US3699872A - Air distribution apparatus - Google Patents

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US3699872A
US3699872A US3699872DA US3699872A US 3699872 A US3699872 A US 3699872A US 3699872D A US3699872D A US 3699872DA US 3699872 A US3699872 A US 3699872A
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duct
air
plates
orifice
combination according
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Michael H Kruger
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Keene Corp
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Keene Corp
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING; AIR-HUMIDIFICATION; VENTILATION; USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F13/00Details common to, or for air-conditioning, air-humidification, ventilation or use of air currents for screening
    • F24F13/08Air-flow control members, e.g. louvres, grilles, flaps or guide plates
    • F24F13/10Air-flow control members, e.g. louvres, grilles, flaps or guide plates movable, e.g. dampers
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING; AIR-HUMIDIFICATION; VENTILATION; USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F13/00Details common to, or for air-conditioning, air-humidification, ventilation or use of air currents for screening
    • F24F13/02Ducting arrangements
    • F24F13/0263Insulation for air ducts
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING; AIR-HUMIDIFICATION; VENTILATION; USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F13/00Details common to, or for air-conditioning, air-humidification, ventilation or use of air currents for screening
    • F24F13/02Ducting arrangements
    • F24F13/06Outlets for directing or distributing air into rooms or spaces, e.g. ceiling air diffuser
    • F24F13/072Outlets for directing or distributing air into rooms or spaces, e.g. ceiling air diffuser of elongated shape, e.g. between ceiling panels
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B9/00Ceilings; Construction of ceilings, e.g. false ceilings; Ceiling construction with regard to insulation
    • E04B9/02Ceilings; Construction of ceilings, e.g. false ceilings; Ceiling construction with regard to insulation having means for ventilation or vapour discharge
    • E04B2009/026Ceilings; Construction of ceilings, e.g. false ceilings; Ceiling construction with regard to insulation having means for ventilation or vapour discharge the supporting ceiling grid acting as air diffusers

Abstract

Air distribution apparatus including an air distributor designed for connection to ductwork in a building and adapted to be mounted flush with a ceiling. The distributor contains an adjustable plenum chamber rotatable about its axis for selectively determining the quantity and directing air through its outlet angularly outward in any direction into a room without using dampers or other air deflecting or directing vanes. The absence of dampers or other members in the air stream minimizes air turbulence and sound noises while increasing the overall efficiency of the distributor.

Description

United States Patent Kruger AIR DISTRIBUTION APPARATUS Michael H. Kruger, Chestnut Hill, Mass.

Assignee: Keene Corporation Filed: March 1, 1971 Appl. No.: 122,611

Inventor:

US. Cl ..98/40 D, 239/597, 251/304 Int. Cl. ..F24f 13/06 Field of Search ..98/4O D, 40 C, 41, 40 N;

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 12/1913 Bosse ..98/4O N 8/1963 Davidson ..98/4O D Oct. 24, 1972 Primary Examiner-William E. Wayner AttorneyAlbert L. Jeffers [57] ABSTRACT Air distribution apparatus including an air distributor designed for connection to ductwork in a building and adapted to be mounted flush with a ceiling. The distributor contains an adjustable plenum chamber rotatable about its axis for selectively determining the quantity and directing air through its outlet angularly outward in any direction into a room without using dampers or other air deflecting or directing vanes. The absence of dampers or other members in the air stream minimizes air turbulence and sound noises while increasing the overall efficiency of the distributor.

18 Claims, 18 Drawing Figures PATENTEU OCT 24 I972 SHEET 3 [IF 4 AIR DISTRIBUTION APPARATUS FIELD OF THE INVENTION The invention described herein relates to air distribution apparatus and more particularly to an air distributor of the type designed for installation in the ceiling or walls of industrial or commercial buildings or vehicular apparatus.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Air distributing systems installed and used in buildings conventionally include ductwork connected at one end to a heating or cooling source and at its other end to distributors or diffusers positioned in walls or ceilings through which air is discharged into rooms or other spaces to be conditioned. The invention herein relates to distributors of the type designed primarily for installation in a ceiling.

Prior 'art distributors conventionally include a sheet metal housing having an inlet connected to an air duct with the outlet usually taking the form of a long narrow slot extending longitudinally of the distributor through which the conditioned air is discharged. The housing often serves the function of a plenum chamber, since it receives air prior to its discharge into the space to be conditioned.

Inasmuch as ceilings vary as to height, such distributors include adjustable vanes which coact with ap-.

propriately formed lips or flanges located in the discharge orifice in order to achieve proper air distribution and ventilation of the space being conditioned. In the case of spaces having low ceilings, the vanes are adjusted to direct the conditioned air horizontally to or parallel with the ceiling surface for achieving the desired. air flow pattern. For spaces having high ceilings, the conditioned air is directed downward or angularly downward for obtaining proper ventilation and conditioning of the space. Also, the distributors may be so placed and the vanes appropriately positioned to wash a vertical surface, such as a window wall. Adjustable dampers which increase or diminish the volume of air to be introduced into a room, are positioned within such distributors either at the air inlet end or the air discharge orifice to permit the balancing of conditioned air into the space.

An important disadvantage resulting from the use of dampers is that great turbulence and resistance is imparted to the air as it strikes and passes over these control vanes and dampers on its way to the distributor orifice. Such turbulence and resistance causes extreme inefficiencies in both the plenum chamber and the complete system, with the result that the air must be placed under a greater pressure and flow at a greater velocity to provide the required air volume to condition a space.

Further, even at a relatively low air pressure and velocity across the control vanes and damper, cavitation takes place as the air moves over these resistant edges thus causing noises and air whistle which cannot be damped out. Since the whistles generated are of a high frequency, the resulting sound noises appear louder than a lower frequency noise of the same power level. Moreover, the resistance to the air stream by the control vanes and damper and the interruption in flow which consequently takes place causes other sound noises of lower frequencies which likewise cannot effectively be damped out of the system. The efficiency of the distributor is therefore substantially less than optimum because the control vane and damper obstructions placed in the air stream adversely affects system performance and the sound noises produced are troublesome to room occupants.

The primary object of my invention therefore is to provide a distributor of high efficiency, inexpensive to manufacture and capable of handling a greater volume of air at lower pressure than air distributors of the same size in the prior art.

Another object of my invention is to provide an air distributor without any adjustable controlling vanes but capable of controlling the direction of air discharged into a space.

Another object of my invention is the provision of a distributor capable of supplying conditioned air at lower sound levels for a given size chamber than those appearing in the prior art.

Still another object of my invention is theprovision of a distributor capable of being quickly and rotatably adjusted for controlling the direction and flow of air to a space being conditioned.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The objects of my invention may be realized through the provision of a distributor which diffuses and directs air into a space to be conditioned. The distributor plenum chamber is adjustable to permit directing air along the ceiling or at any angle toward the vertical and controlling the volume of such air Without employing controlling vanes or other air directing devices. By keeping the distributor air passages free of obstructing members, air entering the space is less subject to sound noises normally associated with air conditioning systems.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION The subject matter which I regard as my invention is particularly pointed out and distinctly claimed in the concluding portion of the specification. My invention, however, both as to organization and method of operation, together with further objects and advantages thereof, may best be understood by reference to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a view illustrating the disposition of ductwork and distributors mounted in the ceiling of a space to be conditioned;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a portion of a distributor including an interconnecting collar and associated ductwork used in the system;

FIG. 3 is a view illustrating parts forming the dis- .tributor air outlet which are designed for mounting on tor parts for respectively dampering a portion of outlet air or shutting off flow into a space;

FIG. 8 shows a modification of the invention;

FIG. 9 is a view taken on lines 9-9 of FIG. 8;

FlGS. 10A, B and C show different positions of distributor of FIG. 8 for controlling the flow of air;

FIG. 1 1 illustrates a slightly different duct design for controlling flow of air through the duct outlets; and

FIG. 12 is an end view of the distributor including the duct design of FIG. 1 l.

Referring now to the drawings wherein like reference characters designate like or corresponding parts throughout the several views, there is shown in FIG. 1, an air conditioning system having one end connected to a heating or cooling source (not shown) and terminating at its other end in distributor designed for mounting above a ceiling or in walls of a building, vehicle or other installation requiring conditioned air. As in conventional installations, a hose or pipe 22 supplies conditioned air, to the distributor at a predetermined pressure and flow rate. In its preferred form, the distributor comprises a duct 24 of circular cross-section which serves the function of a plenum chamber for air to be delivered to the space being conditioned.

The distributors are designed such that single or multiple units may be serially connected to extend along the ceiling depending on the volume of air needed to condition the space and/or to ventilate it.

Referring more specifically to FlGS. 2, 4 and 5, the duct arrangement shown is designed to help diffuse the air and establish a uniform pattern of air flow from the distributor orifice 46 into the space being conditioned. To accomplish this, the lower portion of duct 24 facing the room, has a multiplicity of outlet openings 26 spaced along its length. Each opening is formed by cutting the duct body on three sides and bending the fourth side upwardly to provide multiple tabs 28 along the duct length. These tabs serve to channel the flow of air from the duct to the openings 26 to help assure uniformity of air distribution into the room rather than have a greater flow outwardly from one end or the other of the distributor.

Although a particular type of duct outlet opening has been shown, it is apparent other designs for channeling the air downwardly will occur to those skilled in the art. For example, the duct 24 may be slit longitudinally of the duct complete length, or a portion thereof, and a diffuser having multiple outlet openings may be set between the adjacent edges formed by the slit. Also, the cut edges may simply be separated and bridging members placed therebetween to channel and diffuse the air through the outlet openings, or an open slot for the outlet air may be formed without the use of any diffusing means.

The collar 34 is an important part of the ductwork system and is designed to perform a multiplicity of functions. As shown, it is made of two identical sections welded or otherwise secured together to form rims 36 and 38 each having an outwardly directed flange 40. A projection 42 extends downwardly from the joined flanges for a purpose hereafter described. To provide ease in installation, the rims are made of a diameter less than the inner diameter of hose 22 and duct 24 to permit the hose and duct conveniently to be slid on to the rims during the installation process. The respective diameters are further chosen such that the duct will smoothly and easily rotate on the rim when manipulated by a screwdriver or other tool, to thereby control the direction of air discharged through orifice. 46 into the space.

It is apparent the design of distributors useful in commercial or residential installations must not only be functional but also attractive and capable of being manufactured at low cost. This is accomplished herein by forming the air distributing assembly 44 with a pair of complementaryaluminum plates 47 and 48, FIGS. 3, 4 and 5, which when set in place form the main air outlet or orifice 46 leading to the space being conditioned. The plates 47 and 48 of the configuration shown in FIG. 3, are equipped with internal ribs 54 which fit into complementary grooves or notches 52 formed in the flange on each collar 34.-The inner or facing surfaces of plates 47 and 48 channel the air from duct outlets 26 to the distributor orifice 46. As hereafter described, the inwardly projecting flanges 50 and 51 divert air from duct outlets 26 in the desired direction into the room being conditioned.

In order to hold plates 47 and 48 at a spaced predetermined distance, a U-shaped spacer S6 is inserted therebetween and immediately below each collar. The spacer is equipped with outwardly directed tabs 58 which fit into corresponding openings in the plates and is secured to the plates by rivets 60 or other securing means Desirably, the spacer is assembled and riveted to the plates prior to installation in the ceiling in order to minimize the work otherwise required at a job site. in some installations, it may be desirable to use a bridging bar or a flat plate in lieu of the spacer, the ob ject being to provide an integral assembly which conveniently may be readily placed in the grooves or notches 52 formed in each collar.

Although the difi'user formed by the openings 26 and upstanding tabs 28 serve to channel and direct air to the main outlet or orifice 46, additional diffusing means 62 may be placed on the inturned flanges 50 and 51, if desired, for further diffusing the air prior to its entry into a room.

Since the appearance of the exposed portions of the distributor must be aesthetically proper, each plate 47 and 48 is provided with an out-turned flange 64 on which the ceiling tile 66 rests. As shown, the tile abuts the outer side walls of the plates when they are pushed into position.

Some designs of ceiling tile include narrow grooves extending along one edge. To accomodate such designs, a projecting lip 68, FIG. 3A, is formed on the plate outer side walls, extending the complete length thereof, so that when the tiles are set in place, the tile narrow groove fits over the lips 68 thus providing support for the tiles while also having their lower surfaces engage flange 64.

An important aspect of this invention concerns the design used for directing air angularly into the room. As mentioned above, the duct 24 is designed to rotate on one of the rims, e.g., 38, on collar 34 to direct air from the plenum chamber through orifice 46 either along the ceiling or downward or angularly downward. To provide for such rotation, a number of openings 70, FlGS. 2, 4 and 5, are cut in the duct near the end where it fits over the rim 38. A plate 72 bent to the curvature of the duct having indentations or detents 74 in alignment with openings is attached to the inner side of duct 24 by rivets 76 or similar securing means. The

openings 70 are larger than the detents so that a screwdriver or other tool 78 conveniently can be inserted through the main outlet opening 46 and into contact with the walls forming the detents 74 in the plate for rotating the duct to any one of a number of positions. Since the duct is of greater weight than any forces which may act on it, it will remain in the set position until again moved by an adjusting tool.

FIGS. 6A, B, C and 7A and B illustrate the various positions of duct 24 for achieving the desired direction of air flow into the space being conditioned. When the duct 24 is rotated clockwise by the screwdriver, the duct openings 26 are in the position shown in FIG. 6A. Air flowing from the openings engages the insideof plate 47 and is diverted by projection 50 in a direction to flow through orifice 46, then horizontally and parallel to the ceiling. FIG. 6C shows the position of duct 24 to achieve air flow in the opposite direction. In this case plate 48 and projection 51 serve to direct the air horizontally. When the duct openings are in direct alignment with the distributor orifice 46, air from the duct will flow directly downwardly through outlet 46 into the space being conditioned as shown in FIG. 6B. If it is desired to direct the air downwardly or at any angle to the vertical up to the point where the discharged air will flow across the ceiling, the screwdriver is inserted in the detents and the duct moved the appropriate amount to obtain the desired direction of air flow. As the duct is rotated in any direction, air from the duct plenum chamber will flow through openings 26 and impinge on the inner side walls of plates 47 and/or 48, and as it strikes flanges 50 or 51 will be deflected to flow adjacent the ceiling or at any angle thereto with respect to the vertical axis.

Since the upper surfaces 49 of plates 47 and 48 are located in close proximity to duct 24, the distributor may serve the function of a damper for controlling the volume of air entering the space. FIG. 7A shows the duct positioned such that only a portion of available air enters the space because of the blocking action of surface 49 to air flowing from openings 26.,FIG. 7B shows full dampering of the air. Such restriction to air flow results from the establishment of a static pressure in the space between openings 26 and surface 49, which effectively inhibits air flow to orifice 46.

With thedistributor assembled in the manner described above, the projection 42 fits into the U- shaped spacer 56 thus securely locking collar 34 in position. As a result, the collar will not turn when duct.

24 is rotated and it further furnishes a solid mounting for the duct while simultaneously imparting rigidity to the distributor.

FIGS. 8-10 illustrate a modification of the invention. As shown, the plenum chamber comprises a housing or duct 80 of square cross-section with a hose 82 connected to its inlet for supplying air to the space to be conditioned. The duct is adapted to be pivoted on a front plate 84 and rear plate (not shown) by screws 86 or other support media. The front and rear plates are equipped with bottom flanges 88 to permit installation of the unit in the overhead space of an area to be conditioned.

As in the preferred embodiment, dampers or other air obstructing devices are not used for directing and controlling the amount of air delivered to the space.

The plenum chamber of duct is adapted to be rotated about pivot point 80 by inserting a screwdriver or other tool through opening 89 and into engagement with either of the duct ends 90 and then urging the duct in the desired direction. By merely changing the position of the duct outlet relative to the opening 89 in the ceiling, air may be caused to-flow directly into the room as in FIG. 10A, to right as in FIG. 108, or to the left (not shown) when the duct is moved to the right side position. FIG. 10C shows the position of parts when serving as a damper to restrict air flow into the space. Wing nut 90 locks the duct in position after the desired flow pattern into the room has been achieved. The chamber normally operates at a pressure slightly above atmospheric and as the air is discharged into the space, it strikes walls 92 or 94 and their respective in-turned flange 96 or 98 to achieve the flow pattern illustrated in FIGS. 10A and B.

The rotatable duct may also serve as a damper for partially or completely shutting off air flow to the space. As shown, the terminal ends of the duct walls which form the plenum chamber, are bent reversely and downwardly to form stop members 100 useful in limiting the degree of duct rotation. FIG. 10C illustrates the maximum position of the duct to restrict air flow into the space when the stop member 100 engages wall 94. In this case, air flow is almost completely shut off. Should the duct be moved a portion of this distance, only part of the air would be blocked off with the remainder being diverted to flow along the ceiling. Likewise, the opposite effect will take place when the duct is rotated in the other direction.

FIGS. 11 and 12 illustrate a slightly different design of duct including the arrangement of outlet openings 26 in duct 24.

Instead of forming tabs 28 in the manner shown in FIG. 2, the duct is fashioned to have a depending chan-' nel-like arrangement including legs and 112 and a base 1 14. As in the FIG. 2 design, to form the openings 25, the metal in the base 114 is cut along three sides and tab 28 thereafter bent upwardly to provide the means for uniformly diffusing the air flowing from the duct into a space. It will be apparent this process of forming the openings is followed a multiplicity of times along the duct length for thus forming the outlet openings 26. An important advantage gained from this design is that as the duct is rotated to shut off the flow of air, the walls forming openings 26 lie substantially in contact with the inner surface of plates 47 or 48, depending on the direction of duct rotation, thus completely blocking off the flow of air from openings 26 to the space. Also, very effective channeling of air to orifice 46, and partial dampering, is obtained by utilizing this design. FIG. 12 shows the relationship of parts for securing full dampering of air flowing from opening 26.

It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that the duct walls 110, 112 and 11.4.may be formed by following conventional metal forming processes, and from a single or multiple pieces or sections of duct steel. Also, the provision for rotating the duct to the various positions shown ad described is the same as that illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5.

In view of the above, it will be obvious that many modifications and variations will occur to those skilled in the art. It therefore is to be understood that within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practised other than as specifically described.

What [claim as new and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent is:

1. An air distributor comprising 7 a duct having walls forming a plenum chamber therein, an air inlet to said duct and outlet openings therein for discharging air therefrom;

means rotatably supporting opposite ends of said 1 duct; a pair of parallel plates attached to said support means and spaced a distance along their length to embrace said outlet openings and spaced a lesser distance on their opposite sides to form an air discharge orifice, so that air flowing from the duct outlet openings is guided by said plates for discharge through said orifice into a space being conditioned; w an inwardly directed projection on each of said plates adjacent said orifice; 7 each of said plates further having converging inner walls leading to said orifice; and 1 whereby when said duct is rotated to position its outlet openings directly over said orifice, air from said openings flows directly downward through said orifice, and when said duct is rotated to a position wherein said outlet openings are not indirect alignment with said orifice, air flowing from said outlet openings primarily is guided by one of said plates toward said orifice and then deflected by the projection on that plate to flow in a direction angularly outward from the orificev 2. The combination according to claim 1 wherein the surface of said plates between the point of attachment to the support means and a line running through the axis of said spaced plates, lies close to and opposite from said outlet openings when the duct is rotated toward its extreme positions; and 7 whereby when the duct is rotated to its extreme point, the plate surface presents an impediment to airflow from the outlet openings, and when the duct is rotated to have the outlet openings lie opposite only a portion of said surface, the outlet opening air is partly dampered and only a portion thereof flows through the orifice. 3. An air distributor comprising a duct having walls forming a plenum chamber therein, an inlet to said chamber for receiving air from an air conditioning source and discharge openings along the duct length for directing such air outwardly therefrom; means associated with said duct for rotatably mounting it on supporting devices positioned adjacent opposite ends thereof; air channeling and directing members associated with said duct for receiving air from said duct discharge openings and directing it through an orifice into a space being conditioned; said air channeling and directing members comprising a pair of parallel and immovable plates spaced at their upper ends at least a distance sufficient to embrace said duct discharge openings for receiving air therefrom;

said plates being disposed to converge from said discharge openings toward their opposite ends to define a narrow orifice extending the length of said members through which the conditioned air is discharged into said space;

duct adjusting meanson said duct for changing the position of said duct discharge openings relative to said air channeling and directing members; and

the arrangement being such that depending on the position of said duct discharge openings, air therefrom flows directly downward into said space, or strikes at least one of said plates and is directed at an angle through the orifice into said space, or is dampered to limit the volume of air entering said space.

4. The combination according to claim 3 wherein each of said plates have an inwardly directed flange which lies in the air stream flowing toward said orifice for directing air from said orifice at an angle therefrom into said space.

5. The combination according to claim 4 wherein said adjusting means on said duct includes openings in the walls of said duct and of a size sufficient for engagement by a tool for rotating the duct to a desired position. v

6. The combination according to claim 4 wherein the means for rotatably mounting the duct on supporting devices comprises a collar and said supporting devices include a rim of a size sufficient to loosely receive said duct thereby to permit unimpeded rotation thereof when urged in a rotating direction by a tool.

7. The combination according to claim 6 wherein the duct is of circular cross section and said rim is of a diameter less than said duct; and

means associated with said collar for preventing collar movement when the duct is rotated to a desired position.

8. The combination according to claim 6' wherein said collar includes a pair of rims separated by an outwardly projecting flange, said rims being of a diameter less than an air supply hose adapted to be connected to one of said rims, and less than the diameter of a duct arranged to be rotatably mounted on the other of said rims, whereby air delivered through said hose to the plenum chamber in said duct, is caused to flow from the duct through said outlet openings into the space being conditioned.

9. The combination according to claim 6 wherein said collar contains means for supporting said air directing plates; and

air deflecting means adjacent the bottom of each of said plates near said orifice for directing air into said space. I

10. The combination according to claim 9 wherein the means for supporting said air deflecting plates includes a groove in said flange on opposite sides of said collar; and

said plates have ends complementary to said grooves so that when the plate ends are positioned in the grooves, the plates are supported throughout their complete length.

11. The combination according to claim 10 wherein the means spacing said plates includes a U-shaped device having legs respectively attached to the inner side walls of said plates; and

an opening in said device of a size sufficient to insert a tool for engaging the adjusting means used in rotating said duct to a desired position.

12. The combination according to claim 1 wherein the outer side walls of each of said plates includes a rib extending the plate length for receiving and aligning ceiling tile when the distributor is installed in a ceiling; and

a flange on the bottom of each of said plates for supporting said tile.

13. The combination according to claim 1 wherein the outer side walls of each of said V-shaped plates includes multiple studs spaced and arranged to pierce ceiling tile when the distributor is installed in a ceiling; and

a flange on the bottom of each of said plates for supporting said tile. 7

14 The combination according to claim 1 wherein said supporting devices used for rotatably mounting said duct includes a pair of upstanding members respectively located on opposite ends of said duct; and

means pivoting said duct in said members for permitting duct rotation to align the duct slot with said main outlet.

15. The combination according to claim 14 wherein said air directing plates each have an in-turned flange for directing air at an angle into said space or straight downwardly depending on the position of said duct openings with respect to said orifice.

16. The combination according to claim 15 wherein the walls of said duct forming said discharge openings are reversely bent to provide stop members on the terminal ends thereof for limiting the degree of rotation of said duct; and

locking means on said duct coacting with at least one of said up-standing members for locking said duct in a set position.

17. The combination according to claim 3 wherein a tab on said duct adjacent each of said openings diffuses and directs air toward said outlet opening.

18. The combination according to claim 3 wherein said duct contains a channel on one side thereof comprising side walls and a base, outlet openings formed in said base for directing air toward said orifice for discharge into said space.

Claims (18)

1. An air distributor comprising a duct having walls forming a plenum chamber therein, an air inlet to said duct and outlet openings therein for discharging air therefrom; means rotatably supporting opposite ends of said duct; a pair of parallel plates attached to said support means and spaced a distance along their length to embrace said outlet openings and spaced a lesser distance on their opposite sides to form an air discharge orifice, so that air flowing from the duct outlet openings is guided by said plates for discharge through said orifice into a space being conditioned; an inwardly directed projection on each of said plates adjacent said orifice; each of said plates further having converging inner walls leading to said orifice; and whereby when said duct is rotated to position its outlet openings directly over said orifice, air from said openings flows directly downward through said orifice, and when said duct is rotated to a position wherein said outlet openings are not in direct alignment with said orifice, air flowing from said outlet openings primarily is guided by one of said plates toward said orifice and then deflected by the projection on that plate to flow in a direction angularly outward from the orifice.
2. The combination according to claim 1 wherein the surface of said plates between the point of attachment to the support means and a line running through the axis of said spaced plates, lies close to and opposite from said outlet openings when the duct is rotated toward its extreme positions; and whereby when the duct is rotated to its extreme point, the plate surface presents an impediment to air flow from the outlet openings, and when the duct is rotated to have the outlet openings lie opposite only a portion of said surface, the outlet opening air is partly dampered and only a portion thereof flows through the orifice.
3. An air distributor comprising a duct having walls forming a plenum chamber therein, an inlet to said chamber for receiving air from an air conditioning source and discharge openings along the duct length for directing such air outwardly therefrom; means associated with said duct for rotatably mounting it on supporting devices positioned adjacent opposite ends thereof; air channeling and directing members associated with said duct for receiving air from said duct discharge openings and directing it through an orifice into a space being conditioned; said air channeling and directing members comprising a pair of parallel and immovable plates spaced at their upper ends at least a distance sufficient to embrace said duct discharge openings for receiving air therefrom; said plates being disposed to converge from said discharge openings toward their opposite ends to define a narrow orifice extending the length of said members through which the conditioned air is discharged into said space; duct adjusting means on said duct for changing the position of said duct discharge openings relative to said air channeling and directing members; and the arrangement being such that depending on the position of said duct discharge openings, air therefrom flows directly downward into said space, or strikes at least one of said plates and is directed at an angle through the orifice into said space, or is dampered to limit the volume of air entering said space.
4. The combination according to claim 3 wherein each of said plates have an inwardly directed flange which lies in the air stream flowing toward said orifice for directing air from said orifice at an angle therefrom into said space.
5. The combination according to claim 4 wherein said adjusting means on said duct includes openings in the walls of said duct and of a size sufficient for engagement by a tool for rotating the duct to a desired position.
6. The combination according to claim 4 wherein the means for rotatably mounting the duct on supporting devices comprises a collar and said supporting devices include a rim of a size sufficient to loosely receive said duct thereby to permit unimpeded rotation thereof when urged in a rotating direction by a tool.
7. The combination according to claim 6 wherein the duct is of circular cross section and said rim is of a diameter less than said duct; and means associated with said collar for preventing collar movement when the duct is rotated to a desired position.
8. The combination according to claim 6 wherein said collar includes a pair of rims separated by an outwardly projecting flange, said rims being of a diameter less than an air supply hose adapted to be connected to one of said rims, and less than the diameter of a duct arranged to be rotatably mounted on the other of said rims, whereby air delivered through said hose to the plenum chamber in said duct, is caused to flow from the duct through said outlet openings into the space being conditioned.
9. The combination according to claim 6 wherein said collar contains means for supporting said air directing plates; and air deflecting means adjacent the bottom of each of said plates near said orifice for directing air into said space.
10. The combination according to claim 9 wherein the means for supporting said air deflecting plates includes a groove in said flange on opposite sides of said collar; and said plates have ends complementary to said grooves so that when the plate ends are positioned in the grooves, the plates are supported throughout their complete length.
11. The combination according to claim 10 wherein the means spacing said plates includes a U-shaped device having legs respectively attached to the inner side walls of said plates; and an opening in said device of a size sufficient to insert a tool for engaging the adjusting means used in rotating said duct to a desired position.
12. The combination according to claim 1 wherein the outer side walls of each of said plates includes a rib extending the plate length for receiving and aligning ceiling tile when the distributor is installed in a ceiling; and a flange on the bottom of each of said plates for supporting said tile.
13. The combination according to claim 1 wherein the outer side walls of each of said V-shaped plates includes multiple studs spaced and arranged to pierce ceiling tile when the distributor is installed in a ceiling; and a flange on the bottom of each of said plates for supporting said tile.
14. The combination according to claim 1 wherein said supporting devices used for rotatably mounting said duct includes a pair of upstanding members respectively located on opposite ends of said duct; and means pivoting said duct in said members for permitting duct rotation to align the duct slot with said main outlet.
15. The combination according to claim 14 wherein said air directing plates each have an in-turned flange for directing air at an angle into said space or straight downwardly depending on the position of said duct openings with respect to said orifice.
16. The combination according to claim 15 wherein the walls of said duct forming said discharge openings are reversely bent to provide stop members on the terminal ends thereof for limiting the degree of rotation of said duct; and locking means on said duct coacting with at least one of said up-standing members for locking said duct in a set position.
17. The combination according to claim 3 wherein a tab on said duct adjacent each of said openings diffuses and directs air toward said outlet opening.
18. The combination according to claim 3 wherein said duct contains a channel on one side thereof comprising side walls and a base, outlet openings formed in said base for directing air toward said orifice for discharge into said space.
US3699872D 1971-03-01 1971-03-01 Air distribution apparatus Expired - Lifetime US3699872A (en)

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Cited By (29)

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US3910501A (en) * 1974-11-11 1975-10-07 Murray Gene Tyrone Atomizer
US4441333A (en) * 1982-07-15 1984-04-10 Thermo King Corporation Transport refrigeration unit combination airflow straightener and defrost damper
EP0479734A1 (en) * 1990-10-03 1992-04-08 FIAT AUTO S.p.A. An air outlet for motor-vehicle air-conditioning systems
US5285536A (en) * 1991-08-26 1994-02-15 Arthur Long Wave generating system
US5609305A (en) * 1994-09-19 1997-03-11 Vortec Corporation Apparatus for providing an air curtain
US6386970B1 (en) 2000-04-17 2002-05-14 Vernier, Ii Larry D. Air diffuser
DE10155206C1 (en) * 2001-11-09 2003-05-28 Emco Klima Gmbh & Co Kg Device, for ventilating rooms, comprises a medium-guiding line formed by a rotating pipe/pipe sections having air outlet openings formed by fitted and/or rotatably arranged nozzles
US20060118657A1 (en) * 2004-11-10 2006-06-08 Spraying Systems Co. Air knife
US20080142636A1 (en) * 2006-12-18 2008-06-19 The Boeing Company Uniform flow supply duct and associated method of sizing restrictor plates
US20120006442A1 (en) * 2010-07-12 2012-01-12 Gebke Kevin J Configurable pliable air ducts
US20120010752A1 (en) * 2010-07-07 2012-01-12 Kaufmann Nicholas L Methods and apparatus to determine air duct system configurations
US20120273070A1 (en) * 2011-04-28 2012-11-01 Freers James L Optimized air delivery apparatus
WO2013137803A1 (en) * 2012-03-12 2013-09-19 Inventiair Ab Integrated air flow adjuster for conventional air duct systems
US8616842B2 (en) 2009-03-30 2013-12-31 Airius Ip Holdings, Llc Columnar air moving devices, systems and method
US9151295B2 (en) 2008-05-30 2015-10-06 Airius Ip Holdings, Llc Columnar air moving devices, systems and methods
US9335061B2 (en) 2008-05-30 2016-05-10 Airius Ip Holdings, Llc Columnar air moving devices, systems and methods
US9459020B2 (en) 2008-05-30 2016-10-04 Airius Ip Holdings, Llc Columnar air moving devices, systems and methods
US9494336B2 (en) 2010-05-03 2016-11-15 Rite-Hite Holding Corporation Configurable pliable air ducts
USD783795S1 (en) 2012-05-15 2017-04-11 Airius Ip Holdings, Llc Air moving device
US9631627B2 (en) 2004-03-15 2017-04-25 Airius Ip Holdings, Llc Columnar air moving devices, systems and methods
US9702576B2 (en) 2013-12-19 2017-07-11 Airius Ip Holdings, Llc Columnar air moving devices, systems and methods
US9709193B2 (en) 2013-01-24 2017-07-18 Rite-Hite Holding Corporation Pliable air ducts with anti-condensation nozzles
USD805176S1 (en) 2016-05-06 2017-12-12 Airius Ip Holdings, Llc Air moving device
US9901011B2 (en) 2015-11-04 2018-02-20 Rite-Hite Holding Corporation Cooling systems for devices arranged in rows
USD820967S1 (en) 2016-05-06 2018-06-19 Airius Ip Holdings Llc Air moving device
US10024531B2 (en) 2013-12-19 2018-07-17 Airius Ip Holdings, Llc Columnar air moving devices, systems and methods
US10221861B2 (en) 2014-06-06 2019-03-05 Airius Ip Holdings Llc Columnar air moving devices, systems and methods
US10251312B2 (en) 2016-09-09 2019-04-02 Rite-Hite Holding Corporation Cooling systems for devices arranged in rows
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Cited By (40)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3910501A (en) * 1974-11-11 1975-10-07 Murray Gene Tyrone Atomizer
US4441333A (en) * 1982-07-15 1984-04-10 Thermo King Corporation Transport refrigeration unit combination airflow straightener and defrost damper
EP0479734A1 (en) * 1990-10-03 1992-04-08 FIAT AUTO S.p.A. An air outlet for motor-vehicle air-conditioning systems
US5176567A (en) * 1990-10-03 1993-01-05 Fiat Auto Spa Air outlet for motor-vehicle air-conditioning systems
US5285536A (en) * 1991-08-26 1994-02-15 Arthur Long Wave generating system
US5609305A (en) * 1994-09-19 1997-03-11 Vortec Corporation Apparatus for providing an air curtain
US6386970B1 (en) 2000-04-17 2002-05-14 Vernier, Ii Larry D. Air diffuser
US6648752B2 (en) 2000-04-17 2003-11-18 Metal Industries, Inc. Air diffuser
DE10155206C1 (en) * 2001-11-09 2003-05-28 Emco Klima Gmbh & Co Kg Device, for ventilating rooms, comprises a medium-guiding line formed by a rotating pipe/pipe sections having air outlet openings formed by fitted and/or rotatably arranged nozzles
US9714663B1 (en) 2004-03-15 2017-07-25 Airius Ip Holdings, Llc Temperature destratification systems
US9631627B2 (en) 2004-03-15 2017-04-25 Airius Ip Holdings, Llc Columnar air moving devices, systems and methods
US10487840B2 (en) 2004-03-15 2019-11-26 Airius Ip Holdings, Llc Temperature destratification systems
US7461797B2 (en) 2004-11-10 2008-12-09 Spraying Systems, Co. Air knife
US20060118657A1 (en) * 2004-11-10 2006-06-08 Spraying Systems Co. Air knife
US20080142636A1 (en) * 2006-12-18 2008-06-19 The Boeing Company Uniform flow supply duct and associated method of sizing restrictor plates
US8876580B2 (en) * 2006-12-18 2014-11-04 The Boeing Company Uniform flow supply duct and associated method of sizing restrictor plates
US9335061B2 (en) 2008-05-30 2016-05-10 Airius Ip Holdings, Llc Columnar air moving devices, systems and methods
US9459020B2 (en) 2008-05-30 2016-10-04 Airius Ip Holdings, Llc Columnar air moving devices, systems and methods
US9970457B2 (en) 2008-05-30 2018-05-15 Airius Ip Holdings, Llc Columnar air moving devices, systems and methods
US9151295B2 (en) 2008-05-30 2015-10-06 Airius Ip Holdings, Llc Columnar air moving devices, systems and methods
US8616842B2 (en) 2009-03-30 2013-12-31 Airius Ip Holdings, Llc Columnar air moving devices, systems and method
US9494336B2 (en) 2010-05-03 2016-11-15 Rite-Hite Holding Corporation Configurable pliable air ducts
US20120010752A1 (en) * 2010-07-07 2012-01-12 Kaufmann Nicholas L Methods and apparatus to determine air duct system configurations
US8676545B2 (en) * 2010-07-07 2014-03-18 Rite-Hite Holding Corporation Methods and apparatus to determine air duct system configurations
US8808075B2 (en) * 2010-07-12 2014-08-19 Rite-Hite Holding Corporation Configurable pliable air ducts
US20120006442A1 (en) * 2010-07-12 2012-01-12 Gebke Kevin J Configurable pliable air ducts
US8814067B2 (en) * 2011-04-28 2014-08-26 Maxum Llc Optimized air delivery apparatus
US20120273070A1 (en) * 2011-04-28 2012-11-01 Freers James L Optimized air delivery apparatus
US10184489B2 (en) 2011-06-15 2019-01-22 Airius Ip Holdings, Llc Columnar air moving devices, systems and methods
WO2013137803A1 (en) * 2012-03-12 2013-09-19 Inventiair Ab Integrated air flow adjuster for conventional air duct systems
USD783795S1 (en) 2012-05-15 2017-04-11 Airius Ip Holdings, Llc Air moving device
US9709193B2 (en) 2013-01-24 2017-07-18 Rite-Hite Holding Corporation Pliable air ducts with anti-condensation nozzles
US10024531B2 (en) 2013-12-19 2018-07-17 Airius Ip Holdings, Llc Columnar air moving devices, systems and methods
US9702576B2 (en) 2013-12-19 2017-07-11 Airius Ip Holdings, Llc Columnar air moving devices, systems and methods
US10221861B2 (en) 2014-06-06 2019-03-05 Airius Ip Holdings Llc Columnar air moving devices, systems and methods
US9901011B2 (en) 2015-11-04 2018-02-20 Rite-Hite Holding Corporation Cooling systems for devices arranged in rows
USD805176S1 (en) 2016-05-06 2017-12-12 Airius Ip Holdings, Llc Air moving device
USD820967S1 (en) 2016-05-06 2018-06-19 Airius Ip Holdings Llc Air moving device
US10487852B2 (en) 2016-06-24 2019-11-26 Airius Ip Holdings, Llc Air moving device
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