US3763736A - Electrical pickup for guitar and combination - Google Patents

Electrical pickup for guitar and combination Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3763736A
US3763736A US3763736DA US3763736A US 3763736 A US3763736 A US 3763736A US 3763736D A US3763736D A US 3763736DA US 3763736 A US3763736 A US 3763736A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
body
legs
pickup
neck
microphone
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
C Williams
Original Assignee
C Williams
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by C Williams filed Critical C Williams
Priority to US32971173A priority Critical
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3763736A publication Critical patent/US3763736A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10HELECTROPHONIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
    • G10H3/00Instruments in which the tones are generated by electromechanical means
    • G10H3/12Instruments in which the tones are generated by electromechanical means using mechanical resonant generators, e.g. strings or percussive instruments, the tones of which are picked up by electromechanical transducers, the electrical signals being further manipulated or amplified and subsequently converted to sound by a loudspeaker or equivalent instrument
    • G10H3/14Instruments in which the tones are generated by electromechanical means using mechanical resonant generators, e.g. strings or percussive instruments, the tones of which are picked up by electromechanical transducers, the electrical signals being further manipulated or amplified and subsequently converted to sound by a loudspeaker or equivalent instrument using mechanically actuated vibrators with pick-up means
    • G10H3/18Instruments in which the tones are generated by electromechanical means using mechanical resonant generators, e.g. strings or percussive instruments, the tones of which are picked up by electromechanical transducers, the electrical signals being further manipulated or amplified and subsequently converted to sound by a loudspeaker or equivalent instrument using mechanically actuated vibrators with pick-up means using a string, e.g. electric guitar
    • G10H3/181Details of pick-up assemblies

Abstract

An electrical pickup for a classical guitar, adapted to straddle the strings adjacent the neck and to be supported on the sound table at points adjacent opposite lateral sides of the heel, with the microphone portion of the pickup extending over said strings at a location approximately midway between the nut and bridge. A quick releasable securing element on the pickup is in releasable engagement with and extending below the neck, and also with the table along an edge of the hole, releasably holds the pickup in the aforesaid position on the guitar, and a jack on the pickup electrically connected with the microphone provides for a detachable jack plug that is connected with an amplifier. The guitar itself is not altered in any manner to apply or remove the pickup.

Description

ite States Patent [191 Williams [451 @ct.9,l973

[ ELECTRICAL PICKUP FOR GUITAR AND COMBINATION Filed: Feb. 5, 1973 Appl. No.2 329,711

US. Cl. 84/329, 84/l.l5 Int. Cl. Gl0h 3/00 Field of Search 84/l.l4-1.l6, 329

[56] References Cited UNlTED STATES PATENTS 2,725,778 12/1955 Cronwell 84/l.l6 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 354,301 8/1931 Great Britain 84/l.l5

Primary Examiner-Richard B. Wilkinson Assistant Examiner-U. Weldon Att0rneyMark Mohler et al.

[5 7] ABSTRACT An electrical pickup for a classical guitar, adapted to straddle the strings adjacent the neck and to be supported on the sound table at points adjacent opposite lateral sides of the heel, with the microphone portion of the pickup extending over said strings at a location approximately midway between the nut and bridge. A quick releasable securing element on the pickup is in releasable engagement with and extending below the neck, and also with the table along an edge of the hole, releasably holds the pickup in the aforesaid position on the guitar, and a jack on the pickup electrically connected with the microphone provides for a detachable jack plug that is connected with an amplitier. The guitar itself is not altered in any manner to apply or remove the pickup.

7 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures ELECTRICAL PICKUP FOR GUITAR AND COMBINATIUN SUMMARY The employment of electrical pickups of electromechanical transducers, in which the coil of an electrical conductor around a magnet, or pole pieces, comprises the microphone portion for connection with an amplifier to amplify the sound from the guitar, is old. Such pickups merely convert the vibrations of the guitar strings into electrical symbols.

l leretofore such pickups have been incorporated in electrical guitars, or have been installed on classical guitars, the latter type being guitars of the conventional type antedating the advent of electrical guitars, and which may be used with or without an electrical pickup. However such pickup attachments have heretofore been positioned between the strings and the sound table, and in many instances in a position extending across the hole in the sound table. Also the pickups have been supported on portions of the sound table well spaced from the sides or bouts, and the guitar has been altered by forming a hole or holes for passage of the amplifier cord.

The attachments above described usually necessitate a modification of the guitar, and the sound quality of the guitar, and volume are impaired due to the contact with the sound table at a point or points where the table should be free from any impairment of its natural resonance.

Another objection to conventional pickups heretofore available is the difficulty of attaching and removing them from a classical guitar. Heretofore the time involved in merely attaching an electrical pickup to a classical guitar may take from approximately 15 minutes to several hours. This timeis too long for professional players, in particular, where quick removal of the pickup and reattachment are desired, and where time and the highest quality of amplified and unamplified sound are desired from the same guitar at different times.

One of the objects of the invention is the provision of an electrical pickup that is free from the objections hereinabove mentioned.

Another specific object of the invention is the provision of an electrical pickup that may be attached to and removed from a classical guitar within several seconds of time, and which pickup and attaching means does not mar or injure such guitar, and no alteration whatsoever of the guitar is required.

An added object of the invention is the provision of an electrical pickup that is more economical to make than heretofore, and which pickup may remain on the guitar when not connected with an amplifier, without impairing the natural resonance of the table of the guitar.

A still futher object of the invention is the provision of an electrical pickup for a guitar, that is adapted to be supported in a position on the body of the guitar closely adjacent the heel of the neck, and the microphone of which pickup will extend over and transversely across and above the strings at the heel and in which position it will be approximately midway between the bridge and nut; and an added object is the combination of such electrical pickup and a guitar.

Other objects and advantages will appear in the description and drawings.

DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS FIG. 11 is a top plan view of the body and part of the neck (including the nut adjacent the peg head) showing the pickup in a position on a classical round hole guitar.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged cross-sectional view along line 2-2 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged cross-sectional view along line 3-- 3 of FIG. ll.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the pickup of FIG. I separate from a guitar, with the bail in closed position.

FIG. 5 is a top plan view of the body and part of the neck of an f-hole guitar.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a modification of the device of FIG. 4.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Referring to FIG. 4, which shows the pickup separate from the guitar, the main body of the pickup, which includes the microphone, is a horizontally elongated body generally designated ll carrying the microphone portion 2 (FIG. 2) therein extending longitudinally thereof, which microphone in itself is conventional in that it comprises either a horizontally elongated magnetic core within the winding of a conductor, which core is adapted to extend the width of the group of strings, or magnetic, separate, adjustable pole pieces respectively spaced to be opposed to each pair of strings when the body 11 is in a position extending transversely across the strings of the guitar. The conductor around the core or separate pole pieces, is connected with a jack 3 (FIG. 2) that, in turn, may be connected with the conventional amplifier by a releasable jack plug 4 on the amplifier cord 5. Either of such microphone portions for guitars are old and commercially available.

In the present instance, the pickup body may be of plastic within which the microphone portion 2 is positioned, which body includes legs 6, 7 (H68. 2, 3) projecting to one side of body ll from the ends of the latter.

Legs s, 7 project the same distance from the ends of the body of the pickup, and their terminal outer ends have flat faces adapted to seat against the sound table 8 of the guitar closely adjacent the portion 9 of heel 10 (FIG. 3) that is on the neck II of the guitar. This portion 9 is the portion that is within the main body of the guitar and the upper bout or side 12 of the guitar at each side of the heel extends across the outer side of said heel portion 9 into vertical recesses H3 in the sides of the heel wherein the terminating end edges of the upper bout are secured. The portion 114 (FIG. 3) of the heel 10 that is outside the bout H2 relative to the inside of the guitar body is usually somewhat conical in horizontal cross-sectional contour (FIG. ll) having a rounded apex I5 (FIG. 1-3) facing away from the body, the portion 14 being progressively less in its cross-sectional dimensions as it projects downwardly from the neck III (FIG. 3).

The above structure is formed in most, if not all, clas sical guitars.

Classical guitars of the round hole type have a round hole 16 formed in the table 8 and across which the strings I7 extend. The strings extend from the peg head at the outer end of the neck ll 11 across a transverse ridge or nut 1 over and longitudinally of the fret-carrying fingerboard 1% that is on the upper side of the neck II to and across the bridge saddle to string-securing pegs adjacent the bridge.

The fingerboard 19 normally terminates at one end adjacent hole 16.

With the legs 6, 7 of the pickup 1 supported on the table approximately at the upper bout 12 and adjacent the opposite sides of the portion 9 of heel 14, the natural resonance of the sound table itself is not impaired.

'Legs 6, 7 are of a length to support the microphone portion 2 spaced above and extending across the strings 17 when the legs support the pickup in the above position.

The preferred attachment for holding the pickup in its above position, comprises a spring wire generally designated 23 (FIGS. 1, 4) a length of which extends generally longitudinally of the neck 11 and finger board and transversely across the upper surface of the body of pickup 1 adjacent leg 7, said upper surface being recesses at 24 (FIG. 2) for 'rotatably and slidably receiving said wire and securing it to said body. A bearing cap 24' may be releasably secured by screws or by any other suitable means across the recess 24 and the portion of the wire therebelow.

The forward portion of wire 23 (FIGS. 1, 4) is the portion 25 adapted to extend from the pickup body over the table 8, and said portion has a hook 26 at its terminal forward end that is adapted to extend across and engage the marginal portion of hole 16 at one side of the set of strings 17.

The length of the forward portion 25 of the spring wire, such as piano wire for example, is such that the hook 26 may readily be manually sprung inwardly relative to opening 16 to engage the edge of the opening when the pickup is secured in its operating position and sprung away to release the pickup.

The rearward portion 27 (FIG. 4) of the wire 23 (FIG. 4) comprises a bail extending generally downwardly, when the guitar is horizontal, in the form of a U, having legs 29, 30 and a cross element 31 connecting the outer ends of the legs.

The leg 30 terminates in an outwardly projecting, pointed, end portion 32 (FIG. 2) that is adapted to engage the inner lateral side of a rearward projection 33 (FIGS. 3, 4) of leg 6 and to hold the bail closed. The leg 30 will be formed to normally spring outwardly relative to leg 29 andv must be swung inwardly against the resiliency of the wire to position the pointed end portion 32 between the legs 6, 7 for springing outwardly with the pointed end of portion 32 in holding engagement with the leg 6. This structure enables the bail to accomodate itself to slightly different variations in the dimensions of the depending forward end of neck 11 that forms part of the heel.

The cross element 31 on the bail has an arcuately formed intermediate portion 34 that is rubber covered, and in the concave side of which the rounded edge of the portion 14 of the neck is adapted to engage.

In operation, the pickup body may quickly be clamped onto the guitar in its desired position, as seen in FIG. 1, by swinging the bail 28 from open position to closed position with the portion 34 of the bail snugly against the portion 14 of the neck and then springing the hook 26 into engagement with the edge of hole 16.

The longitudinal slidability of the portion 25 of the clamps relative to the body of the pickup element, enables the clamp to adjust itself to slight variations in the position of hole 16 relative to the upper bout, and to variations in the diameters of the holes.

The portion 23 may, of course, be forceably bent to enable the clamp to accomodate itself to the wider variations, without altering its manner of operation. In the case of the f-hole guitars, the structure is the same with the exception that the forward length 34 of the wire clamp (corresponding to portion 23 in FIG. 1) is longer and may be bent toward the f-opening 35 into which hook 36 isto be engaged.

The modification shown in FIG. 6 substitutes an elastic band 38 for the bail 28, one end of which is adapted to be secured to one leg 39 of the pickup body, while the other leg carries a projection 40 adapted to selectively receive one of the openings 41 in the other end of the hand. A spring wire 42 similar to the length 23 of the wire clamp shown in FIG. 1, may slidably extend through the plastic body of the pickup and be secured in adjusted position against longitudinal and rotary movement by a set screw 43. If desired a pair of such wires may be used, by an additional wire 44 similarly supported and secured to the pickup.

Each wire is formed with a hook 45 at its outer end for yieldable engagement with the edge and marginal portion of the hole in the sound table.

In both forms of the invention, the microphone portion of the pickup is a position spaced above the guitar strings in a location for responding to the vibrations of the strings and to the unimpaired resonance of the sound table as transmitted to the heel-supported marginal portion of the sound table. The combination of string and wood vibrations provides a superior amplified sound, both in quality and volume, and the player may almost instantly remove the pickup and replace it.

The quick detachable jack plug elimintes any likelihood of damage to the guitar should the amplifier cord be accidentally jerked by someone tripping over it.

It is understood that the term classical guitar" refers to accoustical guitars which derive their tones from the wood and strings that respond to an electrical pickup.

I claim:

1. An electrical pickup for a stringed musical instrument, such as a guitar, having a main body with a sound table with a hole therein; a neck projecting from one side of said body and secured at one end thereto by a heel; and a row of parallel tensioned strings respectively extending longitudinally from the other end of said neck over the latter to a bridge secured on said sound table in a position spaced within the bounds of its edges, comprising:

a. a horizontally elongated body including a pair of legs respectively at each of the ends thereof projecting to one side;

b. said legs being spaced apart a distance greater than the width .of said set of strings, and of lengths to support the portion between said legs in operative position spaced above said set of strings when the terminal outer end surfaces of said legs are against said table;

c. a microphone carried by said portion extending between said legs facing and spaced over each of the strings of said row when said portion is supported by said legs in said position; and

d. means for holding said terminal end surfaces against said sound table at points thereon adjacent the heel of the neck of said instruments; and

e. means for connecting said microphone with an amplifier.

2. In a pickup as defined in claim 1:

f. said means for holding including an elongated member extending from and connected with the ends of said body and adapted to extnd below the neck of such instrument adjacent said heel in bolding relation when said portion of the body between said legs is supported by the latter in said operative position.

3. in an electrical pickup as defined in claim 2:

g. said means for holding further including an elongated, resilient element, connected at one end with said body and adapted to extend therefrom to the edge of the hole in said sound table when said portion between said legs is supported by said legs in said operative position; and

h. table engaging means on the opposite end of said elongated element adapted to extend across the edge of such opening and to yieldably engage said edge and the marginal portion of the sound table along said edge when said elongated member is in said holding relation.

4. In an electrical pickup as defined in claim 3:

i. said elongated member being in the form of a bail,

one end of which is integral with and in continuation of said elongated element adjacent one of the legs of said body, and said bail and elongated member being rotatably carried on said body for swinging the other end of said bail about the juncture between said elongated element, and for rotation of said table engaging means; and

j. means on said other end of said bail for releasably engaging the other leg of said body at different points when said bail is closed.

5. In an electrical pickup device as defined in claim k. said bail and said elongated element being a continuous length of spring wire, and said table engaging means being a hook adapted to extend across the edge of said opening when said bail and said elongated element are in body holding position with the portion of said body between said legs in said operative position.

6. In combination with a classical guitar having a main body provided with a sound table having a hole therein; an elongated neck projecting from one side of said body; a heel below said sound table at one edge thereof connecting one end of said neck with said body; a row of strings in spaced relation extending over and longitudinally of said neck from the outer end of the latter to a bridge on said sound table:

a. an electrical pickup including a microphone and an amplifier cord for connecting said microphone with an amplifier;

b. supporting means for supporting said microphone on said sound table in a position spaced over said row of strings at said heel;

c. and holding means for holding said microphone on said guitar in said position.

7. In the combination as defined in claim 6:

d. said supporting means including a microphone support having a pair of legs respectively adjacent each of the end strings of said row in engagement with said sound table at points adjacent said heel; said holding means including an elongated member connected with said microphone support adjacent said legs extending below said neck at said heel, and an elongated element connected with said microphone support and extending to said hole, and table engaging means on said elongated element in releasable engagement with said sound table at said hole.

Claims (7)

1. An electrical pickup for a stringed musical instrument, such as a guitar, having a main body with a sound table with a hole therein; a neck projecting from one side of said body and secured at one end thereto by a heel; and a row of parallel tensioned strings respectively extending longitudinally from the other end of said neck over the latter to a bridge secured on said sound table in a position spaced within the bounds of its edges, comprising: a. a horizontally elongated body including a pair of legs respectively at each of the ends thereof projecting to one side; b. said legs being spaced apart a distance greater than the width of said set of strings, and of lengths to support the portion between said legs in operative position spaced above said set of strings when the terminal outer end surfaces of said legs are against said table; c. a microphone carried by said portion extending between said legs facing and spaced over each of the strings of said row when said portion is supported by said legs in said position; and d. means for holding said terminal end surfaces against said sound table at points thereon adjacent the heel of the neck of said instruments; and e. means for connecting said microphone with an amplifier.
2. In a pickup as defined in claim 1: f. said means for holding including an elongated member extending from and connected with the ends of said body and adapted to extend below the neck of such instrument adjacent said heel in holding relation when said portion of the body between said legs is supported by the latter in said operative position.
3. In an electrical pickup as defined in claim 2: g. said means for holding further including an elongated, resilient element, connected at one end with said body and adapted to extend therefrom to the edge of the hole in said sound table when said portion between said legs is supported by said legs in said operative position; and h. table engaging means on the opposite end of said elongated element adapted to extend across the edge of such opening and to yieldably engage said edge and the marginal portion of the sound table along said edge when said elongated member is in said holding relation.
4. In an electrical pickup as defined in claim 3: i. said elongated member being in the form of a bail, one end of which is integral with and in continuation of said elongated element adjacent one of the legs of said body, and said bail and elongated member being rotatably carried on said body for swinging the other end of said bail about the juncture between said elongated element, and for rotation of said table engaging means; and j. means on said other end of said bail for releasably engaging the other leg of said body at different points when said bail is closed.
5. In an electrical pickup device as defined in claim 4: k. said bail and said elongated element being a continuous length of spring wire, aNd said table engaging means being a hook adapted to extend across the edge of said opening when said bail and said elongated element are in body holding position with the portion of said body between said legs in said operative position.
6. In combination with a classical guitar having a main body provided with a sound table having a hole therein; an elongated neck projecting from one side of said body; a heel below said sound table at one edge thereof connecting one end of said neck with said body; a row of strings in spaced relation extending over and longitudinally of said neck from the outer end of the latter to a bridge on said sound table: a. an electrical pickup including a microphone and an amplifier cord for connecting said microphone with an amplifier; b. supporting means for supporting said microphone on said sound table in a position spaced over said row of strings at said heel; c. and holding means for holding said microphone on said guitar in said position.
7. In the combination as defined in claim 6: d. said supporting means including a microphone support having a pair of legs respectively adjacent each of the end strings of said row in engagement with said sound table at points adjacent said heel; e. said holding means including an elongated member connected with said microphone support adjacent said legs extending below said neck at said heel, and an elongated element connected with said microphone support and extending to said hole, and table engaging means on said elongated element in releasable engagement with said sound table at said hole.
US3763736D 1973-02-05 1973-02-05 Electrical pickup for guitar and combination Expired - Lifetime US3763736A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US32971173A true 1973-02-05 1973-02-05

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3763736A true US3763736A (en) 1973-10-09

Family

ID=23286657

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3763736D Expired - Lifetime US3763736A (en) 1973-02-05 1973-02-05 Electrical pickup for guitar and combination

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3763736A (en)

Cited By (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3869952A (en) * 1974-03-20 1975-03-11 Horace N Rowe Pickup mount for stringed musical instruments
US4075921A (en) * 1975-07-14 1978-02-28 Heet Gregory S String instrument vibration initiator and sustainer
US4887506A (en) * 1986-04-11 1989-12-19 Noma Video Inc. Stringed musical instrument with magnetic pickups
DE4332972A1 (en) * 1993-09-28 1994-09-22 Lars Gunnar Liebchen Guitar with step neck and additional strings and also additional pickups
US6031166A (en) * 1999-03-01 2000-02-29 Petrarca; Anthony I. Strap assembly for supporting an instrument on a person's body
US6046393A (en) * 1999-01-28 2000-04-04 Rose; Floyd D. Stringed instrument having a replaceable head stock
US6046397A (en) * 1999-01-28 2000-04-04 Rose; Floyd D. Stringed instrument having a mechanical control assembly for slidable pick-up
US6051773A (en) * 1999-01-28 2000-04-18 Rose; Floyd D. Stringed instrument having a cover for slidable pick-up
US6111176A (en) * 1999-01-28 2000-08-29 Rose; Floyd D. String assembly including one or more anchors for use with a stringed instrument
US6137039A (en) * 1999-01-28 2000-10-24 Rose; Floyd D. Stringed instrument having slidable saddles
US6194645B1 (en) 1999-01-28 2001-02-27 Floyd D. Rose Stringed instrument having a hidden tremolo
US6198030B1 (en) 1999-01-28 2001-03-06 Floyd D. Rose Stringed instrument having improved neck
US20030177883A1 (en) * 2002-01-11 2003-09-25 Rose Floyd D. Tuning systems for stringed musical instruments
US20060054009A1 (en) * 2004-09-15 2006-03-16 Redard Charlie G Top pickup for musical stringed instruments
US20060156913A1 (en) * 2005-01-18 2006-07-20 Fishman Transducers, Inc. Soundhole accessible musical instrument control platform
US20100175534A1 (en) * 2009-01-14 2010-07-15 Mccabe Geoffrey L Fine tuning means for fulcrum tremolo
AT513769A1 (en) * 2013-01-07 2014-07-15 Elmar Zeilhofer Mechanical-electromagnetic structure-borne sound transducer for musical instruments
US9123312B2 (en) 2012-01-19 2015-09-01 Geoffrey Lee McCabe Tuning mechanisms
US9390699B2 (en) * 2014-07-02 2016-07-12 Hai-Ping Huang Pickup device for a string instrument
US9484007B1 (en) 2015-11-18 2016-11-01 Geoffrey Lee McCabe Tremolo stop tuner and tremolo stabilizer
EP3098808A1 (en) * 2015-05-21 2016-11-30 Luciano Nigro Device and method for improving the quality sound of musical instruments and instrument including the device
US9595245B2 (en) 2015-04-28 2017-03-14 Geoffrey Lee McCabe Locking bearing mechanisms for fulcrum tremolo
US9734804B1 (en) 2015-10-11 2017-08-15 Geoffrey Lee McCabe Drop tuner for fulcrum tremolo
US9847076B1 (en) 2016-10-18 2017-12-19 Geoffrey Lee McCabe Tremolo spring and stabilizer tuner

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB354301A (en) * 1930-02-07 1931-08-07 Stephen Franko Improvements in and relating to stringed musical instruments
US2725778A (en) * 1952-06-13 1955-12-06 Cronwell John Sound pick-up device for the amplification of banjo music

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB354301A (en) * 1930-02-07 1931-08-07 Stephen Franko Improvements in and relating to stringed musical instruments
US2725778A (en) * 1952-06-13 1955-12-06 Cronwell John Sound pick-up device for the amplification of banjo music

Cited By (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3869952A (en) * 1974-03-20 1975-03-11 Horace N Rowe Pickup mount for stringed musical instruments
US4075921A (en) * 1975-07-14 1978-02-28 Heet Gregory S String instrument vibration initiator and sustainer
US4887506A (en) * 1986-04-11 1989-12-19 Noma Video Inc. Stringed musical instrument with magnetic pickups
DE4332972A1 (en) * 1993-09-28 1994-09-22 Lars Gunnar Liebchen Guitar with step neck and additional strings and also additional pickups
US6046397A (en) * 1999-01-28 2000-04-04 Rose; Floyd D. Stringed instrument having a mechanical control assembly for slidable pick-up
US6046393A (en) * 1999-01-28 2000-04-04 Rose; Floyd D. Stringed instrument having a replaceable head stock
US6198030B1 (en) 1999-01-28 2001-03-06 Floyd D. Rose Stringed instrument having improved neck
US6051773A (en) * 1999-01-28 2000-04-18 Rose; Floyd D. Stringed instrument having a cover for slidable pick-up
US6111176A (en) * 1999-01-28 2000-08-29 Rose; Floyd D. String assembly including one or more anchors for use with a stringed instrument
US6137039A (en) * 1999-01-28 2000-10-24 Rose; Floyd D. Stringed instrument having slidable saddles
US6194645B1 (en) 1999-01-28 2001-02-27 Floyd D. Rose Stringed instrument having a hidden tremolo
US6031166A (en) * 1999-03-01 2000-02-29 Petrarca; Anthony I. Strap assembly for supporting an instrument on a person's body
US20030177883A1 (en) * 2002-01-11 2003-09-25 Rose Floyd D. Tuning systems for stringed musical instruments
US7045693B2 (en) 2002-01-11 2006-05-16 Floyd D. Rose Tuning systems for stringed musical instruments
US20060054009A1 (en) * 2004-09-15 2006-03-16 Redard Charlie G Top pickup for musical stringed instruments
WO2006031904A2 (en) * 2004-09-15 2006-03-23 Charlie Gordon Redard Top pickup for musical stringed instruments
WO2006031904A3 (en) * 2004-09-15 2006-11-02 Charlie Gordon Redard Top pickup for musical stringed instruments
US7145063B2 (en) * 2004-09-15 2006-12-05 Charlie Gordon Redard Top pickup for musical stringed instruments
US7247789B2 (en) * 2005-01-18 2007-07-24 Fishman Transducers, Inc. Soundhole accessible musical instrument control platform
US20060156913A1 (en) * 2005-01-18 2006-07-20 Fishman Transducers, Inc. Soundhole accessible musical instrument control platform
US20100175534A1 (en) * 2009-01-14 2010-07-15 Mccabe Geoffrey L Fine tuning means for fulcrum tremolo
US8536430B2 (en) 2009-01-14 2013-09-17 Geoffrey McCabe Fine tuning means for fulcrum tremolo
US9123312B2 (en) 2012-01-19 2015-09-01 Geoffrey Lee McCabe Tuning mechanisms
AT513769B1 (en) * 2013-01-07 2015-11-15 Elmar Zeilhofer Mechanical-electromagnetic structure-borne sound transducer for musical instruments
AT513769A1 (en) * 2013-01-07 2014-07-15 Elmar Zeilhofer Mechanical-electromagnetic structure-borne sound transducer for musical instruments
US9390699B2 (en) * 2014-07-02 2016-07-12 Hai-Ping Huang Pickup device for a string instrument
US9595245B2 (en) 2015-04-28 2017-03-14 Geoffrey Lee McCabe Locking bearing mechanisms for fulcrum tremolo
EP3098808A1 (en) * 2015-05-21 2016-11-30 Luciano Nigro Device and method for improving the quality sound of musical instruments and instrument including the device
US9734804B1 (en) 2015-10-11 2017-08-15 Geoffrey Lee McCabe Drop tuner for fulcrum tremolo
US9484007B1 (en) 2015-11-18 2016-11-01 Geoffrey Lee McCabe Tremolo stop tuner and tremolo stabilizer
US9847076B1 (en) 2016-10-18 2017-12-19 Geoffrey Lee McCabe Tremolo spring and stabilizer tuner

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3407696A (en) Stringed musical instrument stable, harmonic-free tuning
US3442169A (en) Guitar pick holder
US4171661A (en) Guitar tremolo method and apparatus
US4144794A (en) Device for and method of removably securing a harness to a musical instrument
US6057498A (en) Vibratory string for musical instrument
US4567807A (en) Muting and muffling of drums
US4890531A (en) Musical instrument pick holder
US3915049A (en) Stringed musical instrument with aluminum made integral unit
CA1151451A (en) Feedback reducer for an acoustic electric guitar
US4742751A (en) Performer's guitar stand
US4269105A (en) Musical percussion instrument
JP3447967B2 (en) Acoustic guitar bridge mechanism
JPH0756558A (en) Tremolo device for guitar
US6278044B1 (en) Violin shoulder cradle
US5461958A (en) Acoustic guitar assembly
US6835883B2 (en) Readily transportable musical instrument stand
US4522101A (en) Mounting ring and thumbrest
US2499855A (en) Tone volume range control device for reed instruments
US6794569B2 (en) Acoustic instrument triggering device and method
US4941385A (en) Tone plate and clamping device for a musical instrument mouthpiece
CN85109428A (en) Portable drum set
FR2651599A1 (en) According and tremolo apparatus for a string music instrument such as a guitar.
US4030396A (en) Acoustic pickups
US4592265A (en) Foldable leg rest for stringed musical instrument
US5637820A (en) Stringed instrument with on-board tuner