US3712825A - Method of making simulated masonry wall - Google Patents

Method of making simulated masonry wall Download PDF

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US3712825A
US3712825A US3712825DA US3712825A US 3712825 A US3712825 A US 3712825A US 3712825D A US3712825D A US 3712825DA US 3712825 A US3712825 A US 3712825A
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mask
panel
layer
base
coat
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T Yocum
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T Yocum
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B28WORKING CEMENT, CLAY, OR STONE
    • B28BSHAPING CLAY OR OTHER CERAMIC COMPOSITIONS, SLAG, OR MIXTURES CONTAINING CEMENTITIOUS MATERIAL, e.g. PLASTER
    • B28B1/00Producing shaped prefabricated articles from the material
    • B28B1/14Producing shaped prefabricated articles from the material by simple casting, the material being neither forcibly fed nor positively compacted
    • B28B1/16Producing shaped prefabricated articles from the material by simple casting, the material being neither forcibly fed nor positively compacted for producing layered articles
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B28WORKING CEMENT, CLAY, OR STONE
    • B28BSHAPING CLAY OR OTHER CERAMIC COMPOSITIONS, SLAG, OR MIXTURES CONTAINING CEMENTITIOUS MATERIAL, e.g. PLASTER
    • B28B19/00Machines or methods for applying the material to surfaces to form a permanent layer thereon
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B28WORKING CEMENT, CLAY, OR STONE
    • B28BSHAPING CLAY OR OTHER CERAMIC COMPOSITIONS, SLAG, OR MIXTURES CONTAINING CEMENTITIOUS MATERIAL, e.g. PLASTER
    • B28B7/00Moulds; Cores; Mandrels
    • B28B7/0064Moulds characterised by special surfaces for producing a desired surface of a moulded article, e.g. profiled or polished moulding surfaces
    • B28B7/0073Moulds characterised by special surfaces for producing a desired surface of a moulded article, e.g. profiled or polished moulding surfaces with moulding surfaces simulating assembled bricks or blocks with mortar joints
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B44DECORATIVE ARTS
    • B44FSPECIAL DESIGNS OR PICTURES
    • B44F9/00Designs imitating natural patterns
    • B44F9/04Designs imitating natural patterns of stone surfaces, e.g. marble
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S425/00Plastic article or earthenware shaping or treating: apparatus
    • Y10S425/811Stencil
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/16Two dimensionally sectional layer
    • Y10T428/163Next to unitary web or sheet of equal or greater extent
    • Y10T428/164Continuous two dimensionally sectional layer
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/24Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24802Discontinuous or differential coating, impregnation or bond [e.g., artwork, printing, retouched photograph, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24851Intermediate layer is discontinuous or differential
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/26Web or sheet containing structurally defined element or component, the element or component having a specified physical dimension
    • Y10T428/263Coating layer not in excess of 5 mils thick or equivalent
    • Y10T428/264Up to 3 mils
    • Y10T428/2651 mil or less

Abstract

SIMULATED MASONRY WALL PANELS ARE PROVIDED BY FIRST COATING A BASE PANEL WITH A BASE COAT TO SIMULATE MORTAR AND THEN SPRAYING A FINISH-COAT THROUGH A MASK AND THEN REMOVING THE MASK. PANELS TO PROVIDE A SIMULATED BRICK WALL MAY ABUT WITH SHIPLAP JOINTS AND EACH BE THREE COURSES HIGH AND EIGHT FEET LONG.

D R A W I N G

Description

Jan. 23, 1973 T. E. YOCUM 3,712,825

METHOD OF MAKING SIMULATED MASONRY WALL Filed Dec. '7, 1970 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 AIR SAND AND BINDER I5 OR 1 V APPLY BASE l2 COAT FMIXTURE OF WATER, CEMENT L j DRY FIG 2 PROVIDE MASK MIXTURE OF WATER, CEMENT. SAND, COLORING MATERIAL AND BINDER APPLY FINISH TOMMY E. YOCUM INVENTOR.

ATTORNEY Jan. 23, 1973 T. E. YOCUM 3,712,325

METHOD OF MAKING SIMULATED MASONRY WALL Filed Dec. 7, 1970 4 Sheets-Sheet Z FIG 8 FIG 9 46 TOMMY E. YOCUM INVENTOR.

ill/1111111110,

3m I3 47 BY Z ATTORNEY Jill. 23, 1'. YQCUM METHOD OF MAKING SIMULATED MASONRY WALL 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Dec. 7, 1970 ATTORNEY Jan. 23, 1973 YOCUM 3,712,825

METHOD OF MAKING SIMULATED MASONRY WALL Filed Dec. '7, 1970 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 a I, I I I S 29 as V 26 36 3s 39 42 FIG I6 m mi [in] T WWW 1.1m 3 COURSES E FIG 22 mvsmoa i75 fi 12M ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,712,825 METHOD OF MAKING SIMULATED MASONRY WALL Tommy E. Yocum, 2102 Mayflower Drive, Middleton, Wis. 53562 Filed Dec. 7, 1970, Ser. No. 95,812 Int. Cl. B44d 1/52 US. Cl. 117-85 8 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Simulated masonry wall panels are provided by first coating a base panel with a base coat to simulate mortar and then spraying a finish-coat through a mask and then removing the mask. Panels to provide a simulated brick wall may abut with shiplap joints and each be three courses high and eight feet long.

FIELD This invention relates to a method or process for providing simulated masonry walls and more particularly to a combination of process steps for providing panels to provide such walls.

PRIOR ART The invention described and claimed herein is an improvement on and clearly distinguishes over the disclosures of the following patents: 1,123,727, Goldberg; 1,311,362, Walling; 1,341,528, Walling; 1,564,578, Kennedy; 1,591,406, Shope; 2,056,275, Holdsworth (117-85); 2,110,335, Kritzer (117-85); 2,162,861, Polak; 2,595,142, Herck; 2,628,299, Gaiser; 3,096,195, Seman (117-85); and 3,364,088, Seman (117-85).

A characteristic step in the process of the references is that a coating is applied through a mask and the mask is held tightly to the surface underlying the mask. This is accomplished for example as in Kritzer by keeping the undercoat wet and causing the mask to stick to the undercoat because of such wetness and preferably by embedding the mask in the undercoat. It is accomplished in the Seman patents by providing a tacky adhesive on the underside of the tapes used to make the mask. It is accomplished in Holdsworth and Goldberg by providing a hot plastic base coat and then embedding the mask therein. It is also accomplished in Kennedy by embedding the mask in the base coat while the base coat is plastic. And it is accomplished in Herck, for example, by stapling the mask to the undersurface.

SUMMARY In contradistinction to the methods of the prior art, a coating is applied through a mask, as a step in the instant invention, onto an undercoat which is non-plastic, nonmastic and unimpressionable and the second coating is applied by spraying in such a manner that the force of the spray forces the mask against the undersurface.

The base coat is first applied as by troweling, brushing or spraying to a base panel sheet which may be, for example, gypsum board, wood, plywood, pressed wood, synthetic resin foam or the like. The base coat is provided with a finish which simulates mortar either by reason of the method used in applying it or by a second step in the process of applying it such as by first spraying and then "ice brushing or troweling or the like. As a critical step in the process the undercoat is then dried until it becomes nonplastic or non-mastic and nonimpressionable, that is, sufliciently hard so that no impression may be made therein by pressing hands or fingers thereagainst or laying various objects thereon or pressing objects thereagainst with any degree of force less than that which deforms the surface of the base sheet which underlies the base coat.

While the base coat is in the same state, that is, after it has been drie'd until it is unimpressionable and while it retains sufiicient moisture, a finish coat is applied by spraying through the mask. The spraying is conducted in such manner that the force of the air and material sprayed, applied against the mask, pushes the mask against the base coat surface and holds the mask against the base coat surface while the finish coat is built up to the desired thickness. It is critical to the step that the undercoat or base coat include an appreciable degree of moisture in order to provide a suitable bond to the finish coat.

The finish coat is then treated if desired to provide it with any one of a number of suitable finishes. Such treatment may consist of brushing it with a brush having soft bristles or stiff bristles or by brushing it with a wire brush or by troweling it or by spattering it with colored materials.

The mask is then removed, preferably by lifting the mask so that substantially all portions of it are removed simultaneously or almost simultaneously and so that all portions of it are removed in a direction substantially or almost normal to the surface of the panel.

The base coat was well as the finish coat may, as mentioned above, be applied by spraying from spraying devices and when spraying, either the spraying devices may be moved relative to the panels or the panels may be moved relative to the spraying devices.

OBJECTS It is an object of the invention to provide an improved method for providing panels which may be assembled to provide a simulated masonry wall.

Other objects will become apparent from the drawings and from the following detailed description in which it is intended to illustrate the applicability of the invention without thereby limiting its scope to less than that of all equivalents which will be apparent to one skilled in the art.

DRAWINGS In the drawings, like reference numerals refer to like parts and:

FIG. 1 is a schematic elevation of the step of applying the base coat;

FIG. 2 is a schematic elevation of the step of drying the base coat;

FIG. 3 is a partially cross-sectional perspective view of one embodiment of a mask in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional elevation of the step of applying the mask;

FIG. 5 is a schematic partially cross-sectional elevation of the step of applying the finish coat;

FIG. 6 is a schematic elevation of the step of treating to provide a desired finish;

FIG. 7 is a schematic cross-sectional elevation of th step of removing the mask; a

FIG. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-sectional elevation of a portion of a panel provided in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 9 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-sectional elevation of a portion of a panel provided in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 10 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-sectional elevation of a portion of a panel provided in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 11 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-sectional elevation of a portion of a panel provided in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 12 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-sectional perspective view of a portion of the mask which may be used in accordance with an embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 13 is an enlarged view of a portion of the modification of the embodiment of FIG. 12;

FIG. 14 is an enlargement of a portion of FIG. 4 in which the actual dimensional relationships of the parts are more nearly approximated;

FIG. 15 is an enlargement of a portion of FIG. and corresponds to FIG. 14 in that the actual dimensional relationships of the parts are more nearly approximated;

FIG. 16 is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of a mask which may be used in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 17 is an elevation of one panel and portions of two adjacent panels which may be provided in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 18 is a cross-sectional view taken on lines 18-18 in FIG. 17;

FIG. 19 is a cross-sectional view of a modification of a portion of FIG. 18;

FIG. .20 is a top plan view of a corner member which may be provided to complement the panels of FIGS. 17 and 18;

FIG. 21 is a top plan view of a corner member which may be used to complement the member of FIG. 20;

FIG. 22 is a schematic cross-sectional elevation of the step of washing the mask; and

FIG. 23 is a schematic view of the step of drying the mask.

DESCRIPTION Referring to FIG. 1, a base panel sheet is first provided and base coat or undercoat 11 is applied thereto, for example, as a spray 12 applied from spraying device 13. The panel may be moved with respect to the spraying device as indicated by arrow 14 or the spraying device may be moved with respect to the panel as indicated by arrow 15.

Base panel sheet 10 may be wood, plywood, pressed wood (such as a panel of wood cellulose fibers bonded at least in part with lignin, for example, such as is sold under the trademark Masonite by the Masonite Corporation) gypsum board, asbestos board, foamed plastics such as foamed polystyrene or the like. The thickness of the base coat is not critical. It may be as small as .005 or .010 inch. Generally a relatively thin coating is desired in accordance with the demands of economy but a somewhat thicker coating may be provided if desired to provide a desired texture. The base coating is preferably caused to have a texture which simulates mortar. This may be accomplished by spraying alone or by brushing or troweling after spraying or by simply applying the coating originally by brushing or troweling. The invention is not at all limited to the manner in which the base coat is applied. A preferred composition for the base coat may be as follows:

100 pounds portland cement 100-150 pounds sand 5 gallons of liquid A preferred formula for the liquid is:

3 gallons of water 1 allon of bonding agent Any one of a large number of organic synthetic resinous materials may serve suitably as a bonding agent. Preferred bonding agents are acrylic latexes, rubber latexes and vinyl latexes. A preferred material for example is one in which contains vinyl acetate, copolymer latex and which is sold by the Dewey and Almy Chemical Division of W. R. Grace and Company. It is a synthetic latex emulsion which carries the registered trademark Daraweld-C of that company.

In addition to or in place of portions of the sand there may be added relatively small amounts such as 5 or 10 or 20 pounds each of such materials as lime, clay, asbestos or sand-like materials such as fine silica sand or silica powder to suitably adjust properties, for example, to prevent settling or to affect the setting time and the like.

The bond which is obtained between the above described base coat compositions and each of the specifically above mentioned substrate base panel sheet materials is stronger than the substrate and the base coat itself is stronger than the substrate, i.e., when a panel coated with a dried base coat of the above composition, .010 to 0.25 inch in thickness is bent until it breaks, the base coat does not buckle, de-laminate or show any other indication of failure until the base panel sheet breaks.

Latex paint containing sand may be used to provide a base coat but has the disadvantage that the paint weathers out, i.e., is degraded and removed by the action of ultraviolet light, wind, hail, snow and the like whereas the composition described above is relatively highly resistant to weathering. Furthermore, a base coat of latex paint and sand may not have the desirable strengths discussed above.

Referring now to FIG. 2, base panel sheet 10 provided with base coat 11 is dried by any suitable means such as being allowed to stand unmolested for some 10 minutes to 30 minutes at temperatures of -60-l00 F. The manner of drying is not critical. Drying may be accelerated by drying in a tunnel dryer for example and may be accomplished at higher or lower temperatures.

The panel is dried until coating 11 becomes non-plastic and un-mastic, that is, until it becomes unimpressionable. By unimpressionable it is meant that no impression may be made on layer 11 by pressing an article thereagainst, without making a corresponding impression on base sheet 10. However, the panel is not dried until layer 11 is devoid of moisture.

After the panel has been dried until layer 11 is unimpressionable, but while layer 11 still retains an appreciable amount of moisture, a mask 16 (FIG. 3) is applied (FIG. 4) and while coating 11 is still in the same condition a finish coat 17 is applied (FIG. 5).

Finish coat 17 may be applied in the form of a spray 18 from spraying device 19 which may travel with respect to the panel as indicated by arrow 20; alternatively the panel may travel with respect to the spraying device as indicated by arrow 21. The steps of FIGS. 4 and 5 are discussed in greater detail below in connection with FIGS. 14 and 15.

Spraying device 19 may be similar or even identical to spraying device 13. Spraying devices for spraying mixtures of the general nature described herein for the base coat and the finish coat are well known and available commercially and therefore are not described herein.

Finish coat 17 may be applied to a depth of as little as .005 or .010 inch in some instances but is preferably applied to a thickness of at least inch or A4 of a millimeter and it may be applied to a thickness of A or /2 inch. Generally more suitable thicknesses are on the order of from to inch, the thickness selected being that which will provide suitable relief, that is, which provides a depth of the simulated mortar joint suflicient to provide the desired eflFect. Surprisingly, relatively low relief such as may be provided by a thickness of or inch for coating 17 provides remarkable eflfective simulation of a brick wall but generally greater relief, such as is provided by a thickness of 5 inch or greater, and in many cases, preferably /a inch, is preferred.

A preferred composition for a finish coat may be as follows:

100 pounds portland cement 200 pounds sand 5 gallons of liquid suitable small amount of coloring material A preferred formula for the liquid is:

5 gallons of water 1 gallon of bonding agent The bonding agent may be any suitable bonding agent described above as being suitable for use in the formulation for the base coat but is preferably the same or similar to that used for the base coat. Materials described above which may suitably be added to or in place of portions of the sand in the base coat may likewise be added for the same purposes in the finish coat.

Whereas it may be noted that there is a marked similarity between the formulation for the base coat and the formulation for the finish coat, it may be observed that generally and preferably a larger portion of sand or other aggregate and a lower proportion of bonding agent are found preferable and suitable for the finish coat.

As is the case with the base coat, the cohesive strength of the finish coat and the strength of the bond between the finish coat and the base coat after the finish coat has been dried exceed the strength of the substrate material, namely, the material of panel of any one of the aforementioned materials which may be used for panel 10. That is, if the completed panel, after the finish coat is dried, is bent until it breaks, the finish coat (like the base coat) does not show any indication of failure prior to breakage of the substrate base panel sheet.

Coloring material, as indicated above, which is generally preferably a pigment or comprises a pigment, may be added in suitable quantity in a manner well known in the prior art to provide a suitable color for the finish coat. Colors generally preferred are red, white, yellow, brown and grey and by suitable slection of the amount and type of coloring material, the chroma, hue and tone of the color may be varied greatly to provide many variations of each of these colors.

As the next step in the process, a finish treatment may be carried out if desired, as shown in FIG. 6, to provide a suitable texture on the outer surface of the finish coat 17. Thus, a brush may be applied to provide a brushed finish as indicated by brush 22 which may be moved with respect to the panel as indicated by arrow 23. The panel may also be moved with respect to the brush as indicated by arrow 24. The brush may for example have soft bristles, stiff bristles or may even have wire bristles and may be moved laterally or transversely or with a circular or 'elliptical motion to provide any one of a large number of finishes, any one of which may be desired. In place of or in addition to such brushing, the surface may be troweled lightly or heavily and additionally or alternatively the surface may be spattered with materials of slight or great contrast in color to provide any one of a large number of finishes. 7

Before layer 17 has dried mask 16 is removed as shown in FIG. 7. Mask 16 is preferably removed in such manner that all portions thereof are simultaneously or almost simultaneously removed and also so that all portions of mask 16 are preferably removed in a direction normalor substantially normal or almost normal to the surface of the panel. If the mask is relatively flexible, as it may be, and is removed by peeling as described, for example, in connection wtih the Seman patents, bits and pieces are removed in an objectionable manner from edges of portions of layer 17 which remain attached to layer 11.

In order to effectuate the removal of the mask in the desired manner, namely without a peeling action and specifically with all of its portions being simultaneously or almost simultaneously removed and so that they are removed in a direction normal to the panel surface, the mask may be made relatively rigid; for example, mask 16 (FIG. 12) may be utilized. Mask 16' may be made by cutting rectangular portions from a solid sheet of acrylic resin, i.e., cast polymethylmethacrylate, which may be as thick as W inch or inch.

It is also suitable to provide a thinner mask and to retain it within a frame as described in conjunction with FIG. 16.

Such a mask may be made by cutting portions from a thin sheet of steel, for example, a sheet of steel having a thickness of on the order of .030 inch or .040 inch, or may be provided by fastening together in a suitable pattern a plurality of pieces of tape such as tape 16" (FIG. 13) which as shown may consist of two facing layers 45 of polymeric synthetic resin having glass fiber strands 46 embedded in synthetic resinous polymeric adherent material 47 disposed thereinbetween. Solid polymeric synthetic resin tape may, if desired, be used in place of tape 16" if it is of sufiicient strength; for example, extruding nylon tape may be used.

Referring now to FIG. 16, a mask 16" may be cut from a sheet of steel or plastic or may be made by fastening together pieces of tape. One end of mask 16" may be clamped between rigid members 25 and 26 with bolts 27. The other end of mask 16" may be clamped between rigid members 35 and 36 with bolts 37. A plurality of holes 28, of which one is shown, may be provided in member 25 to receive hooked ends of longitudinally extending tension members 29, of which one is shown. Likewise a plurality of holes 38 may be provided in rigid member 35 to receive hooked ends of longitudinally extending tension members 39. A relatively rigid frame of steel pipe 40 may be provided extending entirely around mask 16" and may be provided with holes to receive longitudinally extending portions of members 29 or 39 provided with threaded portions 42. Adjusting nuts 41 may be provided on portions 42 to draw members 29 and 39 toward frame members 40 to exert tension on mask 16". Mask 16" may be tensioned laterally, although to a lesser extent, in similar manner.

By thus tensioning mask 16", it may be removed, to accomplish the step of FIG. 7, in the desired manner. That is, by withdrawing frame members 40 in a direction normal to the surface of the panel, mask 16 is removed in such manner that all portions are almost simultaneously freed from the panel and are Withdrawn from the panel in a direction normal or almost normal to the surface.

In some instances, a relatively thick and rigid mask such as mask 16' may be mounted in a frame such as frame 40 or otherwise mounted to tension the mask as described for mask 16".

After completing the step of FIG. 7, finish coat 17 is dried.

There may thus be provided a panel indicated as 51 if layers 11 and 17 are applied to a base sheet panel 52 of plywood as shown in FIG. 8.

In FIG. 9 there is shown a panel provided in accordance with the process of the invention by application of layers 11 and17 to a panel of gypsum board 53 which may consist of a layer of paper 55 covering a gypsum core 54.

A panel in accordance with the invention may be provided by application of layers 11 and 17 to a pressed woodfiber base panel sheet as shown in FIG. 10 and likewise a panel may be provided in accordance with the method of the invention by application of layers 11 and 17 to a foamed polystyrene base panel sheet 57 as shown in FIG. 11.

As indicated in FIG. 14, it is inevitable that mask 16, due to manufacturing and mounting variations and irregularities is not perfectly and absolutely fiat. Likewise it is inevitable that the outer surface of layer 11 is not absolutely flat, due to minor variations in manufacturing processes. It is therefore inevitable that when mask 16 is layed against the surface of layer 11, small spaces 60 exist therebetween. Spaces 60 may in some instances have a height of as little as .010 inch or .015 inch but in many instances they have heights of as great as A; inch or 4 inch. When finish coat 17 is applied without first eliminating or preventing the presence of spaces 60, portions of the material of layer 17 flow into spaces 60 to provide a pattern which is undesired by reason of failing to correspond to the pattern of the mask.

Heretofore, various methods have been proposed, as discussed above, to eliminate spaces between a mask and an underlying surface. Generally, as discussed above, such methods have involved adhering or otherwise fastening the mask to an underlying surface. In contradistinction, in accordance with the invention, the mask is caused to lie tightly against the outer surface of layer 11 and spaces 60 are thus eliminated by the force of the spray 18 as indicated by arrows 18 in FIG. 15. The force of air and solids in spray 18 applied against mask 16 causes the mask to lie in a desired manner, with spaces 60 eliminated, while layer 17 is deposited. After layer 17 has been deposited, as shown in FIG. 15, adhesive and cohesive forces provided by layer 17 retain mask 16 in the desired position.

To attain the desired result, layer 17 need not be de posited in sufficient depth to exceed the height of the mask. Thus layer 17 may have a thickness less than that of the thickness of the mask as indicated in FIG. 15 or may have a thickness greater than that of the mask as indicated in FIG. 6. Most of the finish treatments discussed in connection with FIG. 6 may be accomplished quite satisfactorily even though layer 17 has a thickness less than that of the thickness of the mask as indicated in FIG. 15.

It is to be noted that the thickness of the layer 17 is not determined by the thickness of the mask and is not even affected by the thickness of the mask unless the mask is made far thicker than discussed hereinabove.

As indicated by arrow 61 the step of FIG. 16 may be carried out by moving panel with respect to spraying device 19.

Generally the invention may be applied to panels of any dimensions which may be suitably handled. Thus, the invention may be applied to provide 4 foot by 8 foot panels, 4 foot by 12 foot panels and the like. However, a pre ferred panel indicated generally as 70 and portions of two adjacent panels indicated generally as 71 and 72 are shown in FIGS. 17 and 18. Panel 70 may be 8 feet in length and may have a width suitable to provide simulation of three courses of brick. Base panel sheets 73, 74 and 75 may be provided with layers 11 and 17 thereon to provide panels 70, 71 and 72 and may be provided as shown with rabbeted tongues and grooves to provide modified shiplap butt joints between panels as shown particularly in FIG. 18. Thus panel 70, as shown, may have a rabbeted tongue protruding along one edge and along one end and have rabbeted groves along the other edge and along the other end. Adjacent panels may be made in similar fashion so that joints as shown in FIG. 18 are provided.

By changing the shape of each tongue and each groove a standard shiplap butt joint may be provi ed between panels as shown for panels 70' and 71' in FIG. 19.

Corner members may be provided to facilitate application of panels of the invention, such as for example, panel 70, to walls having exterior corners. Thus as shown in FIG. 20, a corner member 80 may be provided which may provide in some simulated course for a simulated edge of an entire brick to be presented on the long side and the simulated end of the same brick on the short side. Another such corner member 81 may be provided as shown in FIG. 21 to provide in one course, e.g., the top course, for one-half of a simulated brick and the end of another simulated brick to be presented on the long side and one-half of the latter simulated brick to be presented along the short side.

It is necessary that the mask, when provided as indicated in the step of FIG. 3 and applied as indicated in the step of FIG. 4, be clean and dry. If the mask is not dry when applied in the step of FIG. 4, the material of layer 17 will leach out and create an objectionable or undesired pattern. Therefore, it is necessary to clean and dry a mask, such as mask 16, relatively often. It is necessary to clean it to some extent before each usage and preferably the steps of washing mask 16 by any suitable process such as by agitating it in water contained in container 91 as shown in FIG. 22 and then drying it by blowing air thereagainst as indicated by arrows 92 in FIG. 23 are carried out as additional steps in the process described above which comprises the steps of FIGS. 1 to 7. Thus, although the process of the invention may be considered to comprise the steps of FIGS. 1 to 7, it may also be considered to comprise the steps of FIGS. 1 to 7, 22 and 23. The steps of FIGS. 22 and 23 preferably follow the step of FIG. 7 and precede the step of FIG. 3.

By provision of different masks having suitable patterns panels may be provided to simulate not only the half bond brick wall indicated for panel 70 but to simulate other known brick patterns such as quarter bond, third bond, stack bond and the like. Not only may walls made with common brick be simulated but walls made of other brick such as Roman brick may be simulated and likewise walls made of stone such as field stone or quarry stone may also be simulated.

It may thus be seen that the invention is broad in scope and includes such modifications as will be ap parent to those skilled in the art and is to be limited only by the claims.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. In the process of providing a simulated masonry Wall, the combination of the steps of:

providing a base panel sheet,

coating said base panel sheet with a base layer of cementitious material comprising Water, portland cement, sand and an organic synthetic resinous binder,

providing said layer with a finish to simulate mortar,

drying said layer until said layer is non-plastic and non-mastic and unimpressionable, and then before said base layer is entirely dry and while it retains some moisture, laying against said partially drybase layer a mask of relatively rigid non-fibrous non-tacky relatively water-impervious material, and then before said base layer is entirely dry and while it retains some moisture, spraying against said mask and onto unmasked portions of said base layer an airentrained mixture of cementitious material comprising water, portland cement, sand, coloring material and an organic synthetic resinous binder,

thereby forcing said mask against said base layer and coating unmasked portions of said base layer with said cementitious material to provide a finish-layer, and then removing said mask.

2. The process of claim 1 further characterized by providing said base layer as a relatively thin layer so that sand particles therein are visible and providing said finish layer as a relatively thick layer having a thickness of at least inch or A of a millimeter.

3. The process of claim 1 further characterized by treating the surface of said finish layer, before removing said mask, to provide a surface thereon which resembles any one of various brick surface finishes.

4. The process of claim 1 further characterized by removing all parts of said mask substantially simultaneously and in a direction substantially normal to said base layer.

5. The process of claim 4 further characterized by treating the surface of said finish layer, before removing said mask, to provide a surface thereon which resembles any one of various brick surface finishes.

6. The process of claim 5 further characterized by References Cited providing said base layer as a relatively thin layer so UNITED STATES PATENTS that sand particles therein are visible and providing said finish layer as a relatively thick layer having a thickness 1,591,406 7/1926 Shope 264256 of at least ,4 inch or of a millimeter. 5 2,162,861 6/1939 Polak 52741 7. The process of claim 1 wherein said layers are ap- 3,600,481 8/ 1971 Lanz 264-42 plied by spraying from spraying devices by moving said base panel sheet past said devices and maintaining said WILLIAM V ALEN, Primary Examiner devices substantially stationary.

8. The process of claim 1 further characterized by 10 washing said mask and then drying said mask after remov- 117-38, 45; 52--741; 16l37, 40, 145 ing said mask from the finish layer and before applying it again against a base layer.

US3712825D 1970-12-07 1970-12-07 Method of making simulated masonry wall Expired - Lifetime US3712825A (en)

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Cited By (43)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3858400A (en) * 1971-09-29 1975-01-07 Jean Bernold Method of tunnel boring and tunnel reinforcement mats
US3925586A (en) * 1974-02-19 1975-12-09 Multiple Originals Inc Stencil casting process and resulting architectural art product
US3938923A (en) * 1974-05-02 1976-02-17 Gte Sylvania Incorporated Apparatus and method for forming a sealed outer ring for ceramic regenerator
US4038444A (en) * 1972-04-05 1977-07-26 Erwin Steinhauser Method of producing a metallic plating
US4094941A (en) * 1976-05-03 1978-06-13 Stanley H. Manners Method and apparatus for making decorative panels in relief
US4119480A (en) * 1976-05-13 1978-10-10 Tokyo Shibaura Electric Co., Ltd. Method of manufacturing thick-film circuit devices
US4129669A (en) * 1976-11-01 1978-12-12 Lopez Martha Z Method of applying decorative designs to surfaces
US4164598A (en) * 1977-03-28 1979-08-14 Interior Brick Corporation Veneer wall covering and method of assembly
US4176100A (en) * 1978-10-03 1979-11-27 Kay Tex Products, Inc. Textured surface coating
US4239820A (en) * 1978-02-06 1980-12-16 Salvador Silvano E Method for creating a simulated stone surface or the like
US4510729A (en) * 1982-09-17 1985-04-16 Ewald Syring Method and template for applying relief plastering on a wall surface
US4569178A (en) * 1983-01-12 1986-02-11 Jozsef Kovacs Prefabricated plastered panels for housing
WO1986003433A1 (en) * 1984-12-07 1986-06-19 Henry Schiffer Method of making simulated stone and wood
US4721634A (en) * 1986-05-07 1988-01-26 Mckinnon Gordon Simulated marble
US4774108A (en) * 1986-04-04 1988-09-27 Cano Arq C C Methods of forming and using mat to obtain surface finishes
US4808435A (en) * 1987-04-06 1989-02-28 International Business Machines Corporation Screen printing method for producing lines of uniform width and height
US4959250A (en) * 1986-05-07 1990-09-25 Mckinnon Gordon Simulated marble
US4975303A (en) * 1986-05-07 1990-12-04 Mckinnon Gordon Simulated marble
US5069939A (en) * 1986-05-07 1991-12-03 Mckinnon Gordon Process for covering a substrate with a cementitious surface having a mottled, speckled appearance
US5080750A (en) * 1989-02-23 1992-01-14 Chichibu Cement Co. System for making composite blocks
US5169686A (en) * 1991-03-22 1992-12-08 Mckinnon Gordon Process for making marbleized polyester coating
US5186983A (en) * 1991-02-25 1993-02-16 Brown Robert J Process for decorating a hard surface
US5447752A (en) * 1993-01-08 1995-09-05 Cobb; Clyde T. Method for making a decorative cementitous pattern on a surface
US5930947A (en) * 1997-08-19 1999-08-03 Eckhoff; Gerald J. Landscape system apparatus
US6063856A (en) * 1993-11-16 2000-05-16 Mass; Warren John Plaster material for making fresco-like finish
US6308699B1 (en) * 1999-11-03 2001-10-30 Mark R. Schmitt Paving brick template
WO2002095161A1 (en) 2001-05-24 2002-11-28 Les Materiaux De Construction Oldcastle Canada Inc. Panel, kit and method for forming a masonry wall
EP1308253A1 (en) * 2001-11-02 2003-05-07 Schelfhout C. n.v. Method of making concrete panels
WO2003097959A1 (en) 2002-05-22 2003-11-27 Les Materiaux De Construction Oldcastle Canada Inc. An artificial masonry unit, a masonry wall, a kit and a method for forming a masonry wall
US6702559B1 (en) * 1997-12-12 2004-03-09 Jimmy W. Norman Template for creating designs
US20060249881A1 (en) * 2005-04-21 2006-11-09 Bertin Castonguay Molding Apparatus for Producing Dry Cast Products Having Textured Side Surfaces
US7258897B1 (en) 2005-03-07 2007-08-21 Schindler Anthony J Process for producing an ornamental surface on a substrate
US20090112405A1 (en) * 2007-10-30 2009-04-30 Jtektcorporation Electric power steering apparatus
US20100326010A1 (en) * 2008-02-01 2010-12-30 Michel Bouchard Masonry wall system with guiding means
US8627625B2 (en) 2009-01-30 2014-01-14 Oldcastle Building Products Canada Inc. Masonry wall panel for retaining bricks
US9186819B1 (en) 2014-08-19 2015-11-17 Cambria Company Llc Synthetic molded slabs, and systems and methods related thereto
US20160024723A1 (en) * 2014-07-28 2016-01-28 W. Robert Wilson Dry polymer cement overlay for trafficked pavements
US9289923B1 (en) 2015-01-30 2016-03-22 Cambria Company Llc Synthetic molded slabs, and systems and methods related thereto
US9328027B2 (en) 2012-12-21 2016-05-03 Hanson Aggregates LLC Fast-curing pervious concrete mix
US9556618B2 (en) 2012-09-20 2017-01-31 Oldcastle Building Products Canada Inc. Panel with compressible projections and masonry wall system including the panel
US9598850B2 (en) 2013-03-14 2017-03-21 Forterra Pipe & Precast, Llc Precast stormwater inlet filter and trap
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Cited By (59)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3858400A (en) * 1971-09-29 1975-01-07 Jean Bernold Method of tunnel boring and tunnel reinforcement mats
US4038444A (en) * 1972-04-05 1977-07-26 Erwin Steinhauser Method of producing a metallic plating
US3925586A (en) * 1974-02-19 1975-12-09 Multiple Originals Inc Stencil casting process and resulting architectural art product
US3938923A (en) * 1974-05-02 1976-02-17 Gte Sylvania Incorporated Apparatus and method for forming a sealed outer ring for ceramic regenerator
US4094941A (en) * 1976-05-03 1978-06-13 Stanley H. Manners Method and apparatus for making decorative panels in relief
US4119480A (en) * 1976-05-13 1978-10-10 Tokyo Shibaura Electric Co., Ltd. Method of manufacturing thick-film circuit devices
US4129669A (en) * 1976-11-01 1978-12-12 Lopez Martha Z Method of applying decorative designs to surfaces
US4164598A (en) * 1977-03-28 1979-08-14 Interior Brick Corporation Veneer wall covering and method of assembly
US4239820A (en) * 1978-02-06 1980-12-16 Salvador Silvano E Method for creating a simulated stone surface or the like
US4176100A (en) * 1978-10-03 1979-11-27 Kay Tex Products, Inc. Textured surface coating
US4510729A (en) * 1982-09-17 1985-04-16 Ewald Syring Method and template for applying relief plastering on a wall surface
US4569178A (en) * 1983-01-12 1986-02-11 Jozsef Kovacs Prefabricated plastered panels for housing
WO1986003433A1 (en) * 1984-12-07 1986-06-19 Henry Schiffer Method of making simulated stone and wood
US4774108A (en) * 1986-04-04 1988-09-27 Cano Arq C C Methods of forming and using mat to obtain surface finishes
US4721634A (en) * 1986-05-07 1988-01-26 Mckinnon Gordon Simulated marble
US4959250A (en) * 1986-05-07 1990-09-25 Mckinnon Gordon Simulated marble
US4975303A (en) * 1986-05-07 1990-12-04 Mckinnon Gordon Simulated marble
US5069939A (en) * 1986-05-07 1991-12-03 Mckinnon Gordon Process for covering a substrate with a cementitious surface having a mottled, speckled appearance
US4808435A (en) * 1987-04-06 1989-02-28 International Business Machines Corporation Screen printing method for producing lines of uniform width and height
US5080750A (en) * 1989-02-23 1992-01-14 Chichibu Cement Co. System for making composite blocks
US5186983A (en) * 1991-02-25 1993-02-16 Brown Robert J Process for decorating a hard surface
US5169686A (en) * 1991-03-22 1992-12-08 Mckinnon Gordon Process for making marbleized polyester coating
US5447752A (en) * 1993-01-08 1995-09-05 Cobb; Clyde T. Method for making a decorative cementitous pattern on a surface
US6063856A (en) * 1993-11-16 2000-05-16 Mass; Warren John Plaster material for making fresco-like finish
US5930947A (en) * 1997-08-19 1999-08-03 Eckhoff; Gerald J. Landscape system apparatus
US6702559B1 (en) * 1997-12-12 2004-03-09 Jimmy W. Norman Template for creating designs
US6308699B1 (en) * 1999-11-03 2001-10-30 Mark R. Schmitt Paving brick template
WO2002095161A1 (en) 2001-05-24 2002-11-28 Les Materiaux De Construction Oldcastle Canada Inc. Panel, kit and method for forming a masonry wall
US6857248B2 (en) 2001-05-24 2005-02-22 Les Materiaux De'construction Oldcastle Canada Inc. Panel, a kit and a method for forming a masonry wall
EP1308253A1 (en) * 2001-11-02 2003-05-07 Schelfhout C. n.v. Method of making concrete panels
WO2003097959A1 (en) 2002-05-22 2003-11-27 Les Materiaux De Construction Oldcastle Canada Inc. An artificial masonry unit, a masonry wall, a kit and a method for forming a masonry wall
US20050028476A1 (en) * 2002-05-22 2005-02-10 Michel Bouchard Artificial masonry unit, a masonry wall, a kit and a method for forming a masonry wall
US7658050B2 (en) 2002-05-22 2010-02-09 Les Materiaux De Construction Oldcastle Canada Inc. Artificial masonry unit, a masonry wall, a kit and a method for forming a masonry wall
US20070193176A1 (en) * 2002-05-22 2007-08-23 Les Materiaux De Construction Oldcastle Canada Inc. Artificial Masonry Unit, A Masonry Wall, A Kit and A Method for Forming a Masonry Wall
US7258897B1 (en) 2005-03-07 2007-08-21 Schindler Anthony J Process for producing an ornamental surface on a substrate
US20060249881A1 (en) * 2005-04-21 2006-11-09 Bertin Castonguay Molding Apparatus for Producing Dry Cast Products Having Textured Side Surfaces
US8101113B2 (en) 2005-04-21 2012-01-24 Oldcastle Building Products Canada, Inc. Molding apparatus for producing dry cast products having textured side surfaces
US20090112405A1 (en) * 2007-10-30 2009-04-30 Jtektcorporation Electric power steering apparatus
US20100326010A1 (en) * 2008-02-01 2010-12-30 Michel Bouchard Masonry wall system with guiding means
US8621801B2 (en) 2008-02-01 2014-01-07 Oldcastle Building Products Canada, Inc. Masonry wall system with guiding means
US8966844B2 (en) 2008-02-01 2015-03-03 Oldcastle Building Products Canada, Inc. Masonry wall system with guiding means
US8627625B2 (en) 2009-01-30 2014-01-14 Oldcastle Building Products Canada Inc. Masonry wall panel for retaining bricks
US8973327B2 (en) 2009-01-30 2015-03-10 Oldcastle Building Products Canada Inc. Masonry wall panel for retaining bricks
US9556618B2 (en) 2012-09-20 2017-01-31 Oldcastle Building Products Canada Inc. Panel with compressible projections and masonry wall system including the panel
US9328027B2 (en) 2012-12-21 2016-05-03 Hanson Aggregates LLC Fast-curing pervious concrete mix
US9598850B2 (en) 2013-03-14 2017-03-21 Forterra Pipe & Precast, Llc Precast stormwater inlet filter and trap
US20160024723A1 (en) * 2014-07-28 2016-01-28 W. Robert Wilson Dry polymer cement overlay for trafficked pavements
US10221527B2 (en) * 2014-07-28 2019-03-05 W. Robert Wilson Dry polymer cement overlay for trafficked pavements
US10300626B2 (en) 2014-08-19 2019-05-28 Cambria Company Llc Synthetic molded slabs, and systems and methods related thereto
US9993942B2 (en) 2014-08-19 2018-06-12 Cambria Company Llc Processed slabs, and systems and methods related thereto
US9718303B2 (en) 2014-08-19 2017-08-01 Cambria Company Llc Processed slabs, and systems and methods related thereto
US9186819B1 (en) 2014-08-19 2015-11-17 Cambria Company Llc Synthetic molded slabs, and systems and methods related thereto
US9993943B2 (en) 2014-08-19 2018-06-12 Cambria Company Llc Processed slabs, and systems and methods related thereto
US10105868B2 (en) 2015-01-30 2018-10-23 Cambria Company Llc Processed slabs, and systems and methods related thereto
US10195762B2 (en) 2015-01-30 2019-02-05 Cambria Company Llc Processed slabs, and systems and methods related thereto
US9289923B1 (en) 2015-01-30 2016-03-22 Cambria Company Llc Synthetic molded slabs, and systems and methods related thereto
US10252440B2 (en) 2015-01-30 2019-04-09 Cambria Company Llc Processed slabs, and systems and methods related thereto
US9613412B1 (en) 2015-12-21 2017-04-04 Cambria Company Llc Stone slab manufacturing methods and systems
US10467352B2 (en) 2017-04-03 2019-11-05 Cambria Company Llc Stone slab production methods and systems

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