Connect public, paid and private patent data with Google Patents Public Datasets

Electrical connector

Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3710307A
US3710307A US3710307DA US3710307A US 3710307 A US3710307 A US 3710307A US 3710307D A US3710307D A US 3710307DA US 3710307 A US3710307 A US 3710307A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
stud
screw
set
body
connector
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
J Cooper
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
FL Industries Inc
Original Assignee
ITT Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01RLINE CONNECTORS; CURRENT COLLECTORS
    • H01R11/00Connectors providing two or more spaced connecting locations for conductive members which are thereby interconnected; End pieces for wires or cables, supported by the wire or cable and for facilitating electrical connection to some other wire, terminal, or conductive member
    • H01R11/11End pieces or tapping pieces for wires, supported by the wire and for facilitating electrical connection to some other wire, terminal or conductive member
    • H01R11/26End pieces terminating in a screw clamp, screw or nut

Abstract

A connector for making an electrical connection to a threaded stud for power distribution applications such as transformer applications. A conductive connector threaded at one end to receive the stud is insulated with a protective jacket which mates with the stud bushing to enclose the connection. A set screw projects through the insulation into a threaded socket to bear against the stud when the set screw is tightened. The bearing surface may be a section of the wall of the body within the threaded area or may be an inset pressure pad, or plastic set screw tip. The free end of the connector may have a suitable connector for connection to a cable. A slideable insulating sleeve or boot fitted over the last mentioned connector may insulatingly cover the entire connection.

Description

United States Patent 1 Cooper, Jr.

[ 1 Jan. 9, 1973 [54] ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR [75] Inventor: James Joseph Cooper, Jr., St. Louis,

[73] Assignee: International Telephone and Telegraph Corporation, New York, NY.

221 Filed: Aug. 20, 1970 [21] Appl. No.: 65,372

[52] US. Cl. ..339/ll6 C, 339/272 R [51] Int. Cl. ..H01r 13/54, HOlr 13/30 [58] Field of Search ..339/1l6, 242,213, 272, 265,

339/237, 60; 151/24, 21 C; 174/72 R, 71 R,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,534,323 10/1970 Becker et al ..339/116C 589,167 8/1897 Doolittle ..151/24 2,499,985 3/1950 Cafiero ..339/272 UC 2,280,270 4/1942 Stoner ..15 N24 X 3,183,476 5/1965 Sacks et al.. ..l74/72 1,626,863 5/1927 Nacey ..15l/21 C 3,414,868 12/1968 Howe .....339/116 Primary Examiner-Richard E. Moore Attorney-C. Cornell Remsen, Jr, Walter J. Baum,

Paul W. Hemminger, Charles L. Johnson, Jr., James B. Raden, Delbert P. Warner and Marvin M. Chaban [57] ABSTRACT A connector for making an electrical connection to a threaded stud for power distribution applications such as transformer applications. A conductive connector threaded at one end to receive the stud is insulated with a protective jacket which mates with the stud bushing to enclose the connection. A set screw projects through the insulation into a threaded socket to bear against the stud when the set screw is tightened. The bearing surface may be a section of the wall of the body within the threaded area or may be an inset pressure pad, or plastic set screw tip. The free end of the connector may have a suitable connector for connection to a cable. A slideable insulating sleeve or boot fitted over the last mentioned connector may insulatingly cover the entire connection.

3 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures all/W41;

PATENTEDJAN 9 I975 SHEET 2 BF 2 FIG.

INVENTOR James J. Cooper Jr.

ATT).

ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In general usage, electrical connections from power system components such as transformers terminate in a threaded stud extending normally from the body of the transformer. In the usual condition, a cable is attached to an intermediate member which is in turn connected to the stud. The intermediate member may take the form of a threaded conductive sleeve with the cable soldered or otherwise entered into the opposite end.

Another approach has been to mount a terminal member with either a threaded bore or clearance opening on the stud. In the latter case, a clamping screw or the like would be used.

In either of the cases noted, problems have arisen relative to firmness of the connection. Other problems arise relative to the assembly and possible disassembly of the connection. Of course a necessary condition is that a tight and firm electrical connection be made and that the connection be insulatable both electrically and against moisture entering the connection.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is therefore an object of the invention to provide a new and improved terminal connector for electrically connecting a cable to a threaded stud.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a new stud-mounting connector which is readily assembled and holds the connection firmly and tightly without causing damage to the stud.

It is a further object of the invention to provide an improved stud-mounting connector which may be jacketed with moisture-proof insulation during fabrication and which may be insulated to cover the connection to the stud.

It is a still further object of the invention to provide a stud-mounted connector which may be readily removed from the stud and also be readily detached from a cable connected thereto.

The invention shown and claimed herein employs the principle of an internally threaded connector fitted on the mounting stud. A set screw socket is machined or otherwise formed in the connector body normal to the threaded stud-receiving passage. In one form, a web or desired thickness of material is retained as the socket end wall. The set screw on being tightened will then tighten the threaded area against the stud threads. By the use of the set screw, the connector alignment may be set as desired and maintained without causing any damage to the threads of the stud.

In another form, the set screw opening may be bottomed within the connected stud receiving bore. Either a plastic pressure pad interposed between the set screw tip and the stud bore or plastic-tipped set screw may be used to produce a compressive force against the stud holding it in place tightly in this way.

cables by means of screw tightened open end conduct-- I ing hoods or the like. In one form, a molded sleeve may be mounted on the cable and slid over the terminal thoroughly covering the connection.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. I shows a side elevation of a connector, partially broken away, detached from a stud to which the connector may be attached;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken along line 22 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a side sectional view of a second embodiment of connector similar to that shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a side sectional view of a third embodiment of a connector; and

FIG. 5 is a side view with the cover jacket sectioned of the embodiment of FIGS. 1 and 2 fully connected.

Turning to the drawings in detail, in FIGS. 1, 2, and 5, I show a first embodiment of my invention. There I show a transformer housing 10 from which protrudes a stud mounting insulator or bushing 12 tapered toward the stud 14 which may be embedded at its base within the insulator and which extends normally to the transformer housing 10. Such stud connections are quite well-known in the art and are in general usage.

For mounting a terminal connection on the stud, I provide a jacketed conducting connector 20 of copper, or aluminum, or other suitable material. Connector 20 includes a main body 22 and a terminal member 24, which as shown is angled therefrom. In another form (not shown) a terminal member rectilinearly disposed with respect to the connector body and using my inventive concept may be provided. The main body 22 is cylindrical and has incised in its end wall 26 a threaded stud receiving socket 28 centrally disposed within the main body 22. At right angle to the main body (in the form shown) is the terminal member 24 of circular segmental cross section. On the flat side of the terminal 24 are suitably threaded openings 32 each of which may receive a suitable cable attaching bolt 30. The main body 22 is jacketed within an insulating boot 34 which may be rubber or suitable flexible plastic and may be molded onto the connector body, terminating at the mounting end in an open mouthed tubular sheath 40.

When the connector 20 is mounted on the stud 14, the sheath 40 of the boot covers the stud l4 and the open mouth mates tightly with the transformer bushing thereby insulating the stud connection thoroughly against outside contact. Suitable reinforcing ribs on the exterior of the sheath may be provided, as is well known.

Within the body 22 of the connector, aset screw socket 50 is cut by suitable means. The socket 50 is threaded to receive a set screw 52. A clearance opening 51 in the boot 34 allows the: set screw 52 to be manipulated from the exterior of the boot. The socket base 54 is spaced a controlled distance from the adjacent surface 56 of the stud receiver socket 28 to create a web 58 of material between the tip of the set screw and the adjacent stud wall.

The thickness of web 58 is controlled during the machining or drilling operation forming the set screw socket. This thickness retained in such that the web will deform into the stud socket on tightening of the set screw tip against the web 58. In this way, the added force of the web as driven by the set screw is provided to retain the stud in the tightened position and prevent rotation of the connector relative to the stud. The web of material has a large enough area of contact with the stud to prevent marring of the stud threads in response to the set screw pressure.

On tightening of the set screw, the generated pressure will tend to deform the web and cause it to cold flow into the thread grooves tightly locking the stud to the connector body, without marring or damaging the stud threads.

In FIG. 3, I show a second embodiment of my invention. In that figure, we show a transformed connected stud l4 and connector 20a similar to the one previously described. In this figure, a through passage 50a is cut for the set screw 52a such that the tip 60a of the set screw may travel into the receiving socket 28. The set screw 52a will have affixed to its tip a plastic disc 70 with the disc diameter only slightly less than the diameter of the set screw. Thus, the disc will pass along passage 50a and on tightening of the set screw, the disc will enter the receiving socket 28 deforming against stud 14, its grooves and threads. Again, with this embodiment, pressure generated by the set screw will not mar the stud threads. Pressure of the set screw will cause the softer, more ductile disc to cold flow into the grooves of the stud thereby tightly locking the stud in place.

In FIG. 4, I show a structure similar to those previously described with a transformer stud 14. Here, I employ a set screw 52 similar to that shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. The set screw passage 50b is a through passage entering into the stud socket 28. The joinder of the passage 50b to the stud socket 28 is enlarged in dimension for a short depth to form a cavity 73 open to both the stud socket 28 and the set screw passage 50b. This cavity may be circular and concentric with the set screw passage or it may be rectangular, hexagonal or any suitable shape. In the first case with a circular cavity, a plastic disc 75 of greater diameter than the set screw 52 may be inserted into this cavity; with any other shaped cavity, a suitable shaped pad of rigid plastic or ductile metal material will be fitted into the cavity. This disc or strip acts as a pressure pad forced against a stud 14 by the tightening of the set screw. Again, the pressure pad will compress against the stud and will be deformed by the threads and cold flow into the thread grooves thereof locking the stud once again. In other forms, the dimensions of the pad must allow its insertion through either the set screw passage or the stud socket prior to assembly of course.

In FIG. 5, I show a fully assembled connector of the embodiment of FIGS. 1 and 2 completely jacketed with moisture-proof insulation. The transformer housing has its bushing 12 protruding therefrom, the bushing having an exterior insulating surface from which extends the conductive stud 14. The stud is mated within the receiving socket 28,0f the connector main body 22. Extending angularly from the body 22 is the terminal 24. An insulating exteriorly ribbed boot 34 covers the body and the extension of sheath 40 covers a portion of the bushing 12 completely insulating the stud l4 and connector body 22.

A set screw 52 within a socket 50 in the body and in a like passage 80 through the boot 34 impinges against the socket base 54 spaced a distance from surface of socket 28 to form therebetween the deformable web 58. Tightening of the set screw, as mentioned previously upsets the web into the grooves holding the stud l4 tightly.

Connected to the terminal 24 by suitable bolts 30 is 5 the dual, open-hook lug 90. Lug 90 has an enlarged tubular body 92 crimped or otherwise affixed to the jacketed cable 94. A tubular sleeve 95 of moistureproof, waterproof, insulating material is fitted over the lug and cable and engages the outside of the angled extension 97 of boot 34 covering'the terminal-lug connection. The extreme end of the sleeve 95 has a gripping member 98 tightly gripping the jacket 99 of cable 94 in a manner known in the art.

While there has been shown what is at present thought to be the preferred embodiment of the invention, it is understood that modifications may be made therein such as using a rectilinear connector body, in place of the angled body shown, and it is intended to cover in the appended claims, as such modifications which fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. A connector for making an electrical connection to a threaded conducting stud, the invention comprismg:

a terminal member of high current carrying capacity including a body having a suitably threaded socket for receiving the stud,

a terminal end of said body extending therefrom,

means for exerting compressive force on the stud mated within the body,

said exerting means comprising a set screw, and

an intermediate member disposed between the tip of said set screw and the body of a stud, and wherein said intermediate member responds to pressure from said set screw to cold flow between the threads of said stud, and

wherein said intermediate member comprises a deformable member of greater surface than set screw diameter to provide contact with the stud greater than the area of the tip of said set screw,

said deformable member comprised of material softer than said stud and than said set screw.

2 A connector as claimed in claim 1, wherein said intermediate member comprises a blind, threaded socket in said body disposed toward and spaced from said stud socket for receiving said set screw, and wherein i said intermediate member comprises a continuous, solid web of material of said body within the space between said set screw tip and said stud socket. 3. A connector for making an electrical connection to a threaded connecting stud extending from an en- 55 larged conductive mounting the invention comprising:

a terminal member of high current carrying capacity including a conductive body having a suitably threaded socket for receiving the stud,

a water-proof, insulating flexible housing covering said body,

a first opening in said housing for receiving said stud,

a mouth of said opening cooperating with said insulating member for water-proofing the connection of said body to said stud,

a terminal end of said body extending therefrom externally of said housing,

a threaded socket in said body, said intermediate member comprising means for exerting compressive force on the stud a continuous portion of the sidewall of said socket, male! Within the b y said portion upsettable into the threads of said stud said exerting means comprising a set screw disposed.

within said last-mentioned socket, and

an intermediate member disposed between the tip of said set screw and the body of a stud,

to tightly hold said stud against rotation in the stud socket, and

a waterproof sleeve member covering said terminal said intermediate member having a larger surface sealmfgly i' v il sald hillsmg to fully area in contactwith a stud than said set screw tip, wa erproo an em use Sal cionnec and 10 =0 a

Claims (3)

1. A connector for making an electrical connection to a threaded conducting stud, the invention comprising: a terminal member of high current carrying capacity including a body having a suitably threaded socket for receiving the stud, a terminal end of said body extending therefrom, means for exerting compressive force on the stud mated within the body, said exerting means comprising a set screw, and an intermediate member disposed between the tip of said set screw and the body of a stud, and wherein said intermediate member responds to pressure from said set screw to cold flow between the threads of said stud, and wherein said intermediate member comprises a deformable member of greater surface than set screw diameter to provide contact with the stud greater than the area of the tip of said set screw, said deformable member comprised of material softer than said stud and than said set screw.
2. A connector as claimed in claim 1, wherein said intermediate member comprises a blind, threaded socket in said body disposed toward and spaced from said stud socket for receiving said set screw, and wherein said intermediate member comprises a continuous, solid web of material of said body within the space between said set screw tip and said stud socket.
3. A connector for making an electrical connection to a threaded connecting stud extending from an enlarged conductive mounting the invention comprising: a terminal member of high current carrying capacity including a conductive body having a suitably threaded socket for receiving the stud, a water-proof, insulating flexible housing covering said body, a first opening in said housing for receiving said stud, a mouth of said opening cooperating with said insulating member for water-proofing the connection of said body to said stud, a terminal end of said body extending therefrom externally of said housing, a threaded socket in said body, means for exerting compressive force on the stud mated within the body, said exerting means comprising a set screw disposed within said last-mentioned socket, and an intermediate member disposed between the tip of said set screw and the body of a stud, said intermediate member having a larger surface area in contact with a stud than said set screw tip, and said intermediate member comprising a continuous portion of the sidewall of said socket, said portion upsettable into the threads of said stud to tightly hold said stud against rotation in the stud socket, and a waterproof sleeve member covering said terminal and sealingly mating with said housing to fully waterproof and enclose said connector.
US3710307A 1970-08-20 1970-08-20 Electrical connector Expired - Lifetime US3710307A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US6537270 true 1970-08-20 1970-08-20

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3710307A true US3710307A (en) 1973-01-09

Family

ID=22062252

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3710307A Expired - Lifetime US3710307A (en) 1970-08-20 1970-08-20 Electrical connector

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3710307A (en)

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4214806A (en) * 1979-07-27 1980-07-29 Kraft Russell H Fast release connector
US4283597A (en) * 1979-03-19 1981-08-11 International Telephone And Telegraph Corporation Wide-range insulating/sealing sleeve
US5349144A (en) * 1991-10-25 1994-09-20 Marglass Industries Limited Transformer connector
US6194986B1 (en) 1998-11-03 2001-02-27 Lapp Insulator Company Quick bottom connection for a transformer bushing
US20040161968A1 (en) * 2003-02-18 2004-08-19 Homac Mfg. Company Connector and insulating boot for different sized conductors and associated methods
US20060155280A1 (en) * 2005-01-07 2006-07-13 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Insulated water-tight connector assembly including a set screw driver and plug
US7232775B1 (en) * 2006-05-11 2007-06-19 Mainstream Engineering Corp. Connector body for a lead attachment retrofit arrangement
US20110230083A1 (en) * 2009-03-30 2011-09-22 John Mezzalingua Associates, Inc. Collar for sealingly engaging a cover for cable connectors
US20110256755A1 (en) * 2010-04-14 2011-10-20 John Mezzalingua Associates, Inc. Cover for cable connectors
US8529288B2 (en) 2010-04-14 2013-09-10 John Mezzalingua Associates, LLC Cover for cable connectors
US8764480B2 (en) 2010-04-14 2014-07-01 John Mezzalingua Associates, LLP Cover for cable connectors
US20160111800A1 (en) * 2014-10-16 2016-04-21 Hubbell Incorporated Wire terminal assembly and adapter kit
US20170062972A1 (en) * 2015-06-30 2017-03-02 Commscope Technologies Llc Protector for rf connector

Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US589167A (en) * 1897-08-31 doolittle
US1626863A (en) * 1923-04-23 1927-05-03 Harry M Nacey Automatic sprinkler head for sprinkling systems
US2280270A (en) * 1939-09-02 1942-04-21 Jacobs Mfg Co Nut lock
US2499985A (en) * 1946-02-27 1950-03-07 Michael J Cafiero Combination connector
US3183476A (en) * 1960-08-26 1965-05-11 Burndy Corp Connector
US3414868A (en) * 1967-05-10 1968-12-03 Gen Electric Terminator for connecting a plurality of electrical cables to a secondary of an electrical apparatus
US3534323A (en) * 1969-03-06 1970-10-13 Fargo Mfg Co Inc Transformer tap for underground applications with pressure plate connection

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US589167A (en) * 1897-08-31 doolittle
US1626863A (en) * 1923-04-23 1927-05-03 Harry M Nacey Automatic sprinkler head for sprinkling systems
US2280270A (en) * 1939-09-02 1942-04-21 Jacobs Mfg Co Nut lock
US2499985A (en) * 1946-02-27 1950-03-07 Michael J Cafiero Combination connector
US3183476A (en) * 1960-08-26 1965-05-11 Burndy Corp Connector
US3414868A (en) * 1967-05-10 1968-12-03 Gen Electric Terminator for connecting a plurality of electrical cables to a secondary of an electrical apparatus
US3534323A (en) * 1969-03-06 1970-10-13 Fargo Mfg Co Inc Transformer tap for underground applications with pressure plate connection

Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4283597A (en) * 1979-03-19 1981-08-11 International Telephone And Telegraph Corporation Wide-range insulating/sealing sleeve
US4214806A (en) * 1979-07-27 1980-07-29 Kraft Russell H Fast release connector
US5349144A (en) * 1991-10-25 1994-09-20 Marglass Industries Limited Transformer connector
US6194986B1 (en) 1998-11-03 2001-02-27 Lapp Insulator Company Quick bottom connection for a transformer bushing
US20040161968A1 (en) * 2003-02-18 2004-08-19 Homac Mfg. Company Connector and insulating boot for different sized conductors and associated methods
US7056151B2 (en) 2003-02-18 2006-06-06 Homac Mfg. Company Connector and insulating boot for different sized conductors and associated methods
US20060180335A1 (en) * 2003-02-18 2006-08-17 Homac Mfg. Company Connector insulating boot for different sized conductors and associated methods
US7160146B2 (en) 2003-02-18 2007-01-09 Homac Mfg. Company Connector insulating boot for different sized conductors and associated methods
US20070105428A1 (en) * 2003-02-18 2007-05-10 Homac Mfg. Company, State Of Incorporation: Florida Connector and insulating boot for different sized conductors and associated methods
US20060155280A1 (en) * 2005-01-07 2006-07-13 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Insulated water-tight connector assembly including a set screw driver and plug
US7311563B2 (en) * 2005-01-07 2007-12-25 Thomas & Betts International, Inc. Insulated water-tight connector assembly including a set screw driver and plug
US7232775B1 (en) * 2006-05-11 2007-06-19 Mainstream Engineering Corp. Connector body for a lead attachment retrofit arrangement
US20110230083A1 (en) * 2009-03-30 2011-09-22 John Mezzalingua Associates, Inc. Collar for sealingly engaging a cover for cable connectors
US9130303B2 (en) 2009-03-30 2015-09-08 John Mezzalingua Associates, LLC Cover for cable connectors
US8853542B2 (en) 2009-03-30 2014-10-07 John Mezzalingua Associates, LLC Collar for sealingly engaging a cover for cable connectors
US9106003B2 (en) 2009-03-30 2015-08-11 John Mezzalingua Associates, LLC Cover for cable connectors
US8419467B2 (en) * 2010-04-14 2013-04-16 John Mezzalingua Associates, Inc. Cover for cable connectors
US8529288B2 (en) 2010-04-14 2013-09-10 John Mezzalingua Associates, LLC Cover for cable connectors
US8764480B2 (en) 2010-04-14 2014-07-01 John Mezzalingua Associates, LLP Cover for cable connectors
US20110256755A1 (en) * 2010-04-14 2011-10-20 John Mezzalingua Associates, Inc. Cover for cable connectors
US20160111800A1 (en) * 2014-10-16 2016-04-21 Hubbell Incorporated Wire terminal assembly and adapter kit
US9601841B2 (en) * 2014-10-16 2017-03-21 Hubbell Incorporated Wire terminal assembly and adapter kit
US20170062972A1 (en) * 2015-06-30 2017-03-02 Commscope Technologies Llc Protector for rf connector

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3320575A (en) Grooved coaxial cable connector
US3350677A (en) Telescope waterseal connector
US3501737A (en) Captivated centre conductor connector
US3373243A (en) Electrical multiconductor cable connecting assembly
US3356806A (en) Protectors for electric circuit
US4491685A (en) Cable connector
US4093335A (en) Electrical connectors for coaxial cables
US4090029A (en) Liquid tight connector with improved ground conductivity
US6250973B1 (en) Two conductor split ring battery post connector
US3850495A (en) Multi-pin shielded high voltage connector
US4006288A (en) High voltage shielded cable termination, splice connection, and method of making a splice connection
US1731661A (en) Electrical current tap plug or connecter
US5951327A (en) Connector for use with multiple sizes of cables
US2642474A (en) Electrical connector
US4059330A (en) Solderless prong connector for coaxial cable
US2497820A (en) Cable clamp
US2434475A (en) Electrical connector
US4135776A (en) Solderless coaxial cable connector
US3235834A (en) Shielded braid pin and socket connector
US3571781A (en) Plastic cable clamp
US4384758A (en) Electrical connector
US2275762A (en) Electrical connecting means
US3040284A (en) Termination fitting for mineral-insulated metal-sheath cable
US4362351A (en) Terminal assembly
US2549647A (en) Conductor and compressible insert connector means therefor

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: ITT CORPORATION

Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:INTERNATIONAL TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004389/0606

Effective date: 19831122

AS Assignment

Owner name: FL INDUSTRIES, INC., 220 SUTH ORANGE AVENUE, LIVIN

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:ITT CORPORATION, 320 PARK AVENUE, NEW YORK, NY 10022, ACORP. OF DE.;REEL/FRAME:004453/0578

Effective date: 19850629