US3715949A - Musical instrument using a fluid powered tone generator for generating sonic energy - Google Patents

Musical instrument using a fluid powered tone generator for generating sonic energy Download PDF

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US3715949A
US3715949A US3715949DA US3715949A US 3715949 A US3715949 A US 3715949A US 3715949D A US3715949D A US 3715949DA US 3715949 A US3715949 A US 3715949A
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Prior art keywords
fluid
musical
tone
generator
instrument
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A Takeuchi
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Yamaha Corp
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Yamaha Corp
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10BORGANS; HARMONIUMS OR LIKE WIND-ACTUATED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
    • G10B3/00Details or accessories
    • G10B3/08Pipes, e.g. open pipes, reed pipes
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T137/00Fluid handling
    • Y10T137/206Flow affected by fluid contact, energy field or coanda effect [e.g., pure fluid device or system]
    • Y10T137/2229Device including passages having V over T configuration
    • Y10T137/2256And enlarged interaction chamber

Abstract

A MUSICAL INSTRUMENT USING A FLUID POWERED TONE GENERATOR WHEREIN THE OSCILLATING FREQUENCY IS DETERMINED BY THE LENGTH AND INNER DIAMETER OF A LOOPED FREQUENCYDETERMINING FLUID-PASSING TUBE CONNECTED TO THE MAIN FLUID PASSAGEWAY OF THE OSCILLATOR OF THE TONE GENERATOR TO CONTROL THE MAIN FLOW OF THE FLUID. VARIATION OF OSCILLATING FREQUENCIES CAN BE OBTAINED BY SLIDINGLY VARYING THE LENGTH OF THE FREQUENCY-DETERMINING TUBE, BY ARRANGING A PLURALITY OF FLUID OSCILLATORS HAVING, RESPECTIVELY, VARIED LENGTHS OF FREQUENCY-DETERMINING TUBES, IN AN ORDER CORRESPONDING TO A PREDETERMINED ORDER OF MUSICAL NOTES, SO THAT THEY ARE SELECTIVELY CONTROLLED, FOR EXAMPLE, BY A KEYBOARD, OR BY COUPLING A PLURALITY OF PARALLEL CONNECTED FREQUENCY DETERMINING TUBES TO A FLUID OSCILLATOR AND SELECTIVELY CONTROLLING INSERTION OF ONE OF THE TUBES IN THE OSCILLATOR CIRCUIT.

D R A W I N G

Description

Feb; 13, 1973 AKIHIO TAKEUCHI 3,

I MUSICAL INSTRUMENT USING A FLUID POWERED TONE GENERATOR FOR GENERATING SONIC ENERGY Filed Feb. 16, 1972 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 F l G. 1

14 H 20 x- S s 43 12 15 19 2:22 FLUID POWERED R SOURCE 17C TONE GENERATOR j;

FIG. 3

3 Sheets-Sheet 2 RESONATOR AKIHIO TAKEUCHI FOR GENERATING SONIC ENERGY FIG. 4

MUSICAL INSTRUMENT USING A FLUID POWERED TONE GENERATOR Feb. 13, 1973 Filed Feb. 16, 1972 2 am On 1 R R O M O W 0 @111 T T T A 2 A 1. A N 11. N N llllllllll I1 0 O 0 S S S M MM w 1 9 w w m 2 2 2 2 1 1 2 6 W- 5 6 H w 2 s 1 1 1 1 m w H 1 r 1 vl o 1 D M w H 11 mm 5 PS 1 P llllllll ll PG W 8 O L. 1 2 PE H 4v 2 m D n 8 7 & UN 2 1 4| 2 1 mm a G1 a 3 1% 111111111111 1 6 3 m 6 H 4 m 5 4 4 6 //A YE mm 6 Lo v D OE W 2 MP 1 ll LUO 4 1973 AKIHIO TAKEUCHI 3,715,949

MUSICAL INSTRUMENT USING A FLUID POWERED TONE GENERATOR FOR GENERATING SONIC ENERGY Filed Feb. 16, 1972 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 143 111 or 112 133 123 153 193 FLUID 3 FLUID POWERED RESONATOR 385%? 173 TONE GENERATOR 163 FIG. 6 183 FROM FLUID 5 SUPPLY F1 u1O POWERED 164 To RESONATOR SOURCE 174 TONE GENERATOR FIG. 7

United States Patent MUSICAL INSTRUMENT USING A FLUID POWERED TONE GENERATOR FOR GEN- ERATING SONIC ENERGY Akihiko Takeuchi, Hamamatsu, Japan, assignor to Nippon Gakki Seizo Kabushiki Kaisha, Hamamatsu-shi, Japan Filed Feb. 16, 1972, Ser. No. 226,875 Claims priority, application Japan, Feb. 18, 1971,

46/7,167, 46/7,168 Int. Cl. Gd 7/00 US. Cl. 84--330 18 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A musical instrument using a fluid powered tone generator wherein the oscillating frequency is determined by the length and inner diameter of a looped frequencydetermining fluid-passing tube connected to the main fluid passageway of the oscillator of the tone generator to control the main flow of the fluid. Variation of oscillating frequencies can be obtained by slidingly varying the length of the frequency-determining tube; by arranging a plurality of fluid oscillators having, respectively, varied lengths of frequency-determining tubes, in an order corresponding to a predetermined order of musical notes, so that they are selectively controlled, for example, by a keyboard; or by coupling a plurality of parallel connected frequency determining tubes to a fluid oscillator and selectively controlling insertion of one of the tubes in the oscillator circuit.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a musical instrument and more particularly to a musical instrument using a fluid powered tone generator for generating sonic energy by means of a fluid.

In recent years, there has been developed a pure fluid amplifier element or device made of, for example, plastic material which is so designed as to have a fluid (usually air) conducted thereinto and perform the action of a flip-flop circuit, or a logical operation such as OR/NOR. The device operates as an oscillator by being provided with properly shaped channels to control the flow of fluid introduced thereinto.

The above-mentioned fluid amplifier device has 'various advantages as compared with the conventional electrically operated device in which there has to be controlled the flow of electrons or holes. The fluid device is more easily controlled, has greater resistance to heat as well as to mechanical vibrations or shocks due to absence .of movable parts, thereby maintaining a semipermanent stability, and is usable in such places which present difficulties in effecting control by means of electronics.

This invention has been accomplished in view of the aforesaid circumstances and is intended to provide a musical instrument formed of the previously described fluid amplifier device as a source of tones.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention provides a musical instrument wherein a fluid powered tone generator used as a source of tones may comprise a fluid amplifier, such as a wall attachment amplifier or beam deflection amplifier, having an inlet supplied with a fluid (usually air), an outlet through which a sonic energy is radiated, channels connecting the inlet and outlet so as to oscillatingly change the flow course of the fluid and a looped fluid-flow control duct connected to the channels to determine the pitch or frequency of the sonic energy constituting musical tones.

The pitch of musical tones produced by the fluid powered tone generator is defined by controlling the length or the inner cubic capacity of the aforesaid looped tone control duct, and the volume of the musical tones is controlled by the amount of a fluid initially supplied to the inlet. The sonic energy drawn off from the above-mentioned fluid powered tone generator is resonated by a resonator comprising, for example, one or more resonance pipes each having a predetermined length so as to be finally radiated into the open air as desired musical tones.

Musical instruments realizable by application of the aforementioned fluid powered tone generator may, for example, be of a keyboard type wherein a plurality of fluid amplifiers having, respectively, varied lengths of looped tone control ducts, are arranged corresponding to an order of musical notes of a scale, so that they are selectively controlled by the keys of the keyboard, or of a wind type which is so designed as to have air blown in by a player through a mouthpiece connected to the inlet of a fluid powered tone generator.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a block diagram illustrating the fundamental arrangement of the musical instrument of this invention;

FIG. 2A is a schematic perspective view of a fluid powered tone generator available for the musical instrument of the invention;

FIG. 2B is a schematic equivalent connection diagram of the generator;

FIG. 3 is a schematic equivalent connection diagram of another type of the generator;

FIG. 4 is a schematic block diagram of a wind instrument according to an embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 5 is a schematic block diagram of a keyboard musical instrument according to another embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 6 is a schematic block diagram of a keyboard musical instrument modified from FIG. 6; and

FIG. 7 is a schematic block diagram illustrating means for varying the pitch of sounds delivered by the fluid powered tone generator of the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE "PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS There will now be described by reference to the appended drawings the fundamental arrangement of a musical instrument according to this invention and the preferred embodiments thereof.

FIG. 1 shows the fundamental arrangement of the musical instrument. Numeral 11 represents a fluid powered tone generator used as a source of tones of the musical instrument. \A fluid amplifier such as a wall attachment amplifier or a beam deflection amplifier is used as the tone generator 11. The generator 11 has an inlet 12 connected to a fluid supply source 14 through a tube 13 made of, for example, plastic material so as to be supplied with a fluid such as air. Thus the fluid powered tone generator draws off the air introduced thereinto through the inlet 12 from an outlet 15 through the later described channels. The generator 11 is further provided with a pair of control ports 16 and 17 so as to deliver a sonic or acoustic energy having a predetermined pitch from the outlet 15 by oscillatingly changing the flow of air conducted through the channels. These control ports 16 and 17 are connected in airtight condition by an external plastic tube or pipe 18, the length or inner cubic capacity of which determines the frequency of the generator 11. The sonic energy of a predetermined pitch drawn off from the generator outlet 15 is conducted through an adequate plastic tube 19 into a resonator 20 comprising, for example, one or more pipes, sound boxes,

or bells, so as to be finally radiated into the open air as desired musical tones.

FIG. 2A shows schematically one type of fluid powered tone generator 111 employing a beam deflection type fluid amplifier capable of delivering the aforementioned sonic energy. The generator comprises a lower or base member 21 and an upper or cover member 22 so joined as to keep air tight the internal cavities formed in a manner to be described, both members 21 and 22 being shaped into a rectangular form of the same size. At the substantially central part of the upper surface of the base member 21 is provided an approximately circular cavity 23. Further, an inlet channel 24 is formed extending from the substantially central part of the edge of one crosswise side of the base member 21 to the aforesaid circular cavity 23. On the opposite crosswise side of the base member 21 are provided a pair of outlet channels 25 and 26 extending from the central circular cavity 23 to the edge of the side which channels are so spaced from each other at a prescribed interval progressively decreasing toward the center of the base member 21. On the upper surface of the member 21 between the central circular cavity 23 and the inlet cavity 24 are formed a pair of pitch control channels 27 and 28 extending substantially perpendicularly to the inlet cavity 24 and communicable with both central and inlet cavities 23 and 24, one end of the pitch control channels 27 and 28 being open to both longitundinal edges of the base member 21 respectively. These pitch control channels 27 and 28 are connected airtight by a looped fluid-flowing tube 29 acting as the frequency determining tube or pipe 18 of FIG. 1. There are further formed a pair of output control channels 30 and 31 respectively extending crosswise from the junctions of the aforesaid outlet channels 25 and 26 with the central circular cavity 23 to both longitundinal edges of the base member 21.

FIG. 2B is a schematic connection diagram of the fluid powered tone generator 111. A fluid introduced from the inner channel 24 is delivered to the outside in the form of sonic or acoustic energy in an alternating manner through the outlet channels 25 and 26, one of which is connected to the radiator to produce a musical tone. Adjustment of the length or the inner cubic capacity of the connection tube 29 can vary the pitch or frequency of the sonic energy derived from either of the outlet channels 25 and 26. The volume of sonic energy being delivered is controlled by the amount of fluid conducted into the inlet channel 24.

FIG. 3 is a schematic equivalent connection diagram of a modification of a fluid powered tone generator utilizing a wall attachment type fluid amplifier capable of generating the above-mentioned sonic energy. According to this modification, the fluid introduced from an inlet channel 41 can be delivered from two output channels 42 and 43.

If outlet channel 42 is connected airtight to the output control channel 44 by an external connection tube 45 acting as a fluid feedback loop, then the modification of FIG. 3 will operate as a fluid powered tone generator 111 capable of delivering, as in the case of FIG. 2, sonic energy having a predetermined pitch from the remaining outlet channel 43, which is connected to the radiator. In such case, the outlet channel 42 connected to the connection tube 45 will play the part of controlling, like the output control channels 27 and 28 of FIG. 1, the pitch of the sonic energy derived from the other outlet channel 43 in cooperation with the output control channel 44. The oscillating frequency of the generator 112 is determined by the length or the inner cubic capacity of the connection tube 45 acting as the frequency determining tube or pipe 18 of FIG. 1.

Now let it be assumed that the fluid powered tone generator of FIG. 3 has outer dimensions approximately of 34 mm. x 27 mm. x 4 mm. Then with the aforesaid connection tube 45 taken to have an inner diameter of 3 mm.

and a length of 53 mm. or 128 mm., there will be obtained sonic energy having a predetermined frequency. For example, the frequency will be about 698 Hz. for a length of 53 mm. and about 494 Hz. for a length of 128 mm. This measurement has been conducted by using the wall attachment type fluid amplifier Noksflow Type ON- 50112, manufactured by Nippon Oil Seal Industry Co., Ltd., Japan (optimum pressure applied: 03:0.15 kg./ cm. G; amount of flowing fluid supplied: 5.1 l./min. at 0.3 kg./cm. G).

FIG. 4 is a schematic block diagram of a wind instrument according to this invention consisting of the fluid powered tone generator 111 (or 112) arranged as shown in FIG. 2 or 3. The inlet 121 of the generator 111 disposed at the outer end of the inlet channel is connected through a tube or pipe 131 to the mouthpiece 141. The outlet 151 of the generator positioned at the outer end of the outlet channel is connected to a resonator 201 through a tube or pipe 191. Tone control ports 161 and 171 are connected airtight by a variable-length fluidflowing tube or duct 181 resembling the slide tube of, for example, a trombone. This tube or duct 181 acts as the looped fluid flowing tube 29 shown in FIG. 2 or as the external connection tube 45 in FIG. 3, so that the slidable adjustment of the effective length between the control ports 161 and 171 permits a variable oscillating frequency to be obtained from the generator 111 (or 112).

When a player blows air into the above-mentioned generator by putting his mouth to the mouthpiece 141, while sliding the length-variable tube 181 for adjustment of its effective length in the direction of the indicated arrow 51 or 52, there will be delivered desired musical tones from the resonator 201.

FIG. 5 is a schematic block diagram of a keyboard musical instrument using fluid powered tone generators according to another embodiment of this invention. There are provided a plurality of fluid powered tone generators 111 and 112 of the type shown in FIG. 2 or 3 and having pitch control or frequency determining ducts 182 182 182 the lengths of which are so determined that the frequencies of the respective generators correspond to the musical notes of a scale (the generators 111 and 112 being briefly designated as F.P.T.G. for convenience of drawing), and a plurality of resonators 202 202 202 in corresponding relationship to a plurality of keys 62 arranged on a keyboard 61 in the order of the musical notes of the scale. In FIG. 5, a plurality of resonators 202 202 202 were provided for the respective fluid powered tone generators 111 or 112 in corresponding relation thereto, but contrary to this, only one resonator may be provided for all of the generators, so that all of the outputs from the generators can be led to that single resonator. In the intermediate portion of the tubes 132 connected to the inlets 122 of the respective generators 111 are provided normally closed fluid gates or valves 63, which are collectively connected to an air supply source 142. This air supply source 142 may consist of a blower chamber containing a blower motor or of a mouthpiece as in FIG. 4. If the valves 63 are designed to be selectively opened, as illustrated by broken lines 64, by depression of desired keys 62, then there will be delivered sonic energy of the predetermined pitch from the fluid powered tone generators corresponding to the depressed keys. The sonic energy thus generated is conducted to the corresponding resonator to be reproduced therefrom as desired musical sounds.

In FIG. 5, there were provided fluid powered tone generators for the respective keys 62. If, however, the musical instrument is arranged as illustrated in FIG. 6, then there may be provided only one generator for all the keys 62. Between the two pitch control ports 163 and 173 are arranged parallel length-variable frequency-determining tubes 183 183 183 183 having different lengths capable of producing sonic energy having pitches corresponding to the notes of the respective keys 62. A resonator 203 is connected to the outlet 153 of the common generator through a tube 193. Further, there are provided in the intermediate portion of the tubes 1 83 to 183,, normally closed valves 71 to 71 designed to be opened upon selective depression of the corresponding keys 62, respectively. A keyboard musical instrument according to this invention can obviously be used in the same manner as the type of FIG. 5.

In FIG. 6, means for controlling the pitch of sonic energy derived from a single fluid powered tone generator consisted of tubes 183 to 183 disposed between the two pitch control ports 163 and 173' with different lengths. However, it will be apparent that the same object can be attained by using tubes having ports 1.84 184 184 184 of different inner cubic capacities as shown in FIG. 7.

Throughout FIGS. 4 to 7, the corresponding parts as those of FIG. 1 were denoted by the corresponding numerals and description thereof was omitted.

The foregoing embodiments referred to the utilization of a beam deflection type or wall attachment type fluid amplifier as available for musical instruments of this invention. Obviously, the invention may be practised in the same way as described above using, for example, an edge-tone type fluid amplifier.

What is claimed is:

1. A musical instrument comprising:

a plurality of fluid powered tone generators for producing the tones of a musical scale, each of said tone generators comprising a fluidic oscillator, means for determining the frequency of said oscillator, and means resonating at said frequency for producing an audible tone;

supply means for supplying fluid under pressure to each of said tone generators; and

means to selectively activate each tone generator.

2. A musical instrument as claimed in claim 1, wherein said activating means include a plurality of fluid gates selectively opened and closed by a plurality of playing keys.

3. A musical instrument as claimed in claim 2, wherein each of said fluid gates includes a fluid valve located in a fluid passageway between said supply means and a fluidic oscillator.

4. A musical instrument as claimed in claim 1, wherein said frequency-determining means includes a tube-like fluid passageway, the length of which determines the oscillating frequency of the fluidic oscillator.

5. A musical instrument as claimed in claim 4, further comprising means for slidingly changing the effective length of the tube-like fluid passageway.

6. A musical instrument as claimed in claim 1, further comprising a plurality of playing keys each corresponding to the plurality of said fluidic oscillators; and means coupled to said keys for selectively controlling the fluid flow from said supply means to said tone generators.

7. A musical instrument as claimed in claim 1 comprising a plurality of fluid passageways of different lengths connected to respective fluidic oscillators on a one-toone basis, the lengths of which determine the frequencies of the fluidic oscillators.

8. A musical instrument as claimed in claim 7, further comprising a plurality of playing keys, each corresponding to each of said plurality of fluid passageways; and means coupled to said keys for selectively operating said fluid passageway to permit the fluid to flow in the operated fluid passageway.

9. A musical instrument as claimed in claim 1, wherein said frequency determining means includes a fluid passageway, the inner capacity of which determines the oscillating frequency of the fluidic oscillator.

10. A musical instrument as claimed in claim 1, wherein said frequency determining means comprises a plurality of fluid passageways of different inner capacities, the inner capacities of which determine the frequencies of the fluidic oscillators, said fluid passageways being connected in parallel and being selectively operable to permit the fluid to flow therein to determine the frequencies of said oscillators.

11. A musical instrument as claimed in claim 1 wherein said resonating means is a single common resonating means coupled to each fluidic oscillator of said tone generators.

12. A musical instrument as claimed in claim 1 wherein said resonating means comprises a plurality of resonators respectively coupled to each of said fluidic oscillators of said tone generators.

13. A musical instrument comprising:

at least one fluid powered tone generator for producing tones of a musical scale, said tone generator comprising a fluidic oscillator, means for determining the frequency of said oscillator, and means resonating at said frequency for producing an audible tone, said frequency determining means including a plurality of fluid passageways of different inner capacities connected in parallel to said fluidic oscillator, the inner. capacities of which determine the frequency of said fluidic oscillator, said fluid passageways being selectively operable to permit fluid to flow therein;

supply means for supplying fluid under pressure to said tone generator; and

means to selectively activate each tone generator.

14. A musical instrument as claimed in claim 13 wherein said parallel connected passageways are of different lengths.

15. A musical instrument as claimed in claim 13 wherein said parallel connected passageways each include respective tubes and ports having said different inner capacities.

16. A musical instrument as claimed in claim 13, wherein said activating means includes at least one fluid gate.

17. A musical instrument as claimed in claim 13, including a plurality of fluid gates located in said parallel connected fluid passageways and selectively opened and closed by a plurality of playing keys to permit fluid to selectively flow in said passageways.

18. A musical instrument comprising:

a fluid powered tone generator for producing tones of a musical scale, said tone generator comprising a fluidic oscillator, means for determining the frequency of said oscillator, and means resonating at said frequency for producing an audible tone, said frequency determining means including a tube-like fluid passageway connected to said oscillator and means for slidably, changing the effective length of said tube-like fluid passageway for changing the oscillatingfrequency of said oscillator; and

supply means for supplying fluid under pressure to said tone generator.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,755,767 7/ 1956 Levavasseur 137-815 3,122,165 2/1964 Horton 84-330X 3,185,166 5/1965 Horton et al. 235-201 X 3,490,408 1/ 1970 Monge et al. 235-201 PF RICHARD B. WILKINSON, Primary Examiner L. R. FRANKLIN, Assistant Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R.

US3715949A 1971-02-18 1972-02-16 Musical instrument using a fluid powered tone generator for generating sonic energy Expired - Lifetime US3715949A (en)

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3908505A (en) * 1973-07-06 1975-09-30 Stiron Chem Ind Co Ltd Melody blowing device
USRE33158E (en) * 1979-03-09 1990-02-06 Bowles Fluidics Corporation Fluidic oscillator with resonant inertance and dynamic compliance circuit
US5520089A (en) * 1994-10-12 1996-05-28 Prentiss; John G. Water organ
US20090223345A1 (en) * 2004-12-30 2009-09-10 Mann W Stephen G Fluid user interface such as immersive multimediator or iinput/output device with one or more spray jets

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3908505A (en) * 1973-07-06 1975-09-30 Stiron Chem Ind Co Ltd Melody blowing device
USRE33158E (en) * 1979-03-09 1990-02-06 Bowles Fluidics Corporation Fluidic oscillator with resonant inertance and dynamic compliance circuit
US5520089A (en) * 1994-10-12 1996-05-28 Prentiss; John G. Water organ
US20090223345A1 (en) * 2004-12-30 2009-09-10 Mann W Stephen G Fluid user interface such as immersive multimediator or iinput/output device with one or more spray jets
US8294019B2 (en) * 2004-12-30 2012-10-23 Mann W Stephen G Fluid user interface such as immersive multimediator or iinput/output device with one or more spray jets

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