US3726360A - Mast or pole climbing device - Google Patents

Mast or pole climbing device Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3726360A
US3726360A US3726360DA US3726360A US 3726360 A US3726360 A US 3726360A US 3726360D A US3726360D A US 3726360DA US 3726360 A US3726360 A US 3726360A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
gripping
mast
climbing
foot plate
bar
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
R Cooper
R Gates
W Price
Original Assignee
W Price
R Cooper
R Gates
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by W Price, R Cooper, R Gates filed Critical W Price
Priority to US11644971A priority Critical
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3726360A publication Critical patent/US3726360A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B27/00Apparatus for climbing poles, trees, or the like
    • A63B27/02Climbing devices for round poles or trees attachable to the feet

Abstract

A mast or pole climbing device comprising as an integral unit, a generally U-shaped rigid gripping bar member comprised of an outer gripping bar, an inner gripping bar and a rear gripping bar, said inner and outer gripping bars being substantially parallel to each other and said rear gripping bar connecting said inner and outer gripping bars such that said bars lie in a common plane, the surface portion of the bar gripping the mast or pole being generally rounded, a rigid foot plate including a heel stop on said foot plate and an outer side foot support on said foot plate. The inner gripping bar is integrally connected along substantially its entire length to the inner edge of the foot plate. Attachment means for fastening elements are provided the foot plate and the foot plate forms an angle of about 5* to 30*, preferably 10* to 20* with the common plane of the U-shaped gripping bar member. A coating of resilient material such as plastic is applied to at least the gripping surface of the gripping bars.

Description

United States Patent 1 Price et al.

[ MAST OR POLE CLINIBING DEVICE [76] Inventors: William J. Price, 3823 East Lake Way, Redwood City, 94062; Richard W. Cooper, 1000 Ignatio Boulevard, Apt. 51, Navato, Robert A. Gates, 4018 Bennett Valley Road, Santa Rosa, all of Calif. 95403 [22] Filed: Feb. 18, 1 971 [211 App]. No.: 116,449

[52] US. Cl ..182/134 [51] Int. Cl. ..A63b 27/02 [58] Field of Search ..182/l34, 135

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,121,471 2/1964 Soderberg 182/134 2,009;474 7/1935 Castelli ..-.....132/l34 Primary ExaminerReinaldo P. Machado Attorney-Larson, Taylor & Hinds 51 Apr. 10, 1973 ABSTRACT A mast or pole climbing device comprising as an integral unit, a generally U-shaped rigid gripping bar member comprised of an outer gripping bar, an inner gripping bar and a rear gripping bar, said inner and outer gripping bars being substantially parallel to each other and said rear gripping bar connecting said inner and outer gripping bars such that said bars lie in a common plane, the surface portion of the bar gripping the mast or pole being generally rounded, a rigid foot plate including a heel stop on said foot plate and an outer side foot support on said foot plate. The inner gripping bar is integrally connected along substantially its entire length to the inner edge of the foot plate. Attachment means for fastening elements are provided the foot plate and the foot plate forms an angle of 55am"? to 30, referawio fi mebhimon plane of the U-shaped. gripping bar member. A coating of resilient material such as plastic is applied to at least the gripping surface of the gripping bars.

8 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures PATENTEUAPRI 01m 3.726.360

INVENTORS RICHARD W COOPER ROBERT A, GATES WILLIAM J. PRICE ATTUIINI'IYH PATEHTEUAPR] 01573 3 726,36Q

SHEET 2 BF 2 INVENTORS RICHARD W. COOPER ROBERT A. GATES WILLIAM J. PRICE ATTOR N EV S 1 MAST'OR POLE CLIMBING DEVICE This invention relates to a climbing device for masts and poles. More particularly the invention is directed to climbing devices which when secured to the foot find special use in the climbing of sailboat masts, flag poles and the like.

Devices adapted to be secured to an individuals feet for the climbing or scaling, of poles have been known virtually as long as poles themselves. However, most of these devices are not without their shortcomings. A common criticism of many pole climbing devices is their cost. Those climbing devices fortunate enough to pass the economic hurdle are frequently totally unsuitable for the climbing of sailboat masts. For example, many prior art climbing devices are incapable of use on sailboats because they do not permit the stepping over of the numerous obstructions present along the climbing path of a sailboat mast. Also, since most masts are tapered, there is often a limit as to how high an individual can comfortably climb without danger of inadvertent release or slippage. Other prior art pole climbing devices do such extensive damage to the mast and decks of the boat when employed that they have fallen in unanimous disfavor among sailboat owners.

Another drawback of many prior art climbing devices is that they are restricted to use on poles of particular size and/or shape.

Other climbing devices are cumbersome, difficult to apply to the feet, subject to rapid deterioration by the conditions of weather and the destructive elements of the sea. Finally, many of the known prior climbing devices leave much to be desired from the standpoint of efficiency and safety.

It should be readily apparent, therefore, that a climbing device which overcomes the aforementioned drawbacks of known climbing apparatus would come as a welcomed contribution to the art.

Accordingly, one object of this invention is to provide a climbing device useful in the climbing of sailboat masts as well as poles of various kinds.

It is another object of the invention to provide a device that is used to climb masts or poles of assorted sizes and shapes, e.g., round, square, rectangular, polyagonal, and which will release and grip with the movements of the legs of the climber ascending or descending the pole structure.

A further object of the invention is to provide a climbing device that is particularly adapted to the climbing of tapered masts and possessing pole or mast engaging surfaces of enhanced gripping characteristics.

Another object of the invention is to provide a mast or pole climbing device adapted for use on a pole structure wherein movement up or down the pole structure can be effected in substantially the same manner as a person walking forward up stairs or descending backward down stairs.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a mast or pole climbing device constructed so as to prohibit failure and wear and tear of movable parts.

It is another object of the invention to allow the user to withdraw one foot from the pole structure for the purpose of stepping over an obstruction while the other foot supports the entire weight of the user at the at- It is another object of the invention to be so constructed as to cause no damage (marring, scratching, denting) of the pole structure. Further, the invention is so constructed that accidental dropping will cause no damage to a finished surface nor to the invention. Also the invention is impervious to conditions of weather and the destructive elements in sea water.

Other and further features and objects of the invention are to provide a mast climbing device of simple construction, relatively light weight, inexpensive to manufacture, easy to apply to the foot, and efficient and effective in use.

These and other objects of the invention are obtained by a climbing device which comprises as an integral unit, a generally U-shaped rigid gripping bar member comprised of an outer gripping bar, an inner gripping bar and a rear gripping bar, said inner and outer gripping bars being substantially parallel to each other and said rear gripping bar connecting said inner and outer gripping bars such that said bars lie in a common plane, the surface portion of the bars gripping the mast or pole being generally rounded and a rigid foot plate including a heel stop and an outer side foot support. The inner gripping bar is integrally connected along substantially its entire length to the inner edge of the foot plate. Attachment means for foot fastening elements are provided on the foot plate. The foot plate forms an angle of about 5 to 30, preferably 10 to 20 with the common plane of the U-shaped gripping bar member. A coating or covering of non-metallic,

' resilient material such as plastic is provided at least the gripping surfaces of the gripping bars.

The climbing device may be formed from any suitable rigid material having the required strength to sustain the forces applied during climbing. Strong metallic materials, particularly the light metals, such as aluminum, are preferred, however. Advantageously, the device is cast from metal as a one-piece construction so as to eliminate all moving parts and thereby preclude the possibility of failure on the part of the device due to the wear and tear of such parts.

An important feature of the invention resides in the fact that the surface portion of the bars of the generally U-shaped bar member gripping the mast or pole are generally rounded. It was surprising to find that the generally rounded surface gripping portions in the U- shaped member together with their coating of relatively soft, resilient material provided the necessary grip without in any way scratching, denting, gouging, marring or otherwise damaging the mast. Another valuable function derived from the generally rounded surface of the bars is ease of release of the U-shaped member in tained height with the same efficiency and effectivethe climbing operation. All that is required of a climber to effect release is a rolling of the ankle to the inside.

Thus, the bars that make up the generally U-shaped gripping member may take any desired shape as long as the surface gripping portions are generally rounded. Accordingly, the bars may conveniently assume the more common circular form but may be generally elongated in the plane in which the bars lie. The latter form, while retaining the advantages of the rounded gripping surface of the bars, often provides at the same time additional strength to the bar and an increased gripping force against the mast. Another important feature of the invention resides in the angulation the plane of the foot plate forms with the plane of the bars of the U-shaped bar member. As aforementioned this angle should fall in the range of about to 30, preferably to It has been found that in the climbing of tapered masts or poles, if this angle is less than 5, the climber will reach a point where his ankle is bent to an extremely uncomfortable degree. On the other hand, should this angle exceed about 30 any slight movement of the foot could inadvertently release the grip of the device. The angle within this range which will provide the optimum results will vary depending primarily upon the diameter and degree of the taper of the mast or pole and the length of the rear gripping bar.

In a preferred aspect of the invention, the foot plate is integrally attached to the inner gripping bar of the generally U-shaped gripping bar member so that a portion of the inner gripping bar along substantially its entire length projects above the foot plate. By this arrangement the inner gripping bar serves both as an inner foot support and as a protective shield for the inside of the foot during the climbing operation.

The attachment means for foot fastening elements provided the foot plate can take any suitable form such as, for instance, eyelet-containing members integrally attached to the inner gripping bar and the outer side foot support, and adaptable to receive and retain foot fastening elements such as foot straps. Numerous obvious equivalents for fastening elements .will come to mind to those skilled in the art. Likewise, any suitable fastening elements by which a foot may be secured to the foot plate are contemplated by the invention.

The coating of resilient material provided at least the gripping surfaces of the gripping bars of the climbing devices not only protects the device from the elements and the mast or pole from damage during the climbing operation but as aforementioned also serves together with the generally rounded surface portion of the bar gripping the mast to increase the frictional or gripping forces between the gripping bars and the pole or mast. In a preferred embodiment, the entire climbing device is coated with the resilient material thereby providing for the wearer, a foot plate that is substantially slip-resistant. Furthermore, accidental'dropping of the thuscoated climbing device of the invention onto the deck of the boat causes no damage to a finished surface.

The material provided the climbing device as a coating in accordance with the present invention may be any non-metallic, relatively soft, natural or synthetic material having sufficient resiliency to provide a coating having enhanced grip or frictional characteristics. Such materials include natural or synthetic, organic, film-forming, thermoplastic or thermosetting polymeric resins which solidify or set to a flexible, water-insoluble film. Illustrative of suitable materials are plastics such as vinyl plastics; polyolefins such as polyethylene and polypropylene; polyurethanes and polyacrylates; natural elastomers such as natural rubber; and synthetic elastomers such as neoprene, butyl, isoprene, nitrile, urethan, fluorcarbon and acrylate rubbers. It is preferred that the coating material selected be characterised with a tendency to bond to the substrate upon application. Application of the resilient coating can be made by any suitable method or technique such as those well known in the plastic coating art. Most conveniently, the uncoated climbing device is simply dipped into the coating material while the latter is in molten form and then allowing the coating thus applied to solidify or set. It is preferred, however, to bake the coated device at elevated temperatures after the dipping to facilitate setting and bonding of the coating material to the substrate. The thickness of the coating may vary substantially and often will depend upon the particular coating method selected and the coating technique employed. Coating thicknesses in the range of about one-sixteenth to three-fourths inch or more, for instance, are satisfactory.

The invention will now be further described by reference to the attached drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a top view of the climbing device for the left foot;

.FIG. 2 is an end elevation of the climbing device of FIG. 1 in gripping engagement with the mast;

FIG. 3 is a front elevation of the climbing device of FIG. 1 in gripping engegement with the mast;

FIG. 4 is a rear perspective of the climbing device of FIG. 1 wherein the foot plate is angled upward so as to effect release of the U-shaped gripping member from the mast.

It should be apparent that two climbing devices are employed, one for the left foot and one for the right. The drawings show only the climbing device for the left foot but the climbing device for the right foot is a mirror image of the left one having the U-shaped gripping member attached to the inside of the right foot.

Referring to the drawings a U-shaped gripping bar member, generally indicated as 1, is composed of three bars, an inner bar 3, an outer bar 4 and a rear bar 5. Inner bar 3 and outer bar 4 are substantially parallel to each other, while rear bar 5 connects them at one end to complete the U-shape. The gripping bars 3, 4 and 5 contain generally rounded gripping surfaces 3, 4' and 5, respectively. Inner bar 3 is connected along essentially its entire length to the inner edge of a foot plate indicated generally as 7. As can be seen from FIGS. 2-4, the foot plate 7 is attached to inner bar 3 in a fashion that leaves a portion 3a of the inner bar 3 along its entire length projecting above the foot plate which portion 3a serves at least in part as an inner foot support and also protects the inside of the foot during climbing. In addition, the U-shaped member 1 is attached to the foot plate 7 at a slight angle. In the device shown the plane of the U-shaped member 1 and the plane of the foot plate 7 form an angle of approximately 17', although this angle can vary from about 5 to 30, as previously mentioned.

Foot plate 7 includes a heel stop 9 and a side support 10. Connected to side support 10 are two spaced, upwardly projecting attachment members 11 and 12 in which are provided eyelets l5 and 16, respectively. Generally opposite attachment members 11 and 12 are corresponding attachment members 17 and 18 of identical structure connected to inner gripping bar 3 and containing eyelets 21 and 22, respectively.

The climbing device described is of aluminum, cast as a single-piece construction. A coating of vinyl plastic indicated in the drawings as 20 is applied by dipping the uncoated device in molten vinyl plastic and baking the coated device at a temperature of 300F for approximately 23 minutes to bond the plastic 20 to the aluminum substrate shown in FIG. 1 as broken-away portion 30. The eyelets 15, 16, 21 and 22 are then formed by drilling holes or slots into the upwardly projecting attachment members 11, 12, 17 and 18. Straps 23, 24, 25 and 26 are secured to attachment members 11, 12, 17 and 18, respectively by looping one end of each strap through the eyelet provided the attachment members and, fastening the strap thereto by sewing, rivetting, etc. Foot straps 23 and 24 each contain nonslip buckles 27 and 28, respectively.

The length of the bars 3, 4 and 5 will depend primarily upon the diameter of the mast or pole to be climbed. The inner bar 3 and outer bar 4 are preferably of a length slightly exceeding that of the mast diameter and the rear bar 5 should be of a length that permits easy fitting of the U-shaped member about the pole or mast near its base. Ordinarily, the length of the rear bar 5 falls in the range of about 2.5'to 16 inches. The angular variation of about 5 to 30 and length variations of the rear bar of 25m 16 inches will permit use of the climbing device of the invention with virtually any size mast or pole from about 1 inch in diameter to 15.5 inches in diameter.

In the use of the climbing device, the climber secures the device to his feet, inserts one of the U-shaped gripping members 1 about the mast and places his weight on foot plate 7. When the climber places his weight on the foot plate 7, the gripping surfaces 3, 4' and 5' are forced against the pole and support the weight of the climber. The climber may then altemate-.

ly release and secure a grip upon the mast or pole one foot at a time and may climb up or down the mast or pole one foot after another or by alternately sliding one foot and then the other. Release can be effected by merely rolling the ankle to the inside or by lifting the foot.

Although a specific embodiment of the invention has been described, it is apparent that modifications thereof may be made by those skilled in the art. Such modifications may be made without departing from the spirit and scopt of the invention as set forth in pended claims.

It is claimed:

the apgripping bar and a rear gripping bar, said inner and outer gripping bars being substantially parallel to each other and said rear gripping bar connecting said inner and outer gripping bars such that said bars lie in a common plane, the surface portion of said bars gripping the mast or pole being generally rounded, said outer and inner gripping bars being further comprised of an inner rounded portion and an outer portion of reduced cross sectional area integral with and extending in a direction opposite to said inner rounded portion, a rigid metal foot plate including a heel stop and an outer side foot support, said inner gripping bar being integrally connected along substantially its entire length to the inner edge of said foot plate so that a portion of said inner gripping bar along substantially its entire length projects above the foot plate to thereby provide a protective inner foot support, attachment means on said foot plate for foot fastening elements, said foot plate forming an angle of about to 30 with the common plane of th r U-shaped gripping bar member, at least the gripping surfaces of said gripping bars being provided with a coating of non-metallic, resilient material.

2. The mast or climbing device of claim 1 wherein the uncoated integral unit is of aluminum.

3. The mast or climbing device of claim 1 wherein the integral angle is about to 4. The mast or climbing device of claim 1 wherein the attachment means comprises a first pair of spaced 1. A mast or pole climbing device comprising as an members on the inner gripping bar and a second pair of spaced members on said side support generally opposite said first spaced members, said first and second spaced members being adapted to retain foot fastening elements.-

5. The mast or pole climbing device of claim 4 wherein each of the spaced members contains an eyelet by which the foot fastening elements are secured to the foot plate.

6. The mast or climbing device of claim 1 wherein substantially the entire device is provided with said coating of resilient material.

7. The mast or climbing device of claim 1 wherein the resilient coatlng is of a synthetic, organic, plastic material.

8. The mast or climbing device of claim 7 wherein the synthetic plastic is vinyl plastic.

Claims (8)

1. A mast or pole climbing device comprising as an integral unit a generally U-shaped metal gripping bar member comprised of an outer gripping bar, an inner gripping bar and a rear gripping bar, said inner and outer gripping bars being substantially parallel to each other and said rear gripping bar connecting said inner and outer gripping bars such that said bars lie in a common plane, the surface portion of said bars gripping the mast or pole being generally rounded, said outer and inner gripping bars being further comprised of an inner rounded portion and an outer portion of reduced cross sectional area integral with and extending in a direction opposite to said inner rounded portion, a rigid metal foot plate including a heel stop and an outer side foot support, said inner gripping bar being integrally connected along substantially its entire length to the inner edge of said foot plate so that a portion of said inner gripping bar along substantially its entire length projects above the foot plate to thereby provide a protective inner foot support, attachment means on said foot plate for foot fastening elements, said foot plate forming an angle of about 5* to 30* with the common plane of thr U-shaped gripping bar member, at least the gripping surfaces of said gripping bars being provided with a coating of non-metallic, resilient material.
2. The mast or climbing device of claim 1 wherein the uncoated integral unit is of aluminum.
3. The mast or climbing device of claim 1 wherein the integral angle is about 15* to 20*.
4. The mast or climbing device of claim 1 wherein the attachment means comprises a first pair of spaced members on the inner gripping bar and a second pair of spaced members on said side support generally opposite said first spaced members, said first and second spaced members being adapted to retain foot fastening elements.
5. The mast or pole climbing device of claim 4 wherein each of the spaced members contains an eyelet by which the foot fastening elements are secured to the foot plate.
6. The mast or climbing device of claim 1 wherein substantially the entire device is provided with said coating of resilient material.
7. The mast or climbing device of claim 1 wherein the resilient coatIng is of a synthetic, organic, plastic material.
8. The mast or climbing device of claim 7 wherein the synthetic plastic is vinyl plastic.
US3726360D 1971-02-18 1971-02-18 Mast or pole climbing device Expired - Lifetime US3726360A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11644971A true 1971-02-18 1971-02-18

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3726360A true US3726360A (en) 1973-04-10

Family

ID=22367264

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3726360D Expired - Lifetime US3726360A (en) 1971-02-18 1971-02-18 Mast or pole climbing device

Country Status (3)

Country Link
US (1) US3726360A (en)
DE (1) DE2153241A1 (en)
GB (1) GB1295819A (en)

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4368801A (en) * 1981-03-09 1983-01-18 Lewis Delmar D Column climbing device
WO1990014133A1 (en) * 1989-05-18 1990-11-29 Abb Plast Ab Pole climber
US5407025A (en) * 1993-07-15 1995-04-18 Nickel; Donald C. Gripping device for timber
US5809734A (en) * 1996-11-04 1998-09-22 Turner; Daryl Truss structure for a utility pole
US5870877A (en) * 1994-12-07 1999-02-16 Turner; Daryl Truss structure for a utility pole
US6155017A (en) * 1996-11-04 2000-12-05 Powertrusion 2000 Truss structure
US6453635B1 (en) 1998-07-15 2002-09-24 Powertrusion International, Inc. Composite utility poles and methods of manufacture
US20040099478A1 (en) * 2002-11-27 2004-05-27 Xerox Corporation Climbing apparatus and method
US20060101783A1 (en) * 2004-08-27 2006-05-18 Swierski Robert J Column climbing device and associated method of use
US20110214941A1 (en) * 2010-03-06 2011-09-08 D B Industries, Inc. Pole climbing fall prevention assembly
USD668579S1 (en) 2011-08-16 2012-10-09 D B Industries, Inc. Buckle portion
US20140353084A1 (en) * 2013-06-03 2014-12-04 Canadian Plastics Inc. Swimming pool descending structure with overmolded anti-slip coating
US9265989B2 (en) 2011-11-18 2016-02-23 D B Industries, Llc Connecting adjustment assembly

Families Citing this family (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2624026B1 (en) * 1987-12-08 1994-05-06 Bresch Andre Device for climbing a mat
DE4213753C2 (en) * 1992-04-25 1995-12-14 Thomas Stiller Climbing clamp for climbing a tree along the branch-free tree trunk
WO2010060140A1 (en) * 2008-11-25 2010-06-03 Neralic, Ivan, Robert, Jr. A climbing aid
DE102015013464B4 (en) * 2015-10-17 2018-02-08 Langmatz Gmbh strain relief lugs

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2009474A (en) * 1933-04-26 1935-07-30 Castelli Cesare Climber for poles of hard material
US3121471A (en) * 1962-08-13 1964-02-18 Emil O Soderberg Climber

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2009474A (en) * 1933-04-26 1935-07-30 Castelli Cesare Climber for poles of hard material
US3121471A (en) * 1962-08-13 1964-02-18 Emil O Soderberg Climber

Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4368801A (en) * 1981-03-09 1983-01-18 Lewis Delmar D Column climbing device
WO1990014133A1 (en) * 1989-05-18 1990-11-29 Abb Plast Ab Pole climber
US5407025A (en) * 1993-07-15 1995-04-18 Nickel; Donald C. Gripping device for timber
US5870877A (en) * 1994-12-07 1999-02-16 Turner; Daryl Truss structure for a utility pole
US5809734A (en) * 1996-11-04 1998-09-22 Turner; Daryl Truss structure for a utility pole
US6155017A (en) * 1996-11-04 2000-12-05 Powertrusion 2000 Truss structure
US6453635B1 (en) 1998-07-15 2002-09-24 Powertrusion International, Inc. Composite utility poles and methods of manufacture
US20040099478A1 (en) * 2002-11-27 2004-05-27 Xerox Corporation Climbing apparatus and method
US20060101783A1 (en) * 2004-08-27 2006-05-18 Swierski Robert J Column climbing device and associated method of use
US20110214941A1 (en) * 2010-03-06 2011-09-08 D B Industries, Inc. Pole climbing fall prevention assembly
US8887866B2 (en) 2010-03-06 2014-11-18 D B Industries, Llc Pole climbing fall prevention assembly
US10086234B2 (en) 2010-03-06 2018-10-02 D B Industries, Llc Pole climbing fall prevention assembly
USD668579S1 (en) 2011-08-16 2012-10-09 D B Industries, Inc. Buckle portion
US9265989B2 (en) 2011-11-18 2016-02-23 D B Industries, Llc Connecting adjustment assembly
US9931526B2 (en) 2011-11-18 2018-04-03 D B Industries, Llc Connecting adjustment assembly
US20140353084A1 (en) * 2013-06-03 2014-12-04 Canadian Plastics Inc. Swimming pool descending structure with overmolded anti-slip coating

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
DE2153241A1 (en) 1972-09-07
GB1295819A (en) 1972-11-08

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US4714135A (en) Rappel rescue system
US7871049B2 (en) Corner climber
US3707730A (en) Basketball practice glove
US3857397A (en) Electrically conductive wrist strap
US5810695A (en) Water trampoline device
US5022094A (en) Gripping glove
US5348360A (en) Replaceable cushioned contoured gripping device for the handle of a tool
US4667772A (en) Ascender for rope climbing, adapted for use with a carabiner
US5618249A (en) Unidirectionally adjustably resistant recoilers and portable exercise devices
US6948589B2 (en) Tree stand and climbing devices
US5803881A (en) Athletic training belt
US3752474A (en) Arm and leg push pull type exercising device
US5514019A (en) Life jacket with stabilizing handles
AU2011224603B2 (en) Pole climbing fall prevention assembly
US4754499A (en) Gripper pads for hands
US5931259A (en) Safety ladder attachment
US4308629A (en) Safety harness device
US4114874A (en) Appliance for swimmers
US20070056144A1 (en) Hand tool handle modification system
US5082156A (en) Tool wrist strap
US4484740A (en) Weight training device
US4706858A (en) Hunting device
US6708340B1 (en) Apparatus and method relating to a quick attachment and release goggle mounting system
US5353440A (en) Grip glove
US4057246A (en) Multipurpose push pull exerciser