US3724829A - Apparatus for the introduction of volatile additives into a melt - Google Patents

Apparatus for the introduction of volatile additives into a melt Download PDF

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US3724829A
US3724829A US3724829DA US3724829A US 3724829 A US3724829 A US 3724829A US 3724829D A US3724829D A US 3724829DA US 3724829 A US3724829 A US 3724829A
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vessel
openings
compartment
melt
treatment
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A Alt
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Georg Fischer AG
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Georg Fischer AG
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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C21METALLURGY OF IRON
    • C21CPROCESSING OF PIG-IRON, e.g. REFINING, MANUFACTURE OF WROUGHT-IRON OR STEEL; TREATMENT IN MOLTEN STATE OF FERROUS ALLOYS
    • C21C1/00Refining of pig-iron; Cast iron
    • C21C1/10Making spheroidal graphite cast-iron

Abstract

Introduction of vaporizable additives, such as magnesium, into an iron melt in which the vaporization is initiated by a tilting movement of a treatment vessel. The vaporizable material is contained in a separate compartment which can be externally charged and which, in one position of the vessel segregates the additive from the melt, but on tilting the vessel, permits communication with the melt through openings located at different levels. The vapor bubbles formed ascend through the melt with such a size and in such a number that at least a portion of the bubbles escape from the surface of the melt. The vapor bubbles have a great surface area to provide, for example with magnesium, a yield of at least 30 percent and preferably more than 40 percent of the additive in the melt while the velocity of the ascending vapor bubbles is such as to produce a flushing action on the melt resulting in a reduction of the reaction products and residual undesirable impurities in the melt.

Description

[54] APPARATUS FOR THE INTRODUCTION OF VOLATILE ADDITIVES INTO A MELT Inventor:

Anton Alt, Mettmann, Germany Georg Fischer Aktiengesellschaft, Schaffhausen, Switzerland Filed: Dec. 15, 1971 Appl. No.: 208,074

Assignee:

Related US. Application Data Division of Ser. No. 793,065, Jan. 22, 1969, Pat. No. 3,666,449.

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Jan. 26, 1968 Dec. 3, 1968 Switzerland 1274/68 Switzerland ..l796l/68 US. Cl. ..266/34 T, 266/39 Int. Cl ..C2lc 7/00 Field of Search... ..266/34 A, 34 T; 75/130 R Reier ences Cited UNITED s'n TEs PATENTS 2,698,749 1/1955 Fisliell ..266/34T [451 Apr. 3, 1973 Primary Examiner-Gerald A. Dost AttorneyWerner W. Kleeman [57] ABSTRACT Introduction of vaporizable additives, such as magnesium, into an iron melt in which the vaporization is initiated by a tilting movement of a treatment vessel. The vaporizable material is contained in a separate compartment which can be externally charged and which, in one position of the vessel segregates the additive from the melt, but on tilting the vessel, permits communication with the melt through openings located at difierent levels. The vapor bubbles formed ascend through the melt with such a size and in such a number that at least a portion of the bubbles escape from the surface of themelt. The vapor bubbles have a great surface area to provide, for example with magnesium, a yield of at least 30 percent and preferably more than 40 percent of the additive in the melt while the velocity of the ascending vapor bubbles is such as to produce a flushing action on the melt resulting in a reduction of the reaction products and residual undesirable impurities in the melt.

15 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures APPARATUS FOR THE INTRODUCTION OF VOLATILE ADDITIVES INTO A MELT CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED CASE The present application is a divisional and continuation-in-part application of my commonly assigned, copending U.S. application, Ser. No. 793,065, filed Jan. 22, 1969, and now U.S. Pat. No. 3,666,449 and entitledz: METHOD FOR THE INTRODUCTION OF VOLATILE ADDITIVES INTO A MELT.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a new and improved apparatus. for the introduction of volatile or vaporizable additives into a melt, especially magnesium, into a iron-carbon melt, in which the vaporization is initiated by a tilting movement of a treatment vessel whereby the volatile additives are immersed beneath the surface of the melt, and further, wherein the speed of vaporization is retarded by means of a receiving compartment for the additives which are to be vaporized, such receiving compartment being equipped with openings directed into the interior of the treatment vessel and relates further to the use of the same for the production of various materials.

The introduction of magnesium into iron melts is the surest technical and the most economical manner to produce iron-carbon cast materials with spherical graphite. In so doing, magnesium, as well as also other elements of the earth alkaline group and the group of the rare earths, causes, in known manner, a separation of the graphite in spherical form during solidification and/or subsequent heat treatment, and therefore results in improved mechanical properties.

However, the introduction of magnesium is associated with known difficulties. Its specific weight of 1.74 g/cm is considerably lower than that of the iron melts. Above all, magnesium, with a boiling point of ll07C at a generally encountered temperature of the iron melt of l480C, develops a vapor pressure of approximately 12 atmospheres. Therefore, in the majority of instances, magnesium is introduced in the form of key alloys or hardeners with a magnesium content of to 30 percent into the melt which is to be treated, since the vapor pressure is reduced in accordance with the dilution.

However, the use of key alloys or hardeners possesses the drawback that other elements are introduced into the melt to a certain degree in undesirable quantities. Consequently, the possibility of using such key alloys or hardeners is generally limited. The use of such materials necessitates starting with melts of low sulfur content. Melts of low sulfur content can ordinarily only be realized in a basic melting furnace unit or in an acidic melting furnace unit while using a sulfur-poor material charge or by using a special desulfurizing technique. Moreover, the use of key alloys or hardeners is associated with increased costs. Thus, the cost for the same quantity of added magnesium utilizing conventional key alloys or hardeners amounts to about five to twenty times that of using pure magnesi- Accordingly, a whole series of techniques have become known to the art which are concerned with the introduction of pure magnesium into the iron melts. Thus, at the present time, a small quantity of cast iron with spherical graphite may be produced according to a technique in which pure magnesium is added under a pressure which corresponds to the vapor pressure at the given treatment temperature. Methods are also known to the art wherein pure magnesium is continuously added in solid, liquid, or gaseous condition, the speed of reaction being controlled by the speed with which the material is added. It has also already been proposed to reduce to an acceptable degree the vigor or intensity of the reaction of magnesium during continuous or one-time addition by mixing the same with suitable inert materials in powderyor pasty-like condition, by imbuing porous materials with magnesium, by the use of suitable coatings, or by introducing the magnesium into a container having predetermined openings limiting the contact with the melt.

In addition to the conventional methods of adding magnesium to the melt by pouring-over, immersionor introduction with a pipe or similar device, it has also been proposed heretofore to bring about the addition or introduction in such a manner that the magnesium is placed into a tiltable vessel within a specially provided pocket therefor. After filling with iron the magnesium is brought below the surface of the bath by carrying out a tilting movement through about'90. Additionally, a technique has also become known according to which the device provided for the reception of the magnesium is constructed in the form of a compartment which can be externally charged and which is equipped with an opening towards the inside, the size of which is decisive for the heat delivered by convection to the magnesium through the melt and, therefore, for the speed of vaporization. The drawback of this method resides in the fact that the considerable quantity of vapor hinders the continuous flow of heat-supplying melt. Consequently, on the one hand, this causes an irregular reaction process which is associated with violent eruptions and, on the other hand, the dimensioning of the opening towards the lower extreme is limited and thus renders impossible a delay or retardation of the reaction to the desired degree.

According to another known method, the yield is considerably increased due to the arrangement of a number of small openings, whereby the melt does not enter into the chamber or compartment containing the magnesium, rather the heat required for vaporization is delivered by conducting heat through the walls of the chamber. However, with this technique, the flushing effect is practically lost.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Therefore, it is a primary object of this invention to provide a new and improved means for the introduction of vaporizable materials into an iron melt which is free from the foregoing and other such disadvantages.

It is a further object of this invention to provide an apparatus for the addition of vaporizable materials in a melt, specifically magnesium, wherein the vapor bubbles of the vaporizing additives are permitted to ascend through the melt with a size and speed such that there occurs a rather extensive absorption of the vapor by the melt and, additionally, the bubbles cause a flushing action which is effective to separate the reaction products between the melt and the vapor.

Another object of this invention is the provision of a tiltable vessel having an externally-chargeable compartment for reception of the vaporizable materials which compartment does not communicate with the melt in one position of the vessel, and does communicate with the melt when the vessel is tilted by about 90, the compartment having openings at different levels to facilitate a flow-through of the melt without interference by the vapor bubbles.

A still further object of this invention is the provision of apparatus for the addition of other materials such as fluxing agents and carbon to the melt simultaneously with the addition of the vaporizable materials.

The basic objects of the invention are to permit the vapor bubbles formed by the additives to ascend through the melt with such a size and in such a number that at least a portion of the formed vapor bubbles escape from the surface of the bath with such a large velocity that the ascending bubbles exert a flushing action upon the melt. This results in a reduction of the reaction products and residual undesirable mixtures or impurities in the melt. n the other hand, the size of the vapor bubbles is chosen to be such that there results a sufficiently great reaction surface of the vapor bubbles ascending in the melt whereby there is obtained a favorable yield of the additivesintroduced into the melt, for instance, a magnesium yield in iron-carbon melts at the usualtreatment temperature of at least 30 percent and preferably above 40 percent.

In other words, the invention is generally characterized by the fact that the vapor bubbles of the vaporizing additives are permitted to ascent through the melt with such a size and in such a number that, on the one hand, there occurs as extensive as possible absorption or reception of the resulting vapor by the melt and, on the other hand, a favorable flushing action for separating reaction products between the melt and the resulting vapor. During the introduction of the additives into the melt, the same can be simultaneously subjected to a circulatory movement.

As indicated', the invention is concerned with the provision of an improved tiltable treatment vessel for carrying out the aforesaid treatment technique. This tiltable treatment vessel is manifested by the features that it possesses at least one rigidly mounted receiving compartment for the additives which compartment can be charged from the outside, that is externally of the vessel. This receiving compartment is arranged at' least at a portion of the base surface of the interior of the ladle or vessel when the vessel is tilted to its treatment or vertically-extending position. Yet, the interior or inner chamber of the receiving compartment does not communicate with the melt when the vessel is in its filling" or horizontally-extending position. Further, the compartment includes a number of openings directed towards the interior of the treatment vessel, which openings are arranged and constructed in such a fashion thatthe melt passes into the compartment from the treatment vessel through at least some of the openings when the vessel is in its treatment position to vaporize the vaporizable additives with a certain speed and then passes back through at least some of the openings from the compartment into the interior or inner chamber of the treatment vessel.

According to the instant inventive concepts, the techniques hereof may be used for treating cast iron or malleable cast iron melts which have been molten in an acidic process without prior desulfurization, with technically pure magnesium or alloys containing large quantities of magnesium. Further, these techniques may be used for the production of cast iron with a carbon content of 2.5 to 3.8 percent carbon, as well'as for the production of gray cast iron and cast iron with vermicular graphite.

By virtue of the instant invention, there is simultaneously attained, with an exceptional yield of, for instance, magnesium, such a flushing or agitation effect that the reaction products formed between the melt and the vapor, for instance, magnesium sulfide, are separated from the I melt. In contrast, with known techniques wherein the melts are treated with magnesium, the use of melts having a higher starting sulfur content have been excluded due to the formation of undesired inclusions. Consequently, the known treatment of sulfur-rich iron melts, for instance, cast iron or'malleable cast iron melts from the. acidic cupola furnace cannot be undertaken without previous desulfurization and withoutharmful products of reaction remaining in the melt. Sulfur-rich starting melts treated according to the inventive method manifest themselves, for instance, by a lower content of sulfur remaining in the melt.

As mentioned, it is advantageous, according to this invention, to equip the receiving compartment or chamber with openings which permit the magnesium vapor bubbles to ascent with such a size or magnitude through the melt that the magnesium yield amounts to at least 30 percent and preferably, more than 40 percent. a

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING The invention will be better understood, andobje'cts other than those set forth above will become apparent, when consideration is given to the following detailed description thereof. Such description makes reference to the annexed drawing, whereinz- FIG. 1 schematically illustrates an exemplary embodiment of a tiltable treatment vessel according to this invention in its filling orhorizontally extending position; and

FIG. 2 depicts the tiltable vessel shown in FIG. 1 in its treatment or vertically extending position.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawing and, more particularly, to FIG. 1, it will be seen that the treatment vessel 1 is lined with refractory material and is filled while in its horizontally extending position with melt 2 to such an extent that the receiving compartment or'chamber 3, which can be charged from the-outside or externally, remains free, that is to say, does not communicate with the iron melt 2. After opening the stopperor plug 4, the receiving compartment or chamber 3 is charged with the vaporizable additive 5 with the addition of possible further additives, as will be explained hereinafter. By means of the stopper or closure 4, the charging opening of the receiving chamber or compartment 3 is closed and by means of a suitable cover member 6, the charging opening of the vessel 1 is likewise closed. The cover 6 contains an opening of to 50 mm. diameter which is aligned with an opening in the tea can-like pouring spout of the vessel 1 when the cover 6 is in its closed position to vent the vessel.

After closing the plug 4 and the cover member 6, the entire treatment vessel 1 can be tilted by a remote controlled drive mechanism (not shown) into the treatment or vertically extending position depicted in FIG. 2. In the vertically extending position of the treatment vessel 1, the receiving compartment 3 is located below the surface of the melt 2, and the melt passes via the apertures or openings 7 and 8 into the interior of the receiving compartment 3 where it contacts the additive 5 causing vaporization of the same. The formed vapor escapes in accordance with the lift through the discharge openings 8 arranged at the top of the receiving compartment 3, while the melt 2 continuously flows through the inlet openings 7 arranged at the lower region of the receiving compartment 3. Accordingly, the delivery of the heat in this manner assists and supports the vaporization process which is associated with a considerable take-up heat. By appropriately dimensioning the cross-section of the openings 7 and 8, it is possible to predetermine the reaction velocity or speed of the pure magnesium 5 located in the receiving compartment 3, without requiring undesired additive materials. It is here to be mentioned that the total cross sectional area or cross-section of the compartment openings 7 located at the lower height or region of the receiving compartment 3 when the-treatment vessel 1 is in its treatment or vertically extending position advantageously may be either equal to or different from the total cross-sectional area of the compartment openings 8 located at the upper height or region of such receiving compartment. The walls of the compartment 3 are preferably formed of refractory material, preferably clay graphite plates of 10 to 50 mm. thickness. The openings 7 are preferably of a diameter of 20 to 40 mm. and the openings 8 are preferably of a diameter of 10 to 30 mm. with the openings 8 distributed over at least a third of the base surface of the vessel 1 and, in the embodiment under consideration it may be assumed the entire cross-sectional area of the openings 7 are smaller than the entire cross-sectional area of the openings 8.

By virtue of the arrangement of the openings 7 and 8 of the receiving compartment 3 depicted in the drawing, the inlet openings 7 are subjected to a greater hydrostatic pressure (H than the outlet or discharge openings 8 (H Due to contact of the molten castiron with the magnesium, there result vapor bubbles which escape through the discharge openings '8. Consequently, there exists a through-flow of the molten cast iron through the receiving compartment 3, so that there occurs a uniform reaction of the magnesium.

The vapor bubbles escaping through the openings 8 move through the melt 2 towards the top and, in so doing, are intentionally taken up in part by the melt. The melt'which is treated in this manner is again emptied through the filling openings by tilting the treatment vessel 1. In order to dampen the reaction of the pure magnesium located in the receiving compartment 3, it is possible to additionally introduce into this compartment cold scrap iron or another cooling agent. Through the arrangement of one or a number of grid-like intermediate floors formed of refractory material in the vessel 1 (not shown), it is possible to still further improve the yield of the additives. In order to obtain an overpressure in the treatment vessel 1, it is possible to appropriately construct the cover member 6.

The mode of operation of the treatment technique by means of the inventive apparatus will now be explained in conjunction with the following examples:

EXAMPLE 1 A cast iron melt of the following chemical composition:

3 .80 C 1.80 Si 0.57 Mn 0.07 P 0.179% S had added thereto at a temperature of 1500C, according to the inventive process, 0.3 percent pure magnesium in the form of bars, or ingots. The quantity of iron to be treated amounted to 1700 kg. The vaporization of the magnesium lasted for seconds. After emptying the treatment vessel into a ladle, the following chemical composition was determined:

0.002 S 0.065 %-Mg Thus, the magnesium yield amounted to 66 percent.

The structure of the cast test pieces after innoculation with 0.5 percent ferrosilicon consisted of spherical graphite, that is to say, 96 percent Type VI according to VDG Merkblatt, P 441 and 4 percent Type V.

EXAMPLE 2 had added thereto at a temperature of 1510C, according to the inventive process, 0.28 percentpure magnesium in the form of bars, or ingots. The amount of iron to be treated amounted to 860 kg. The vaporization of the magnesium lasted seconds. After emptying the treatment vessel into a ladle, the following chemical composition was determined:

0.056 Mg I Thus, the magnesium yield amounted to 63.5 percent.

Furthermore, it is known for the carburization of iron-carbon melts to add carbon to the surface of the bath of a melt located in an electric induction-furnace. However, the degree of carburization with such a technique is dependent to a large extent upon the agitation effect of the magnetic coils and the type of slag cover. With lower input powerto the electric furnace,

carburization together with desulfurization in the ladle, whereby the required bath movement, on the one hand, is produced byrotation or centrifuging or, on the other hand, by air-or gas flushing.

These known techniques exhibit the drawback that the treatment times last up to 10 minutes and the carbon yield is low and subjected to certain undesired fluctuations.

It has now been additionally found that it is possible to positively carburize and simultaneously desulfurize and, if desired, regulate the residual magnesium content required for the spherical graphite formation of an iron-carbon melt in a simple manner, if during the performance of the inventive process before and/or during the introduction of magnesium into the iron-carbon melt, carbon is added to the surface of the bath; The carbon is added in the form of conventional carburizing agents, preferably in the form of coke grit or sand or graphite or carbon electrodes.

The above technique is especially suitable for the carburization of cast iron, and indeed, specifically for the production of cast iron with spherical graphite.

During the production of cast iron with spherical gra-.

phite, it is necessary to reduce the sulfur content of the melt delivered from the acidic adjusted cupola furnace and to increase the carbon content to approximately 3.6, to 3.8 percent C.

As the treatment vessel there can advantageously be used a converter, as such has previously been described in conjunction with FIGS. 1 and 2.

i The carbon for carburization of the melt, after filling of the starting melt, is added to the uncovered bath in the converter which is located in its horizontally'extending position. After the subsequent rocking or pivoting of the converter into the vertically extending position, the vaporizing magnesium brings about a pronounced agitation of the bath which promotes carburization. Furthermore, the strongly reducing conditions, the basic slag, and the reduction of the sulfur content, act favorably for carburization. Due to the cooperation of these conditions, it is possible to desulfurize a melt in a single working operation within approximately 70 seconds to approximately 0.003 percent final sulfur content, and the carbon content can be increased by approximately 0.6 percent and the residual magnesium content can be regulated to the amount necessary for cast iron with spherical graphite.

The formation of slag in the receiving compartment and in the openings between this compartment and the treatment vessel can be prevented by the addition of small amounts of fluxing agents, such as N aCl. In so do-.

ing, the fluxing agent is added to the pure magnesium ingots, for instance, in a ratio of 0.2 kg NaCl/lOOO kg is shown and described present' means operable from outside said vessel for closing said 1. A tiltable treatment vessel comprising means defining a melt-receiving main chamber for said vessel, means defining a vaporizable additive-receiving compartment fixedly secured within said vessel and including an additive-opening for charging said compartment with additives from outside said vessel, means for tilting said vessel through approximately between a filling position and a treatment position, a plurality of apertures in said means defining said compartment to comrnunicate said compartment with said chamber, said compartment being arranged in at least a portion of the 7 base of said chamber in a'manner such' that additives contained in said compartment do not communicate with melt contained in said chamber when said vessel is in said filling position, but said additives do communicate with said melt when said vessel is in said treatment position, said apertures being dimensioned and arranged such that melt in said chamber passes through at least some of said apertures and into said compartment at a predetermined speed when said vessel is in said treatment position;

2. The vessel of claim 1, wherein said means defining said compartment are formed of refractory material.

3. The vessel of claim 2, wherein said means defining said compartment comprises clay graphite plates of 10 to 50 mm thickness. Y

4. The vessel of claim 1, further including a meltopening for charging said chamber with melt and a tightly fitting cover member for said melt-opening, said cover member including at least one through passageway of 10 to 50 mm.

5. The vessel of claim 1, further including stopper additive-opening. I

6. The vessel of claim 1, wherein said vessel is provided with a tea can-like pouring spout.

7. The vessel of claim 1, wherein said means defining said compartment includes apertures at different levels when said vessel is in said treatment position whereby the melt enters said compartment through apertures located at the lower region of said compartment and can escape from said compartment through apertures located at the upper region of said compartment.

8. The vessel of claim 7, wherein said apertures located at the lower region of said compartment have a diameter of 20 to 40 mm and said apertures located at the upper region of said compartment have a diameter of 10 to 30 mm.

9. The vessel of claim 7, wherein the entire cross-sectional area of said apertures located at the lower region of said compartment is smaller than the entire crosssectional area of said apertures located at the upper region of said compartment.

10. A tiltable treatment vessel for the production of iron-carbon cast materials with spherical graphite through the introduction of vaporizable additives into the melt, especially pure magnesium, comprising means defining a melt-receiving main chamber for the vessel, means defining an additive-receiving compartment for the vessel, means for enabling tilting of such vessel between a filling position and a treatment position, said additive-receiving compartment being provided with a plurality of openings for flow communicating said additive-receivingcompartment with said chamber, a first group of said openings providing infeed openings for permitting entry of the melt when filled into said main chamber into said additive-receiving compartment for contact with the additives contained therein to vaporize same, the remainder of said openings defining a second group of openings providing outfeed openings for discharge of the vaporized additives and the melt contained in said additive-receiving compartment into said main chamber, said first and second group of openings of said additive-receiving compartment being located at different elevational positions with respect to one another when the vessel is tilted into said treatment position.

11-. The treatment vessel as defined in claim 10, wherein at least a portion of said openings of said second group are upwardly directed towards the upper 13. The treatment vessel as defined in claim 10, wherein said first group of openings are located at the lower region of said additive-receiving compartment and said second group of openings are located at the upper region of said additive-receiving compartment when the vessel has been tilted into its treatment position, the total cross-sectional area of said first group of openings equaling the total cross-sectional area of said second group of openings.

14. The treatment vessel as defined in claim 10, I 1

wherein .said first group of openings located at the lower region of said additive-receiving compartment when the vessel assumes its treatment position possess a diameter in the range of approximately 20 to 40 mm, and wherein said second group of openings located at the upper region of the treatment compartment possess a diameter in the range of approximately 10 to 30 mm.

15. The treatment vessel as defined in claim 10, wherein said second group of openings located at the upper region of said additive-receiving compartment when the vessel has assumed its treatment position are distributively arranged over at least one-third of the base surface of the vessel.

Claims (14)

  1. 2. The vessel of claim 1, wherein said means defining said compartment are formed of refractory material.
  2. 3. The vessel of claim 2, wherein said means defining said compartment comprises clay graphite plates of 10 to 50 mm thickness.
  3. 4. The vessel of claim 1, further including a melt-opening for charging said chamber with melt and a tightly fitting cover member for said melt-opening, said cover member including at least one through passageway of 10 to 50 mm.
  4. 5. The vessel of claim 1, further including stopper means operable from outside said vessel for closing said additive-opening.
  5. 6. The vessel of claim 1, wherein said vessel is provided with a tea can-like pouring spout.
  6. 7. The vessel of claim 1, wherein said means defining said compartment includes apertures at different levels when said vessel is in said treatment position whereby the melt enters said compartment through apertures located at the lower region of said compartment and can escape from said compartment through apertures located at the upper region of said compartment.
  7. 8. The vessel of claim 7, wherein said apertures located at the lower region of said compartment have a diameter of 20 to 40 mm and said apertures located at the upper region of said compartment have a diameter of 10 to 30 mm.
  8. 9. The vessel of claim 7, wherein the entire cross-sectional area of said apertures located at the lower region of said compartment is smaller than the entire cross-sectional area of said apertures located at the upper region of said compartment.
  9. 10. A tiltable treatment vessel for the production of iron-carbon cast materials with spherical graphite through the introduction of vaporizable additives into the melt, especially pure magnesium, comprising means defining a melt-receiving main chamber for the vessel, means defining an additive-receiving compartment for the vessel, means for enabling tilting of such vessel between a filling position and a treatment position, said additive-receiving compartment being provided with a plurality of openings for flow communicating said additive-receiving compartment with said chamber, a first group of said openings providing infeed openings for permitting entry of the melt when filled into said main chamber into said additive-receiving compartment for contact with the additives contained therein to vaporize same, the remainder of said openings defining a second group of openings providing outfeed openings for discharge of the vaporized additives and the melt contained in said additive-receiving compartment inTo said main chamber, said first and second group of openings of said additive-receiving compartment being located at different elevational positions with respect to one another when the vessel is tilted into said treatment position.
  10. 11. The treatment vessel as defined in claim 10, wherein at least a portion of said openings of said second group are upwardly directed towards the upper region of said main chamber when the vessel has been tilted into its treatment position.
  11. 12. The treatment vessel as defined in claim 10, wherein said first group of openings are located at the lower region of said additive-receiving compartment and said second group of openings at the upper region of said additive-receiving compartment when the vessel has assumed its treatment position, the total cross-sectional area of said first group of openings differing from the total cross-sectional area of said second group of openings.
  12. 13. The treatment vessel as defined in claim 10, wherein said first group of openings are located at the lower region of said additive-receiving compartment and said second group of openings are located at the upper region of said additive-receiving compartment when the vessel has been tilted into its treatment position, the total cross-sectional area of said first group of openings equaling the total cross-sectional area of said second group of openings.
  13. 14. The treatment vessel as defined in claim 10, wherein said first group of openings located at the lower region of said additive-receiving compartment when the vessel assumes its treatment position possess a diameter in the range of approximately 20 to 40 mm., and wherein said second group of openings located at the upper region of the treatment compartment possess a diameter in the range of approximately 10 to 30 mm.
  14. 15. The treatment vessel as defined in claim 10, wherein said second group of openings located at the upper region of said additive-receiving compartment when the vessel has assumed its treatment position are distributively arranged over at least one-third of the base surface of the vessel.
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CH127468A CH509413A (en) 1968-01-26 1968-01-26 Magnesium added to iron melt with uniform - reaction and higher purity
CH1796168 1968-12-03

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Cited By (4)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4199353A (en) * 1977-01-18 1980-04-22 Canron Inc. Molten metal treatment
US4544407A (en) * 1981-03-03 1985-10-01 George Fischer Aktiengesellschaft Process for producing cast iron castings with a vermicular graphite structure
US4666133A (en) * 1985-01-29 1987-05-19 Georg Fischer Aktiengesellschaft Wall member for converter chamber
WO2010128273A1 (en) * 2009-05-06 2010-11-11 Foseco International Limited Treatment ladle

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US3778250A (en) * 1969-02-26 1973-12-11 Jones & Laughlin Steel Corp Method for treating metallic melts
GB1311093A (en) * 1969-03-13 1973-03-21 Materials & Methods Ltd Process for the treatment of molten metals
CH522459A (en) * 1971-04-23 1972-06-30 Fischer Ag Georg Tiltable pouring container for treating iron-carbon melt with vaporizable additives
US3955974A (en) * 1971-05-18 1976-05-11 Georg Fischer Aktiengesellschaft Apparatus and method for treating a metal melt with a vaporizable substance
CH564605A5 (en) * 1971-10-05 1975-07-31 Fischer Ag Georg
DE2208960C3 (en) * 1972-02-25 1982-06-24 Kloeckner-Humboldt-Deutz Ag, 5000 Koeln, De
DE2331783C3 (en) * 1973-06-22 1986-11-13 Kloeckner-Humboldt-Deutz Ag, 5000 Koeln, De
JPS50125674U (en) * 1974-04-01 1975-10-15
BR7402666A (en) * 1974-04-04 1975-12-09 Foseco Do Brasil Produtos Para Process and equipment for manufacturing nodular cast iron
JPS53123258U (en) * 1977-03-09 1978-09-30
PL114811B1 (en) * 1978-07-17 1981-02-28 Przedsieb Projektowania Wyposa Cast iron spheroidizing apparatus
JPS5533185U (en) * 1978-08-25 1980-03-03
CA1125505A (en) * 1980-05-09 1982-06-15 William E. Creswick Fabricated tuyere
DE3105200A1 (en) * 1981-02-13 1983-01-20 Metallgesellschaft Ag TILTABLE VESSEL FOR THE TREATMENT OF CAST IRON
DE8224282U1 (en) * 1982-06-07 1982-12-02 Georg Fischer Ag, 8201 Schaffhausen, Ch CASTING DEVICE, ESPECIALLY CONVERTER FOR POURING AND / OR FOR TREATING MOLTEN MATERIAL
JPS6150872U (en) * 1984-09-08 1986-04-05
CH664580A5 (en) * 1984-12-21 1988-03-15 Fischer Ag Georg Method for evaporating additives in a metal melt.
AT388569B (en) * 1984-12-21 1989-07-25 Fischer Ag Georg Process for vaporizing additives in a metal melt
CH665654A5 (en) * 1985-02-14 1988-05-31 Fischer Ag Georg Method for keeping inductor gutters, input and spout channels and the like of deposits.
CH668925A5 (en) * 1985-12-31 1989-02-15 Fischer Ag Georg BEHANDLUNGSGEFAESS FOR TREATING liquid metal ALLOYS.
CH671955A5 (en) * 1987-01-15 1989-10-13 Fischer Ag Georg
CH679987A5 (en) * 1989-11-28 1992-05-29 Fischer Ag Georg
CH680270A5 (en) * 1990-01-05 1992-07-31 Fischer Ag Georg
IT1248457B (en) * 1991-04-05 1995-01-19 Benet Di Bennati Ettore Method and apparatus for treating metal baths using a material with a high gas or vapor potential
DE10207434A1 (en) * 2002-02-21 2003-09-04 Disa Ind Ag Schaffhausen Converter for the magnesium treatment of cast iron melts
CN108788027A (en) * 2018-06-23 2018-11-13 共享装备股份有限公司 The spheroidization device and spheronization process of spheroidal graphite cast-iron

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Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4199353A (en) * 1977-01-18 1980-04-22 Canron Inc. Molten metal treatment
US4296920A (en) * 1977-01-18 1981-10-27 Canron Inc. Molten metal treatment
US4544407A (en) * 1981-03-03 1985-10-01 George Fischer Aktiengesellschaft Process for producing cast iron castings with a vermicular graphite structure
US4666133A (en) * 1985-01-29 1987-05-19 Georg Fischer Aktiengesellschaft Wall member for converter chamber
WO2010128273A1 (en) * 2009-05-06 2010-11-11 Foseco International Limited Treatment ladle
EP2251443A1 (en) * 2009-05-06 2010-11-17 Foseco International Limited Treatment ladle
KR20120007432A (en) * 2009-05-06 2012-01-20 포세코 인터내셔널 리미티드 Treatment ladle
US20120152060A1 (en) * 2009-05-06 2012-06-21 Emmanuel Berthelet Treatment ladle
AU2010244265B2 (en) * 2009-05-06 2013-11-21 Foseco International Limited Treatment ladle
RU2530922C2 (en) * 2009-05-06 2014-10-20 Фосеко Интернэшнл Лимитед Ladle for treatment

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
JPS4911971B1 (en) 1974-03-20
JPS496969B1 (en) 1974-02-18
US3666449A (en) 1972-05-30
DE1815214A1 (en) 1969-12-11
DE1815214C3 (en) 1975-06-19
FR2000779B1 (en) 1973-03-16
BE727380A (en) 1969-07-01
FR2000779A1 (en) 1969-09-12
DE1815214B2 (en) 1974-11-07
JPS496968B1 (en) 1974-02-18
SE391947B (en) 1977-03-07
GB1231372A (en) 1971-05-12

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