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Heat transfer unit

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US3685507A
US3685507A US3685507DA US3685507A US 3685507 A US3685507 A US 3685507A US 3685507D A US3685507D A US 3685507DA US 3685507 A US3685507 A US 3685507A
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container
heat
transfer
pocket
unit
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William R Donnelly
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STAMPER MAXWELL H AS TRUSTEE JOHN J KLEYNOWSKI ALLEN C MATHENA AND GEORGE SHAW
Readi Temp Inc
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Readi Temp Inc
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25DREFRIGERATORS; COLD ROOMS; ICE-BOXES; COOLING OR FREEZING APPARATUS NOT COVERED BY ANY OTHER SUBCLASS
    • F25D5/00Devices using endothermic chemical reactions, e.g. using frigorific mixtures
    • F25D5/02Devices using endothermic chemical reactions, e.g. using frigorific mixtures portable, i.e. adapted to be carried personally
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47GHOUSEHOLD OR TABLE EQUIPMENT
    • A47G23/00Other table equipment
    • A47G23/04Containers with means for keeping food cool or hot
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47JKITCHEN EQUIPMENT; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; APPARATUS FOR MAKING BEVERAGES
    • A47J36/00Parts, details or accessories of cooking-vessels
    • A47J36/24Warming devices
    • A47J36/28Warming devices generating the heat by exothermic reactions, e.g. heat released by the contact of unslaked lime with water
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D81/00Containers, packaging elements, or packages, for contents presenting particular transport or storage problems, or adapted to be used for non-packaging purposes after removal of contents
    • B65D81/34Containers, packaging elements, or packages, for contents presenting particular transport or storage problems, or adapted to be used for non-packaging purposes after removal of contents for packaging foodstuffs or other articles intended to be cooked or heated within the package
    • B65D81/3484Packages having self-contained heating means, e.g. heating generated by the reaction of two chemicals

Abstract

A portable heat transfer unit characterized by a multi-walled container. The container is so formed that wall portions thereof define therein separate pockets or chambers. Disposed in said pockets and separated by said wall portions are at least two separate types of material, the material to be treated and heat transfer material, the latter being activated, when required, by a simple manipulation of the container.

Description

United States Patent Donnelly [4 1 Aug. 22, 1972 [54] HEAT TRANSFER UNIT FOREIGN PATENTS'OR APPLICATIONS [72] Inventor: William R- Donnelly, Piq a, i 407,332 12/1909 France ..126/263 [73] Assigneez keadixremp Inc Dayton, Ohio 452,542 8/1936 Great Bntaln ..l26/263 [22] Filed: Nov. 2, 1970 Primary Examiner-Charles J. Myhre [211 App 86 068 Attorney-Jerome P. Bloom ABSTRACT g. A portable heat transfer unit characterized by a multi- 58] g g 6 262 walled container. The container is so formed that wall portions thereof define therein separate pockets or chambers. Disposed in said pockets and separated by [56] References and said wall portions are at least two separate types of UNTED STATES T NTS material, the material to be treated and heat transfer material, the latter being activated, when required, by 1% a simple manipulation of the container.

219681932 1/1961 Vance et al ..126/263 x 23 Claims, 5 Drawing figures Patented Aug. 22, 1972 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG-2 INVENTOR WILLIAM R. DONNELLY A TTORIVE Y Patented Aug. 22, 1972 3,685,507

I 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 IIIIIIIIIIIINIIlI/I)"llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllyflllllllllllllllllll i INVENTOR WILLIAM R. DONNEL LY BYWQM ATTORNEY Patented Aug. 22, 1972 3,685,507

3 Sheets-Sheet 5 11 llllllllllllllllHlllllllllHHllLlllllIlIllllllllll v uvvavron WILLIAM R. DONNELLY WW KM A TTOR/VE Y HEAT TRANSFER UNIT BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to improvements in portable heat transfer units and unique container concepts therefor.

It will be described herein with particular reference to application thereof to cooling units. However, it will be obvious that the use of the invention embodiments is not so limited in application and such is not intended. The invention devices can be readily utilized as heating units as well as cooling units.

There have been many portable heat transfer units SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention overcomes problems such as above noted which have been heretofore encountered in the art in question. It provides a portable heat transfer unit featuring an improved package or container the contents of which will neither deteriorate or leak during storage, transport or use. The container concepts of the invention provide that the material to be treated in the invention unit can be either introduced therein by the manufacturer or can be customer introduced by the user. The invention provides an option, moreover, as to the form in which the material to be treated is introduced. It may be incorporated as unpackaged bulk material or simply as a pre-packaged unit quantity. In either case, the invention package will contain suitable heat transfer chemical, either of an endo-thermic or an exo-thermic nature which can be simply energized while remaining in a relatively sealed relation in the package or container per se.

It is a primary object of the invention to provide a portable heat transfer unit featuring unique container concepts which is economical to fabricate, more efficient and satisfactory in use, adaptable to a wide variety of applications and unlikely to malfunction in use.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel container concept enabling a heat transfer unit for use in connection with the preservation or preparation of other materials, either pre-packaged or in bulk form.

A further object of the invention is to provide a convenient portable heat transfer unit which may function independently of a source of electricity or heat, being entirely self-contained and independent of other sources of energy.

Another object of the invention is to provide a means whereby a unique chemical heat transfer unit may be produced which can be simply taken from a shelf and simply manipulated to almost instantaneously produce a change of temperature of its contents or the temperature of any material brought into proximity therewith.

Another object of the invention is to provide a heat transfer unit characterized by an improved container for chemical heat transfer material which inhibits leakage or deterioration of its contents.

An additional object of the invention is to provide a novel heat transfer unit and container components therefor possessing the advantageous structural features, the inherent meritorious characteristics and the means and mode of operation herein described.

With the above and other incidental objects in view,

' as will more fully appear in the specification, the invention intended to be protected by Letters Patent consists of the features of construction, the parts and combinations thereof and the mode of operation as hereinafter described or their equivalents.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Referring to the drawings wherein some but not necessarily the only forms of embodiment of the invention are shown,

FIG. 1 is a cross sectional view of a heat transfer unit in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a cross sectional view of a modified heat transfer unit in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 3 is a cross sectional view of a further embodiment of the invention concepts;

FIG. 4 is yet another form of heat transfer unit which features the invention concepts; and

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary sectional view of a particular means for closing the unit illustrated in FIG. 4.

Like parts are indicated by similar characters of reference throughout the several views.

Referring to FIG. 1 of the drawings, the invention as there shown is embodied in a thin walled but selfsustaining container 10 capable of being flexed, to a limited degree, under an externally applied pressure. The container is, in this embodiment, comprised of two thermo-formed plastic cup sections 11 and 12, one inverted over and opening to the other. After the desired contents are introduced, expanded lip portions of these cup sections are overlapped and permanently joined together, as by spin welding. Thus, once the cup sections are joined together, the container is fully sealed. Prior to such sealing, however, in accordance with the invention there is placed within the bottom cup section 11, centered on its base 13, a pre-packaged unit amount of a chemical 15. This chemical is sealed within a frangible shell-like container 16, preferably one made of plastic. As will be further described, on application of a suitable pressure, the shell 16 will separate or rupture to release its contents.

As seen in FIG. 1, the packaged chemical 15 is retained in positionby nesting the bottom of its container in a pocket defined by an annular ridge 17 formed on the interior surface of the container base 13.

So positioned, there is defined about the packaged chemical an annular space 18. Introduced in the space 18; to fill the same and extend upwardly of the container, is a second chemical composition 19. The chemicals 15 and 19 are chosen to suit the intended application. If the embodiment of the invention is to serve as a cooling unit, then the chemicals 15 and 19 will be such that v on contact there will be an interaction therebetween to produce an immediate reduction in the existing temperature of their environment, resulting in a reduction in the temperature of the entire container and its contents. In such case, by way of example, the chemical 15 could be a mixture-of sodium thiosulfate and water while the chemical 19 could be a charge of ammonia nitrate or ammonia chloride. When the Sodium thiosulfate and water is intermixed with either the ammonia nitrate or ammonia chloride, there will be produced an immediate endo-thermic reaction which, as will be further described, cools the container and the product or material to be treated.

Looking again to the container 10 as illustrated in FIG. 1 of the drawings the cup section 12 which provides an extension of and caps the section 11 is so formed to produce within the limits thereof a double walled container structure. As will be noted, within a narrow annular peripheral base portion 20, shown uppermost, the bottom of the cup section 12 is formed with a central portion projected inwardly the depth of the cup to produce in the upper end of the container 10 a pocket 22. The latter is adapted to receive a charge of a product or material 27 to be treated within the conv tainer.. This material may be in either a bulk or prepackaged form. In the described formation of the pocket 22 there is thus produced in the upper portion of the container an inner wall 23 which defines thereabout, with the peripheral wall 21 of cup section 12, an annular mixing space 24, the purpose of which will be further described.

To summarize the foregoing, in fabricating the described embodiment of the invention the container cup section 11 has introduced therein the package of chemical l and about such package the chemical 19. i

As is self-evident, the chemicals are separated by the shell-like container 16 in the first instance. After introduction of the chemicals, the cup section 12 is applied and integrated with ,the section 11 as previously described. The chemicals are thus sealed and separated at this point. The material to be treated, whether in solid or liquid state or pre-packaged or in bulk form, is then introduced in the pocket 22. To afford a complete shelf package, the baseportion 20 of the cup section 12 shown uppermost is "then bridged by a cap or seal 25. The latter may be heat sealed to the container at the portion 20 or otherwise suitably attached so as to seal the contents 27 in the pocket 22.

It is to be recalled that in the particular embodiment described the chemicals and 19 have been chosen so as to produce on contact and an intermixture thereof a cooling effect. It is of course obvious that the chemicals necessary to squeeze'with the fingers the lower section 11 of the container 10 and produce a pressure'thereon sufficient to react on the shell 16 of the chemical 15.

The container shell 16 is designed, of course, so that it will not inadvertently rupture or fracture but will respond to a steadily applied pressure to so react. On

thus breaking the container 16 within the container 10, the chemical 15 will be exposed to the chemical 19 to produce a heat transfer action within the container 10. This reaction is accelerated by shaking and/or inverting the container so as to dispersethe contacted chemicals throughout the container and into the annular'mixing space 24 about the container pocket 22. The heat transfer reaction is instantaneous and the portion of the container 10 defining the pocket 22 is such to facilitate heat transfer whereby there is an extremely rapid cooling of the cocktail or other material in the pocket 22.

If the chemicals are designed, as suggested above, to produce an exo-therrnic reaction, then the contents of the pocket 22 will of course be heated rapidly and effectively. It is noted that whether an endo-thermic or an exo-thermic reaction is produced, the transmission of heat through the walls of the pocket 22 israpid.

From the foregoing, it will vbe seen that the described embodiment of the invention is particularly well adapted for merchandising food products which are to be consumed in an area where it is difficult to provide for their cooling or heating, as the case may be. The advantages equally obtain in reference to any other carried on picnics, camping trips or the like. In any ease, the inventionobviates the need for dependence on normal icing or heating mediums.

As is apparent, the material 27 can be made ready.

foruse in a brief interval of time and at any location. At the point when it is desired to use or consume the materials'27, one need only remove or break the cap 25. Note that the container 10 per se can serve as a dish, cup or glass.

Looking now-to FIG. 2 of the drawings, the invention embodiment there illustrated utilizes the same basic concept as the invention of FIG. 1. In this case there is an outer container shell 30 having the general configuration of a glass. The container shell 30 is preferably.

thenno-fonned of a plastic material which is self sustaining but capable of a degree of flexing for pur-- poses as described with respect to the cup section 11 of the structure of FIG. 1. As seen, the shell 30 comprises a disc-like base 31 formed onthe interior surface thereof with an upwardly projected annular ridge 32. The base 31 is rimmed by a vertically projected selfsustaining wall structure 33 having at its upper extremity a revers'ely directed outwardly projected lip 34. Suspended by a suitable sealing connection to the lip 34 to depend interiorly .of the shell 30 is a bag-like structure 35. The latter is preferably made of a plastic film which is completely flexible but lacks any selfsustainingcharacteristics. As disposed within the shell 30, the bag 35 produces a container unit'which has a double wall structure through a major portion of its longitudinal or vertical extent. The inner of the walls is provided by the dependent portion 36 of the bag 35 which disposes generally in spaced relation to the wall 33 of the shell 30. So disposed, there defined within the shell 30 and between the wall portions 33 and 36 a generally annular space 37.

It will be noted that the bag 35 in effect forms a seal of the shell 30 and in particular in reference to the lower portion thereof. As in the case of the embodiment first described, seated on the base 31 of the shell 30 and nested within the pocket defined by the ridge 32 is a container 38 the contents of which will be of a chemical composition such as described with reference to the chemical package 15-16 of the device of FIG. 1 of the drawings. In surrounding relation to the package 38 and within the annular space thereabout in the shell 30 there is provided a chemical 19' in bulk form which not only will preferably surround the package 38 but extend upwardly thereof about the lower portion of the dependent bag 35.

As in the case of the pocket 22, the bag 35 defines an open pocket 39 inwardly of the top of a multi-wall container structure.

In respect to the embodiment of the invention as shown in FIG. 2, this is particularly adaptable for use in the treatment, either heating or cooling, of prepackaged materials. Note that such materials may be packaged in a canned condition, represented by the can 40 illustrated in FIG. 2. The very nature of the construction illustrated will facilitate the heating or cooling of a can and its contents, the same being disposed interiorly of the multi-wall portion of the basic package provided by the invention. Of course, the invention of FIG. 2 may have equally disposed in the pocket 39 material in bulk form. In any case, whether the item 40 is integrated in packaged or bulk form, it may either be inserted in the pocket 39 at the place of use or be inserted by a manufacturer and in'any case prior to use 35 to transmit, at a place of use, the weight of the inserted material to be treated in the pocket 39 so as to fracture the chemical package 38 is of particular advantage.

In any case the embodiments of the invention of FIG.

FIG. 3 shows yet a further embodiment of the inven- 1 tion. In FIG. 3 the outer container shell 40 is thermoformed to a glass-like configuration comprising, in this instance, a flat disc-like base 41. The base 41 is rimmed by a vertically projected self-sustaining wall 42 of plastic having a lip 43 at its upper extremity similar to' the lip 34 on the shell 30. In this case, however, the wall portion '42 is distinguished by circumferential portions in adjacent spaced relation to the base 41 being formed to provide therein corrugations or grooves 44. Frictionallyheld by the corrugations 44, interiorly of the shell 40 in adjacent spaced relation to the base 41, is a there may be applied across the pocket 39 a sealing cap such as the cap 25 utilized in the embodiment of FIG. 1 of the drawings. 1

Further, in a manner as described previously, to use the embodiment of FIG. 2, one needs only to apply pressure to the wall 33 which has a degree of capability of flexing. By applying a sufficient steady pressure one can rupture the package 38 to bring into contact the chemicals 15' and 19'. The device of FIG. 2 can also be so provided, by suitable depth of the bag within the shell 30, that when a can is inserted in the pocket 39, the can may transmit through the bottom of the bag 35 its pressure to the package 38 and in this manner rupture such package and provide for exposing the chemical 15' to the surrounding chemical 19'. In either case, the entire container package may be shaken, with the material being contained in place so as to cause the chemicals l5 and 19' to intermix and dispose peripherally of the bag 35 in the space 37 and substantially throughout the expanse of the bag. It may be readily seen that with this type of contact and utilizing the bag 35 there is an immediate proximity to thebag and its substantial expanse of the chemical materials, which are effective, depending upon whether the reaction produced is endo-thermic or exo-thermic, to cause a rapid heat transfer effective to quickly change the temperature of the material contents designated by the numeral 40. 1

It is noted that the use of the thin, flexible plastic film is an important ;consideration in producing a most effective heat transfer. Moreover, the design of the bag partition 45 having a generally cup-like configuration which is open in a sense upwardly of the shell 40. The partition 45 thereby defines to the bottom thereof a relatively sealed chamber which prior to insertion of the partition has introduced therein a chemical 46. Also disposed interiorly of the shell 40 is a flexible plastic bag 47. The bag 47' is suspended by asealed connection of the portion defining the mouth thereof to the lip 43 so as to dispose in the shell 40 similarly to the disposition of the bag 35 in the shell 30 of the embodiment of FIG. 2 of the drawings. Prior to the seal of the bag 47 to the lip 43 of the shell 40 there is introduced to be cupped by the partition 45 and about and upwardly of the bag a chemical 48. It will be thus seen that the completely flexible non-selfesustaining material of the bag 47 is cupped to a substantial extent by the chemical 48, the latter which is separated from the chemical 46 by the cup-formed partition 45. The bag 47 thus defines in a multi-walled container assembly a substantial pocket 49 for the receipt of material to be treated.

As described with reference to the embodiments of FIG. 1 and FIG. 2, the normally separated chemicals 46 and 48 inserted in the container structure will be of a nature that on contact and intermixture there will be produced an endo-therrnic or exo-thermic reaction. Of course, the nature of the reaction will be dependent on the selection of chemicals for the purpose intended. Also, as in the case of the other embodiments, the material to be treated can be pre-packaged in the heat transfer unit within the'pocket 49, the latter of which may be capped by a cover such as 25.

To activate the unit illustrated in FIG. 3 of the drawings, one again need only press firmly in a sense inward of the container on the shell wall 42, in the vicinity of the grooves defined by the corrugatioris44. In this manner one will displace the frictionally held partition 45 to thereby expose the chemicals 46 and 48 to each other. Upon briefly shaking the container unit the will'be chosenaccordingly.

chemicals are thoroughly mixed. Also, by inverting the entire containerwhere the pocket 49 is capped, there will be insured-a most complete exposure of the wall of the plastic bag 47 to the. interacting chemicals. De-

pending on thenature of the chemicals, one will, as

previously-described, produce either an endo-thermic or an exo-thermic reaction which .is fully applied tothe contents of the pocket '49,whatever they might beat the moment. w A

FIG. 4 of the drawing shows yet another embodiment of the invention wherein there is a multi walled container unit 50 fabricated of plastic film. A basic dif- As the bag 52 is disposed within the bag 5l,the mouth thereof, which is stretched to be of a sizecorresponding to that of the mouth of the bag 51, is heat sealed tothe mouth of the bag 51, coextensivelytherewith. Thebag 52 is distinguished from the bag 51 not only in that it is shorter in length so; the sealed inner end thereof is spaced from the bottom of the bag 51 but the bag 52 is smaller. in circumferential extent. Thus, as the bag 52 is disposed in the bag 51, the peripheralwall'thereof will be spaced from that of the-bag 51' inwardly of their inter-connected mouths. Th'e'spacing is identified in FIG; 4 by the. numeral 54. In preparing this last embodiment of the invention, before the introduction of the bag '52 to the bag 51 and a sealingconnection therebetween, there is introduced in the bottom of the outer bag a charge of chemical 55. Also there is disposed .in the bottom of the bag 51 within the'charge of chemical '55 a small-plastic-bag 53. The latter has sealed therein a charge of a second chemical 56. Of course, in accordance with-theinvention concepts, the bag ;53 is susceptible to rupture upon firmly applied pressure. Y x As previously described'with reference to the first three embodiments of the invention illustrated, the chemicals 55 and 56, normally separated by the bag 53, will be chosenso that on contact and intermixture thereof therewill be produced either anendo-ther'mic or an exo-thermic reaction. 'Ihis'will depend on themture of the application of the chemical heat transfer unit inquestion. If the unit is to be a cooling unit, then thechemicals may be such as' previously described by way of example but not by way of limitation. If there is to be a heating action to take; place, then the chemicals With thechemicals 'placed in the bottom of the bag 51, the inner bag-"52 is theninserted and the mouth container unit 50 may beso'p'rovided that it may be adhesively *and te'rhporarily sealedito form a seal of the pocket57fiTh'en one'can squeeze inwardly o'f'the'container" unit to'compress the envelope 5'3,-causing it to 51 may be manipulated to assist in the rapid mixture of I theqchemicals and the bringing them in coextensive contact withthe outerwall'of theinner bag 52. The heat transfer action which will take place is thereby made extremely efiicient and, as in thecase as previ- 1 ously described, there is'a rapid and simple actionito either heat or cool the contents of the material or container 58 that has been disposed in the pocket defined by the bag '52. Particular note should be taken that in this case as well as in the previous cases a multi-walled container construction is utilized in a manner to insure that maximum exposure ismade of the pocket walls to facilitate the most rapid and most complete heat transfer action possible.

From the above description it will be apparent'there is thus provided a unit of the character described possessing the particular features of advantage before enumerated as desirable but which obviously is susceptible of modification in form, proportions, detail construction and arrangement of parts without departing from the principle involved or sacrificing any of its advantages; It is emphasized that the chemicals described by way ofexample herein are not to be construed as limiting'since in and of'themselves the specific chemical forms no part of the'present invention. It is only necessarythatphysical properties of the'respective chemicals shown-are those which oncontact and inter- 'Attention is'directed to the fact thatrepresentative of an-extension of the embodimentsdescribed there is shown a modification of the construction of FIG. 4 of thedrawingsiln this case, the construction is entirely the same with the exception that the outer bag,

designated 51', has the mouth thereof extended beyond' the'mouth of the inner bag 52' which is sealingly attached. In such case it is provided that the portion "59' of thebag 51'- extended beyond the mouth of the bag 52' maybe tied together at 60, for example,

and thereby'form a sealed container unit. Of course,

other methods of closing the portion 59 may be utilized without'departing from the concept here indicated. As isself-evident, the embodiment of FIG. 5 may be utilized and brought'into play in a manner similarto that 'of FIG. 4. 1 Having thus described my invention,'I claim: 1

l.- A heat transfer unit comprising a multi-walled container structure embodying" separate materials which'are individually'inactive but which on contact interact to produce a medium inducing heat transfer, said container structure including wall portions positioning one within the other and defining at least one sealed pocket and a further pocket, one of said pockets accommodating means to be treated by heat transfer, another of said pockets including therein a first portion of said inactive materials, a further portion of said inactive materials for interacting with said first portion having means maintaining the same in a separated noncontacting relation to said first portion, at least one of said portions of inactive materials being disposed in peripheral contact with wall portions of said multiwalled container structure and there being means included for inducing a distributed and intimate contact between said first and said further portions of said inactive materials and their interaction in adjacent and surrounding non contacting relation to the means to be treated by heat transfer.

2. A heat transfer unit as in claim 1 wherein peripheral portions of the wall portion defining said further pocket are disposed to be surrounded by at least one of said portions of inactive material.

3. A heat transfer unit as in claim 1 wherein said further portion of said inactive materials is normally contained in a pocket commonly containing the said first portion of said materials and a flexible wall portion of said container provides the means through which pressure may be applied to the means for maintaining a separated relation of said inactive material portions.

4. A heat transfer unit as in claim 1 wherein said first and further portions of said inactive materials are disposed in their inactive state to nest one within the other.

5. A heat transfer unit as in claim 1, characterized by said one pocket accommodating means to be treated I being defined in one end of said container, the wall portions of said container being integrated to form a unitary structure and produce thereby said sealed pocket and said wall portions having flexing capability through the medium of which the contact and distribution of said inactive materials may be achieved.

6. A heat transfer unit as set forth in claim 1, wherein said multi-walled container structure has said pockets defined therein by recessing at least one wall portion thereof.

7. A heat transfer unit as in claim 1 characterized by the inner of said wall portions being connected in integrated relation to the outer of said wall portions to define therebetween a space about the pocket accommodating the means to be treated by heat transfer, said space providing for the disposal about the means to be treated by heat transfer of at least a portion of the interacting materials.

8. A heat transfer unit as set forth in claim 1 characterized by the inner of said container wall portions being defined by means dependent within outer of said wallportions, with which outer of said wall portions said dependent means is integrated.

9. A heat transfer unit as set forth in claim 1 characterized by said multi-walled container structure being comprised of flexible bag-like segments including an outer bag and a plurality of inner bags, one of said inner bags defining with said outer bag said one sealed pocket and per se providing a further pocket and one of said inner bags including one of said portions of inactive material.

10. A heat transfer unit as set forth in claim 1 characterized by said pockets being formed by layered flexible material peripheral portions of which are sealingly interconnected.

11. A heat transfer unit as set forth in claim 10 characterized by said layered flexible material providing plural pockets wall portions of which are flexible and disposing one within the other to provide said one sealed pocket and said further pocket and there being flexibly displaceable means intermediate said layered material to normally separate the respective portions of inactive material, pressure on which separating means through the outermost wall portion of said container providing for communication between said respective portions of inactive material.

12. A heat transfer unit including a container having means bridging one end to depend therein and form a receptacle for means to be heat treated and define within the outer wall of said container a relatively sealed pocket, said pocket accommodating therein a normally inactive component of a heat transfer material and in separated relation thereto a further normally inactive component of a heat transfer material which on contact with said first component will interact to provide a heat transfer medium, means normally separating said components to provide that one thereof is peripherally encompassed, at least in part, by the other, and the outer wall portion of said container providing means which when subjected to pressure will provide access between said components, said container and the means dependent therein being an integrated structure forming a unit wherein a chamber is provided about said dependent means within which said components may be shifted and moved to interact in closely surrounding relation to the means to be treated by heat transfer.

13. A heat transfer unit according to claim 12 characterized by said unit container being made of material deformable by hand squeezing to induce access between said components.

14. A heat transfer unit according to claim 12 wherein said container is made of film-like material subject to flexing and at least one of said components being in a flexible container disposed and arranged to rupture on pressure being applied to outer wall portions of said container.

15. An expendable package adapted to form an enclosure for means to be subjected to heat transfer including a container having flexible wall portions defining a hollow interior and a sealed pocket closed to opposite ends, within which pocket there are the respective normally inactive components of a heat transfer medium in separated relation, the means to be subjected to heat transfer being accommodated by one wall portion of said container and said container wall portions being conditioned for a squeezing pressure to induce communication between said components to effect and a contact and interaction therebetween and said sealed pocket providing a chamber within which the interacting components may be shaken to provide an enveloping heat transfer medium in respect to the means to be heat treated.

16. A heat transfer unit as in claim 15 characterized by the respective wall portions of said container being of flexible film-like plastic.

17. A heat transfer unit as in claim 16 characterized by wall portions of said container forming a sealed pocket wherein one of said components is received in a loose bulk form and the other of said components is enveloped in film-like flexible material which on squeezing said container is conditioned to rupture and provide said access between said components.

18. An expendable shelf package of a product which desirably is heated or cooled before using, including a container having a hollow interior and closed at its opposite ends, means providing a product accommodating recessed pocket within the container adapted to open through one end thereof, side walls of said pocket being spaced from container side walls, the bottom of said pocket being closed and spaced from the other end of said container, the open mouth of said pocket joining to said container at its said one end, removable means seating on the said one end of said container and sealing and closing the mouth of said pocket, charges of respective components of a heat transfer material in said container in the said other end thereof, with said components being separated from the other in an inactive state and arranged to be brought in interacting contact by a squeezing pressure applied to a part of said terior of said product accommodating pocket.

19. A package according to claim 18, wherein said container is constructed of a self-supporting material and is substantially symmetrical with flattened ends whereby the package may be inverted after squeezing of said container means and allowed to stand in a position applying the reacting materials directly to the exterior of said pocket.

20. A package according to claim 18, wherein said removable means closing the mouth of said pocket is a thin film-like member disposing substantially in the plane of the said one end of said container.

21. A package according to claim 18, wherein the said one end of said container is configured to serve as the lip of a cup or glass.

22. A package according to claim 18, wherein the means providing said pocket is an integral part of the container projecting unitarily from the said one end thereof.

23. A package according to claim 18, wherein said container is comprised of two similar cup-like elements disposing in an opposed relation with their open ends joined together in a sealed connected relation, the bottom of one of said elements being displaced inwardly to define said pocket whereby the means providing said pocket is an integral part of the container projected unitarily from the said one end thereof.

Claims (23)

1. A heat transfer unit comprising a multi-walled container structure embodying separate materials which are individually inactive but which on contact interact to produce a medium inducing heat transfer, said container structure including wall portions positioning one within the other and defining at least one sealed pocket and a further pocket, one of said pockets accommodating means to be treated by heat transfer, anotheR of said pockets including therein a first portion of said inactive materials, a further portion of said inactive materials for interacting with said first portion having means maintaining the same in a separated non-contacting relation to said first portion, at least one of said portions of inactive materials being disposed in peripheral contact with wall portions of said multi-walled container structure and there being means included for inducing a distributed and intimate contact between said first and said further portions of said inactive materials and their interaction in adjacent and surrounding non contacting relation to the means to be treated by heat transfer.
2. A heat transfer unit as in claim 1 wherein peripheral portions of the wall portion defining said further pocket are disposed to be surrounded by at least one of said portions of inactive material.
3. A heat transfer unit as in claim 1 wherein said further portion of said inactive materials is normally contained in a pocket commonly containing the said first portion of said materials and a flexible wall portion of said container provides the means through which pressure may be applied to the means for maintaining a separated relation of said inactive material portions.
4. A heat transfer unit as in claim 1 wherein said first and further portions of said inactive materials are disposed in their inactive state to nest one within the other.
5. A heat transfer unit as in claim 1, characterized by said one pocket accommodating means to be treated being defined in one end of said container, the wall portions of said container being integrated to form a unitary structure and produce thereby said sealed pocket and said wall portions having flexing capability through the medium of which the contact and distribution of said inactive materials may be achieved.
6. A heat transfer unit as set forth in claim 1, wherein said multi-walled container structure has said pockets defined therein by recessing at least one wall portion thereof.
7. A heat transfer unit as in claim 1 characterized by the inner of said wall portions being connected in integrated relation to the outer of said wall portions to define therebetween a space about the pocket accommodating the means to be treated by heat transfer, said space providing for the disposal about the means to be treated by heat transfer of at least a portion of the interacting materials.
8. A heat transfer unit as set forth in claim 1 characterized by the inner of said container wall portions being defined by means dependent within outer of said wall portions, with which outer of said wall portions said dependent means is integrated.
9. A heat transfer unit as set forth in claim 1 characterized by said multi-walled container structure being comprised of flexible bag-like segments including an outer bag and a plurality of inner bags, one of said inner bags defining with said outer bag said one sealed pocket and per se providing a further pocket and one of said inner bags including one of said portions of inactive material.
10. A heat transfer unit as set forth in claim 1 characterized by said pockets being formed by layered flexible material peripheral portions of which are sealingly interconnected.
11. A heat transfer unit as set forth in claim 10 characterized by said layered flexible material providing plural pockets wall portions of which are flexible and disposing one within the other to provide said one sealed pocket and said further pocket and there being flexibly displaceable means intermediate said layered material to normally separate the respective portions of inactive material, pressure on which separating means through the outermost wall portion of said container providing for communication between said respective portions of inactive material.
12. A heat transfer unit including a container having means bridging one end to depend therein and form a receptacle for means to be heat treated and define within the outer wall of said container a Relatively sealed pocket, said pocket accommodating therein a normally inactive component of a heat transfer material and in separated relation thereto a further normally inactive component of a heat transfer material which on contact with said first component will interact to provide a heat transfer medium, means normally separating said components to provide that one thereof is peripherally encompassed, at least in part, by the other, and the outer wall portion of said container providing means which when subjected to pressure will provide access between said components, said container and the means dependent therein being an integrated structure forming a unit wherein a chamber is provided about said dependent means within which said components may be shifted and moved to interact in closely surrounding relation to the means to be treated by heat transfer.
13. A heat transfer unit according to claim 12 characterized by said unit container being made of material deformable by hand squeezing to induce access between said components.
14. A heat transfer unit according to claim 12 wherein said container is made of film-like material subject to flexing and at least one of said components being in a flexible container disposed and arranged to rupture on pressure being applied to outer wall portions of said container.
15. An expendable package adapted to form an enclosure for means to be subjected to heat transfer including a container having flexible wall portions defining a hollow interior and a sealed pocket closed to opposite ends, within which pocket there are the respective normally inactive components of a heat transfer medium in separated relation, the means to be subjected to heat transfer being accommodated by one wall portion of said container and said container wall portions being conditioned for a squeezing pressure to induce communication between said components to effect and a contact and interaction therebetween and said sealed pocket providing a chamber within which the interacting components may be shaken to provide an enveloping heat transfer medium in respect to the means to be heat treated.
16. A heat transfer unit as in claim 15 characterized by the respective wall portions of said container being of flexible film-like plastic.
17. A heat transfer unit as in claim 16 characterized by wall portions of said container forming a sealed pocket wherein one of said components is received in a loose bulk form and the other of said components is enveloped in film-like flexible material which on squeezing said container is conditioned to rupture and provide said access between said components.
18. An expendable shelf package of a product which desirably is heated or cooled before using, including a container having a hollow interior and closed at its opposite ends, means providing a product accommodating recessed pocket within the container adapted to open through one end thereof, side walls of said pocket being spaced from container side walls, the bottom of said pocket being closed and spaced from the other end of said container, the open mouth of said pocket joining to said container at its said one end, removable means seating on the said one end of said container and sealing and closing the mouth of said pocket, charges of respective components of a heat transfer material in said container in the said other end thereof, with said components being separated from the other in an inactive state and arranged to be brought in interacting contact by a squeezing pressure applied to a part of said container toward its said other end, said container providing means for said interacting components toward the said one end of the container to achieve a surrounding intimately contacting relation with the exterior of said product accommodating pocket.
19. A package according to claim 18, wherein said container is constructed of a self-supporting material and is substantially symmetrical with flattened ends whereby the package may be inverted after squeezing of sAid container means and allowed to stand in a position applying the reacting materials directly to the exterior of said pocket.
20. A package according to claim 18, wherein said removable means closing the mouth of said pocket is a thin film-like member disposing substantially in the plane of the said one end of said container.
21. A package according to claim 18, wherein the said one end of said container is configured to serve as the lip of a cup or glass.
22. A package according to claim 18, wherein the means providing said pocket is an integral part of the container projecting unitarily from the said one end thereof.
23. A package according to claim 18, wherein said container is comprised of two similar cup-like elements disposing in an opposed relation with their open ends joined together in a sealed connected relation, the bottom of one of said elements being displaced inwardly to define said pocket whereby the means providing said pocket is an integral part of the container projected unitarily from the said one end thereof.
US3685507A 1970-11-02 1970-11-02 Heat transfer unit Expired - Lifetime US3685507A (en)

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Cited By (28)

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US3942510A (en) * 1974-08-21 1976-03-09 General Kinetronics Heating device
US4597917A (en) * 1983-04-19 1986-07-01 Lunsford Kevin S Portable medical gas warming system
US4773389A (en) * 1986-02-19 1988-09-27 Chori Company, Ltd. Self-heating foodstuff container
US5351675A (en) * 1992-08-14 1994-10-04 The Kendall Company Method and apparatus for preheating an optical instrument prior to use thereof in a medical procedure
EP0731674A1 (en) * 1993-11-23 1996-09-18 Biomet, Inc. Thermal packaging unit for biocompatible implants
US5628304A (en) * 1995-06-22 1997-05-13 G & S Regal Trading Corporation Self-heating container
US6289889B1 (en) * 1999-07-12 2001-09-18 Tda Research, Inc. Self-heating flexible package
US6338252B1 (en) 2000-03-13 2002-01-15 Smartcup International Heat transfer container
WO2002012807A1 (en) * 2000-08-07 2002-02-14 Leandro Liberati Instantaneous cooling system for containers of liquid
WO2002007656A3 (en) * 2000-07-20 2002-06-13 Gmp Surgical Solutions Inc Apparatus, systems, and methods for warming materials
WO2002085748A1 (en) * 2001-04-23 2002-10-31 Guida & C. S.P.A. A self-cooling container, particularly for beverages
US6484514B1 (en) * 2000-10-10 2002-11-26 The Procter & Gamble Company Product dispenser having internal temperature changing element
WO2003002425A1 (en) 2001-06-29 2003-01-09 The Procter & Gamble Company Self-heating/self-cooling package
US20040065314A1 (en) * 2000-07-20 2004-04-08 Layer James H. Apparatus, systems, and methods for warming materials
US20060289565A1 (en) * 2005-06-24 2006-12-28 Stephen Manzo Product dispensing package with single use thermal engine
US20070163569A1 (en) * 2006-01-19 2007-07-19 Mark Strachan Arrangement for and method of selectably changing the temperature of a product by employing a snap action invertible actuator
WO2007147108A2 (en) * 2006-06-16 2007-12-21 Tempra Technology, Inc. Portable heating device ventilation
US20080271476A1 (en) * 2007-02-09 2008-11-06 Elias Langguth Endothermic beverage cooler
US20090199843A1 (en) * 2007-09-26 2009-08-13 William Farone Self-heating systems and methods for rapidly heating a comestible substance
US7671302B1 (en) 2004-03-23 2010-03-02 O. R. Solutions, Inc. Thermal treatment system instrument rack and method of selectively thermally treating medical instrument portions
US7728262B1 (en) 2004-03-23 2010-06-01 O.R. Solutions, Inc. Thermal treatment system instrument rack and method of selectively thermally treating medical instrument portions
US20100224510A1 (en) * 2009-03-09 2010-09-09 Heat Wave Technologies, Llc Self-heating systems and methods for rapidly heating a comestible substance
US20100227027A1 (en) * 2009-03-09 2010-09-09 John Ford Self-heating systems and methods for rapidly heating a comestible substance
US20130014519A1 (en) * 2011-02-21 2013-01-17 Hydro-Turbine Developments Pty Ltd Method and cup for operation of frozen beverage device
US8710407B2 (en) 2010-09-02 2014-04-29 Ecolab Usa Inc. Selective thermal treatment of medical instrument portions with thermal treatment system instrument holder
US8721572B1 (en) 2010-06-10 2014-05-13 Eyedetec Medical, Inc. Systems, devices, kits and methods for therapy of the eye
WO2017075334A1 (en) * 2015-10-29 2017-05-04 Tempra Technology, Inc. Portable heating for small quantities of consumer product
US9689606B2 (en) 2012-02-22 2017-06-27 Chill Factor Global Pty. Ltd. Method of, and apparatus for, making frozen beverages, ice cream and other frozen confections

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US2623515A (en) * 1950-12-29 1952-12-30 Sukacev Lev Self-heating container
US2968932A (en) * 1958-07-31 1961-01-24 John R Vance Cooling device
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Cited By (40)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3942510A (en) * 1974-08-21 1976-03-09 General Kinetronics Heating device
US4597917A (en) * 1983-04-19 1986-07-01 Lunsford Kevin S Portable medical gas warming system
US4773389A (en) * 1986-02-19 1988-09-27 Chori Company, Ltd. Self-heating foodstuff container
US5351675A (en) * 1992-08-14 1994-10-04 The Kendall Company Method and apparatus for preheating an optical instrument prior to use thereof in a medical procedure
EP0731674A1 (en) * 1993-11-23 1996-09-18 Biomet, Inc. Thermal packaging unit for biocompatible implants
US5628304A (en) * 1995-06-22 1997-05-13 G & S Regal Trading Corporation Self-heating container
US6289889B1 (en) * 1999-07-12 2001-09-18 Tda Research, Inc. Self-heating flexible package
US6338252B1 (en) 2000-03-13 2002-01-15 Smartcup International Heat transfer container
US20040065314A1 (en) * 2000-07-20 2004-04-08 Layer James H. Apparatus, systems, and methods for warming materials
WO2002007656A3 (en) * 2000-07-20 2002-06-13 Gmp Surgical Solutions Inc Apparatus, systems, and methods for warming materials
WO2002012807A1 (en) * 2000-08-07 2002-02-14 Leandro Liberati Instantaneous cooling system for containers of liquid
US6484514B1 (en) * 2000-10-10 2002-11-26 The Procter & Gamble Company Product dispenser having internal temperature changing element
WO2002085748A1 (en) * 2001-04-23 2002-10-31 Guida & C. S.P.A. A self-cooling container, particularly for beverages
WO2003002425A1 (en) 2001-06-29 2003-01-09 The Procter & Gamble Company Self-heating/self-cooling package
US8153937B2 (en) 2004-03-23 2012-04-10 Ecolab Inc. Thermal treatment system instrument rack and method of selectively thermally treating medical instrument portions
US8148667B2 (en) 2004-03-23 2012-04-03 Ecolab Inc. Thermal treatment system instrument rack and method of selectively thermally treating medical instrument portions
US20100200561A1 (en) * 2004-03-23 2010-08-12 Faries Jr Durward I Thermal Treatment System Instrument Rack and Method of Selectively Thermally Treating Medical Instrument Portions
US7728262B1 (en) 2004-03-23 2010-06-01 O.R. Solutions, Inc. Thermal treatment system instrument rack and method of selectively thermally treating medical instrument portions
US20100116810A1 (en) * 2004-03-23 2010-05-13 O.R. Solutions, Inc. Thermal Treatment System Instrument Rack and Method of Selectively Thermally Treating Medical Instrument Portions
US7671302B1 (en) 2004-03-23 2010-03-02 O. R. Solutions, Inc. Thermal treatment system instrument rack and method of selectively thermally treating medical instrument portions
US20060289565A1 (en) * 2005-06-24 2006-12-28 Stephen Manzo Product dispensing package with single use thermal engine
US20070163569A1 (en) * 2006-01-19 2007-07-19 Mark Strachan Arrangement for and method of selectably changing the temperature of a product by employing a snap action invertible actuator
WO2007147108A3 (en) * 2006-06-16 2008-11-13 Tempra Tech Inc Portable heating device ventilation
WO2007147108A2 (en) * 2006-06-16 2007-12-21 Tempra Technology, Inc. Portable heating device ventilation
US20080271476A1 (en) * 2007-02-09 2008-11-06 Elias Langguth Endothermic beverage cooler
US9603483B2 (en) 2007-09-26 2017-03-28 Heat Wave Technologies, Llc Self-heating systems and methods for rapidly heating a comestible substance
US8556108B2 (en) 2007-09-26 2013-10-15 Heat Wave Technologies, Llc Self-heating systems and methods for rapidly heating a comestible substance
US20090199843A1 (en) * 2007-09-26 2009-08-13 William Farone Self-heating systems and methods for rapidly heating a comestible substance
US8783244B2 (en) 2009-03-09 2014-07-22 Heat Wave Technologies, Llc Self-heating systems and methods for rapidly heating a comestible substance
US8360048B2 (en) 2009-03-09 2013-01-29 Heat Wave Technologies, Llc Self-heating systems and methods for rapidly heating a comestible substance
US20100227027A1 (en) * 2009-03-09 2010-09-09 John Ford Self-heating systems and methods for rapidly heating a comestible substance
US8578926B2 (en) 2009-03-09 2013-11-12 Heat Wave Technologies, Llc Self-heating systems and methods for rapidly heating a comestible substance
US9175876B2 (en) 2009-03-09 2015-11-03 Heat Wave Technologies, Llc Self-heating systems and methods for rapidly heating a comestible substance
US9598186B2 (en) 2009-03-09 2017-03-21 Heat Wave Technologies, Llc Self-heating systems and methods for rapidly heating a comestible substance
US20100224510A1 (en) * 2009-03-09 2010-09-09 Heat Wave Technologies, Llc Self-heating systems and methods for rapidly heating a comestible substance
US8721572B1 (en) 2010-06-10 2014-05-13 Eyedetec Medical, Inc. Systems, devices, kits and methods for therapy of the eye
US8710407B2 (en) 2010-09-02 2014-04-29 Ecolab Usa Inc. Selective thermal treatment of medical instrument portions with thermal treatment system instrument holder
US20130014519A1 (en) * 2011-02-21 2013-01-17 Hydro-Turbine Developments Pty Ltd Method and cup for operation of frozen beverage device
US9689606B2 (en) 2012-02-22 2017-06-27 Chill Factor Global Pty. Ltd. Method of, and apparatus for, making frozen beverages, ice cream and other frozen confections
WO2017075334A1 (en) * 2015-10-29 2017-05-04 Tempra Technology, Inc. Portable heating for small quantities of consumer product

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CA958381A (en) 1974-11-26 grant

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