US3735744A - Intake manifold fuel system - Google Patents

Intake manifold fuel system Download PDF

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US3735744A
US3735744A US3735744DA US3735744A US 3735744 A US3735744 A US 3735744A US 3735744D A US3735744D A US 3735744DA US 3735744 A US3735744 A US 3735744A
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fuel mixture
plurality
members
inlet passage
device
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P Brody
O Brody
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O Brody
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M29/00Apparatus for re-atomising condensed fuel or homogenising fuel-air mixture
    • F02M29/04Apparatus for re-atomising condensed fuel or homogenising fuel-air mixture having screens, gratings, baffles or the like

Abstract

A fuel system for internal combustion engines comprising a manifold having an inlet passage for a fuel mixture and a plurality of outlet passages to the cylinders of the engine. A fuel mixture distributing device is provided adjacent the inlet passage and comprises a plurality of closely packed sinuous members defining a plurality of generally axially extending twisted passages which are laterally intercommunicating.

Description

United States Patent [191 Brody etal.

[54] INTAKE MANIFOLD FUEL SYSTEM [76] Inventors: Peter E. Brody, 224 California Avenue; Otto H. Brody, 559 Askin Boulevard, both of ,Windsor, Ontario, Canada 22 Filed: July 18, 1971 [211 App]. No.: 163,499

Related U.S. Application Data [63] Continuation of Ser. No. 858,730, Sept. 17, 1969.

[111 wasm a [451 May 29, 1973 2,498,190 2/1950 Weeks ..48/1 80 1,418,877 6/1922 Mabee.... ..l38/42 1,095,555 5/1914 Crone..... ....2l9/271 2,701,557 2/1955 Ramey ....l23/141 3,437,467 4/ 1 969 Jacobus ..48/180 2,685,504 8/1954 Ulbing ..48/l80 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS Germany ..l23/l41 Great Britain ..123/141 Primary Examiner-Al Lawrence Smith Attorney-Barnes, Kisselle, Raisch & Choate 5 7] ABSTRACT A fuel system for internal combustion engines comprising a manifold having an inlet passage for a fuel mixture and a plurality of outlet passages to the cylinders of the engine. A fuel mixture distributing device is provided adjacent the inlet passage and comprises a plurality of closely packed sinuous members defining a plurality of generally axially extending twisted passages which are laterally intercommunicating.

9 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures 1 INTAKE MANIFOLD FUEL SYSTEM CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION combustion engines.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In the presently-used systems, several basic problems have become generally accepted as necessary evils. The most obvious of these problems is the passage of totally-liquid fuels along the walls of the carburetor and intake manifold, and finally into the firing chamber. Aside from the substantial waste of fuel involved, a primary condition of concern is the production of carbon monoxide, a direct result of incomplete combustion. Carbon monoxide is rapidly becoming a primary menace to the public health in many larger cities.

An additional problem is the result of the inefiectual manifold systems presently employed. Improper mixing of the fuel and air creates a problem in that the highoctane fuel particles tend to go to the most remote branches of the manifold and are not inclined to enter the short-range, or central branches of the manifold which are nearest the carburetor outlet, due largely to the inertial effect of the heavy tetroethyl lead contained in the fuel; consequently, and overdose of the tetroethyl lead is required to prevent detonation in the central cylinders. Consequently, the consumer is required to use costlier fuel, and the exhaust emissions contain almost lethal quantities of metallic lead.

Yet another area of the present systems which requires improvement is the idling system. The choked condition of the present systems during the idle period accelerates the production of carbon monoxide, especially in slow-moving urban traffic.

' tions only to further show the advantages offered by this invention; it should be noted that each system described has improved one condition at the cost of another of equal importance.

First reference is made to US. Pat. No. 1,012,380, which comprised a substantial number of baffled passages which serve to break up fuel particles and efi'ect a more complete fuel-air dispersion. However, in introducing such a large number of surfaces parallel to the flow of the mixture, a boundary flow problem of substantial magnitude is created.

US. Pat. No. 2,072,353 depicts a system wherein the flow is carried from the walls of the carburetor throat to a central location in the manifold body. Since the object of the invention is a dumping" technique, in that the fuel is gathered in this central area of the manifold, a problem is automatically created by virtue of the tendency of leaded fuel particles to travel beyond proximate branchlines due to inertia of the particles. Consequently, the purpose of the device is defeated in the manifold area; prior to the entry of the mixture into the firing chambers.

The third reference is US. Pat. No. 2,384,681. A brief study of the flow pattern of this last patent being referred to indicates an obvious tendency for the unit to centrifuge the fuel mixture and actually magnify the problem of boundary flow. Rotation of the mixture prior to entry into the firing chamber is, in itself, substantially inefi'ective in providing suitable atomizing functions, and cannot be considered comparable, in any way, to this invention or that of US. Pat. No. 1,012,380, to which previous reference was made, in providing a generally homogenious mixture.

Accordingly, the prime object of this invention is to provide a system having more efficient combustion; this being the result of the introduction to the firing chamber of a perfectly homogenious fuel mixture. More specifically, an object of this invention is the producu'on of such a homogenious mixture.

A further object of this invention is to provide not only fuel economy as a result of leaner mixing, but also the significant reduction of carbon monoxide, particulate hydrocarbons and metallic lead in the emitted exhausts.

A further object of this invention is to provide a system having the variable-circuit function to comply with the various functions experienced in carburetion; some of these functions being chocked or semi-choked operation, acceleration, deceleration, high speed and idling operations.

Further objects of this invention are the provision of a low-cost system; a system which will require a minimum of service and which will provide a maximum lifespan; a system whichwill provide improved fuel economy by facilitating the use of a leaner mixture, and by also facilitating the use of lower octane rated, and consequently less expensive, fuels.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 11 is a fragmentary sectional view of a system embodying the invention.

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along the line 2-2 in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a plan view of a blank'utilized in forming a portion of the device utilized in the invention.

FIG. 4 shows an intermediate step in the forming of the device.

FIG. 5 is a diagrammatic view showing the fuel system embodying the invention.

DESCRIPTION Referring to FIG. 5, the system embodying the invention comprises a carburetor 10 that is adapted to direct a fuel mixture to a manifold 11 through an inlet passage 12. In turn the manifold lll directs the fuel mixture to a plurality of outlet passages 13 for supplying the various cylinders of the internal combustion engine in accordance with conventional practice.

Referring to FIG. 1, in accordance with the invention a fuel mixture distributing device 15 is provided at the inlet passage. The device comprises a plurality of closely spaced generally parallel members 16 which are twisted. The members thus define spiral paths. The paths are laterally interconnected so that intercommunication is provided between the paths.

Referring to FIGS. 3 and 4, the device 15 is preferably made from a blank 17 which is provided with slits 18 to form the axially extending member 16. The members are then twisted as shown in FIG. 4 in the same direction and at the samepitch. The blank is then spirally wound as viewed in FIG. 2. The portion 19 of the blank which supports the member 16 is adapted to be received in the passage 12.

In operation, the fuel mixture passage from the carburetor is directed through the plurality of sinuous or twisted paths defined by the members. This produces a swirling motion to the fuel mixture, different portions of the mixture being provided with separate swirling action. Since the passages defined by the members are laterally intercommunicating, the paths through which the fuel mixture moves are not uniform and a turbulence is achieved throughout the entire device. As a result, separate drops of fuel from the carburetor are unable to follow any individual swirl pattern due to their momentum. The drops of fuel are therefore exposed to various fuel paths and because of the high turbulence the drops are broken up into even smaller fuel drops, and finally are evaporated.

With the increased turbulence and evaporation a more uniform fuel-to-air mixture exists and is directed throughout the manifold. As a result, there is a lesser tendency toward rich mixture in the end cylinders as occurs with conventional fuel systems. Further, a more equal air-to-fuel ratio will exist in each cylinder.

With such better distribution to each cylinder the airfuel ratio can be adjusted for complete combustion rather than compromising the adjustment for conditions that are not uniform. Finally, with better combustion brought about by the uniform distribution of fuel, the engine will produce less undesirable contaminants such as carbon monoxide.

The following tables illustrate the desired results that have been achieved with the fuel system embodying the invention.

TABLE I 35MPH. 1700RPM. Without Generator With Generator B.H.P. 5.05 5.43 FUEL LBS/HR. 11.53 9.45 FUEL LBS/EH1. HR. 2.28 1.74 THERMAL EFFICIENCY k 5.50 7.20 COOLING LOSS b 31.19 43.75 MAN.FOLD VACUUM INCHES OF Hg. 17.40 16.85 EXHAUST DEG. TEMP. F. 891 1020 EXHAUST GAS VOLUME VOLUME CO, 8.70 13.00 0, 0.30 0.65 N, 83.30 85.15 CO 7.70 1.20

CO RATIO FUEL RATIO TABLE II 35MPH. 1700RPM. Without Generator With Generator B.H.P. 18.00 17.26 FUEL LBS/HR. 14.88 13.60 FUEL LBS/B.H.P. HR. 0.825 0.790 THERMAL EFFICIENCY 15.19 15.90 COOLING LOSS 33.80 36.25 MANIFOLD VAC. INS. Hg. 11.25 10.45 EXHAUST TEMP. DEG. F. 1 174 1200 EXHAUST GAS VOLUME CO, 12.50 13.20 0 0.50 1.80 N, 85.80 84.95 CO 1.20 0.05 co RATIO FUEL RATIO [/11 24:1 1.04:1

TABLE III 35MPH. 1700 RPM. Without Generator With Generator B.H.P. 37.20 36.48 33.31 FUEL LBS/HR. 26.88 27.25 21.28 FUEL LBS/BJ-LP. HR. 0.724 0.747 0.639 THERMAL EFFICIENCY 17.32 16.78 19.60 COOLING LOSS 31; 22.75 22.20 29.00 MANIFOLD VAC. INS. Hg. 1.17 1.11 1.00 EXHAUST TEMP. DEG. F. 1315 1315 1430 EXHAUST GAS Volumn Volume% Volume CO, 10.90 10.80 13.45 0, 0.40 0.40 1.50 N, 85.60 85.50 85.00 CO 3.10 3.30 0.05

CO RATIOS FUEL RATIOS I/III 62:1 1 13:1 II/III 66:1 1.17:1

We claim:

1. In an intake manifold having an inlet passage for a fuel mixture and a plurality of outlet passages,

a fuel mixture distributing device mounted adjacent said inlet passage and extending in the direction toward said outlet passages,

said device comprising a plurality of generally parallel closely spaced sinuous members in lateral sideby-side relation defining a plurality of radially spaced generally axially extending twisted paths,

said paths being non-uniform but laterally intercommunicating whereby a fuel mixture flowing axially through said device is caused to move through a plurality of laterally spaced interconnected axially extending non-uniform paths to effect turbulence of the fuel mixture and whereby droplets of fuel mixture are prevented from moving through the device along the walls of a manifold,

said members being made from a spirally wound single piece comprising a plurality of parallel slits defining each said member, each said member being thereafter twisted to the final form.

2. The combination set forth in claim 1 wherein the ends of said members remote from said inlet passage are free and unconnected.

3. The combination set forth in claim 1 wherein said members have the same pitch.

4. The combination set forth in claim 1 wherein each said member is twisted in the same direction.

5. For use in an intake manifold having an inlet passage for a fuel mixture and a plurality of outlet passages,

a generally circular fuel mixture distributing device having its inlet mounted adjacent said inlet passage and having a large portion extending into the manifold,

said device comprising a plurality of generally parallel closely radially spaced sinuous members in lateral side-byside relation defining a plurality of generally axially extending twisted paths,

said paths being laterally intercommunicating whereby a fuel mixture flowing axially through said device is caused to move through a plurality of laterally spaced interconnected axially extending non-uniform paths to effect turbulence of the fuel mixture and whereby droplets of fuel mixture are prevented from moving along the outside of the device and along the walls of a manifold,

said members being made from a spirally wound single piece comprising a plurality of parallel slits defining each said member,

each said member being thereafter twisted to the final form.

6. The combination set forth in claim 5 wherein the ends of said members remote from said inlet passage are free and unconnected.

7. The combination set forth in claim 5 wherein said members have the same pitch.

8. The combination set forth in claim 5 wherein each said member is twisted in the same direction.

9. For use in an intake manifold having an inlet passage for a fuel mixture and a plurality of outlet passages,

a generally circular fuel mixture distributing device having its inlet mounted adjacent said inlet passage and having a large portion extending into the manifold,

said device comprising a plurality of parallel closely radially spaced sinuous members in lateral closely spaced side-by-side relation adapted to fill substantially the entire area of said inlet passage and defining'a plurality of axially extending twisted paths,

said paths being laterally intercommunicating and the spaces between adjacent sinuous members being unrestricted in an axial direction throughout the lengths of said sinuous members whereby a fuel mixture flowing axially through said device is caused to move through a plurality of laterally spaced interconnected axially extending nonuniform paths to effect turbulence of the fuel mix ture and whereby droplets of fuel mixture are prevented from moving along the outside of the device and along the walls of a manifold.

Claims (9)

1. In an intake manifold having an inlet passage for a fuel mixture and a plurality of outlet passages, a fuel mixture distributing device mounted adjacent said inlet passage and extending in the direction toward said outlet passages, said device comprising a plurality of generally parallel closely spaced sinuous members in lateral side-by-side relation defining a plurality of radially spaced generally axially extending twisted paths, said paths being non-uniform but laterally intercommunicating whereby a fuel mixture flowing axially through said device is caused to move through a plurality of laterally spaced interconnected axially extending non-uniform paths to effect turbulence of the fuel mixture and whereby droplets of fuel mixture are prevented from moving through the device along the walls of a manifold, said members being made from a spirally wound single piece comprising a plurality of parallel slits defining each said member, each said member being thereafter twisted to the final form.
2. The combination set forth in claim 1 wherein the ends of said members remote from said inlet passage are free and unconnected.
3. The combination set forth in claim 1 wherein said members have the same pitch.
4. The combination set forth in claim 1 wherein each said member is twisted in the same direction.
5. For use in an intake manifold having an inlet passage for a fuel mixture and a plurality of outlet passages, a generally circular fuel mixture distributing device having its inlet mounted adjacent said inlet passage and having a large portion extending into the manifold, said device comprising a plurality of generally parallel closely radially spaced sinuous members in lateral side-by-side relation defining a plurality of generally axially extending twisted paths, said paths being laterally intercommunicating whereby a fuel mixture flowing axially through said device is caused to move through a plurality of laterally spaced interconnected axially extending non-uniform paths to effect turbulence of the fuel mixture and whereby droplets of fuel mixture are prevented from moving along the outside of the device and along the walls of a manifold, said members being made from a spirally wound single piece comprising a plurality of parallel slits defining each said member, each said member being thereafter twisted to the final form.
6. The combination set forth in claim 5 wherein the ends of said members remote from said inlet passage are free and unconnected.
7. The combination set forth in claim 5 wherein said members have the same pitch.
8. The combination set forth in claim 5 wherein each said member is twisted in the same direction.
9. For use in an intake manifold having an inlet passage for a fuel mixture and a plurality of outlet passages, a generally circular fuel mixture distributing device having its inlet mounted adjacent said inlet passage and having a large portion extending into the manifold, said device comprising a plurality of parallel closely radially spaced sinuous members in lateral closely spaced side-by-side relation adapted to fill substantially the entire area of said inlet passage and defining a plurality of axially extending twisted paths, said paths being laterAlly intercommunicating and the spaces between adjacent sinuous members being unrestricted in an axial direction throughout the lengths of said sinuous members whereby a fuel mixture flowing axially through said device is caused to move through a plurality of laterally spaced interconnected axially extending non-uniform paths to effect turbulence of the fuel mixture and whereby droplets of fuel mixture are prevented from moving along the outside of the device and along the walls of a manifold.
US3735744D 1971-07-18 1971-07-18 Intake manifold fuel system Expired - Lifetime US3735744A (en)

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Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3826235A (en) * 1971-11-26 1974-07-30 Lacrex Brevetti Sa Means for use in conjunction with a carburetor of an internal combustion engine for improving the combustion of fuel
US3998195A (en) * 1975-02-03 1976-12-21 Scott Alfred E Flow control and vaporizing chamber
US4092966A (en) * 1976-11-03 1978-06-06 Vortac, Inc. Fuel vaporizing and mixing device for gasoline engines
US4192273A (en) * 1974-07-17 1980-03-11 Stan Gray Combustion mixture mixing device
WO1980002860A1 (en) * 1979-06-11 1980-12-24 M Showalter High swirl very low pollution piston engine employing optimizable vorticity metering
DE3002325A1 (en) * 1980-01-23 1981-07-30 Gerhard Heim Insert for IC engine inlet manifold - has internal and external spiral profiles to improve homogeneity of fuel air mixture
US4515138A (en) * 1978-06-23 1985-05-07 Isaac Agadi Internal combustion engines
US4711225A (en) * 1986-03-01 1987-12-08 Andreas Stihl Connecting piece between the carburetor and the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine
US4807570A (en) * 1987-09-24 1989-02-28 Ruffolo Russ F Sequentially charged intake manifold
US4889081A (en) * 1988-05-23 1989-12-26 Suzuki Jidosha Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Vehicle suction system
US20060245296A1 (en) * 2005-04-28 2006-11-02 Hitachi, Ltd. Fluid mixing apparatus

Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB191112416A (en) * 1911-05-23 1912-02-08 William Henry Yardley Improvements in Vaporizing and Mixing Devices for Internal Combustion Engines.
US1095555A (en) * 1912-08-19 1914-05-05 Francis G Crone Mixing unit for fluids.
US1345791A (en) * 1918-04-27 1920-07-06 Fuel Economy Company Gaseous mixer device
US1418877A (en) * 1920-09-22 1922-06-06 Leroy R Mabee Fuel mixer for gasoline engines
DE451559C (en) * 1925-06-12 1927-10-28 Samuel Richard Bailey By mixing device for the charging mixture of carburetor machine
US1703493A (en) * 1925-10-10 1929-02-26 Leach Charles Combined mixer and auxiliary air-inlet device
US1973889A (en) * 1931-01-26 1934-09-18 Continental Motors Corp Engine
US2072353A (en) * 1934-12-20 1937-03-02 Chrysler Corp Internal combustion engine fuel system
US2498190A (en) * 1948-04-30 1950-02-21 Leonard M Weeks Mixing device
US2685504A (en) * 1953-03-26 1954-08-03 Otmar M Ulbing Fuel mixing device
US2701557A (en) * 1950-11-24 1955-02-08 Axiuer J Ramey Atomizing and mixing device for internal-combustion engines
US3437467A (en) * 1964-07-10 1969-04-08 Floyd Jacobus Air injector for a carburetor

Patent Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB191112416A (en) * 1911-05-23 1912-02-08 William Henry Yardley Improvements in Vaporizing and Mixing Devices for Internal Combustion Engines.
US1095555A (en) * 1912-08-19 1914-05-05 Francis G Crone Mixing unit for fluids.
US1345791A (en) * 1918-04-27 1920-07-06 Fuel Economy Company Gaseous mixer device
US1418877A (en) * 1920-09-22 1922-06-06 Leroy R Mabee Fuel mixer for gasoline engines
DE451559C (en) * 1925-06-12 1927-10-28 Samuel Richard Bailey By mixing device for the charging mixture of carburetor machine
US1703493A (en) * 1925-10-10 1929-02-26 Leach Charles Combined mixer and auxiliary air-inlet device
US1973889A (en) * 1931-01-26 1934-09-18 Continental Motors Corp Engine
US2072353A (en) * 1934-12-20 1937-03-02 Chrysler Corp Internal combustion engine fuel system
US2498190A (en) * 1948-04-30 1950-02-21 Leonard M Weeks Mixing device
US2701557A (en) * 1950-11-24 1955-02-08 Axiuer J Ramey Atomizing and mixing device for internal-combustion engines
US2685504A (en) * 1953-03-26 1954-08-03 Otmar M Ulbing Fuel mixing device
US3437467A (en) * 1964-07-10 1969-04-08 Floyd Jacobus Air injector for a carburetor

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3826235A (en) * 1971-11-26 1974-07-30 Lacrex Brevetti Sa Means for use in conjunction with a carburetor of an internal combustion engine for improving the combustion of fuel
US4192273A (en) * 1974-07-17 1980-03-11 Stan Gray Combustion mixture mixing device
US3998195A (en) * 1975-02-03 1976-12-21 Scott Alfred E Flow control and vaporizing chamber
US4092966A (en) * 1976-11-03 1978-06-06 Vortac, Inc. Fuel vaporizing and mixing device for gasoline engines
US4344394A (en) * 1978-06-12 1982-08-17 Automotive Engine Associates High swirl very low pollution piston engine employing optimizable vorticity
US4515138A (en) * 1978-06-23 1985-05-07 Isaac Agadi Internal combustion engines
WO1980002860A1 (en) * 1979-06-11 1980-12-24 M Showalter High swirl very low pollution piston engine employing optimizable vorticity metering
DE3002325A1 (en) * 1980-01-23 1981-07-30 Gerhard Heim Insert for IC engine inlet manifold - has internal and external spiral profiles to improve homogeneity of fuel air mixture
US4711225A (en) * 1986-03-01 1987-12-08 Andreas Stihl Connecting piece between the carburetor and the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine
US4807570A (en) * 1987-09-24 1989-02-28 Ruffolo Russ F Sequentially charged intake manifold
US4889081A (en) * 1988-05-23 1989-12-26 Suzuki Jidosha Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Vehicle suction system
US20060245296A1 (en) * 2005-04-28 2006-11-02 Hitachi, Ltd. Fluid mixing apparatus
US8033714B2 (en) * 2005-04-28 2011-10-11 Hitachi High-Technologies Corporation Fluid mixing apparatus

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