US3699837A - Frame for a musical instrument and method of making same - Google Patents

Frame for a musical instrument and method of making same Download PDF

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US3699837A
US3699837A US212239A US3699837DA US3699837A US 3699837 A US3699837 A US 3699837A US 212239 A US212239 A US 212239A US 3699837D A US3699837D A US 3699837DA US 3699837 A US3699837 A US 3699837A
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support
neck
sides
secured
struts
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US212239A
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Domenico M Annessa
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Domenico M Annessa
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; AEOLIAN HARPS; SINGING-FLAME MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D3/00Details of, or accessories for, stringed musical instruments, e.g. slide-bars

Abstract

A frame work for a stringed instrument such as a guitar or violin is comprised of a hard wood single stabilizing central one piece dorsal spine which includes a lower hook portion for support of the back and a portion of the top of the instrument and an offset longitudinally extending upper hooked portion forming a support for another portion of the top. A plurality of cross struts are attached to the dorsal spine to support the back. Upright side blocks are supportably interposed between the top and back and are secured to the sides along interior portions thereof respectively spaced outwardly of the ends of said cross struts. Additional blocks are secured on opposite sides of end portion of the dorsal spine extending between and engaging the top and back.

Description

United States Patent Annessa [541 FRAME FOR A MUSICAL INSTRUMENT AND METHOD or MAKING SAME [4 Oct. 24, 1972 Assistant Examiner-Lawrence R. Franklin [72] Inventor: Domenico M. Annessa, 3536 Burns Attorney cunen, Settle Sloman & Cantor Avenue, Detroit, Mlch. 48214 [22] Filed: Dec. 27, 1971 ABSTRACT [21] ApplNoJ 212,239 A frame work for a stringed instrument such as a guitar or violin is comprised of a hard wood single stabilizing centralone piece dorsal spine which includes U-S- Cl a lower hook portion for support of the back and a [51] Int. Cl. ..Gl 0d 3/00 portion of the top of the instrument and an offset lon- [58] Field of Search ..8 4/267, 275, 291 gitudinally extending upper hooked portion forming a support for another portion of the top. A plurality of [56] References Cited cross struts are attached tothe dorsal spine to support the back. Upright side blocks are supportably inter- UNITED STATES PATENTS posed between the top and back and are secured to 651,146 6/1900 Rogers ..84/267 t Sides along interim respectively 1,800,980 4/1931 Berry et al. ..s4/275 x P? utward1y ends 3,302,507 2/1967 Fender ..s4/291 x bmcks are f P end portion of the dorsal spine extendmg between and en- FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS g g g the P and b 1,239 12/ 1900 Great Britain ..84/291 5 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures 44 3b 5 ll 40 60 I 44 I l 34 1 I ll I I T 66 a, I 1 A l I I I I I I [Q 1 1| -/5 [H M u a a 1 1' 2a 46. l 1|| 111 I I I 1 ,11
"1 22 I 1 I' III""" 1" 32 I 68 k J i I H 1 l l k 2 HI 6 I FRAME FOR A MUSICAL INSTRUMENT AND- METHOD OF MAKING SAME The present invention relates to stringed instruments such as guitars and violins, etc.
Musical stringed instruments, such as guitars, ordinarily comprise a sound box having a flat top and back and sides circumferentially connectingsaid. top and back. The top is provided with a sound hole across which extends a plurality of strings for extension longitudinally across the sound box. The strings extend over a finger board mounted on the neck, are anchored to a bridge at their one ends and adjustably secured at their other ends to the head.
In conventional practice, the sound box is made up of a skeleton of longitudinal and transverse ribs to which the top and back and sides are glued to provide sufficient rigidity. The finger board is separately secured to the top end of the sound box. The attachment of the finger board to the sound box needs additional bracing for rigidity.
The construction of stringed musical instruments in the conventional manner as above described is costly and time consuming and in general detracts from the sound quality with reference to volume and resonance. Additionally, these instruments, due to the multiplepart glued-together construction, are subject to. adverse atmospheric influences, in particular humidity.
Accordingly, the present invention provides an improved construction for a stringed musical instrument which eliminates the foregoing disadvantages.
It is an object of the present invention to supply new construction providing the guitar or similar instrument with a one piece central stabilizing dorsal spine, and with a bend-proof laminated neck.
It is a further object to render this construction applicable to all kinds of stringed instruments.
It is a further object to provide a new frame construction which prolongs the life of the guitar or other in-' strument by minimizing the damage caused by atmospheric changes in general and humidity in particular.
It is a further object to provide a new construction that provides a stronger anchorage for the strings, mounting the bridge over a larger area of the top, thereby enhancing vibration and improving tonal quality.
It is a further object to provide an improved bridge for the guitar or similar instrument more in harmony with the outline of the instrument and one that, by reason of its greater surface, provides a steadier anchorage point for the strings enhancing their vibrations and tonal performance.
The purpose of this invention and new construction is to produce a guitar possessing the following characteristics: l) ampler overall string vibration and resonance; 2) more balance between the bass strings and the treble; 3) ability to resist to a greater degree the damaging effects of atmospheric changes in general and humidity in particular. This new construction is not to be limited to the guitar, but is applicable to other string instruments, particularly those of the violin family. The ultimate result will be the production of musical instruments which sound better and last longer.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The accompanying drawing illustrates a preferred I embodiment in which:
FIG. 1 is a front perspective view illustrating the first step in the manufacture of the dorsal spine.
FIG. 2 is a fragmentary partly exploded view of the instrument, the top and back and sides being broken away.
FIG. 3 is a fragmentary plan view of the instrument partly broken away at the top for illustration.
FIG. 4 is a fragmentary perspective view illustrating the making of the head form.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION SKELETON OR FRAME This is by far the most important innovation and consists of a central column or dorsal spine 20 extending from the head of the'instrument to the tail-block. It is 'carved out of a hard-wood board (k inch X 4 inches x 40 inches) in the shape shown in FIG. 1. On each side of this dorsal spine at its forward end 24 are glued two similarly shaped neck parts 26. These extend from the head to an inch beyond the twelfth fret carved out of a board 1 41 inches thick.
The final laminated surface, FIG. 3, will be 3 inches in width. This assembly will provide the raw material from which the head, neck and heel of the guitar will be finally shaped. The upper hooked portion 28 of the dorsal spine extends 3 541 inches from the twelfth fret, for illustration, bracing the finger-board 30 fragmentarily shown, to underneath the seventeenth fret. This makes the heavy and cumbersome upper block unnecessary.
The lower hooked portion 32 of the dorsal spine, also 3 41 inches long, for illustration, will similarly eliminate the necessity of a heavy and cumbersome tail-block. These two features will in themselves add to the freedom and life of the top 34, together with other benefits presented hereunder.
While the dorsal spine 20 constitutes a backbone to steady up the whole instrument and prevent warping, the laminated neck 26, 24, 26, will prevent any bending of the finger board, a frequent occurrence in the guitar and one which renders the instrument unplayable. Furthermore, this more stable construction will enhance the vibration of th strings and be productive of a clear, well balanced and velvety tonal quality.
THESIDES The sides 36 will be glued in the usual manner to a slot at 38, FIG. 3, in the frame at the twelfth fret level, with the upper block being constituted by that portion of the side-boards protruding beyond the twelfth fret The tail-block will consist of two falciform pillars or triangular prisms 46, glued one on each side of the lower end of the dorsal spine. The main principle is that the tail-block will be much smaller than customary,
leaving the top when glued, more free and alive in its lower'bout.
THE TOP preliminary experimental work, I found that the tops /8 of an inch thick werev quite satisfactory and gave an even, mellow, velvety tone without loss of clarity or tonal volume. I suggest therefore that the thickness of the top 34 be no less than 3/ 32 inches. I
. By reason of the new supporting frame, it will be unnecessary to have cross-bars above and below the soundhole 42. This will further enhance the freedom and life of the upper bout and improve tonal quality. I suggest a heavier lining 48 for the sound hole, A inch around the opening and tapered flush towards the periphery.
Tobreak away from centuries old traditions is always a hazardous occupation; and I have heard the hue and cry of several guitar makers of my acquaintance. Having done away with. fan-bracings without experiencing the disastrous results predicted by my friend luthiers, I thought of a one piece bracing 50 for the top (FIG. 3). This is more as a peace offering than as a necessary appendix, since guitars made with or without this bracing sound exactly the same. For those who believe that a bracing for the top is indispensable, this new way of 1 making one is much simpler and just as functional. It is carved out of a V8 of an inch pine board. The upper cross bar 54 is half an inch below the sound hole lining. The lower cross bar 56 is underneath the bridge 58. The lower end is half an inch from the tip of the lower hook in the dorsal spine. This adds to the solidity of the top 34 and its value is, in my opinion, more structural than acoustic.
THEBACK THE BRIDGE The rectangular form of the conventional bridge is in sharp contradiction with the graceful curves of the guitar. Furthermore, it is desirable to distribute the pulling force of the strings tension over a larger area of the top, thus, diminishing the possibility of warping. Both for aesthetic and functional reasons,,l have designed the bridge 58 shown in FIG. 3. The area of this bridge is much greater than the conventional one. The main body 66 of the bridge extends laterally of the center a considerable distance, and is suitably secured to the top. The bridge anchor plate 68 is fixedly secured to the bridge body 66 to form an integral part thereof when assembled.
THE HEAD In these days of changing looks and of what appears to be a desperate struggle to substitute the new for the old, a large section of instrumentalists will welcomea new face for the head of the guitar. A logical choice was the scroll of the violin family, considering also the fact that the F-holes of the violin have already adopted for some guitars. How to achieve this new head 70 for my frame is schematically representedin FIG. 4. This new head would provide a double well for the strings and accommodate the individual mechanical keys (in substitution to the conventional machine head). I suggest that the scroll be kept massive for the four strings of the bass guitar; but even the classical guitar would acquire a new dignified, artistic and more musical appearance, something the traditional head is utterlydevvoid of.
Having described my invention, reference should now be had to the following claims.
I claim:
1. In a musical instrument having a sound box including a top, back, sides-and a neck, the improvement comprising:
a longitudinal stabilizing dorsal spine having a neck portion extending centrally of said neck, and a back'support vertically offset from said neck portion adapted for extension longitudinally through said sound box;
said neckportion having an upper hook portion extending rearwardly over said back support;
the back support having an end formed into a lower hook portion to provide a tongue vertically spaced from the back support;
said tongue extending towards said upper hook portion;
a plurality of parallel longitudinally spaced back supporting cross struts of varying transverse lengths secured to said back support;
and a series of upright blocks spaced outwardly of the. ends of said cross struts secured to the sides and of a heighth corresponding to the offset distance between said neck portion and said back support; and terminating at their ends in flat inwardly extending top and back support platforms;
and a pair of upright blocks at their ends terminating in flat top and back support platforms, secured to the rear end of said dorsal spine upon its opposite sides;
said back support including said hook portions, said blocks and said cross struts conjointly with each other forming a supporting frame work for said sound box.
-2. In the instrument of claim 1, a pair of longitudinal side members shaped to correspond with the shape of said neck portion of said dorsal spine, said side members being secured to opposite sides of said neck portion in lateral alignment for formation with said neck portion of a finger board support.
3. A frame work assembly for a stringed musical instrument such as a guitar or the like having a neck and finger board attached to a sound box, the sound box having aback, a top and sides circumferentially connecting said back and top to provide a resonant chamber;
said frame work assembly comprising:
a longitudinal central dorsal spine having a neck portion extending into said sound box along the back;
a back support vertically spaced from said neck portion adapted to extend through said sound box in a longitudinal direction in substantial planer alignment with said back;
said back support forming a backbone;
a plurality of back support cross struts attached to said back support within the sound box; said cross struts being of varying transverse dimensions; I
a series of upright blocks spaced outwardly of the ends of said cross struts respectively, adapted for attachment to the sides, and terminating at their upper and lower ends in laterally enlarged inwardly extending top and back support platforms;
a pair of similar blocks attached to opposite sides of the end of said dorsal spines;
said bottom being adhesively attached to said plurality of cross struts and blocks;
said sides being adhesively attached to said blocks at their sides and to corresponding portions of the back;
said top being adhesively attached to the upper edges of the sides and to said blocks and to said hook portions to provide a unitary structure.
4. In the framework assembly as defined in claim 3, a pair of longitudinal side members of a shape corresponding to the shape of said neck portion secured to oppositesides thereof to provide a finger board support. I
5. In the instrument of claim 1, a bridge including enlarged body portion secured to said top and extending laterally to points adjacent the sides; and a bridge anchor plate centrally secured to said body adapted to anchor the strings, whereby the tension thereof is distributed to the top throughout the increased undersurface of said bridge body.

Claims (5)

1. In a musical instrument having a sound box including a top, back, sides and a neck, the improvement comprising: a longitudinal stabilizing dorsal spine having a neck portion extenDing centrally of said neck, and a back support vertically offset from said neck portion adapted for extension longitudinally through said sound box; said neck portion having an upper hook portion extending rearwardly over said back support; the back support having an end formed into a lower hook portion to provide a tongue vertically spaced from the back support; said tongue extending towards said upper hook portion; a plurality of parallel longitudinally spaced back supporting cross struts of varying transverse lengths secured to said back support; and a series of upright blocks spaced outwardly of the ends of said cross struts secured to the sides and of a heighth corresponding to the offset distance between said neck portion and said back support; and terminating at their ends in flat inwardly extending top and back support platforms; and a pair of upright blocks at their ends terminating in flat top and back support platforms, secured to the rear end of said dorsal spine upon its opposite sides; said back support including said hook portions, said blocks and said cross struts conjointly with each other forming a supporting frame work for said sound box.
2. In the instrument of claim 1, a pair of longitudinal side members shaped to correspond with the shape of said neck portion of said dorsal spine, said side members being secured to opposite sides of said neck portion in lateral alignment for formation with said neck portion of a finger board support.
3. A frame work assembly for a stringed musical instrument such as a guitar or the like having a neck and finger board attached to a sound box, the sound box having a back, a top and sides circumferentially connecting said back and top to provide a resonant chamber; said frame work assembly comprising: a longitudinal central dorsal spine having a neck portion extending into said sound box along the back; a back support vertically spaced from said neck portion adapted to extend through said sound box in a longitudinal direction in substantial planer alignment with said back; said back support forming a backbone; a plurality of back support cross struts attached to said back support within the sound box; said cross struts being of varying transverse dimensions; a series of upright blocks spaced outwardly of the ends of said cross struts respectively, adapted for attachment to the sides, and terminating at their upper and lower ends in laterally enlarged inwardly extending top and back support platforms; a pair of similar blocks attached to opposite sides of the end of said dorsal spines; said bottom being adhesively attached to said plurality of cross struts and blocks; said sides being adhesively attached to said blocks at their sides and to corresponding portions of the back; said top being adhesively attached to the upper edges of the sides and to said blocks and to said hook portions to provide a unitary structure.
4. In the framework assembly as defined in claim 3, a pair of longitudinal side members of a shape corresponding to the shape of said neck portion secured to opposite sides thereof to provide a finger board support.
5. In the instrument of claim 1, a bridge including enlarged body portion secured to said top and extending laterally to points adjacent the sides; and a bridge anchor plate centrally secured to said body adapted to anchor the strings, whereby the tension thereof is distributed to the top throughout the increased undersurface of said bridge body.
US212239A 1971-12-27 1971-12-27 Frame for a musical instrument and method of making same Expired - Lifetime US3699837A (en)

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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4481855A (en) * 1982-03-09 1984-11-13 Bozung Richard E Zither-like instruments
US4592264A (en) * 1984-05-29 1986-06-03 Daniel Svoboda Violin family instruments with integrating tonal arm
US5025695A (en) * 1989-10-30 1991-06-25 Viel Gerald J Stringed instrument with inwardly extending neck
US5052269A (en) * 1989-07-26 1991-10-01 Young Jr Lawrence P Acoustic-electric guitar with interior neck extension
GB2289568A (en) * 1994-05-18 1995-11-22 Barry Roger Sims Strengthened stringed instrument

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US651146A (en) * 1899-08-31 1900-06-05 Thomas C Ryan Sound-bar for musical instruments.
GB190001239A (en) * 1900-01-19 1900-12-22 Georges Contal Improvements in Stringed Musical Instruments.
US1800980A (en) * 1929-04-12 1931-04-14 Frank C Berry Stringed musical instrument
US3302507A (en) * 1963-06-07 1967-02-07 Columbia Broadcasting Syst Inc Guitar, and method of manufacturing the same
CA755835A (en) * 1967-04-04 Dacos Robert Stringed musical instruments

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CA755835A (en) * 1967-04-04 Dacos Robert Stringed musical instruments
US651146A (en) * 1899-08-31 1900-06-05 Thomas C Ryan Sound-bar for musical instruments.
GB190001239A (en) * 1900-01-19 1900-12-22 Georges Contal Improvements in Stringed Musical Instruments.
US1800980A (en) * 1929-04-12 1931-04-14 Frank C Berry Stringed musical instrument
US3302507A (en) * 1963-06-07 1967-02-07 Columbia Broadcasting Syst Inc Guitar, and method of manufacturing the same

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4481855A (en) * 1982-03-09 1984-11-13 Bozung Richard E Zither-like instruments
US4592264A (en) * 1984-05-29 1986-06-03 Daniel Svoboda Violin family instruments with integrating tonal arm
US5052269A (en) * 1989-07-26 1991-10-01 Young Jr Lawrence P Acoustic-electric guitar with interior neck extension
US5025695A (en) * 1989-10-30 1991-06-25 Viel Gerald J Stringed instrument with inwardly extending neck
GB2289568A (en) * 1994-05-18 1995-11-22 Barry Roger Sims Strengthened stringed instrument

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