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US3714795A - Outdoor refrigerant apparatus - Google Patents

Outdoor refrigerant apparatus Download PDF

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US3714795A
US3714795A US3714795DA US3714795A US 3714795 A US3714795 A US 3714795A US 3714795D A US3714795D A US 3714795DA US 3714795 A US3714795 A US 3714795A
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Prior art keywords
coil
condenser
fan
air
housing
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Expired - Lifetime
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A Fowell
G Knebusch
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White Consolidated Industries Inc
Goodman Manufacturing Co LP
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Tappan Co
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING, AIR-HUMIDIFICATION, VENTILATION, USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F1/00Rooms units, e.g. receiving primary air from a central station or with supply of heating or cooling agents from a central station, such as those applied to air-treatment systems included in F24F3/00 and F24F5/00
    • F24F1/06Separate outdoor units, e.g. outdoor unit to be linked to a separate room comprising a compressor and a heat exchanger
    • F24F1/08Compressors specially adapted for separate outdoor units
    • F24F1/10Arrangement or mounting thereof
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING, AIR-HUMIDIFICATION, VENTILATION, USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F1/00Rooms units, e.g. receiving primary air from a central station or with supply of heating or cooling agents from a central station, such as those applied to air-treatment systems included in F24F3/00 and F24F5/00
    • F24F1/06Separate outdoor units, e.g. outdoor unit to be linked to a separate room comprising a compressor and a heat exchanger
    • F24F1/08Compressors specially adapted for separate outdoor units
    • F24F1/12Vibration or noise prevention thereof
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING, AIR-HUMIDIFICATION, VENTILATION, USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F1/00Rooms units, e.g. receiving primary air from a central station or with supply of heating or cooling agents from a central station, such as those applied to air-treatment systems included in F24F3/00 and F24F5/00
    • F24F1/06Separate outdoor units, e.g. outdoor unit to be linked to a separate room comprising a compressor and a heat exchanger
    • F24F1/14Heat exchangers specially adapted for separate outdoor units
    • F24F1/16Arrangement or mounting thereof
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING, AIR-HUMIDIFICATION, VENTILATION, USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F1/00Rooms units, e.g. receiving primary air from a central station or with supply of heating or cooling agents from a central station, such as those applied to air-treatment systems included in F24F3/00 and F24F5/00
    • F24F1/06Separate outdoor units, e.g. outdoor unit to be linked to a separate room comprising a compressor and a heat exchanger
    • F24F1/38Fan details of outdoor units, e.g. bell-mouth shaped inlets or fan mountings
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING, AIR-HUMIDIFICATION, VENTILATION, USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F1/00Rooms units, e.g. receiving primary air from a central station or with supply of heating or cooling agents from a central station, such as those applied to air-treatment systems included in F24F3/00 and F24F5/00
    • F24F1/06Separate outdoor units, e.g. outdoor unit to be linked to a separate room comprising a compressor and a heat exchanger
    • F24F1/46Component arrangements in separate outdoor units
    • F24F1/48Component arrangements in separate outdoor units characterised by air airflow, e.g. inlet or outlet airflow
    • F24F1/50Component arrangements in separate outdoor units characterised by air airflow, e.g. inlet or outlet airflow with outlet air in upward direction
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25BREFRIGERATION MACHINES, PLANTS OR SYSTEMS; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT-PUMP SYSTEMS
    • F25B31/00Compressor arrangements
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25BREFRIGERATION MACHINES, PLANTS OR SYSTEMS; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT-PUMP SYSTEMS
    • F25B39/00Evaporators; Condensers
    • F25B39/04Condensers

Abstract

Covers an outdoor refrigerant condenser-compressor unit operating at a low noise level. The unit consists of an upright housing in which a motor-driven fan having its blades in a relatively horizontal position transmits air under pressure directed upwardly, and a tubular condenser coil is mounted above the blades of the fan so that the air delivered by the fan will flow through the coil and cool and condense the hot refrigerant vapor supplied by the compressor as part of a cooling system. The compressor may be physically positioned adjacent to the fan within the same general housing, but the compressor may occupy a separate ventilated space adjacent to the fan structure. The condenser coil is arranged to substantially occupy the whole top space of the housing unit, or most of that space, in any case positioned well above the blades of the fan. The fan is thus concealed and inaccessible to fingers, pebbles and other impediments. The fan is operated at increased efficiency because relatively cool air is delivered thereto from the ground level.

Description

United States Patent [1 1 Fowell et al.

[54] OUTDOOR REFRIGERANT APPARATUS [75] Inventors: Andrew J. Fowell, Martinsville, N.J.; George R. Knebusch, North Olmsted, Ohio [73] Assignee: The Taliban Company, Mansfield,

Ohio

[22] Filed: March 31, 1970 [21] Appl. No.: 24,245

[52] US. Cl. ..62/508, 62/181, 62/259 [51] Int. Cl ..F25b 39/04 [58] Field of Search ..62/498, 506, 507, 508, 181, 62/183, 452-455, 259, 426, 428, 429

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,475,841 7/1949 Jones ..62/429 2,920,464 1/1960 Trzsk t ..62/428 3,508,417 4/1970 Kimura ..62/508 TB CC Feb. 6, 1973 Primary Examiner-Meyer Perlin Attorney-Jefferson Ehrlich, Tenn'es l. Erstad and Robert G. Crooks 57 ABSTRACT adjacent to the fan within the same general housing,

but the compressor may occupy a separate ventilated space adjacent to the fan structure. The condenser coil is arranged to substantially occupy the whole top space of the housing unit, or most of that space, in any case positioned well above the blades of the fan. The fan is thus concealed and inaccessible to fingers, pebbles and other impediments. The fan is operated at in creased efficiency because relatively cool air is delivered thereto from the ground level.

15 Claims, 14 Drawing Figures GR FN CONDENSER COIL BW COMPRESSOR PAIENTEDFEB 6 I973 3.714.795

CONDENSER COIL FL COMPRESSOR -FIG.IO'

IN VEN TOR. ANDREW J. FOWELL Lib; ZL 201% ATTORNEY pressor units and, more particularly, to such units for installation outside of or adjacent to a building in conjunction with cooling systems, air-conditioning systems, refrigerating systems and the like, which are operatively associated with the building.

Noise generated in a conventional refrigerant-condenser compressor unit has been a source of considerable annoyance not only to the residents of the building with which the unit is associated, but also with respect to neighbors in adjacent buildings. Considerable attention has been directed to reduce the noise level in and around such units but, notwithstanding such efforts, the noise level has remained sufficiently high to remain a nuisance.

Many conventional units employ a fan which discharges air substantially horizontally through a condensing unit which is adjacent to and vertically disposed with respect to the fan. Such a vertically arranged fan structure ofttimes produces undesirable effects by reason of the fact that it drives air against adjacent shrubbery or trees at the same time that it produces noise directed to neighboring houses to disturb the inhabitants.

It has been found that the introduction of obstructions or baffles or other impediments near the inlet to the fan obstructthe free flow of air into the fan and provide additional noise problems, thereby unfortunately also increasing the overall noise level.

More recently, outdoor condenser-compressor units were set up so as to have a substantially horizontal condenser coil and a fan so mounted above the condenser. coil, so as to draw or suck air through the coil. In such cases the fan is operated relativelyjineffic iently because it is adjacent to the hot fluids traversing the condenser coil. That is, the air delivered by the fan isrelativel'y warmer than it ought to be and, because it is surmounted over and above the coil, the noise level is rather large, especially noticeable at the outlet of the fan. People near the fan will therefore be disturbed by the increased noise level arising from the surmounted rotating fan structure.

According to the present invention, a refrigerant condenser-compressor unit is provided which is relatively low in its generated noise level and at the same time operates more efficiently. The arrangement will include a flat, rectangular coil structure mounted horizontally, together with a motor-driven fan mounted below the condenser coil, so that the fan will receive relatively cool air and deliver relatively cool air substantially uniformly in a blow-through arrangement to the flat, rectangular condenser coil. It has been found that this type of physical structure has considerable advantages over earlier conventional arrangements, especially reducing the noise level, also improving the operating efficiency of the unit and increasing also its safety against accidents, etc.

, A particular type of construction according to the present invention embodies the flat rectangular coil mounted horizontally in a blow-througharrangement with the fan mounted below the coil and the arrangement will be economical to produce, with expected longer life, while developing a relatively low noise level.

Another significant feature of this invention resides in the isolation of the compressor from the air flow path of the fan by means of a wall or other enclosure. By effectively' removing the compressor from the air flow path, especially in a composite construction in which the pressurized stream from the fan is to be delivered rather uniformly and upwardly directed to the condenser coil, the noise generated in the compressor and in the composite construction is substantially reduced by the enclosure of the compressor while the pressurization of relatively cool air is being developed by the fan to improve the efficiency of the overall system.

Furthermore, by the blow-through arrangement of the fan arrangement of this invention in delivering cooling air to the surmounted condenser coil, a denser cooler air delivered to the fan from a lower level may be allowed to move more slowly and more quietly through the fan than in conventional arrangements to produce the same or the equivalent cooling effect to the condenser coil.

Another feature of this invention involves the employment of a grill atop the housingconstruction, the vanes of which may be adjusted or made adjustable to direct the emitted air of the blow-through construction along any desired path.

This invention, together with its various objects and features, will be better and more clearly understood from the more detailed description and explanation hereinafter following when read in connection with the accompanying schematic drawing, in which:

FIG. 1 is a vertical sectional view taken through the centerlines of a fan, a compressor and a condenser within a housing and constructed according to this invention;

FIG. 2 illustrates a top plan view of the FIG. 1 arran'gement;

FIG. 3 illustrates another vertical cross-sectional view employing a partition for the compressor unit, part of the partition being'inclined at an angle with respect to a horizontal plane so as to increase the space for the movement of air delivered by the fan;

FIG. 4 illustrates a segment of another similar compressor-condenser unit in cross-section, employing a different form of partition positioned at a different angle to accommodate a relatively smaller condenser coil;

FIG. 5 shows a cross-sectional view of a still different arrangement in which the condenser coil is a smaller flat horizontal coil and the compressor is in a separate compartment which has vertical flat walls;

FIG. 6 is a plan view of the'arrangement shown in FIG. 5; J

FIG. 7 illustrates another cross-sectional view of an arrangement employing a larger rectangular condenser coil, but the construction employs no w'all separating the compressor unit from the fan and the condenser coil arrangement;

FIG. 8 represents a plan view of the arrangement shown in FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 shows a construction similar to the one illustrated in FIG. 7 except that the condenser coil is a smaller unit; I

FIG. 10 shows a cross-sectional view of a somewhat different arrangement in which the'compre'ssor is positioned in a compartment which extends'v'ertically only part way up through the housing and the compressor housing does not extend across the entire space between the front and rear walls of the housing;

FIG. 11 is a plan view of the arrangement shown in FIG. r

FIG. 12 illustrates an end view of the arrangement shown in FIGS. 10 and 11;and

FIG. 13 is a plan view of an arrangement with an angled partition wall separating the compressor unit from the fan structure and the condenser coil.

1 FIG. 14 illustrates a segment at the top of the housing showing a grilled structure having adjustable vanes-or louvres.

Throughout the drawing, the same or similar reference characters will be employed to designate the same or similar parts wherever they may occur throughout the drawing. Moreover, relatively insignificant or unimportant parts or components may not be shown in some or all of the figures of the drawing, or, if shown, they may not be shown in detail, butthe structure, operation and use of such parts and components of the equipmentwill be understood by those skilled in the art from a reading and understanding of the specification.

Referring especially to FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawing, the refrigerant compressor unit is mounted in an upright box-like external housing as shown, which has four walls, two side walls SW1 and SW2 and front and rear walls RWl and RW2. The external housing is mounted on a floor FL which may be, for example, of any well known type of base structure of any desired height, such as a base structure made of concrete, and

the floor FL may serve also as a pedestal. The side wall SW2 may be made as a removable panel to provide access to the refrigerant compressor CP and to the other miscellaneous components such as the capacitor, switch contactors, refrigerant couplings, etc., which are mounted within the cabinet or housing. Moreover, the

side wall SW2 may be, for example, in the form of a I CC which, as shown, may be of a finned tube type. The condenser coil CC may include one or. more tube sheets AS, each preferably of an angled cross section, was to hold .the several refrigerant tubes TB of the condenser coil CC in position substantially against the side walls SW] and SW2 of the housing. A'plurality of metallic fins FN are closely spaced or adjacent to each other and they parallel the tube sheets AS.

The refrigerant tubes TB are arranged so as to extend within theopenin'gs of the aligned fins FN and to be retained therein by conventional tube expander techniques. The several refrigerant tubes of the condenser coil CC may be joined to each other by conventional tube bends which, if desired, may be soldered or otherwise affixed to the projecting ends of the tubes TB.

The space immediately above the coil CC may preferably be occupied by a fixed or an adjustable louvre structure or grill GR which may consist of a plurality of parallel slats or expanded metal. The slats composing the grill GR may be vertically directed or, if desired, directed at smaller angles, such as 70 or 80, with respect to the horizontal plane, so that air delivered and discharged through the coil CC will be directed in an assigned or predetermined direction, preferably away from adjacent buildings, trees or 'shrubbery. Th'e slats of the grill GR may be made adjustable so that they may be pointed in any desired direction, as already noted, and the slats may be adjusted by hand one by one, or if preferred, they may be adjusted simultaneously by any movable mechanism interconnected with the various slats in any well known manner. The grill GR and its various slats, therefore, may occupy substantially the entire top area of the external housing. They are effective to divert or deflect all of the air traveling vertically upwardly through the condenser coil CC and its fins FN, and the direction may be changed as may be desired. Moreover, the grill GR may be cushioned by a foam rubber component or components (not shown) interposed and retained between the grill GR and the condenser coil CC so as to have a positive effect toward reducing or eliminating vibratory noise or other sounds that may be developed by either of these two components. Furthermore, the

slatted grill GR is made of 'a material of sufficient strength which, when further supported by the conadults, etc. The compressor C? may be mounted in a separate compartment defined by the sidewall SW2, the upstanding partition PD, the top wall TW and the bottom wall or base BW. in the arrangement of FIGS. 1 and 2, the partition PD may extend vertically to meet the horizontal top wall TW. This provides a sufficient space above the top wall TW and beneath the condenser coil CC for the .free transmission of air to coil CC, as will be further explained hereinafter.

The space at the left of the partition PD is occupied by a circular venturi panel VN. The venturi panel VN is supported against the side wall SW1 and the partition PD. The venturi panel VN may be regarded as closing the bottom of the plenum space extending to condenser coil CC so that air may be admitted therethrough for condenser coil CC and can move only upwardly through the opening within the venturi panel VN when the fan is operating.

The venturi panel VN supports, at its lower end, a protection grill PG which may be made of wire so as to provide large open spaces for the ready flow of air therethrough.-The venturi panel VN is alsoarranged to support the motor frame MF, which is preferably a skeleton frame. The motor frame MF houses and supports a motor M0 and its propeller fan -PF, the blades of which extend to, but do not fully reach, the inner rim of the venturi panel VN so that the blades enjoy free movement within the inner rim. r

A box BX may be located within the chamber of the compressor CP for receiving and retaining certain essential components, such as the conventional capacitor,- power supply contacts, etc. Access to the box would be available by opening the side panel SW2.

grill PG by virtue of the open areas provided by the legs LGl and LG2. When the motor MO. is in operation, the

propeller fan PF, driven byv the motor M0, will draw air in abundant supply upwardly through the wire-type fan protection guard PG and through the central opening of the venturi panel VN. The rotation of the blades of fan PF will pressurize the plenum chamber, i. e., the space above the fan blades extending to the condenser coil CC. The pressurized air flows upwardly and rather uniformly through the parallel fins FN, extracting heat from the refrigerant flowing through the tubes TB of the condenser coil CC. The refrigerant within the tubes TB is thereby condensed in a well known manner, so that the refrigerant may be used for cooling purposes in a remotely located evaporator (not shown).

The incoming air fed upwardly to the fan blades PF is relatively cool or cold. The incoming air is, therefore, at a much lower temperature than it would be if the fan were positioned above the condenser coil CC. This is an important factor. Consequently, the fins FN of the condenser coil arrangement will be cooled more rapidly by a relatively cooler air than will be available in conventional constructions in which the condenser coil CC is not in a blow-through position with respect to the fan PF as in this invention. The-plenum space is substantially as extensive as the horizontal surface of the horizontal coil CC, so that all parts of the coil CC are subjected substantially equally and uniformly to the cooling temperatures of the rapidly moving cool air. The exhaust air traversing the spaces about the condenser coil CC is driven through the grill GR into the external space, the blades of the grill GR being directed or pointed away from adjacent buildings or trees or shrubbery. v

The construction just described is readily distinguished from, and is superior to, conventional or common constructions in which the propeller fan is positioned above or downstream of the condenser coil and in which the condenser coil and the venturi panel are interconnected by a chamber or duct. The chamber or duct is usually rectangular in cross-section and would normally introduce eddy currents and considerable noise. Although the noise level may be reduced in such a construction by employing a large slow-moving propeller fan, the walls of such a connecting duct would normally be quite close to the rim or tips of the fan blades. The close proximity of the fan blades to the walls of the adjacent or surrounding duct is, and is known to be, a source of considerable noise. Obviously, such an arrangement is quite different from the arrangement of this invention in which the fan and the condenser coil are arranged in a balanced blowthrough plan. In the arrangement of FIGS.1 and 2, for example, the air supply is in abundance around the periphery of the fan PF and there is no closely adjacent duct or enclosure for noise generation. This is another of the features of this invention.

A further feature of the arrangement of, for example, FIGS. 1 and 2, as already suggested, is that the air, in being discharged substantially vertically upwardly through the grill GR, will not disturb adjacent property owners and, moreover, the discharge will not be directed against adjacent trees or shrubbery. Moreover, a relatively high velocity fan discharge is characteristic of this invention, so that the condenser coil CC receives a substantially even anddiffused air flow at a velocity which may be somewhat lower than large extent by the floor FL or ground.

As another feature, the fan motor MO is mounted directly on venturi panel VN above a wire type bracket, such as PG, and the panel VN preferably rests on foam type sound damping strips SP for absorbing vibration and noise. Hence, the overall noise level of the structure is considerably below the level available in comparable conventional structures. The difference from conventional structures is significant and readily noticeable.

FIG. 3 differs from the arrangement of FIGS. 1 and 2 in that the partition PD segregating compressor CP is bent through an angle of about The upper portion of the partition PD is designated PDl. Although the portion PDI covers the compressor CP to contain and isolate the compressor, the angular disposal of the upper part of the partition PDl permits air discharged by the blades of the fan PF to flow more freely through thelarger plenum chamber to reach the remote parts adjacent to the side wall SW2.

FIG. 4 is a modified construction in which the condenser coil CC does not extend over the entire roof of the external housing, although it does extend, not only over the motor driven fan, but also sufficiently to allow the fan PF to fully discharge air through all the segments of the condenser coil CC. Theupper segment of the partition PD is designated PD2 and it almost approaches the shape of a vertical partition.

FIGS. 5 and 6 illustrate an arrangement in which the condenser coil CC fills the upper space between the side wall SW1 and the partition PD, and the fan structure is positioned in an enclosure between these same two walls SW1 and PD. The fan PF is essentially symmetrically arranged beneath the condenser coil CC. The grill GR in this case extendsover the condenser coil CC and between walls SW1 and PD. Hence, a flat top cover is all that is required to provide a roof for the isolated compressor CP.

FIGS. 7, 8 and 9 show an arrangement in which an upwardly extending partition PD is omitted. The venturi panel VN is supported by wall SW1 and panel PD3 which is provided especially to furnish support and to complete the enclosure of the'plenum. The omission of the upward segment of partition PD provides more uniform discharge through condenser coil CC and greater air circulation over the compressor. The arrangement is also somewhat less costly.

In the arrangement shown in FIGS. 10, 11 and 12, the partition PD and its roof PF fully enclose the compressor CP. The partition PD also serves as one of the fins FN affixed to its tubes are directly and substantially uniformly exposed to theair driven upwardly by the fan ,-blades PF. Thus, a fairly uniform air pressure is developed and substantially continuously maintained across the whole upstream face of the condenser coil CC. Moreover, a fairly uniform linear air velocity is developed across the fins FN, thereby cooling the tins and the tubes affixed thereto. This promotes effective and improved heat transfer between the pressurized moving cool air and the tubes of the condenser coil CC to chill the refrigerant traveling therethrough. Because of the greater efficiency of the arrangement of this invention, smaller coils may be employed in practice for a given condenser coil capacity and capability to yield the same chilling effect as may be accomplished by prior structures.

The air discharged by the fan blade PF has a very definite circumferential flow component. It is well established, for example, that a circumferentially moving particle of air, when striking a fin FN at an angle,

, will promote improved air turbulence at the edge of the fin. This also promotes improved and more efficient heat transfer between the turbulent air and the moving refrigerant.

The air that is supplied to the fan blades PF arrives from a very low level, i.e., alevel at or near the ground, where the air is usually at its coolest temperature in the absence of direct sunlight. Thus, the fan blades PF will drive air upwardly that is relatively cool, the'driving force being applied to the air before it has been heated by contact with the warmed fluid in the tubes of the condenser coil CC. This type of operation has considerable advantage over conventional arrangements because smaller and less expensivecomponents and smaller power will be sufficient to produce the same amount of heat transfer. Furthermore, a lower speed motor MO may be employed for the fan structure PF, thereby promoting safety and fewer maintenance problem-s. It will be apparent that, although the condenser coil CC has been shown and described as having a rectangular shape, this is not all essential. if desired, the condenser coil may have a circular shape or any other desired shape,

Furthermore, although the motor MO is shown positioned above the fan blades PF, the motor M may be brought closer to the underside of the condenser coil CC.

Furthermore, although the arrangement has been shown with a single motor M0 and a single fan PF, the

. positioned below the blades so that the blades may be thereof has been made lower than the noise level of the conventional compressors for residential systems. Thus, the blow-through fan-condenser coil combination arranged for the upward vertical discharge of the air and the separated housing or compartment for the compresser together have reduced the overall noise level below the noise level of standard or conventional equipments available in the market.

in practicing this invention, it has been found that the spacing between the venturi panel VN and the base of the housing FL should preferably be no less than about one-half the diameter of the fan blade PF. The spacing betweenthe venturi panel VN and the condenser coil CC should preferably be not less than about one-half the diameter of the fan blade PF. Thus, for a 16 inch fan blade, the venturi panel should preferably be about midway between the coil CC and the ground FL, with the spacing between the coil CC and the r ground FL substantially about equal to the diameter of the blade PF. The above noted dimensions would be suitable for all of the embodiments shown in the several figures of the drawing. The measured noise levels were found to be minimalfor all of the several embodiments which were tested and examined.

While this invention has been shown and described in certain particular arrangements merely for illustration and explanation, it will be apparent that the arrangements of the invention may be set up in other and widely varied organizations, all within the spirit and scope of this invention.

What isclaimed is: I

, 1. An outdoor refrigerant unit for relatively quite operation, comprising a substantially flat condenser coil having a plurality of interconnected tubes substantially parallel to the ground, a fan having rotatable blades which are substantially parallel to the ground and positioned underneath the condenser coil, a housing for said fan and said condenser coil having a first opening near the bottom thereof for the admission of air upwardly to the fan blades and a second opening adjacent said condenser coil, and air deflection means in said second opening selectively adjustable variably to direct air from the housing, the fan being operated to direct incoming air upwardly as a pressurized stream ov'erthe wide intervening space against substantially all the tubes of the condenser coil, so that air moved through the spaces between the tubes will be discharged through the adjustable air deflection means of the housing. I

2. Anoutdoor refrigerant unit according to claim 1 wherein the air deflection means includes substantially parallel adjustable jplates abovethe condenser coil for discharging the air from the housing in a selected upward direction after it has passed through the spaces between the tubesof the condenser coil.

3. An outdoor refrigerant unit according to claim 2 in which the condenser coil is of the finned tube type with its fins'positioned in substantially vertical planes which are perpendicular to the tubes and occupy substantially the entire horizontal space below the second opening of the housing, the fins of the tubes being positioned closely adjacent the parallel plates.

4. An outdoor refrigerant unit according to claim 3 including a substantially horizontal venturi panel for supporting the fan midway between the condenser coil and the housing base. a

5. An outdoor refrigerant unit for relatively quiet operation, comprising a housing, a condenser coil having a plurality of tubes which are substantially parallel to the ground and occupy a position near the top of the housing, a fan having a vertical rotary axis and positioned beneath the condenser coil and having its blades rotatable about said axis over a space substantially parallel to the condenser coil, a compressor positioned in the housing and separately enclosed to segregate the same from the fan and condenser coil, the housing having a first opening near the bottom thereof for receiving air to be delivered upwardly and substantially uninterruptedly to the fan blades and a second opening adjacent the condenser coil, the fan blades being spaced from and positioned approximately midway between the condenser coil and the base of the housing, the fan blades delivering pressurized air substantially uniformly to the condenser coil so that air traversing the condenser coil will be exhausted through the second opening of the housing.

6. An outdoor refrigerant unit according to claim wherein the condenser coil includes a plurality of parallel plate fins which are arranged in substantially vertical planes and have openings for receiving the tubes of such condenser coil, and wherein the second opening is in the top of the housing and is substantially co-extensive with the width and length of the same, the condenser coil occupying substantially the entirehorizontal space below the second housing opening.

7. An outdoor refrigerant unit according to claim 6 further including adjustable air deflection means in said 9. An outdoor refrigerant unit according to claim 8 including acompressor unit which is separately enclosed within a walled compartment within the housing second opening, said air deflection means consisting of a plurality of substantially parallel blades overlying the fins of the condenser coil and providing spaces through which air may be discharged in a selected upward direction from the housing after it has traversed the condenser coil.

8. An outdoor refrigerant unit for substantially quiet operation, comprising an upright housing having an opening near the bottom thereof, a venturi panel supported by said housing and having an opening through which relatively cool air received through the opening of said housing may travel, a fan which is mounted so as to revolve about a vertical axis and is supported by said venturi panel and having horizontal blades which are rotatable through a space substantially parallel to the base of the housing, a finned type of condenser coil having a plurality of interconnected tubes all of which are substantially parallel to the base of the housing and are positioned above the fan blades, the venturi panel being substantially parallel to the base of the housing and positioned substantially midway between the condenser coil and the base of the housing, the tins of the condenser coil being parallel to each other throughout the lengths of the tubes of the condenser coil and perpendicular to the tubes of the condenser coil, the fins having openings in which the tubes are mounted, and a grill consisting of a plurality of parallel, panels positioned above said condenser coil and adjacent the top of said housing, whereby air delivered through the opening of the housing to the blades of the fan will be pressurized and transmitted substantially upwardly only against substantially all of the underside of the tubes of the condenser coil and then emitted through the grill in a preselected direction determined by the orientation of the panels of the grill at the top of said housing.

and is positioned away from the flow path of the air delivered by the fan to the condenser coil.

10. An outdoor refrigerant unit according to claim 9 including also a wire cage mounted on the venturi panel and supporting the motor of the fan, the wire cage presenting negligible impedance to the air delivered by the fan to the condenser coil.

11. An outdoor refrigerant unit according to claim 10 in which the panels of the grill which are adjustable to change the angle of the emitted air, are of sufficient strength to form a protective support for the housing which can withstand substantially large weights.

I 12. An outdoor refrigerant unit having a housing which is to include a substantially flat condenser coil of the finned tube type and having a top with openings therein, an electrically operated fanfand a compressor, the combination thereof for substantially reducing the generated noise level, the condenser coil being positioned closely adjacent the top of the housing and substantially parallel to the ground, the fan having its blades rotatable about its vertical axis and having its blades extending over a diameter reaching over a large area of the condenser coil undersurface and directing air upwardly only and positioned beneath the condenser coil and substantially parallel to the ground at a location which is'widely spaced between the condenser coil and ground, and the compressor being separately enclosed within a walled compartment within the housing and completely removed from the flow path of the air delivered by the fan to a condenser coil, the housing having an opening near its bottom so that incoming relatively cool air will be received uninterruptedly by the fan and impelled by the fan in a substantially vertical and upward direction so that the pressurized air will directly impingeagainst substantially all of the underside of the condenser coil and then be emitted through the top of the housing in a preselected direction.

13. An outdoor refrigerant unit according to claim 12, in which the top of the housing includes a grill composed of substantially parallel narrow adjustable plates for controlling the direction of discharge of the air from the housing after traversing the condenser coil.

14. An outdoor refrigerant unit according to claim 13 including a venturi panel mounted on the inner walls of said housing and supporting the fan, the venturi panel being also substantially equally Spaced from the condenser coil and the base of the housing. p

15/ An outdoor refrigerant compressor-condenser unit comprising an upright rectangular housing having two spaced parallel side walls and two spaced parallel end walls defining a rectangular top opening whose length and width are substantially coextensive with the exterior length and width of the housing;

a refrigerant condenser coil of the finned tube type arranged in a horizontal prone position within the upper portion of the housing so that the fins thereof lie in vertical planes; said coil occupying substantially the entire space defined by the opening whereby the entire plan dimension of the housing is utilized for coil containment purposes;

compressor compartment means arranged within the plan outline of the housing below the coil, said compressor compartment being formed in part by said venturi panel being located well above the lower extremity of the housing to provide a large subjacent air space having free unobstructed communication with the outdoor ambient via'the housing periphery; said venturi panel and'compartment top wall forming the bottom wall of a plenum chamber which admits pressurized air to the'entire face area of the coil.

l l 8 7 i

Claims (15)

1. An outdoor refrigerant unit for relatively quite operation, comprising a substantially flat condenser coil having a plurality of interconnected tubes substantially parallel to the ground, a fan having rotatable blades which are substantially parallel to the ground and positioned underneath the condenser coil, a housing for said fan and said condenser coil having a first opening near the bottom thereof for the admission of air upwardly to the fan blades and a second opening adjacent said condenser coil, and air deflection means in said second opening selectively adjustable variably to direct air from the housing, the fan being operated to direct incoming air upwardly as a pressurized stream over the wide intervening space against substantially all the tubes of the condenser coil, so that air moved through the spaces between the tubes will be discharged through the adjustable air deflection means of the housing.
1. An outdoor refrigerant unit for relatively quite operation, comprising a substantially flat condenser coil having a plurality of interconnected tubes substantially parallel to the ground, a fan having rotatable blades which are substantially parallel to the ground and positioned underneath the condenser coil, a housing for said fan and said condenser coil having a first opening near the bottom thereof for the admission of air upwardly to the fan blades and a second opening adjacent said condenser coil, and air deflection means in said second opening selectively adjustable variably to direct air from the housing, the fan being operated to direct incoming air upwardly as a pressurized stream over the wide intervening space against substantially all the tubes of the condenser coil, so that air moved through the spaces between the tubes will be discharged through the adjustable air deflection means of the housing.
2. An outdoor refrigerant unit according to claim 1 wherein the air deflection means includes substantially parallel adjustable plates above the condenser coil for discharging the air from the housing in a selected upward direction after it has passed through the spaces between the tubes of the condenser coil.
3. An outdoor refrigerant unit according to claim 2 in which the condenser coil is of the finned tube type with its fins positioned in substantially vertical planes which are perpendicular to the tubes and occupy Substantially the entire horizontal space below the second opening of the housing, the fins of the tubes being positioned closely adjacent the parallel plates.
4. An outdoor refrigerant unit according to claim 3 including a substantially horizontal venturi panel for supporting the fan midway between the condenser coil and the housing base.
5. An outdoor refrigerant unit for relatively quiet operation, comprising a housing, a condenser coil having a plurality of tubes which are substantially parallel to the ground and occupy a position near the top of the housing, a fan having a vertical rotary axis and positioned beneath the condenser coil and having its blades rotatable about said axis over a space substantially parallel to the condenser coil, a compressor positioned in the housing and separately enclosed to segregate the same from the fan and condenser coil, the housing having a first opening near the bottom thereof for receiving air to be delivered upwardly and substantially uninterruptedly to the fan blades and a second opening adjacent the condenser coil, the fan blades being spaced from and positioned approximately midway between the condenser coil and the base of the housing, the fan blades delivering pressurized air substantially uniformly to the condenser coil so that air traversing the condenser coil will be exhausted through the second opening of the housing.
6. An outdoor refrigerant unit according to claim 5 wherein the condenser coil includes a plurality of parallel plate fins which are arranged in substantially vertical planes and have openings for receiving the tubes of such condenser coil, and wherein the second opening is in the top of the housing and is substantially co-extensive with the width and length of the same, the condenser coil occupying substantially the entire horizontal space below the second housing opening.
7. An outdoor refrigerant unit according to claim 6 further including adjustable air deflection means in said second opening, said air deflection means consisting of a plurality of substantially parallel blades overlying the fins of the condenser coil and providing spaces through which air may be discharged in a selected upward direction from the housing after it has traversed the condenser coil.
8. An outdoor refrigerant unit for substantially quiet operation, comprising an upright housing having an opening near the bottom thereof, a venturi panel supported by said housing and having an opening through which relatively cool air received through the opening of said housing may travel, a fan which is mounted so as to revolve about a vertical axis and is supported by said venturi panel and having horizontal blades which are rotatable through a space substantially parallel to the base of the housing, a finned type of condenser coil having a plurality of interconnected tubes all of which are substantially parallel to the base of the housing and are positioned above the fan blades, the venturi panel being substantially parallel to the base of the housing and positioned substantially midway between the condenser coil and the base of the housing, the fins of the condenser coil being parallel to each other throughout the lengths of the tubes of the condenser coil and perpendicular to the tubes of the condenser coil, the fins having openings in which the tubes are mounted, and a grill consisting of a plurality of parallel, panels positioned above said condenser coil and adjacent the top of said housing, whereby air delivered through the opening of the housing to the blades of the fan will be pressurized and transmitted substantially upwardly only against substantially all of the underside of the tubes of the condenser coil and then emitted through the grill in a preselected direction determined by the orientation of the panels of the grill at the top of said housing.
9. An outdoor refrigerant unit according to claim 8 including a compressor unit which is separately enclosed within a walled compartment within the housing and is positioned away from the flow path of the air delivered by the fan to the condenser coil.
10. An outdoor refrigerant unit according to claim 9 including also a wire cage mounted on the venturi panel and supporting the motor of the fan, the wire cage presenting negligible impedance to the air delivered by the fan to the condenser coil.
11. An outdoor refrigerant unit according to claim 10 in which the panels of the grill which are adjustable to change the angle of the emitted air, are of sufficient strength to form a protective support for the housing which can withstand substantially large weights.
12. An outdoor refrigerant unit having a housing which is to include a substantially flat condenser coil of the finned tube type and having a top with openings therein, an electrically operated fan, and a compressor, the combination thereof for substantially reducing the generated noise level, the condenser coil being positioned closely adjacent the top of the housing and substantially parallel to the ground, the fan having its blades rotatable about its vertical axis and having its blades extending over a diameter reaching over a large area of the condenser coil undersurface and directing air upwardly only and positioned beneath the condenser coil and substantially parallel to the ground at a location which is widely spaced between the condenser coil and ground, and the compressor being separately enclosed within a walled compartment within the housing and completely removed from the flow path of the air delivered by the fan to a condenser coil, the housing having an opening near its bottom so that incoming relatively cool air will be received uninterruptedly by the fan and impelled by the fan in a substantially vertical and upward direction so that the pressurized air will directly impinge against substantially all of the underside of the condenser coil and then be emitted through the top of the housing in a preselected direction.
13. An outdoor refrigerant unit according to claim 12, in which the top of the housing includes a grill composed of substantially parallel narrow adjustable plates for controlling the direction of discharge of the air from the housing after traversing the condenser coil.
14. An outdoor refrigerant unit according to claim 13 including a venturi panel mounted on the inner walls of said housing and supporting the fan, the venturi panel being also substantially equally spaced from the condenser coil and the base of the housing.
US3714795A 1970-03-31 1970-03-31 Outdoor refrigerant apparatus Expired - Lifetime US3714795A (en)

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US2424570 true 1970-03-31 1970-03-31

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US3714795A true US3714795A (en) 1973-02-06

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US3714795A Expired - Lifetime US3714795A (en) 1970-03-31 1970-03-31 Outdoor refrigerant apparatus

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US (1) US3714795A (en)
DE (1) DE2058505A1 (en)
GB (1) GB1273323A (en)

Cited By (14)

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US3857253A (en) * 1972-09-25 1974-12-31 Trane Co Unitary air cooled centrifugal refrigeration water chiller
US3865517A (en) * 1973-05-29 1975-02-11 Carrier Corp Refrigeration condenser unit
US4220880A (en) * 1978-10-02 1980-09-02 Woodard Randle C Adjustable motor cover
US5151018A (en) * 1990-07-31 1992-09-29 Copeland Corporation Sound attenuation chamber
US5199273A (en) * 1990-09-28 1993-04-06 The Manitowoc Company, Inc. Reach-in cooler with interchangeable refrigerator and freezer systems
US5284023A (en) * 1990-09-28 1994-02-08 The Manitowoc Company, Inc. Reach-in cooler with window
US5293758A (en) * 1991-08-29 1994-03-15 American Standard Inc. Outside section for split system air conditioning unit
US20050115272A1 (en) * 2003-12-01 2005-06-02 Lim Hyoung K. Radiating apparatus of built-in refrigerator
US20070036648A1 (en) * 2005-08-11 2007-02-15 York International Corporation Extended venturi fan ring
US20090169387A1 (en) * 2007-12-28 2009-07-02 Lg Electronics, Inc. Fan assembly
US20090260382A1 (en) * 2005-11-07 2009-10-22 Daikin Industries, Ltd. Electric equipment assembly, and outdoor unit of air conditioner and air conditioner provided with the same
US20100293993A1 (en) * 2002-09-24 2010-11-25 Rini Daniel P Method and Apparatus for Highly Efficient Compact Vapor Compression Cooling
US20150369546A1 (en) * 2013-02-12 2015-12-24 Mitsubishi Electric Corporation Outdoor cooling unit for vehicular air conditioning apparatus
CN105698285A (en) * 2015-12-25 2016-06-22 广东美的制冷设备有限公司 Compressor assembly, outdoor unit and air conditioner

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CA2163495C (en) * 1995-02-17 2000-04-18 Wazo Yamada Air conditioner

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US2475841A (en) * 1944-06-15 1949-07-12 U S Thermo Control Co Air conditioning unit
US2920464A (en) * 1957-02-28 1960-01-12 Internat Heater Company Air cooled condensing unit
US3508417A (en) * 1967-08-06 1970-04-28 Keiichi Kimura Condensing unit

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US2475841A (en) * 1944-06-15 1949-07-12 U S Thermo Control Co Air conditioning unit
US2920464A (en) * 1957-02-28 1960-01-12 Internat Heater Company Air cooled condensing unit
US3508417A (en) * 1967-08-06 1970-04-28 Keiichi Kimura Condensing unit

Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3857253A (en) * 1972-09-25 1974-12-31 Trane Co Unitary air cooled centrifugal refrigeration water chiller
US3865517A (en) * 1973-05-29 1975-02-11 Carrier Corp Refrigeration condenser unit
US4220880A (en) * 1978-10-02 1980-09-02 Woodard Randle C Adjustable motor cover
US5151018A (en) * 1990-07-31 1992-09-29 Copeland Corporation Sound attenuation chamber
US5199273A (en) * 1990-09-28 1993-04-06 The Manitowoc Company, Inc. Reach-in cooler with interchangeable refrigerator and freezer systems
US5284023A (en) * 1990-09-28 1994-02-08 The Manitowoc Company, Inc. Reach-in cooler with window
US5293758A (en) * 1991-08-29 1994-03-15 American Standard Inc. Outside section for split system air conditioning unit
US20100293993A1 (en) * 2002-09-24 2010-11-25 Rini Daniel P Method and Apparatus for Highly Efficient Compact Vapor Compression Cooling
US8024942B2 (en) * 2002-09-24 2011-09-27 Rini Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for highly efficient compact vapor compression cooling
US20050115272A1 (en) * 2003-12-01 2005-06-02 Lim Hyoung K. Radiating apparatus of built-in refrigerator
US7878015B2 (en) * 2003-12-01 2011-02-01 Lg Electronics Inc. Radiating apparatus of built-in refrigerator
US20070036648A1 (en) * 2005-08-11 2007-02-15 York International Corporation Extended venturi fan ring
US7481619B2 (en) 2005-08-11 2009-01-27 York International Corporation Extended venturi fan ring
US20090260382A1 (en) * 2005-11-07 2009-10-22 Daikin Industries, Ltd. Electric equipment assembly, and outdoor unit of air conditioner and air conditioner provided with the same
US20090169387A1 (en) * 2007-12-28 2009-07-02 Lg Electronics, Inc. Fan assembly
US8337155B2 (en) * 2007-12-28 2012-12-25 Lg Electronics Inc. Fan assembly having reduced vibration
US20150369546A1 (en) * 2013-02-12 2015-12-24 Mitsubishi Electric Corporation Outdoor cooling unit for vehicular air conditioning apparatus
US9784507B2 (en) * 2013-02-12 2017-10-10 Mitsubishi Electric Corporation Outdoor cooling unit for vehicular air conditioning apparatus
CN105698285A (en) * 2015-12-25 2016-06-22 广东美的制冷设备有限公司 Compressor assembly, outdoor unit and air conditioner

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
DE2058505A1 (en) 1971-10-21 application
GB1273323A (en) 1972-05-10 application

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