. 8 and 14 for wiring into the building electrical. circuit.

Receptacle compartment 24 receives an air permeable dirt receiving and collecting bag 102 of the conventional type shown in FIG. 13 and having an opening on its upper end for slidably fitting over the lower end 60' of a vertical conduit 60 generally in the power compartment portion of the apparatus and part of the conduit means to the hose receptacle 62, to be explained later. The receptacle bag 102 may be inserted into compartment 24 by temporary removal of access door 20.

As shown in FIGS. 4 and 13, door 20 has a pair of downwardly projecting tongues 20a on its lower edge 21 for insertion into a corresponding pair of spaced slots 14g on the lower edge 15 of element 14. The upper portion 33 of door 20 may be pivoted about the tongues 20a until the door projections 20b on the side edges 27 engage and fall into the frame slots 29 in the adjacent side portions 31 of flange 14b shown best in FIG. 13. No connectors or other equivalents need be employed to maintain the door in its closed position. Removal of the door can be achieved simply by prying the upper portion 33 loose from element 14 with the finger-tips inserted in the detent 35 thereby pivoting the door out about tongues 20a and then lifting it up to remove tongues 20a from slots 14g.

With respect to the conduit means, conduit 60 extends vertically upwardly from its lower outlet or end portion 60' in receptacle compartment 24 through the opening 14j in the main support frame 14 and may have an upwardly projecting portion 60a, best shown in FIGS. and 14, extending vertically out the top of rear shell 16 through opening 17 therein (FIG. 8) for connection to a remote vacuum conduit and auxiliary hose receptacle (not shown) placed at a desired location in another adjacent or upstairs room. If the upwardly projecting portion 60a is not used, a suitable cap 70 may be placed thereon to close and seal this conduit off. A portion of conduit 60 also extends forwardly and thence downwardly to a hose receptacle 62 shown in FIGS. 2, 10 and 15, located in the undersurface or bottom surface 18a of front cover shell 18. If conduit 60 includes upwardly projecting portion 60a, a suitable tee-connector 60b as shown in FIG. 10, may be used to provide the forward orientation, with a suitable L- shaped inlet 60c extending from the tee-connector 60b and changing direction so that its outer end is oriented downwardly toward the floor and in engagement with hose receptacle 62. Since the entire unit 10 is normally mounted within a few feet from the floor, receptacle 62 is normally out of view to persons within the room. Consequently, the unit would be viewed substantially as shown in FIG. 1, to be aesthetically attractive and practically flush with the wall surface because the unit is recessed within the wall. Yet, use of the vacuum unit 10 is extremely simple since, as shown in FIG. 10, by pivoting the spring-biased closure flap 62a on inlet receiver 62d, using flange 62b, the resilient seal 62c will be pulled away from inlet receiver 62d of the hose receptacle so that the hose connector 80a of the hose assembly 80 shown in FIG. 1 will slidably fit into the female inlet receiver 62d.

Front power compartment cover shell 18 is removably connected over this hose receptacle and conduit means. Specifically as shown in FIGS. 4 and 14, front cover shell 18 has tabs 18b along its upper edge 19 which are inserted upwardly into corresponding spaced slots 14h shown in FIGS. 7 and 14 in the upper edge 13 of the support frame 14 while the lower end 11 of the cover shell 18 is positioned outwardly at an angle as depicted in FIG. 13. The lower end 11 is then arcuately pivoted toward frame 14, causing actuator 56 to project through its opening 57 in the cover shell 18, and with the downwardly facing undersurface or bottom surface 18a of the cover being temporarily deformed downwardly by finger pressure to enable it to project around hose receptacle 62. Receptacle 62 thereafter projects through hose receptacle opening 180 in the bottom surface 18a as shown in FIGS. 3 and 10. Suitable fasteners 82 as shown in FIGS. 3 and 13 may be employed to secure lower end 1 l of cover shell 18 to bosses l4i of frame 14 shown in FIGS. 5 and 10.

Operation of the wall mounted vacuum cleaner comprising this invention will be readily apparent from the detailed description given above. Briefly, access door 20 is temporarily removed and a dirt receptacle bag 102 is inserted into chamber with the mouth of the bag being slipped up over the lower discharge end portion 60 of conduit 60. Then door 20 is replaced. Hose connector 80a of the hose assembly 80 of conventional type is inserted into hose receptacle 62, after pivoting flap 62a into its open position illustrated in FIG. 2. Switch actuator 56' is then shifted to initiate motor operation. Motor 38 powers vacuum pump 40 which, through its communication to chamber 25, draws air from the chamber through grill 14c through the pump, thence through motor 38, to the discharge of the motor and out upper grill 16b in rear cover shell 16. This, of

course, causes a negative pressure at conduit outlet 60, to cause air to be drawn through hose 80, thence through hose connector a and receptacle 62, inlet 60c, tee-connector 60b, and conduit 60, thereby drawing dirt-laden air into the dirt receptacle bag 102 connected to end portion 60.

Having made reference to the operation of the wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit comprising this invention, reference is now made particularly to the cleaner unit 10 and its manner of installation as depicted in FIGS. 13 through 16. The unit 10 as shown in these figures is substantially similar to that of the previous figures, except there are various changes in design and contour. However, the principle of operation as well as associated parts are substantially identical with respect to their general form and function.

It should be noted that the access door 20 when placed in its closed position with the projections 20b within their corresponding slos 29, the door 20 must provide some hermetic sealing of the opening into chamber 25. This is accomplished by means of providing on the main support frame 14 the outwardly disposed flange which mates with a corresponding closed loop groove or U-shaped flange provided on the inside surface 91 of the access door 20 into which is received a resilient gasket member 92 to provide for hermetic sealing of the receptacle compartment 24 upon engagement of the flange 90 against the resilient gasket member 92. Obviously, the flange 90 could be placed along the inside surface 91 of the access door while the corresponding groove and resilient gasket member 92 would be placed around the perimeter of the opening into chamber 25 in order to accomplish the identical hermetic sealing effect.

Reference is now made to FIG. 15 where there is shown in cross section a detailed arrangement of hose connector 80a inserted within hose receptacle 62. It will be noted that there is a snug or tight fit engagement with regard to the downward depending hose connector 800 within the framework of the conduit inlet 60c which is also disposed in a downward position toward the floor. The close tolerance between these two pieces insures secure engagement of the hose connector 80a in the hose receptacle 62 as well as providing for good sealing engagement.

As in the case of FIG. 10, the hose receptacle 62 shown here is provided with a spring biased flap 62a having a forward flange 62b for prying the flap open. The flap 62a is pivotally secured at 93 to the base plate 94 and a conventional spring is provided at the point of pivoting to cause the flap 62a to move in the direction of arrow 95 to its closed position covering the inlet receiver 62d.

As compared to the structure shown in FIG. 10, it should be noted that the flap 62 in FIG. 15 has on its under surface 96 the outwardly extended projection 97 to engage under the annular ridge 98 integral to the hose connector 80a. Thus, the biasing pressure of the flap 62a causes the projection 97 to engage the underside surface of the annular ridge 98 to help maintain and insure that the hose-connector 80a will remain in its secured position within the conduit inlet 60c.

Reference is now made to FIGS. 14 and 16 wherein there is shown the mounting frame 103 which comprises two identical frame sides 104, which as shown are angle irons. The frame sides 104 are secured in parallel relation by means of the identical end brackets 105 by any suitable means such as by fasteners in the form of a rivet indicated at 106. It should be noted that the frame sides 104 are provided with a plurality of identically spaced slots, one set of slots being provided in the front face 106 of each frame side 104 and another set of slots being provided in the side face 107 of each of the frame sides 104. The slots 108 in the front face 106 of each of the frame sides 104 are elongated slots, their longitudinal extent being in the vertical direction. On the other hand, the slots 110 in the side faces 107 of each of the frame sides 104 are elongated with their longitudinal extent in a horizontal direction. Also, final securement holes 111 are provided in each of the side faces 107, the purpose of which will be explained hereinafter.

The manner of installing the wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit is a relatively simple task because of the employment of the mounting frame 103 and particularly with the provision of the elongated slots 108 and 110 in the front faces 106 and in the side faces 107, respectively, of the frame sides 104. In this connection, the unique manner and method of installing the unit 10 is accomplished as follows in an existing building structure.

As shown in FIG. 16, an opening 112 is prepared in the wall 113 of sufficient size to receive the rearward portions of the unit 10 with the peripheral flange 14b covering the entire opening 112. In order to insure complete coverage of the wall opening 112 as well as proper alignment of the mounting frame 103 relative to the unit 10, particularly the main support frame 14, the mounting frame 103 may be temporarily mounted to the main support frame 14 by means of employing fasteners through the openings 34 in the peripheral flange 14b, which fasteners extend through each of the elongated slots 108 wherein the fasteners are properly secured with corresponding fastening devices. Thus, the mounting frame 103 may be relatively adjusted upwardly or downwardly relative to the main support frame peripheral flange 14b as indicated by the arrow 114 in FIG. 14 to insure proper opening coverage as well as proper alignment between the respective frames.

The mounting frame 103 is then by itself mounted within the opening 112 wherein one side frame 104 is fastened to the stud 115 while the other frame side 104 is fastened to the stud 116 by use of the shims 117 in order to dimensionally match the mounting frame 103. In securing the mounting frame 103 within the opening 112 to the studs as disclosed in FIG. 16, it should be noted that fasteners such as ordinary nails may be applied through the openings 110 in the side faces 107. However, these nails are not completely set into the studs their full extent in order to allow adjustment of the mounting frame within the wall opening 112 as indicated by arrow 118 in FIG. 6 to compensate for wall thickness indicated by the arrow 119 in FIG. 16 and also insure flush engagement of the rear surfaces of the peripheral flange 14b of the main support frame 14 relative to the wall surface upon final installation.

The mounting frame 103 can then be finally secured in position with the use of fasteners, such as screws or nails, as applied through the openings 111 in the side faces 107 of the frame sides 104. Also, any further adjustment of the mounting frame 103 relative to the main support frame 14 can be accomplished by adjusting the securing fasteners along the length of the elongated slots 108 if necessary.

After the unit is installed, the front cover shell 18 can be removed for purposes of connecting the wiring 54.

While other wall mounted vacuum cleaner units of the prior art may providefor an exhaust conduit relative to the exhaust from motor 38, unit 10 of the present inventionmerely provides for the motor exhaust to be expelled through the grid 16b into the inner chambers of the wall structure of the building. In this connection, one or more openings 120 can be provided in the floor plate 128 (or in the ceiling plate) of the wall chamber to permitthe exhaust air to escape into other various wall chambers of the building structure or to escape into an attic, basement or other crawl space. In any event, if desirable, an exhaust conduit vent can be provided for connection at the point of the exhaust grid 16b.

From the foregoing, it can readily be seen that a wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit is provided which is not only aesthetically attractive, but also minimizes to a greater extent the wear imposed on the hose assembly attached to the hose receptacle of such units while making it easier for the user to manipulate the hose as sembly by having the hose connector and the connected hose directed from the hose receptacle immediately to the floor so that there is no substantial weight or force either due to the weight of the hose or the force that is applied by the user in using the hose assembly during cleaning purposes as compared in the case where such receptacles are flush with the wall with the hose connector extending horizontally therefrom and out into the room and, thus, rendering it an obstruction. Also, it should be appreciated that the vacuum cleaner unit is not only compact but also is provided with a minimum of assembly involving largely only four pieces which are releasably connected to gether in a quick and simple fashion to simplify manufacture and later inspection and repair.

The foregoing description, of course, sets forth the preferred embodiment of this invention, and in order to do so, specific terminology must be employed. In this connection, it should be noted that when using specific terminology in describing the preferred embodiment, it is intended only in the generic or descriptive sense and not for any purpose of limiting the scope of the invention as defined in the claims.

I claim:

1. A wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit comprising a multi-piece assembly consisting of a main support frame havingan integral lower rearwardly projecting cover shell defining a front opening to form a receptacle compartment and having a peripheral flange for flush engagement with a wall surface having an opening into which said unit is inserted, an outwardly protruding front cover shell mounted on said frame and having a downwardly oriented bottom surface extending forwardly beyond the plane of said peripheral flange, a hose receptacle mounted in said bottom surface, a rearwardly protruding rear cover shell mounted on said frame in opposite and opposed relation to said front cover shell, said front and rear cover shells forming a vacuum power compartment, and. a front access door for hermetically sealed engagement with said receptacle compartment opening.

2. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 1 characterized by conduit means in said power compartment with its tubular ends in communication with said receptacle compartment and said hose receptacle, respectively.

3. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 2 characterized by an L-shaped inlet included in said conduit means, one end of which extends downwardly for communication with said hose receptacle.

4. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 1 characterized in that said front cover shell bottom surface is in a plane substantially perpendicular to the plane of said main support frame periphery flange.

5. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 1 characterized by an outwardly disposed flange for the length of the perimetral edge of said receptacle compartment opening, a corresponding closed loop groove on the inside surface of said access door, a resilient gasket member in said groove to provide for hermetic sealing of said receptacle compartment upon engagement with said outwardly disposed flange.

6. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 5 characterized in that said gasket comprises a tubular resilient material.

7. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 5 characterized in that said groove and gasket are provided on said receptacle compartment opening perimetral edge whereas said outwardly disposed flange is provided on said access door inside surface.

8. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 1 characterized by a pair of tongues on the bottom edge of said access door, a pair of corresponding slots in the bottom portion of said main support frame peripheral flange to receive said tongues, and an outwardly extended projection on opposite sides of said access door, corresponding slots in the side portions of said main support frame peripheral flange to receive said projections to releasably engage said door relative to said receptacle compartment opening.

9. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 1 characterized in that said front and rear cover shells are fastened to said main support frame by means of cooperative extended tabs and slots respectively on said shells and said frame and secured into position with fastening means.

10. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 9 characterized by the provision of fasteners to releasably secure said shells to said main support frame.

11. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 1 characterized in that said front and rear cover shells are provided with extended tabs to secure said cover shells to said main frame support through the aid of fastening means.

12. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 1 characterized by a mounting frame to which said main support frame is secured, said mounting frame including two frame sides, each having a front face and a side face, a plurality of elongated slots provided in said faces, fastening means for securing said main support frame to said mounting frame and for mounting said mounting frame to said wall through said elongated slots, said elongated slots to permit initial selective directional adjustment and orientation when mounting said mounting frame in an opening in a wall and when securing said main support frame to said mounting frame.

13. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 12 characterized in that said plurality of slots in said side faces are elongated in a horizontal direction to permit inward and outward initial adjustment of said mounting frame relative to the surface of the wall and said plurality of slots in said front faces are elongated in a vertical direction to permit upward and downward initial adjustment of said main support frame relative to said mounting frame.

14. A wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit comprising a housing means forming a receptacle compartment and a power compartment and including a front cover shell for said power compartment and an access door for said receptacle compartment, said front cover shell projecting outwardly forming a downwardly oriented bottom surface, a hose receptacle mounted in said bottom surface and not normally visible when said unit is mounted into a wall since said bottom surface is below eye level, motor and vacuum pump means in said power compartment communicant with said receptacle compartment, and conduit means having one end portion communicant with said receptacle compartment and its other end portion disposed downwardly within said front cover shell and communicant with said hose receptacle.

15. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 14 characterized in that said conduit means includes a vertical section in said power compartment with its lower end portion communicant with said receptacle compartment, and an L-shaped section in said power compartment having one end connected directly into said vertical section and its other end disposed downwardly to be communicant with said hose receptacle.

16. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 15 characterized in that the upper end portion of said vertical section extends upwardly beyond the point of connection of said L-shaped section and out of said power compartment.

17. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 14 characterized in that said hose receptacle includes a female inlet, a male hose connector of a hose assembly receivable in said female inlet, said hose connector having an annular ridge on its forward end portion, a spring biased flap pivotally secured to said inlet adapted to close said inlet, an outwardly extended projection on the underside surface of said flap to engage under said hose connector annular ridge upon insertion of said hose connector into said inlet.

18. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 14 characterized by a batting positioned at the point of communication between said motor and vacuum pump and said receptacle compartment.

19. A wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit comprising: housing means forming a receptacle compartment and a power compartment; said housing means including a front cover shell over said power compartment, and an access door over said receptacle compartment; said front cover shell projecting outwardly and having a downwardly oriented underside surface defining a hose receptacle not normally visible when said unit is mounted into a wall since said bottom surface is below eye level; motor and vacuum pump means in said power compartment communicant with said receptacle compartment; and conduit means having a main generally vertical portion and a portion communicant with said receptacle compartment and having a communicating generally L-shaped inlet end at said hose receptacle.

20. A wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit comprising: housing means forming a lower receptacle compartment and an upper power compartment, said housing means being composed of a main support member, a rear power compartment cover shell, a front power compartment cover shell, and a receptacle compartment access door; said main support member having a peripheral wall engagement frame and a lower rear cover shell enclosing the back of said receptacle compartment; said rear power compartment shall being secured to said main support member above said lower rear cover shell; said front power compartment shell being secured to said main support in a position opposite said rear power compartment shell and projecting outwardly from the plane of said support members thereby defining a downwardly oriented underside surface, a hose receptacle in said underside surface, said door being releasably connected to said main support member below said front power compartment shell and opposite said main support lower rear shell; motor and vacuum pump means in said power compartment, the latter having an air inlet communicant with said receptacle compartment; conduit means in said power compartment having a main generally vertical portion and having one communicating generally L-shaped portion extending peripherally beyond the remainder of said housing means to enable said rear power compartment shell and said lower rear shell to be behind a wall and to enable said front power compartment shell and said access door to be in front of the wall, when said unit is mounted.

Claims (20)

1. A wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit comprising a multi-piece assembly consisting of a main support frame having an integral lower rearwardly projecting cover shell defining a front opening to form a receptacle compartment and having a peripheral flange for flush engagement with a wall surface having an opening into which said unit is inserted, an outwardly protruding front cover shell mounted on said frame and having a downwardly oriented bottom surface extending forwardly beyond the plane of said peripheral flange, a hose receptacle mounted in said bottom surface, a rearwardly protruding rear cover shell mounted on said frame in opposite and opposed relation to said front cover shell, said front and rear cover shells fOrming a vacuum power compartment, and a front access door for hermetically sealed engagement with said receptacle compartment opening.
2. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 1 characterized by conduit means in said power compartment with its tubular ends in communication with said receptacle compartment and said hose receptacle, respectively.
3. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 2 characterized by an L-shaped inlet included in said conduit means, one end of which extends downwardly for communication with said hose receptacle.
4. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 1 characterized in that said front cover shell bottom surface is in a plane substantially perpendicular to the plane of said main support frame periphery flange.
5. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 1 characterized by an outwardly disposed flange for the length of the perimetral edge of said receptacle compartment opening, a corresponding closed loop groove on the inside surface of said access door, a resilient gasket member in said groove to provide for hermetic sealing of said receptacle compartment upon engagement with said outwardly disposed flange.
6. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 5 characterized in that said gasket comprises a tubular resilient material.
7. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 5 characterized in that said groove and gasket are provided on said receptacle compartment opening perimetral edge whereas said outwardly disposed flange is provided on said access door inside surface.
8. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 1 characterized by a pair of tongues on the bottom edge of said access door, a pair of corresponding slots in the bottom portion of said main support frame peripheral flange to receive said tongues, and an outwardly extended projection on opposite sides of said access door, corresponding slots in the side portions of said main support frame peripheral flange to receive said projections to releasably engage said door relative to said receptacle compartment opening.
9. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 1 characterized in that said front and rear cover shells are fastened to said main support frame by means of cooperative extended tabs and slots respectively on said shells and said frame and secured into position with fastening means.
10. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 9 characterized by the provision of fasteners to releasably secure said shells to said main support frame.
11. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 1 characterized in that said front and rear cover shells are provided with extended tabs to secure said cover shells to said main frame support through the aid of fastening means.
12. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 1 characterized by a mounting frame to which said main support frame is secured, said mounting frame including two frame sides, each having a front face and a side face, a plurality of elongated slots provided in said faces, fastening means for securing said main support frame to said mounting frame and for mounting said mounting frame to said wall through said elongated slots, said elongated slots to permit initial selective directional adjustment and orientation when mounting said mounting frame in an opening in a wall and when securing said main support frame to said mounting frame.
13. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 12 characterized in that said plurality of slots in said side faces are elongated in a horizontal direction to permit inward and outward initial adjustment of said mounting frame relative to the surface of the wall and said plurality of slots in said front faces are elongated in a vertical direction to permit upward and downward initial adjustment of said main support frame relative to said mounting frame.
14. A wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit comprising a housing means forming a receptacle compartment and a power compartment and including a froNt cover shell for said power compartment and an access door for said receptacle compartment, said front cover shell projecting outwardly forming a downwardly oriented bottom surface, a hose receptacle mounted in said bottom surface and not normally visible when said unit is mounted into a wall since said bottom surface is below eye level, motor and vacuum pump means in said power compartment communicant with said receptacle compartment, and conduit means having one end portion communicant with said receptacle compartment and its other end portion disposed downwardly within said front cover shell and communicant with said hose receptacle.
15. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 14 characterized in that said conduit means includes a vertical section in said power compartment with its lower end portion communicant with said receptacle compartment, and an L-shaped section in said power compartment having one end connected directly into said vertical section and its other end disposed downwardly to be communicant with said hose receptacle.
16. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 15 characterized in that the upper end portion of said vertical section extends upwardly beyond the point of connection of said L-shaped section and out of said power compartment.
17. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 14 characterized in that said hose receptacle includes a female inlet, a male hose connector of a hose assembly receivable in said female inlet, said hose connector having an annular ridge on its forward end portion, a spring biased flap pivotally secured to said inlet adapted to close said inlet, an outwardly extended projection on the underside surface of said flap to engage under said hose connector annular ridge upon insertion of said hose connector into said inlet.
18. The wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit of claim 14 characterized by a batting positioned at the point of communication between said motor and vacuum pump and said receptacle compartment.
19. A wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit comprising: housing means forming a receptacle compartment and a power compartment; said housing means including a front cover shell over said power compartment, and an access door over said receptacle compartment; said front cover shell projecting outwardly and having a downwardly oriented underside surface defining a hose receptacle not normally visible when said unit is mounted into a wall since said bottom surface is below eye level; motor and vacuum pump means in said power compartment communicant with said receptacle compartment; and conduit means having a main generally vertical portion and a portion communicant with said receptacle compartment and having a communicating generally L-shaped inlet end at said hose receptacle.
20. A wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit comprising: housing means forming a lower receptacle compartment and an upper power compartment, said housing means being composed of a main support member, a rear power compartment cover shell, a front power compartment cover shell, and a receptacle compartment access door; said main support member having a peripheral wall engagement frame and a lower rear cover shell enclosing the back of said receptacle compartment; said rear power compartment shall being secured to said main support member above said lower rear cover shell; said front power compartment shell being secured to said main support in a position opposite said rear power compartment shell and projecting outwardly from the plane of said support members thereby defining a downwardly oriented underside surface, a hose receptacle in said underside surface, said door being releasably connected to said main support member below said front power compartment shell and opposite said main support lower rear shell; motor and vacuum pump means in said power compartment, the latter having an air inlet communicant with said receptacle compartment; conduit means in said power compartment having a main generally vertical portiOn and having one communicating generally L-shaped portion extending peripherally beyond the remainder of said housing means to enable said rear power compartment shell and said lower rear shell to be behind a wall and to enable said front power compartment shell and said access door to be in front of the wall, when said unit is mounted.
US3783472D 1972-01-14 1972-01-14 Wall mounted vacuum cleaner unit and method of installation Expired - Lifetime US3783472A (en)

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WO1997048324A1 (en) * 1996-06-21 1997-12-24 Vacs America, Inc. Free standing central vacuum system
US6158080A (en) * 1999-01-04 2000-12-12 Schlapkohl; Peter Ultra-compact recessed wall mounted vacuum cleaner
US20020178536A1 (en) * 2001-05-31 2002-12-05 Guido Valentini Appliance for the vacuum cleaning of dusty material and similar
WO2004112559A1 (en) * 2003-06-23 2004-12-29 Tecnoplus S.R.L. Built-in vacuum cleaning box with air outside discharge
US20060196002A1 (en) * 2005-03-04 2006-09-07 Peter Schlapkohl Ultra-compact recessed wall mounted vacuum cleaner
US20070158443A1 (en) * 2006-01-11 2007-07-12 Patrick Boudreau Ventilator Device For Dehumidification
US9237832B2 (en) 2012-05-31 2016-01-19 Ivd Global Corporation Illuminated inlet for vacuum cleaning apparatus
US9254070B2 (en) 2012-05-31 2016-02-09 Ivd Global Corporation Inlet for vacuum cleaning apparatus
USD785255S1 (en) * 2015-05-15 2017-04-25 Ivd Global Corporation Wall mounted vacuum cleaner

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WO1997048324A1 (en) * 1996-06-21 1997-12-24 Vacs America, Inc. Free standing central vacuum system
US6158080A (en) * 1999-01-04 2000-12-12 Schlapkohl; Peter Ultra-compact recessed wall mounted vacuum cleaner
US20020178536A1 (en) * 2001-05-31 2002-12-05 Guido Valentini Appliance for the vacuum cleaning of dusty material and similar
US7069618B2 (en) * 2001-05-31 2006-07-04 Guido Valentini Appliance for the vacuum cleaning of dusty material and similar
WO2004112559A1 (en) * 2003-06-23 2004-12-29 Tecnoplus S.R.L. Built-in vacuum cleaning box with air outside discharge
US20060150359A1 (en) * 2003-06-23 2006-07-13 Giancarlo Plebani Built-in vacuum cleaning box with air outside discharge
US20060196002A1 (en) * 2005-03-04 2006-09-07 Peter Schlapkohl Ultra-compact recessed wall mounted vacuum cleaner
US7581281B2 (en) 2005-03-04 2009-09-01 Peter Schlapkohl Ultra-compact recessed wall mounted vacuum cleaner
WO2006096309A3 (en) * 2005-03-04 2007-11-29 Peter Schlapkohl Improved ultra-compact recessed wall mounted vacuum cleaner
US20070158443A1 (en) * 2006-01-11 2007-07-12 Patrick Boudreau Ventilator Device For Dehumidification
US9237832B2 (en) 2012-05-31 2016-01-19 Ivd Global Corporation Illuminated inlet for vacuum cleaning apparatus
US9254070B2 (en) 2012-05-31 2016-02-09 Ivd Global Corporation Inlet for vacuum cleaning apparatus
USD785255S1 (en) * 2015-05-15 2017-04-25 Ivd Global Corporation Wall mounted vacuum cleaner

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