New! View global litigation for patent families

US3696826A - Leg supporting device - Google Patents

Leg supporting device Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3696826A
US3696826A US3696826DA US3696826A US 3696826 A US3696826 A US 3696826A US 3696826D A US3696826D A US 3696826DA US 3696826 A US3696826 A US 3696826A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
leg
member
support
device
engaging
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
James A Gruzalski
Original Assignee
James A Gruzalski
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F13/00Bandages or dressings; Absorbent pads
    • A61F13/04Plaster of Paris bandages; Other stiffening bandages
    • A61F13/041Accessories for stiffening bandages, e.g. cast liners, heel-pieces
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F5/00Orthopaedic methods or devices for non-surgical treatment of bones or joints; Nursing devices; Anti-rape devices
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T403/00Joints and connections
    • Y10T403/32Articulated members
    • Y10T403/32008Plural distinct articulation axes
    • Y10T403/32057Angular and linear

Abstract

A device for supporting an individual''s leg in a substantially horizontal position when the individual is seated. The device is particularly designed to support a leg in a cast, and is adapted to be worn on the cast around the user''s leg when the device is not in use. The device includes a generally U-shaped ankle engaging member adapted to be secured around the user''s ankle or lower calf, and a stanchion rotatably connected to the ankle engaging member. The stanchion includes a pair of parallel support bars, each of which mounts the ankle engaging member at one end thereof. The other end of each support bar is integrally connected to another generally U-shaped member which acts as a base for the stanchion when the device is in use, and which partially encircles the upper calf portion of the user''s leg when the device is not in use. Suitable stop means are provided on the ankle engaging member and the upper ends of the stanchion for limiting rotational movement of the stanchion relative to the ankle engaging member. The support bars are preferably slotted to permit the stanchion to be adjusted to a comfortable position on the user''s leg when the device is not in use.

Description

United States Patent Gruzalski [451 Oct. 10, 1972 [54] LEG SUPPORTING DEVICE [72] Inventor: James A. Gruzalski, 10509 Winnetka Avenue, Los Angeles County, Calif.

[22] Filed: July 17, 1970 [21] Appl. No.: 55,717

[52] US. Cl. ..135/45, 2/44, 297/439, 128/835, 287/99 [51] Int. Cl. ..A6lf 5/02, A45b H00 [58] Field of Search ..287/99, 92; 5/327, 317, 4; 297/438, 439, 461, 462; 128/82, 83; 135/45;

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,433,570 12/ 1947 Markkula ..287/99 1,417,250 5/1922 Kelly ..135/45 2,581,110 l/l952 Kenworthy ..5/327 R X Primary Examiner-Casmir A. Nunberg Attorney-Paul L. Gardner and Kendrick and Subkow 57 ABSTRACT A device for supporting an individuals leg in a substantially horizontal position when the individual is seated. The device is particularly designed to support a leg in a cast, and is adapted to be worn on the cast around the users leg when the device is not in use. The device includes a generally U-shaped ankle engaging member adapted to be secured around the users ankle'or lower calf, and a stanchion rotatably connected to the ankle engaging member. The stanchion includes a pair of parallel support bars, each of which mounts the ankle engaging member at one end thereof. The other end of each support bar is integrally connected to another generally U-shaped member which acts as a base for the stanchion when the device is in use, and which partially encircles the upper calf portion of the users leg when the device is not in use.

Suitable stop means are provided on the ankle engaging member and the upper ends of the stanchion for limiting rotational movement of the stanchion relative to the ankle engaging member. The support bars are preferably slotted to permit the stanchion to be adjusted to a comfortable position on the users leg when the device is not in use.

8 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PATENTEB 10 INVENTOR JAMEE A. 660246544 LEG SUPIORTING DEVICE The present invention relates to a device for supporting a users leg (particularly a leg in a cast) in a substantially horizontal position while the user is seated.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Anyone who has worn a leg cast is familiar with the problems and discomfort encountered while wearing such a cast in a seated position. T o alleviate such discomfort, individuals wearing leg casts typically rest their legs on footstools, or prop them with pillows, books, etc. Unfortunately, however, stools or propping devices of the proper height are not always available at each time and place an individual is seated.

The leg supporting device of the present invention is adapted to be worn around the users leg cast so that it is always available when the user desires to be seated. The device includes an ankle engaging member adapted to be secured around the user's ankle or lower calf, and a stanchion rotatably connected to the ankle engaging member for movement between a supporting position and'a stored position on the users leg.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a side elevation view of a preferred embodiment of the leg supporting device of the present invention, showing the device being employed to support a users leg in a substantially horizontal position;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the leg supporting device shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a partial side elevation view, partly in section, showing the connection between the ankle engaging member and the stanchion of the leg supporting device of FIGS. 1 and 2, the parts being shown in the position they assume when the device is being employed to support the users leg;

FIG. 4 is a partial side elevation view, similar to FIG. 3, but showing the parts in the position they assume when the device is being adjusted in its stored position around the users leg;

FIG. 5 is a partial side elevation view showing the connection between the ankle engaging member and the stanchion of a modified leg supporting device constructed according to the present invention; and

FIG. 6 is a partial side elevation view, similar to FIG. 5, showing the interconnection between the ankle engaging member and stanchion of a third embodiment of the leg supporting device of the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawing, the leg supporting device 10 shown therein is seen to comprise a generally U-shaped ankle engaging member 12 and a stanchion 14.

The stanchion 14 includes a pair of parallel support bars 16, 16, each of which has one of its ends rotatably connected to one side of the ankle engaging member 12. The other end of each support bar 16 is integrally connected to a generally U-shaped base member 18 which serves a dual function. When the user is seated and the device 10 is employed to support his leg in a substantially horizontal position (solid line position of the device in FIG. 1), the base serves as a-pedestal for the device.

- When the device is no longer needed as a support (e.g., when the user is standing or moving around), the user rotates the stanchion 14 to a position adjacent his leg (phantom line position in FIG. 1). In this position, the U-shaped base 18 partially encircles the upper calf of the users leg, thereby permitting the support bars 16, 16 to straddle his leg cast 20.

A strap 21 is riveted or otherwise suitably secured to the free ends of the ankle-engaging member 12 for securing the device around the users ankle or lower calf (as shown in FIG. 1).

The ankle-engaging member 12 is preferably made of two generally arcuate sides l7, 17 connected by a hinge 19. By virtue of this construction, the member 12 is adapted to fit around ankles or lower calves of vari- OUS SIZCS.

Alternatively, the ankle-engaging member may be a single U-shaped member.

The ends 23, 23 of the base member 18 are bent slightly inwardly to better engage the portion of the cast around which it fits. A rubber cover 22 is preferably provided around the lower edge of the base member 18 to prevent the member from sliding on the floor when the device is in use, and to prevent damage to the floor or other property.

As best shown in FIG. 2, the stanchion 14 is rotatably connected to the ankle-engaging member 12 by means of bolts 25, 25 which extend through the sides 17, 17 of the ankle-engaging member 12 and through holes 26, 26 in the free ends 28, 28 of the support bars I6, 16. Rotational movement of the stanchion 14 relative to the ankle-engaging member 12 is limited by means of outwardly struck flanges 30, 30 on the sides of the ankle-engaging member.

An elongated slot 32 is provided in each support bar 16 directly adjacent the hole 26 through which the bolt 25 passes. The slots 32, 32 are narrower than the diameter of the holes 26, 26 and the bolts 25, 25 are flattened to ride in the slots when the stanchion is rotated to its non-supporting position (FIG. 4 position; phantom line position in FIG. 1).

With reference to FIG. 3, it will be noted that when the stanchion 14 is in the leg supporting position (position shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3) and bolts 25, 25 cannot ride in the slots 32, 32 because the slots are narrower than the diameter of the bolt shank.

Spaced holes 35, 35 may be provided along the length of each slot 32 to permit the effective supporting height of the stanchion to be adjusted.

When the stanchion 14 is turned 90 in a clockwise 7 direction (as viewed in FIGS. 1-4) to the non-supporting position (FIG. 4), the bolt shank 25 can ride in the slot 32 and the support bars 16, 16 may be slid downwardly on the users leg until the base member 18 is located in a position comfortable to the user (i.e., well below the knee joint). Of course, when the device 10 is employed in conjunction with a full leg cast, it will not be necessary to employ this sliding feature of the device.

In use, the ankle-engaging member 12 is secured around the ankle or lower calf portion of the users cast 20 by means of strap 21. When the device 10 is not being employed to support the users leg, the stanchion 14 is rotated tothe position shown in phantom lines in FIG. 1. In this non-supporting position, the U-shaped base member 18 engages and partially encircles the upper calf portion of the users leg below the knee joint, thereby permitting the support bars l6, 16 to straddle the calf of the users leg. Thus, the stanchion will not inhibit the users mobility.

When the user sits down and desires to support his leg in a horizontal position (FIG. 1), he simply slides the support bars 16, 16 upwardly along his leg until one of the sets of holes 26 or 35 engages the flattened bolt shanks 25, 25.

The stanchion is then rotated approximately 90 in a clockwise direction (as viewed in FIG. 1) until the upper side edge of thesupport bars 16, 16 engage the struck out flanges 30, 30 on the ankleengaging member 12. In this supporting position of the device 10 (FIGS. 1 and 2), the U-shaped base 18 of the stanchion l4 rests on the floor and acts as a pedestal or foundation for the device. As best shown in FIG. 3, each of the flattened bolt shanks 25, 25 is so positioned in its associated hole 26 (or 35) that it cannot enter the narrower slot 32 adjacent the hole. The device 10 thus serves as a sturdy support for the users leg.

When the user desires to rise, he simply rotates the stanchion 14 approximately 90 in a counter-clockwise direction (as viewed in FIG. 1) until each of the flattened bolt shanks 25 registers with its associated slot 32. If the user is wearing a half-leg cast, he may then push the support bars 16, 16 downwardly until the base member 18 is comfortably located below his knee joint. It will be noted that when the stanchion 14 is rotated to this non-supporting position (phantom line position in FIG. 1), the U-shaped base member 18 will engage and partially encircle the upper calf portion of the users leg and the support bars 16, 16 will straddle his calf. The flattened bolt shank 25 in the slot 32 will prevent rotational movement of the stanchion.

The user'may thenlie down or-move around without interference by the device 10. When the user next needs support for his leg, the device 10 will be available.

The slot 32 and flattened bolt shank 25 arrangement of the leg support depicted in FIGS. 1-4 are not essential, and non-adjustable supports may be made in accordance with the teachings of this invention.

It is also to be understood that structure other than the struck out flanges 30, 30 on the ankle-engaging member 12 may be provided for limiting rotational movement of the stanchion.

FIGS. and 6 show two modified leg supports which are not adjustable (i.e., have no slots or flattened bolt shanks), and are provided with different means for limiting rotational movement of the stanchion.

Referring to FIG. 5, it will be noted that the ankleengaging member 48 is provided with a struck out flange 50 on each side thereof. The outwardly struck flange 50 is adapted to cooperate with a lip 52 provided on the upper end of the support bar 54. This structure limitsclockwise rotational movement of the stanchion support bar 54 (as viewed in FIG. 5).

It will be noted thatno adjustment slots (like slots 32 of the device are provided in the support bar 54, and the bolt 56 which secures the support bar to the ankle-engaging member 48. It will also be noted that the ankle strap 58 is looped around a slot 60 provided in the upper, free ends of the ankle engaging member 48 rather than riveted thereto as is the strap 58 shown in the FIG. l-4 embodiment.

The ankle-engaging member shown in FIG. 6 employs a hexagonal nut which acts as an abutment head to limit clockwise movement of the support bar 72.

Of "course, it is contemplated that various'rnodiflcations may be made to the regular support devices depicted in the drawings and described above without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. For example, the .U-shaped base 18, which doubles as an upper calf-engaging member, may be rotatably mounted on the lower ends of the support bars 16, and may be provided with a strap (like strap 21). The ankle-engaging member 12 may then be rigidly connected to the other ends of the support bars. Employing this arrangement, the stanchion 14 is rotated relative to the upper calf-engaging member, rather than the ankleengaging member. Such a structure may be desirable, for example, when a leg cast is worn which does not extend down to the users ankle.

It is alsocontemplated that structure other than the slotted support bars 16 and flattened bolt shanks 25 may be provided for rendering the stanchion slidable relative to the ankle-engaging member 12 (FIGS. l-4- embodiment).

I claim:

1.'An improved leg supporting device comprising:

an ankle engaging member adapted to receive the ankle or lower calf ofa users leg;

a stanchion connected at one end thereof to said ankle-engaging member;

a base member, connected to the other end of said stanchion;

said stanchion comprising a pair of spaced, substantially parallel support bars;

means pivotably connecting oneend of each support bar to said ankle-engaging member; and

means for limiting pivotal movement of said stanchion relative to said ankle engaging member.

2. An improved leg supporting device according to claim 1, wherein said pivotal limiting means comprises flange means struck from said ankle engaging member and adapted to be contacted by said one end of each of said support bars.

3.- An improved leg supporting device according to claim 1, wherein said pivotal limiting means comprises an abutment head mounted on said ankle engaging member and adapted to be contacted by said one end of one of said support bars.

4. An improved leg supporting device according to claim 1, wherein said means pivotably connecting said support bars to said ankle engaging member comprises a bolt extending through said ankle engaging member and a hole in said one end of each of said support bars.

5. An improved leg supporting device. according to claim 4, and further comprising means for adjusting the position of said ankle engaging member relative to the length of said stanchion; said adjusting means compris-1 ing flattened side edges on each of said bolts, and an elongated slot in each of said support'bars; each of said slots adjoining said hole in the upper end of its support bar and being adapted to receive said bolt when said bolt is disposed with its flattened sides parallel to the side edges of said slot.

6. An improved leg supporting device according to 8. An improved leg supporting device comprising: claim 5 and further comprising at least one height ada substantially U-shaped leg engaging member justment hole along the length of each of said slots in said support bars for shortening the effective height of said stanfhim when the leg Pl 'f device i 5 bars each connected at one end thereof to said leg 7. An improved leg supporting device comprising: engaging member; means pivotably connecting a 'ff' f Tdapted be f said one end of each of said support bars to said leg o a users eg; an conga e supp en a in member; and a base member extendin connecmd at one end P to Said leg befwien and connected to the other ends of sai engaging member; and means pivotably connectl0 su on bars whereb Said support bars may be ing said one end of said support member to said pp b y h leg engaging member; whereby Said Support moved etween a supporting position w erem sai member may be moved between a Supporting posh base member engages the floor and said support tion wherein it supports a users leg in a substanbars PP a user 8 leg m a f f l tially horizontal position and a non-supporting [S posmon and P posmon Y' position wherein it is disposed adjacent to the said support bars extend alongside the user leg. users leg.

adapted to be secured on a portion of a users leg; a pair of elongated, substantially parallel support

Claims (8)

1. An improved leg supporting device comprising: an ankle engaging member adapted to receive the ankle or lower calf of a user''s leg; a stanchion connected at one end thereof to said ankle-engaging member; a base member, connected to the other end of said stanchion; said stanchion comprising a pair of spaced, substantially parallel support bars; means pivotably connecting one end of each support bar to said ankle-engaging member; and means for limiting pivotal movement of said stanchion relative to said ankle engaging member.
2. An improved leg supporting device according to claim 1, wherein said pivotal limiting means comprises flange means struck from said ankle engaging member and adapted to be contacted by said one end of each of said support bars.
3. An improved leg supporting device according to claim 1, wherein said pivotal limiting means comprises an abutment head mounted on said ankle engaging member and adapted to be contacted by said one end of one of said support bars.
4. An improved leg supporting device according to claim 1, wherein said means pivotably connecting said support bars to said ankle engaging member comprises a bolt extending through said ankle engaging member and a hole in said one end of each of said support bars.
5. An improved leg supporting device according to claim 4, and further comprising means for adjusting the position of said ankle engaging member relative to the length of said stanchion; said adjusting means comprising flattened side edges on each of said bolts, and an elongated slot in each of said support bars; each of said slots adjoining said hole in the upper end of its support bar and being adapted to receive said bolt when said bolt is disposed with its flattened sides parallel to the side edges of said slot.
6. An improved leg supporting device according to claim 5 and further comprising at least one height adjustment hole along the length of each of said slots in said support bars for shortening the effective height of said stanchion when the leg supporting device is in use.
7. An improved leg supporting device comprising: a leg-engaging member adapted to be secured on a portion of a user''s leg; an elongated support member connected at one end thereof to said leg engaging member; and means pivotably connecting said one end of said support member to said leg-engaging member; whereby said support member may be moved between a supporting position wherein it supports a user''s leg in a substantially horizontal position and a non-supporting position wherein it is disposed adjacent to the user''s leg.
8. An improved leg supporting device comprising: a substantially U-shaped leg engaging member adapted to be secured on a portion of a user''s leg; a pair of elongated, substantially parallel support bars each connected at one end thereof to said leg engaging member; means pivotably connecting said one end of each of said support bars to said leg engaging member; and a base member extending between and connected to the other ends of said support bars; whereby said support bars may be moved between a supporting position wherein said base member engages the floor and said supporT bars support a user''s leg in a substantially horizontal position, and a non-supporting position wherein said support bars extend alongside the user''s leg.
US3696826A 1970-07-17 1970-07-17 Leg supporting device Expired - Lifetime US3696826A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US5571770 true 1970-07-17 1970-07-17

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3696826A true US3696826A (en) 1972-10-10

Family

ID=21999700

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3696826A Expired - Lifetime US3696826A (en) 1970-07-17 1970-07-17 Leg supporting device

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3696826A (en)

Cited By (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4776108A (en) * 1987-07-24 1988-10-11 Bayless James D Leg rest for orthopedic shoe
US4799610A (en) * 1988-03-14 1989-01-24 Hsieh Wu H Carrying holder
US4867441A (en) * 1988-08-23 1989-09-19 Blakeman Walter W Cyclist aid for leg amputees
US5113887A (en) * 1989-07-27 1992-05-19 Herman Jr Harry H Mobility assisting devices
US5217033A (en) * 1989-07-27 1993-06-08 Herman Jr Harry H Mobility assisting device
US5575299A (en) * 1995-08-01 1996-11-19 Bieri; H. Carlton Walking device
US5640986A (en) * 1994-06-29 1997-06-24 Herman; Harry H. Mobility assisting device
US5941263A (en) * 1997-10-17 1999-08-24 Venetec International, Inc. Leg support crutch
US6474742B1 (en) * 2001-03-09 2002-11-05 Earlene D. Robinson Appendage cramp relief device
US6712781B1 (en) * 2002-05-14 2004-03-30 Helen S. Sheppard Self-contained limb and cast support device
US20060272893A1 (en) * 2005-05-26 2006-12-07 Joe Foggio Therapeutic foot/leg/knee elevation
US20090091175A1 (en) * 2007-10-09 2009-04-09 Continuum Footspas, Llc Spa device with leg rests and calf supports
US20090100590A1 (en) * 2007-10-23 2009-04-23 Continuum Footspas, Llc Basin for a foot spa
US20100057171A1 (en) * 2008-09-03 2010-03-04 Trisha Stephens Mobile apparatus for providing cryotherapy and thermotherapy to a region of a knee being in elevated position
US20110010843A1 (en) * 2009-07-15 2011-01-20 Continuum Footspas, Llc Adjustable leg rest assembly
US20110126843A1 (en) * 2009-11-30 2011-06-02 Gamber Michael R Limb Support Device
US8408652B1 (en) * 2010-12-21 2013-04-02 Frank L. Mobley, Sr. Adjustable foot rest
US9492016B2 (en) 2010-12-08 2016-11-15 Bryan Miller Compact, portable elevating device for a lower limb

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1417250A (en) * 1920-04-14 1922-05-23 Kelly Robert Emmett Back brace
US2433570A (en) * 1944-11-25 1947-12-30 American Braces Leg brace knee lock
US2581110A (en) * 1949-12-24 1952-01-01 Aurelia E Kenworthy Adjustable leg rest for invalids

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1417250A (en) * 1920-04-14 1922-05-23 Kelly Robert Emmett Back brace
US2433570A (en) * 1944-11-25 1947-12-30 American Braces Leg brace knee lock
US2581110A (en) * 1949-12-24 1952-01-01 Aurelia E Kenworthy Adjustable leg rest for invalids

Cited By (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4776108A (en) * 1987-07-24 1988-10-11 Bayless James D Leg rest for orthopedic shoe
WO1990003742A1 (en) * 1987-07-24 1990-04-19 Bayless James D Leg rest for orthopedic shoe
US4799610A (en) * 1988-03-14 1989-01-24 Hsieh Wu H Carrying holder
US4867441A (en) * 1988-08-23 1989-09-19 Blakeman Walter W Cyclist aid for leg amputees
US5113887A (en) * 1989-07-27 1992-05-19 Herman Jr Harry H Mobility assisting devices
US5217033A (en) * 1989-07-27 1993-06-08 Herman Jr Harry H Mobility assisting device
US5640986A (en) * 1994-06-29 1997-06-24 Herman; Harry H. Mobility assisting device
US5575299A (en) * 1995-08-01 1996-11-19 Bieri; H. Carlton Walking device
US5941263A (en) * 1997-10-17 1999-08-24 Venetec International, Inc. Leg support crutch
US6474742B1 (en) * 2001-03-09 2002-11-05 Earlene D. Robinson Appendage cramp relief device
US6712781B1 (en) * 2002-05-14 2004-03-30 Helen S. Sheppard Self-contained limb and cast support device
US20060272893A1 (en) * 2005-05-26 2006-12-07 Joe Foggio Therapeutic foot/leg/knee elevation
US20090091175A1 (en) * 2007-10-09 2009-04-09 Continuum Footspas, Llc Spa device with leg rests and calf supports
US20090100590A1 (en) * 2007-10-23 2009-04-23 Continuum Footspas, Llc Basin for a foot spa
US8296874B2 (en) 2007-10-23 2012-10-30 Continuum Footspas, Llc Basin for a foot spa
US20100057171A1 (en) * 2008-09-03 2010-03-04 Trisha Stephens Mobile apparatus for providing cryotherapy and thermotherapy to a region of a knee being in elevated position
US20110010843A1 (en) * 2009-07-15 2011-01-20 Continuum Footspas, Llc Adjustable leg rest assembly
US8341776B2 (en) 2009-07-15 2013-01-01 Continuum Footspas, Llc Adjustable leg rest assembly
US20110126843A1 (en) * 2009-11-30 2011-06-02 Gamber Michael R Limb Support Device
US8656917B2 (en) 2009-11-30 2014-02-25 Gemm Quality Products Llc Limb support device
US9492016B2 (en) 2010-12-08 2016-11-15 Bryan Miller Compact, portable elevating device for a lower limb
US8408652B1 (en) * 2010-12-21 2013-04-02 Frank L. Mobley, Sr. Adjustable foot rest

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3477673A (en) Leaning device to reduce fatigue
US3029810A (en) Back brace
US3380447A (en) Ankle device for supporting an individual in an inverted position
US3081085A (en) Back posture and stretch board
US4608971A (en) Emergency leg splint
US4647066A (en) Orthopedic chair
US2741412A (en) Safety device for infants
US4403773A (en) Exercising apparatus
US3570479A (en) Traction table
US5236333A (en) Leg exerciser
US2661000A (en) Surgical splint
US5440770A (en) Infant seat with opposite supporting surfaces
US5599260A (en) Device for exercising during office work
US5418991A (en) Therapeutic appliance for spacing legs
US5293655A (en) Nursing cradle
US5083806A (en) Adult walker for seated and standing use
US5927797A (en) Portable work stool
US5297848A (en) Portable, orthopedically correct, adjustable seating cushion
US4759562A (en) Walker conversions for wheel chairs
US2119325A (en) Surgical splint
US4650249A (en) Ergonomic seating assembly system with front chest support component, pelvic tilt seat component and related attachments
US6254517B1 (en) Multiple exercise device
US2099345A (en) Body support or stool
US3853123A (en) Orthopedic knee brace
US6368260B1 (en) Rehabilitation chair