US3744482A - Dry contact electrode with amplifier for physiological signals - Google Patents

Dry contact electrode with amplifier for physiological signals Download PDF

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US3744482A
US3744482A US3744482DA US3744482A US 3744482 A US3744482 A US 3744482A US 3744482D A US3744482D A US 3744482DA US 3744482 A US3744482 A US 3744482A
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electrode
skin
input
amplifying
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W Kaufman
D Powell
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HITTMAN ASS Inc
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/04Measuring bioelectric signals of the body or parts thereof
    • A61B5/04004Input circuits for EEG-, or EMG-signals
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/04Measuring bioelectric signals of the body or parts thereof
    • A61B5/0402Electrocardiography, i.e. ECG
    • A61B5/0428Input circuits specially adapted therefor
    • A61B5/04284Capacitive or ionised electrodes, e.g. MOSFET

Abstract

An electrode and amplification circuitry connected thereto mounted within a housing for capacitively coupling physiologically produced potential along the skin surface of the body to the amplification circuitry without undesirable direct current shifts in potential and with rapid recovery from saturation due to a transient by means of a Zener diode or leakresistor circuit arrangement in the amplification circuitry.

Description

' United States Patent 1191 Kaufman et al. a

1 11 3,744,482 1 1 Jul 10, 1973 DRY CONTACT ELECTRODE WITI-I AMPLIFIER FOR PHYSIOLOGICAL SIGNALS [75] Inventors: William M. Kaufman, Chevy Chase;

Donald P. Powell, Baltimore, both of Md.

[731 Assignee: Hitt man Associates, Inc., Columbia,

[22] Filed: June 29, 1971 21 Appl. No.: 158,040

52 u.s.c1 ..128/2.06E,l28/2.1B,128/2.1E 51 1111 01. ..A61b 5/04 58 Field of 'Search 128/206 13,206 E, 1 128/20611, 2.1 E, 010. 4; 330/109 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,620,208 11 1971 Higley et' al...... 128 206 E 3,568,662 3/1971 Everett et a], 128/206 E Primary Examiner -william E. Kamm Attorney-Flei t, Gipple & Jacobson 1571 l ABSTRACT 12 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures Pmmww 3.744.482

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William M. Kaufman Dana/d I? Powell INVENTORS PATENTEU JUL 1 0191s SHEHZUFZ Fig.6

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Fig. 7

William M. Kaufma B BY;

I)RY CONTACT ELECTRODE WITH AMPLIFIER FOR PHYSIOLOGICAL SIGNALS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The measurement of physiologically generated electrical potentials on the surface of the body is common in medical practice and in research. Two examples are electrocardiography (ECG) and electroencephalography (EEG), both of which are frequently employed diagnostically. Typically, electrodes are placed at various locations on the surface of the body and the voltage between selected pairs of electrodes is measured (usually recorded) as a function of time.

If the electrodes in contact with the body are metallic conductors, various electrochemically induced electrical potentials can appear between the metal and the skin, for example, because of perspiration. This problem of contact noise with metallic electrodes necessitated the development of special conductive pastes in combination with specific metals that would minimize noise generation at the electrode contact. The most popular combination of this sort consists of a silver metal contact and a concentrated silver chloride aqueous solution in the form of a conductive paste.

Although the use of electrode paste minimizes the problem of contact noise, there are several problems associated with the application of paste electrodes for long-term monitoring. When paste contact electrodes are used for many hours or several days continuously, skin irritation is a common problem. The continuous contact of the concentrated salt solution on the skin is not fully acceptable and puffy irritated welts may arise. As the paste dries under the metal electrode, contact noise is created which can become so severe that the electrodes must be removed, cleaned and repositioned on the body in order to obtain an acceptable signal-tonoise ratio.

For these reasons, investigators have been pursuing the development of capacitively coupled electrodes. With typical capacitive coupling to the body, the skin is in contact with a stable insulating'material, such as a metallic oxide, which is relatively chemically inert and non-irritating. Such an electrode does not depend upon electrical conduction; therefore, the conductivity of the horny layer of skin and the presence or absence of perspiration will not affect signal quality. Since the electrical impedance of a capacitive coupling increases with decreasing frequency and since the frequency band of interest for most biological signals is very low (from as low as fractions of one hertz), it is necessary to provide an amplifier circuit with a very high input impedance. Previous investigators have described very high input resistance dc amplifiers for this application and have mounted these amplifiers in close proximity to the coupling insulator to minimize pickup of electromagnetic interference.

Unfortunately, zero signal stability of dc amplifiers is a major problem area. Induction of a small charge on the control electrode of the initial amplifying circuit element due to an input transient or a leakage current can cause the dc amplifier to shift its quiescent operating point significantly. These effects make a dc amplifier somewhat undesirable for circuit applications that do not require dc response capability. The pass bands that are used for the recording of the EGC and the EEG include low frequency components but do not include dc. Therefore, an ac amplifier could be suitable for these applications if properly designed and constructed for compatibility therewith.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to ac coupled electrodes for the acquisition of electrical signals, particularly those potentials generated physiologically which are normally measured at the surface of the body.

A primary object of the invention is the provision of dry contact means involving a relatively inert material touching .the skin thereby preventing irritation and other medical complications at the skin surface.

Another object of this invention is the elimination of electrical conduction with the skin so that the conductivity of the horny layer of skin and the presence or absence of perspiration will not affect signal quality and so that direct current shifts in potential are avoided due to capacitive coupling.

Still another object of this invention is the provision of means facilitating replacement of the coupling film.

A still further object of the invention is the provision of non-linear circuit motion'action and high capacitive reactance to respectively allow rapid recovery from saturation due to a transient and enhance patient safety by limiting Hz leakage.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING The above and other objects of this invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art after a detailed description of preferred embodiments of this invention taken together with the accompanying drawing wherein:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational'view of an insulated electrode;

FIG. 2 is a plan view thereof;

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view of an embodiment of the electrode;

FIG. 4 is a plan view of the embodiment;

FIG. 5 is schematic view of the capacitance coupling portion of the electrode shown in FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 6 is a schematic view of the capacitance coupling portion of the electrode shown in FIGS. 3 and 4;

FIG. 7 is a schematic view of the electrode circuitry; and

FIG. 8 is a schematic view of an embodiment of the electrode circuitry.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Referring in detail tothe drawing, there is shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 an electronic amplifier l0 housed within a cup 12 formed of conducting material and extending below the bottom surface of a molded casing 14 formed of insulating material. An insulating film 16 is removably positioned over the exposed cylindrical wall and bottom surface of cup 12 by means of a retainer ring 18. An electrical cable 20 containing power and signal leads connects amplifier 10 to a power supply and coupling filters (not shown) so that the electrode can be used to transmit the physiological signal to an instrument for visual display or recording. The molding compound used for making cable 20, casing 14, and cup 12 into a compact signal unit is an insulated material such as epoxy or acrylic resins.

As shown in FIG. 5, insulating film 16 along the bottom surface of cup 12 is placed in contact with the skin 30 of the subject being measured. The skin 30, being electrically conductive, serves as one of the plates of a coupling capacitor C and cup 12, which is preferably of stainless steel, serves as the other plate of C with film 16 being the dielectric medium.

A second method of capacitively coupling the physiological signal is to eliminate the use of insulating film 16. Cup 12 is housed directly within casing 14 in a manner so that the bottom surface of cup 12 is flush with the bottom surface of casing 14 for exposure to the skin as clearly illustrated in FIG. 3. As shown in FIG. 6, the skin 30 and the bottom of conducting cup 12 form a terminal point 32 which is connected to one terminal 34 of a conventional capacitor C which couples the signal to the remainder of the electrode circuit.

The basic electronic circuit for the electrode employs an operational amplifier A with an input coupling capacitor C and a capacitor C, in the feedback loop. The resistance R, in the feedback loop sets the low frequency cut-off point of the pass band F, which is:

f I/Z'ITR C Operational amplifier A is a very high gain inverting amplifier with very high input impedance and very low output impedance. In the idealized limit, the amplifier gain and input impedance are infinite and output impedance is zero. Micro-circuit operational amplifiers are commercially available with gains on the order of 10 input impedance on the order of ohms or greater, and output impedance on the order of 10 or 10 ohms. A good example of such a commercially available device is theAmelco 2741 operational amplifier. Using the idealization defined above, the circuit response of amplifier A is:

15 /12, j21rf RFCFII j21rf RFCF using conventional electrical engineering notation and terminology. The amplitude of the frequency response is:

zl i f F F f RFCF)2 which is a high pass response. The upper cutoff frequency is not apparent from this equation because of the idealized assumption for the operational amplifier A. Since all realizable operational amplifiers have an upper frequency limit to their amplification, this will provide an upper limit to the pass band of the electrode circuit. This upper limit is far beyond the frequency spectrum of physiological signals for typical commercial operational amplifiers.

Clinical quality ECG amplifiers must have a lower cutoff frequency of 0.1 Hz or lower. Since practical coupling capacitors must be relatively small, a very high value for R, is needed. A coupling film of commercially available insulating material (e.g., 0.00025 inch Mylar) has approximately 2.5 X 10' [If capacitance per square inch. Conventional conductive electrodes are on the order of 0.25 to 1.00 square inch in area. Therefore, a comparably sized coupling film will have approximately 10* pf capacitance. The corresponding value of R forf 0.1 Hz is R,= 1.6 X 10 ohms. This is a very high resistance value not easily obtained with linear resistance material. It has been found in solving this dilemma that it is possible to use the reverse characteristics of a semiconductor junction diode to obtain resistors with this high level of resistance. FIG. 7 shows two diodes D connected back-to-back so that reverse characteristics dominate for current in either direction.

An improvement on this design is desirable because of the very low frequency response of the preamplifier. A low frequency response capability implies that the preamplifier will be sensitive to transient dc shifts. The decay time for recovery from a transient step input is longer, the lower the value of the low end cutoff frequency. A transient large enough to saturate the preamplifier and block signal transmission may last many seconds in a typical ECG monitoring application.

Clinical requirements are conflicting in that low frequency response capability is required for ECG, but a loss of ECG signal for more than a few seconds (typically 9 to 10 seconds) will strike an alarm. This problem can be obviated by means of non-linear circuit action.

A non-linear circuit action is needed that will prevent the input terminal of operational amplifier A (the summing point) from drifing either positively or negatively in voltage beyond very narrowly defined limits. For example, if the amplifier power supply is :9V and if the operational amplifier gain is 10 then iQOuV at the summing point will saturate the amplifier. Use of Zener diodes as back-to-back diodes Dz making up R, will provide saturation protection as shown in FIG. 8. If the Zener voltage is considerably less than the voltage of the power supply, then, as the amplifier output voltage increases in magnitude beyond the Zener voltage level, diodes Dz begin to pass current readily thereby reducing the feedback resistance and hastening the decay of the transient voltage. Once the outputfalls below the Zener voltage level, then amplifier A resumes linear operation.

Another means of obtaining this non-linear action is to add an input leak resistor R to the circuit of FIG. 7. In this circuit R is a resistor whose value has been specially selected to be large enough so as not to affect the low end frequency response and small enough to leak off the charge at the input once amplifier A goes into saturation. In the normal linear mode of operation, the effective value of any input leak resistance is multiplied by the operational amplifier gain. When the amplifier saturates, the normal high gain drops off and input resistor R permits a relatively rapid discharge of the potential at the summing point.

While preferred embodiments of this invention have been illustrated and described, it should be understood by those skilled in the art that many changes and modifications may be resorted to without departing from the spirit and scope of this invention.

I claim:

1. A dry contact electrode for receiving physiological signals from the surface of the skin, comprising a casing, conducting means secured to said casing and adapted to form one plate of an input capacitor, amplifying means housed within said conducting means, coupling means for insulating said conducting means from the surface of the skin and adapted to physically connect the surface of the skin to an input of said amplifying means through said conducting means so that the skin forms the other plate of said input capacitor, said coupling means comprising inert material which eliminates skin irritation and other medical complications arising from contact with the skin surface, wherein said amplifying means has feedback means comprising a feedback capacitor and a pair of diodes connected back-to-back in parallel with said feedback capacitor for providing high capacitive reactance and limiting 4. The electrode of claim 1, including resistive means connected across the input of said amplifying means for leaking off charge at the input of said amplifying means when going into saturation.

5. The electrode of claim 1, wherein said pair of diodes breakdown to a low resistance level at a predetermined voltage level hastening the decay of a transient voltage allowing rapid recovery from saturation.

6. The electrode of claim 1, wherein said diodes are Zener diodesv 7. A dry contact electrode for receiving physiological signals from the surface of the skin of a patient, the electrode comprising: a main casing; conducting means supported by said main casing for defining one plate of an input capacitor; insulating means associating with said conducting means for insulating said conducting means from the skin of a patient in such a manner that when said dry contact electrode is in contact with the skin of the patient, the skin defines the other plate of said input capacitor; amplifying means housed by said main casing; circuit means for connecting said input capacitor to said amplifying means; output means for transmitting the output signal developed by said amplifying means to a load; feedback capacitance connected between an input and an output of said amplifying means; and a pair of feedback diodes connected backto-back in parallel across said feedback capacitance.

8. The electrode of claim 7, and further comprising resistor means connected across the input of said amplifying means.

9. The electrode of claim 7, wherein said diodes are Zener diodes. g

10. The electrode of claim 7, wherein said insulating means takes the form of a film covering the outside surface of said conducting means.

11. The electrode of claim 10, and further comprising retaining means for removably mounting said insulating film over the outside surface of said conducting means.

12. A dry contact electrode for receiving physiological signals from the surface of the skin of a patient, the electrode comprising: a main casing; conducting means supported by said main casing for contacting the surface of the skin of the patient; amplifying means housed by. said main casing; capacitor means connected between said conducting means and an input of said amplifying means for transmitting physiological signals to said amplifying means; output means for transmitting the output signals developed by said amplifying means to a load; feedback capacitance connected between the input and the output of said amplifying means; and a pair of feedback diodes connected back-to-back in parallel across said feedback capacitance.

Claims (12)

1. A dry contact electrode for receiving physiological signals from the surface of the skin, comprising a casing, conducting means secured to said casing and adapted to form one plate of an input capacitor, amplifying means housed within said conducting means, coupling means for insulating said conducting means from the surface of the skin and adapted to physically connect the surface of the skin to an input of said amplifying means through said conducting means so that the skin forms the other plate of said input capacitor, said coupling means comprising inert material which eliminates skin irritation and other medical complications arising from contact with the skin surface, wherein said amplifying means has feedback means comprising a feedback capacitor and a pair of diodes connected back-to-back in parallel with said feedback capacitor for providing high capacitive reactance and limiting leakage, and an output of said amplifier means from which amplified physiological signals can be extracted.
2. The electrode of claim 1, wherein said coupling means includes an insulating film covering the outside surface of said conducting means.
3. The electrode of claim 2, including retaining means adjacent said casing and physically engaging said insulating film for removably mounting said insulating film over the outside surface of said conducting means.
4. The electrode of claim 1, including resistive means connected across the input of said amplifying means for leaking off charge at the input of said amplifying means when going into saturation.
5. The electrode of claim 1, wherein said pair of diodes breakdown to a low resistance level at a predetermined voltage level hastening the decay of a transient voltage allowing rapid recovery from saturation.
6. The electrode of claim 1, wherein said diodes are Zener diodes.
7. A dry contact electrode for receiving physiological signals from the surface of the skin of a patient, the electrode comprising: a main casing; conducting means supported by said main casing for defining one plate of an input capacitor; insulating means associating with said conductiNg means for insulating said conducting means from the skin of a patient in such a manner that when said dry contact electrode is in contact with the skin of the patient, the skin defines the other plate of said input capacitor; amplifying means housed by said main casing; circuit means for connecting said input capacitor to said amplifying means; output means for transmitting the output signal developed by said amplifying means to a load; feedback capacitance connected between an input and an output of said amplifying means; and a pair of feedback diodes connected back-to-back in parallel across said feedback capacitance.
8. The electrode of claim 7, and further comprising resistor means connected across the input of said amplifying means.
9. The electrode of claim 7, wherein said diodes are Zener diodes.
10. The electrode of claim 7, wherein said insulating means takes the form of a film covering the outside surface of said conducting means.
11. The electrode of claim 10, and further comprising retaining means for removably mounting said insulating film over the outside surface of said conducting means.
12. A dry contact electrode for receiving physiological signals from the surface of the skin of a patient, the electrode comprising: a main casing; conducting means supported by said main casing for contacting the surface of the skin of the patient; amplifying means housed by said main casing; capacitor means connected between said conducting means and an input of said amplifying means for transmitting physiological signals to said amplifying means; output means for transmitting the output signals developed by said amplifying means to a load; feedback capacitance connected between the input and the output of said amplifying means; and a pair of feedback diodes connected back-to-back in parallel across said feedback capacitance.
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Cited By (34)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3882846A (en) * 1973-04-04 1975-05-13 Nasa Insulated electrocardiographic electrodes
US4602639A (en) * 1982-07-01 1986-07-29 Mardice Holding S.A.R.L. Method and apparatus for contactless measurement of charge concentrations and potential differences in biological organisms
US4628939A (en) * 1980-09-11 1986-12-16 Hughes Aircraft Company Method and improved apparatus for analyzing heart activity
US4669479A (en) * 1985-08-21 1987-06-02 Spring Creek Institute, Inc. Dry electrode system for detection of biopotentials
US4669468A (en) * 1979-06-15 1987-06-02 American Hospital Supply Corporation Capacitively coupled indifferent electrode
US4679568A (en) * 1985-09-19 1987-07-14 Siegen Corporation Physiological potential preamplifier
US4751471A (en) * 1985-08-21 1988-06-14 Spring Creek Institute, Inc. Amplifying circuit particularly adapted for amplifying a biopotential input signal
US4763659A (en) * 1985-08-21 1988-08-16 Spring Creek Institute, Inc. Dry electrode system for detection of biopotentials
US4865039A (en) * 1985-08-21 1989-09-12 Spring Creek Institute Dry electrode system for detection of biopotentials and dry electrode for making electrical and mechanical connection to a living body
WO1991013584A1 (en) * 1990-02-28 1991-09-19 Srd Shorashim Medical, Ltd. Apparatus for mounting electrodes
WO1993002616A1 (en) * 1991-08-09 1993-02-18 Srd Shorashim Medical, Ltd. Apparatus for mounting electrodes
EP0624338A2 (en) * 1993-05-13 1994-11-17 ARBO-tec Sensor-Technologie GmbH Body electrode
US6253099B1 (en) * 1999-08-19 2001-06-26 Lifecor, Inc. Cardiac monitoring electrode apparatus and method
US6718191B2 (en) * 1998-05-04 2004-04-06 Medikro Oy Skin potential measuring sensor
US20040070446A1 (en) * 2001-02-13 2004-04-15 Krupka Michael Andrew Low noise, electric field sensor
US6807438B1 (en) * 1999-08-26 2004-10-19 Riccardo Brun Del Re Electric field sensor
US20040254435A1 (en) * 2003-06-11 2004-12-16 Robert Mathews Sensor system for measuring biopotentials
US20050073302A1 (en) * 2003-10-07 2005-04-07 Quantum Applied Science And Research, Inc. Integrated sensor system for measuring electric and/or magnetic field vector components
US20050277841A1 (en) * 2004-06-10 2005-12-15 Adnan Shennib Disposable fetal monitor patch
US20050275416A1 (en) * 2004-06-10 2005-12-15 Quasar, Inc. Garment incorporating embedded physiological sensors
US20060015027A1 (en) * 2004-07-15 2006-01-19 Quantum Applied Science And Research, Inc. Unobtrusive measurement system for bioelectric signals
US20060041196A1 (en) * 2004-08-17 2006-02-23 Quasar, Inc. Unobtrusive measurement system for bioelectric signals
US20060074284A1 (en) * 2004-10-04 2006-04-06 John Juola Capacitive medical electrode
US20060264767A1 (en) * 2005-05-17 2006-11-23 Cardiovu, Inc. Programmable ECG sensor patch
US20070010750A1 (en) * 2003-10-03 2007-01-11 Akinori Ueno Biometric sensor and biometric method
US20070191728A1 (en) * 2006-02-10 2007-08-16 Adnan Shennib Intrapartum monitor patch
US20070249952A1 (en) * 2004-02-27 2007-10-25 Benjamin Rubin Systems and methods for sleep monitoring
US20070255184A1 (en) * 2006-02-10 2007-11-01 Adnan Shennib Disposable labor detection patch
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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3882846A (en) * 1973-04-04 1975-05-13 Nasa Insulated electrocardiographic electrodes
US4669468A (en) * 1979-06-15 1987-06-02 American Hospital Supply Corporation Capacitively coupled indifferent electrode
US4628939A (en) * 1980-09-11 1986-12-16 Hughes Aircraft Company Method and improved apparatus for analyzing heart activity
US4602639A (en) * 1982-07-01 1986-07-29 Mardice Holding S.A.R.L. Method and apparatus for contactless measurement of charge concentrations and potential differences in biological organisms
US4669479A (en) * 1985-08-21 1987-06-02 Spring Creek Institute, Inc. Dry electrode system for detection of biopotentials
US4865039A (en) * 1985-08-21 1989-09-12 Spring Creek Institute Dry electrode system for detection of biopotentials and dry electrode for making electrical and mechanical connection to a living body
US4763659A (en) * 1985-08-21 1988-08-16 Spring Creek Institute, Inc. Dry electrode system for detection of biopotentials
US4751471A (en) * 1985-08-21 1988-06-14 Spring Creek Institute, Inc. Amplifying circuit particularly adapted for amplifying a biopotential input signal
US4679568A (en) * 1985-09-19 1987-07-14 Siegen Corporation Physiological potential preamplifier
WO1991013584A1 (en) * 1990-02-28 1991-09-19 Srd Shorashim Medical, Ltd. Apparatus for mounting electrodes
WO1993002616A1 (en) * 1991-08-09 1993-02-18 Srd Shorashim Medical, Ltd. Apparatus for mounting electrodes
EP0624338A2 (en) * 1993-05-13 1994-11-17 ARBO-tec Sensor-Technologie GmbH Body electrode
EP0624338A3 (en) * 1993-05-13 1996-11-06 Arbo Robotron Medizin Technolo Body electrode.
US6718191B2 (en) * 1998-05-04 2004-04-06 Medikro Oy Skin potential measuring sensor
US6253099B1 (en) * 1999-08-19 2001-06-26 Lifecor, Inc. Cardiac monitoring electrode apparatus and method
US6807438B1 (en) * 1999-08-26 2004-10-19 Riccardo Brun Del Re Electric field sensor
US7088175B2 (en) 2001-02-13 2006-08-08 Quantum Applied Science & Research, Inc. Low noise, electric field sensor
US20040070446A1 (en) * 2001-02-13 2004-04-15 Krupka Michael Andrew Low noise, electric field sensor
US20040254435A1 (en) * 2003-06-11 2004-12-16 Robert Mathews Sensor system for measuring biopotentials
US6961601B2 (en) 2003-06-11 2005-11-01 Quantum Applied Science & Research, Inc. Sensor system for measuring biopotentials
US20070010750A1 (en) * 2003-10-03 2007-01-11 Akinori Ueno Biometric sensor and biometric method
US20050073302A1 (en) * 2003-10-07 2005-04-07 Quantum Applied Science And Research, Inc. Integrated sensor system for measuring electric and/or magnetic field vector components
US7141968B2 (en) 2003-10-07 2006-11-28 Quasar Federal Systems, Inc. Integrated sensor system for measuring electric and/or magnetic field vector components
US7141987B2 (en) 2003-10-07 2006-11-28 Quantum Applied Science And Research, Inc. Sensor system for measurement of one or more vector components of an electric field
US20070159167A1 (en) * 2003-10-07 2007-07-12 Hibbs Andrew D Integrated sensor system for measuring electric and/or magnetic field vector components
US20050073322A1 (en) * 2003-10-07 2005-04-07 Quantum Applied Science And Research, Inc. Sensor system for measurement of one or more vector components of an electric field
US20070249952A1 (en) * 2004-02-27 2007-10-25 Benjamin Rubin Systems and methods for sleep monitoring
US20050277841A1 (en) * 2004-06-10 2005-12-15 Adnan Shennib Disposable fetal monitor patch
US20050275416A1 (en) * 2004-06-10 2005-12-15 Quasar, Inc. Garment incorporating embedded physiological sensors
US7173437B2 (en) 2004-06-10 2007-02-06 Quantum Applied Science And Research, Inc. Garment incorporating embedded physiological sensors
US20060015027A1 (en) * 2004-07-15 2006-01-19 Quantum Applied Science And Research, Inc. Unobtrusive measurement system for bioelectric signals
US7245956B2 (en) 2004-07-15 2007-07-17 Quantum Applied Science & Research, Inc. Unobtrusive measurement system for bioelectric signals
US20060041196A1 (en) * 2004-08-17 2006-02-23 Quasar, Inc. Unobtrusive measurement system for bioelectric signals
US20060074284A1 (en) * 2004-10-04 2006-04-06 John Juola Capacitive medical electrode
US8965532B2 (en) 2004-10-04 2015-02-24 John Juola Capacitive medical electrode
US7904180B2 (en) 2004-10-04 2011-03-08 Peerlead Medical, Inc. Capacitive medical electrode
US20110160559A1 (en) * 2004-10-04 2011-06-30 John Juola Capacitive Medical Electrode
US20060264767A1 (en) * 2005-05-17 2006-11-23 Cardiovu, Inc. Programmable ECG sensor patch
US8688189B2 (en) * 2005-05-17 2014-04-01 Adnan Shennib Programmable ECG sensor patch
US20070255184A1 (en) * 2006-02-10 2007-11-01 Adnan Shennib Disposable labor detection patch
US20070191728A1 (en) * 2006-02-10 2007-08-16 Adnan Shennib Intrapartum monitor patch
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US8965500B2 (en) 2007-06-06 2015-02-24 Zoll Medical Corporation Wearable defibrillator with audio input/output
US9603542B2 (en) 2009-07-13 2017-03-28 Koninklijke Philips N.V. Electro-physiological measurement with reduced motion artifacts
EP2962724A1 (en) 2011-03-10 2016-01-06 Electrocore LLC Device with enclosure for nerve modulation
EP2962725A1 (en) 2011-03-10 2016-01-06 Electrocore LLC Apparatus for nerve modulation
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