US3675604A - Garment cutting and stacking method - Google Patents

Garment cutting and stacking method Download PDF

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Publication number
US3675604A
US3675604A US3675604DA US3675604A US 3675604 A US3675604 A US 3675604A US 3675604D A US3675604D A US 3675604DA US 3675604 A US3675604 A US 3675604A
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United States
Prior art keywords
garment
center plait
center
plait
garment part
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Wade W Frost
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Oxford Industries Inc
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Oxford Industries Inc
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Priority to US7903170A priority Critical
Priority to US24375372A priority
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3675604A publication Critical patent/US3675604A/en
Priority to US05391645 priority patent/US3871309A/en
Priority to US05467052 priority patent/US3886879A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

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Classifications

    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05BSEWING
    • D05B41/00Work-collecting devices
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41HAPPLIANCES OR METHODS FOR MAKING CLOTHES, e.g. FOR DRESS-MAKING, FOR TAILORING, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A41H42/00Multi-step production lines for making clothes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41HAPPLIANCES OR METHODS FOR MAKING CLOTHES, e.g. FOR DRESS-MAKING, FOR TAILORING, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A41H43/00Other methods, machines or appliances
    • A41H43/02Handling garment parts or blanks, e.g. feeding, piling, separating, reversing
    • A41H43/0207Stacking
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05BSEWING
    • D05B33/00Devices incorporated in sewing machines for supplying or removing the work
    • D05B33/02Devices incorporated in sewing machines for supplying or removing the work and connected, for synchronous operation, with the work-feeding devices of the sewing machine
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05BSEWING
    • D05B35/00Work-feeding or -handling elements not otherwise provided for
    • D05B35/06Work-feeding or -handling elements not otherwise provided for for attaching bands, ribbons, strips, or tapes or for binding
    • D05B35/062Work-feeding or -handling elements not otherwise provided for for attaching bands, ribbons, strips, or tapes or for binding with hem-turning
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05BSEWING
    • D05B33/00Devices incorporated in sewing machines for supplying or removing the work
    • D05B33/006Feeding workpieces separated from piles, e.g. unstacking
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05DINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES D05B AND D05C, RELATING TO SEWING, EMBROIDERING AND TUFTING
    • D05D2207/00Use of special elements
    • D05D2207/02Pneumatic or hydraulic devices
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05DINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES D05B AND D05C, RELATING TO SEWING, EMBROIDERING AND TUFTING
    • D05D2207/00Use of special elements
    • D05D2207/02Pneumatic or hydraulic devices
    • D05D2207/04Suction or blowing devices
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05DINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES D05B AND D05C, RELATING TO SEWING, EMBROIDERING AND TUFTING
    • D05D2303/00Applied objects or articles
    • D05D2303/02Tape
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05DINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES D05B AND D05C, RELATING TO SEWING, EMBROIDERING AND TUFTING
    • D05D2303/00Applied objects or articles
    • D05D2303/20Small textile objects e.g., labels, beltloops
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05DINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES D05B AND D05C, RELATING TO SEWING, EMBROIDERING AND TUFTING
    • D05D2305/00Operations on the work before or after sewing
    • D05D2305/02Folding
    • D05D2305/04Folding longitudinally to the sewing direction
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05DINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES D05B AND D05C, RELATING TO SEWING, EMBROIDERING AND TUFTING
    • D05D2305/00Operations on the work before or after sewing
    • D05D2305/08Cutting the workpiece
    • D05D2305/12Cutting the workpiece transversally
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/525Operation controlled by detector means responsive to work
    • Y10T83/541Actuation of tool controlled in response to work-sensing means
    • Y10T83/543Sensing means responsive to work indicium or irregularity
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/768Rotatable disc tool pair or tool and carrier
    • Y10T83/7863Tool pair comprises rotatable tool and nonrotatable tool

Abstract

A garment cutting and stacking method and apparatus for use in combination with a sewing machine where the center plait of a shirt is applied to the front panel of the shirt in the shirt making process. The center plait is positioned on the shirt panel so that its ends overlie the leading and trailing edges of the panel, and as the pieces are stitched together and moved from the sewing machine, the leading and trailing ends of the center plait are cut so that they are approximately co-extensive with the leading and trailing edges of the shirt panel. A stacker is responsive to the passage of the trailing edge of the shirt panel from the sewing machine to grasp and stack the shirt panel at a position remote from the sewing machine.

Description

[ 1 July 11, 1972 Frost [54] GARMENT CUTTING AND STACKING METHOD [72] inventor: Wade W. Frost, Vidalia, Ga. [73] Assignee: Oxford lndustrles, Inc., Atlanta, Ga

[22] Filed: Oct. 8, I970 211 Appl. No.: 79,031

[52] 1.8.0 ..ll2l262,ll2/l2l.29,ll2ll30 511 int. Cl. ..D05b 1/00 [58] Field of Search ..1 12/262, 265, 267-269,

ll2/l30, l2l.29, l52; 2/243 R [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,989,018 6/l96l Bleicher ..l l2/262 3,223,059 12/1965 Jacobs l2/l30 X Attomey-Jones & Thomas [57] ABSTRACT A garment cutting and stacking method and apparatus for use in combination with a sewing machine where the center plait of a shirt is applied to the front panel of the shirt in the shirt making process. The center plait is positioned on the shirt panel so that its ends overlie the leading and trailing edges of the panel, and as the pieces are stitched together and moved from the sewing machine, the leading and trailing ends of the center plait are cut so that they are approximately co-extensive with the leading and trailing edges of the shirt panel. A stacker is responsive to the passage of the trailing edge of the shirt panel from the sewing machine to grasp and stack the shirt panel at a position remote from the sewing machine.

6Claims, 9 Drawing Figures PM'ENTEDJUL 1 1 I972 SHEET 10F 5 BY Jdhmffimw INVENTOR WADE W. FROST ATTORNEYS PATENTEDJUL 1 1 can 3, 675.604

SHEET 3 BF 5 SOL 3| I22 CONTROL INVENTOR WADE WV FROST BY aamufm ATTORNEYS PATENTEDJUL 11 m2 3, 675.604

SHEET u or 5 ENTOR H- WADE w 0ST ATTORNEYS PATENTEDJUL 1 1 1972 SHEET 5 OF 5 INVENTOR WADE W FROST ATTORNEYS GARMENT CUTTING AND STACKING METHOD BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION When the center plait of a garment, such as a man's shirt or a woman's dress, is applied to the front portion of the garment, the length of the center plait is usually formed longer than the garment panel so that when the center plait is sewn to the garment panel its ends overlie the top and bottom edges of the garment panel. Usually at a subsequent garment processing station a worker trims the ends of the center plait so that the cut edges are approximately even or coextensive with the edges of the garment panel. The upper end of the center plait, usually the leading end as the pieces are processed through the sewing machine, usually must be cut with a curved cut or an angled cut to match the neck opening of the garment, and the lower or trailing end of the center plait usually is cut with a straight cut that matches the lower or trailing edge of the garment panel.

In order to handle the garment parts for the cutting of the ends of the center plait it has been customary for the first worker that sewed the center plaits to the garment panels to stack the sewn garment parts in the vicinity of her machine for subsequent collection by a second worker. The second worker usually collected the stacked garment parts and delivered them to a third worker who cut the ends of the center plaits and restacked the garment parts. The garment parts were then again collected and delivered to a subsequent garment processing station where subsequent stitching, and other functions were performed. The manual steps of stacking, collecting, conveying, cutting and restacking the garment parts in the process of applying the center plaits to the garment panels impede the garment manufacturing process, increase the probability of misplacing garment parts in the manufacturing process, and are costly.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Briefly described, the present invention comprises an automatic garment cutting and stacking method and apparatus wherein the overhanging ends of the center plait of a shirt or similar garment are cut at the neck area and tail area of the garment as the garment leaves the sewing machine. The leading or upper end of the center plait is cut with a curved cut that corresponds to the curvature of the neck opening of the garment piece, and the trailing or lower end of the center plait is cut with a straight cut which is approximately coextensive with the lower or trailing edge of the garment piece. As the trailing end of the center plait is cut, a stacker grasps the garment piece and moves it away from the sewing machine to a stacking area. The garment stacker responds to the movement of the trailing end of the garment piece as it moves from beneath the sewing head of the sewing machine to the cutter. The stacking area to which the garments are moved comprises a conveyor mechanism which is indexed by the worker at the sewing station when a bunch of garment pieces has been processed through the sewing machine cutter and stacker, so that the bunches of garment portions maintain their identity.

Thus, it is an object of this invention to provide an automatic garment cutting and stacking method and apparatus for cutting the leading and trailing ends of the center plait of a garment and for stacking the garment parts.

Another object of this invention is to provide a method and apparatus for cutting and stacking garment parts in response to the movement of the garment parts from a sewing machine.

Another object of this invention is to provide apparatus for automatically cutting and stacking garment parts which is inexpensive to construct, inexpensive to operate, which eliminates the manual steps of stacking, cutting and restacking the garment parts, and which enables the sewing machine operator to work at a high rate of speed.

Other objects, features and advantages of the present invention will become apparent upon reading the following specification when taken into conjunction with the accompanying drawing.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 illustrates the manner in which a center plait is attached to a front panel of a shirt or similar garment.

FIG. 2 is a schematic perspective view of the garment sewing station which shows the garment cutter and stacker.

FIG. 3 is a detailed showing of the cutter.

FIG. 4 is a schematic illustration of the control system for the garment cutter and stacker of FIG. 2.

FIG. 5 illustrates the manner in which a center plait is attached to the front panel of a garment that has no from opening in the garment, such as a woman's dress.

FIG. 6 is a schematic perspective view of a sewing station which includes the modified garment cutter and modified garment stacker.

FIG. 7 is a detailed showing of the cutter of FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is a detailed perspective showing of the cutter of FIGS. 6 and 7.

FIG. 9 is a schematic illustration of the control mechanism utilized for the garment cutter and stacker of FIG. 6.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now in more detail to the drawing, in which like numerals indicate like parts throughout the several views, FIG. 1 illustrates a partially completed shirt section 10 which includes a shirt front panel 11 and a center plait I2. The shirt front panel 11 includes side edge 14 which is normally connected to the back panel of the shirt, tail edge 15, shoulder edge 16, arm openings edge 17, neck opening edge 18, and center opening edge 19 at the center of the garment. Center plait 12 is applied to the exterior surface of the shirt front panel 11 at center opening edge 19 by stitching along the side edges of the center plait. The overlying leading and trailing ends 20 and 21 at the upper and lower ends of the shirt front panel II are cut away from the garment part with a cut 22 at the neck opening edge 18 which is curved and is approximately coextensive with the curved neck opening edge. The trailing end 21 is cut away with a straight out 24 which is approximately coextensive with the tail edge I5 of the shirt front panel I]. Cuts 22 and 24 were performed manually in the prior art processes and are performed automatically as the garment part is processed from the sewing machine, as will be described hereinafter.

As is illustrated in FIG. 2 a sewing station 25 includes a work table or platform 26 upon which a sewing machine 28 having sewing head 29 is mounted in the usual manner. In addition, a garment puller 30, cutter apparatus 31 and control box 32 are also mounted on work table 26. Stacker 34 and conveyor 35 are mounted behind and adjacent work table 26.

Garment puller 30 comprises brush puller 36 and roller puller 38. Brush puller 36 includes motor housing 39 mounted behind the base of sewing machine 28 and rotatable brush head 40 which is driven in the direction as indicated by arrow 41 by a motor (not shown) in motor housing 39. The motor is actuated by a switch connected to the operator's foot pedal so that the brush puller will be operated during the operation of the sewing head. A plurality of groups of brush bristles 42 extend radially outwardly from brush head 40 and brush across the surface of work table 26 in the direction as indicated by arrow 41. The groups of brush bristles 42 are spaced generally in alignment with the gap 44 between sewing head 29 and the base of sewing machine 28, so that the bristles will engage the material passing through the gap of the sewing machine. Also, brush puller 36 is angled at approximately 10 away from the path of the material passing through gap 44, so that the groups of brush bristles 42 will tend to slightly stretch the material away from sewing head 29 and remove any folds or wrinkles from the material with a gentle sweeping motion. The gentle engagement of the groups of brush bristles 42 with the material causes a light force to be applied to the material as the material passes through sewing head 29 and this light force is enough to cause the material to move through gap 44 with the operation of the sewing head.

Roll puller 38 is positioned behind and in alignment with sewing head 29. Drive shaft 44 extends between roll puller 38 and housing 45, is connected therebetween by means of universal joints, and includes a telescoping slip joint 47 for flexibility. Belt 46 is connected to the sewing machine drive mechanism (not shown) into sheave 48 of housing 45, and sheave 48 is connected through drive gears (not shown) in housing to drive shaft 44 of roll puller 38. The arrangement is such that roll puller 38 operates in unison with sewing machine 28 and the surface speed of roller puller 38 is adjustable and usually maintained slightly faster than the surface speed of sewing machine 28. Thus, when the material from sewing head 29 reaches roll puller 38, no slack will occur in the material as it is pushed from the sewing head.

Cutter apparatus 31 is positioned in alignment with sewing head 29 and roll puller 38 and includes support bracket 50, pneumatic ram 51, pusher bar 52 and coil tension springs 54 and 55. Curved cutter blade 56 and straight cutter blade 58 are positioned below support bracket in opening 59 of work table 26. Curved cutter blade 56 is pivoted at one of its ends about the support axle 60, while straight cutter blade 58 is pivotally supported at one of its ends about axle 61. Axle support blocks 62 and 63 are spaced apart on work table 26, and axle and 61 extend through aligned openings in the support blocks. Coil compression spring 64 bears against rear axle support block 63 and collar 65 is attached to axle 60, to urge axle 60 and its curved cutter blade 56 toward the leading edge 66 of opening 59 in work table 26. Coil compression spring 68 bears on axle support block 52 and collar 69 which is attached to axle 61, to urge axle 61 and straight cutter blade 58 toward trailing edge 70 of opening 59 in work table 26. Coil tension springs 54 and 55 are attached at their upper ends to support bracket 50 and at their lower ends to cutter blade 56 and 58, to hold the cutter blades up out of opening 59 in work table 26 against the cross bar of the T-shaped pusher bar 52. A coil compression spring 71 (FIG. 4) inside pneumatic ram 51 normally maintains pusher bar 52 in its retracted position, which allows cutter blades 56 and 58 to stay in their pivoted up positions, as illustrated. When pneumatic ram 51 is actuated, pusher bar 52 will cause cutter blades 56 and 58 to move down into opening 59 in work table 26 with a scissors action with respect to the leading and trailing edges 66 and 70 of openings 59, to perform a cutting action.

The radius of curvature of the curved cutting blade 56 is greater than the radius of curvature of the leading edge 66 of cutter opening 59. Since the base of the curved cutter blade 56 is received within the confines of cutter blade opening 59 before any movement of the cutter blade occurs, the downward pivotal movement of curved cutter blade 56 together with the resilience of coil compression spring 64 will allow the cutting edge of the cutter blade to walk along or progressively contact the leading edge 66 of the cutter blade opening 59. Cutter apparatus 31 is positioned so that the normal path of the center plait 12 of the shirt front panel 11 will pass beneath cutter blades 56 and 58 at a distance away from the base of each of the cutter blades, so that if any bounce or vibration is experienced in curved cutter blade 56 as it engages the leading edge of 66 of cutter blade opening 59, the curved cutter blade will have had time to recover from such bounce or vibration and accurately perform its cutting function on center plait 12.

Stacker 34 is positioned behind work table 26 and includes a pair of bearing blocks 72 and 73 spaced apart from each other on a support (not shown), and a generally Z-shaped pick-up or stacker arm 75 has its lower leg 76 rotatably sup ported in bearing blocks 72 and 73. The center leg 77 extends upwardly from bearing blocks 72 and 73 to a position generally above the trailing edge of the work table 26, and upper leg 78 extends generally parallel to the trailing edge of the work table. Clamp mechanism 80 is supported at the upper end of the stacker arm 75 includes clamp plate 81 which is rigidly connected to the upper leg 78 of stacker arm 75 and movable clamp plate 82 which moves back and forth and into and out of engagement with stationary clamp plate 81. Pneumatic clamp ram 84 is mounted on the center leg 77 of stacker arm 75, and it's drive shaft 86 is connected to crank link 88 of movable clamp plate 82, so that when drive shaft 86 is extended from clamp ram 84, crank link 88 will cause movable clamp plate 82 to move toward stationary clamp plate 81 with a clamping or grasping motion.

Extension arm 89 projects laterally from center leg 77 of stacker arm 75, and lost motion bracket 90 has its elongated slot 91 extending about the extension arm. Coil compression spring 92 is positioned in slot 91 and normally urges extension arm 89 toward the end of slot 91 adjacent work table 26. Lost motion bracket 90 is connected to the end of drive shaft 94 of double acting pneumatic stacker arm ram 95.

Holding plate 96 is rigidly connected to lower leg 76 of stacker arm 75 between bearing blocks 72 and 73, and pneumatic holding ram 98 is positioned so that its drive shaft 99 engages holding plate 96 when the drive shaft projects from the ram, to hold stacker arm 75 in a raised position away from the trailing edge of work table 26. When pneumatic holding ram 98 allows its drive shaft 99 to retract, stacker arm 75 will be allowed to move toward work table 26 under the influence of coil compression spring 92 of lost motion bracket 90 of stacker ram 95.

Bleed valves 100, 101 and 102 are positioned at the end of lower leg 76 of stacker arm 75, and earns 104, 105 and 106 are arranged to actuate the bleed valves upon the rotation of lower leg 76 of stacker arm 75.

Conveyor 35 is positioned in spaced relationship behind work table 26, generally between the end of the stroke of stacker arm 75 and the work table. Conveyor 35 comprises a pair of spaced apart V-belts 108 and 109 mounted about sheaves 110, 111, and 112, with sheave 112 being driven by electric motor 114. The upper flights of V-belts 108 and 109 are approximately horizontal and they are usually arranged parallel to the trailing edge of work table 26 and positioned in alignment with the movement of clamp mechanism 80 of stacker 34. V-belts 108 and 109 are normally stationary, and electric motor 114 is actuated to drive the V-belts by a switch at the sewing station operators position. The arrangement is such that the operation can stack garment parts upon conveyor 35 until a bunch of garment parts is stacked in a pile on the conveyor belt, and the operator can then energize motor 114 to drive the conveyor belt and move the stacked bunch out of alignment with stacker 34 and the subsequent bunches being processed from the sewing station can be stacked in an empty location on the conveyor. The stacks of garment parts can be allowed to accumulate along the length of the conveyor, if desired.

As is illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 4, the control mechanism for causing cutter apparatus 31 and stacker 34 to function is energized by photocell 115 which is positioned between sewing machine 28 and cutter apparatus 31, generally in alignment with the gap 44 of sewing machine 28. Photocell 115 is arranged so that it will detect the presence or absence of a shirt front panel 11 passing from sewing machine 28 by sensing darkness or light as the shirt front panel covers and then exposes the photocell.

As is illustrated in FIG. 4, a source of air pressure 116 is provided to pressurize the flow lines of the system through filter 118 and flow regulator 119. The photocell 115 and control are illustrated in both the upper and lower portions of P16. 4, but it will be understood that only one photocell and control are necessary to cause the system to function properly. When photocell 115 senses a change from light to dark, as when a shoulder edge 16 of a shirt front panel 11 is passing through the gap 44 of sewing machine 28, solenoid 121 will be energized to shift and return valve spool 122 of solenoid 123 and create a flow of air from flow conduit 124 to flow conduit 125. The air passing through flow conduit 125 will be received in the left end of shuttle valve 126 and cause valve spool 128 to move to the right. This causes the pressurized air flow conduit 124 to communicate with the upper end of pneumatic cutter ram 51 and the left end of shuttle valve 126. Pneumatic cutter ram will then act against the compression of its spring 71 to thrust its pusher bar 52 in a downward direction against the upper edges of cutter blades 56 and 58 to cause the cutter blades to move downward in a scissors action in the opening in the work table. Since the curved cutter blade 56 is positioned so that it extends generally across the path of travel of the center plait 12 of the garment and is located closer to the sewing machine than straight cutter blade 58, the curved cutter blade 56 will function to cut the leading end of center plait 12 (FIG. 1). Of course, the curvature of curved cutter blade 56 is chosen to match the curvature of the neck opening edge 18 of the shirt front panel 11 and the cut made in the center plait 12 will be approximately coextensive with the neck opening edge 18.

Since the shifting of solenoid valve 23 is only instantaneous, flow conduit 125 will be vented through solenoid valve 23 upon the return of valve spool 122, and the pressure on the left end of valve spool 128 of shuttle valve 126 will be depleted while the spring 71 in cutter ram 51 will tend to maintain the pressure in cutter ram 51 and on the right end of shuttle valves spool 128. This causes valve spool 128 to shift back to the left, so that cutter ram 51 will be allowed to bleed rapidly through shuttle valve 126 instead of having to bleed back through flow conduit 125 through solenoid valve 123. This arrangement causes a quick return of cutter ram 51 and cutter blade 56 and 58.

Control 120 is programmed so that when photocell 115 de tects a change from light to dark, only cutter apparatus 31 will be energized and stacker 34 will remain dormant.

When photocell 115 detects a change from darkness to light, as when the tail edge 15 of the shirt front panel passes over the photocell, cutter apparatus 31 will be energized again in a manner similar to that previously described. In addition, control 120 is programmed to begin the movement of stacker 34. Solenoid 130 is momentarily shifted to open bleed valve 131. Bleed valve 131 is connected to the end of holding ram shuttle valve 132. Since flow conduit 139 is connected to the source of air pressure 116 and its branch conduits 135 and 136 communicate with the ends of shuttle valve 132, bleed valve 131 will deplete the pressure in the lower end of shuttle valve 132 and allow its valve shuttle 133 to move in a downward direction. This causes the pressure from flow conduit 139 which was previously in communication with pneumatic holding ram 98 to terminate its communication with this ram, and the ram is then bled through shuttle valve 132 to the atmosphere. This results in the retraction of ram drive shaft 99 from holding plate 96 and allows stacker arm 75 to pivot about its lower leg 76 toward the trailing edge of work table 26.

The downward pivoting movement of stacker arm 75 causes cam 104 to engage bleed valve 100. Bleed valve 100 communicates with the lower end of clamp shuttle valve 138 through flow line 134. Clamp shuttle valve 138 communicates with flow conduit 124, and the ends of the valve shuttle 140 are pressurized. When bleed valve 100 is opened, the pressure is exhausted from the lower end of valve shuttle 140 causing the valve shuttle to move in a downward direction. Prior to the downward movement of valve shuttle 140, the pressure from flow conduit 124 had not been allowed to flow through clamp shuttle valve 138, and when valve shuttle 140 is moved in a downward direction, pressure communicates through clamp shuttle valve 138 with clamp ram 84, causing its drive shaft 86 to extend out of the ram and urge movable clamp plate 82 against stationary clamp plate 81 through crank link 88.

Bleed valve 100 also communicates with the lower end of arm shuttle valve 141. Arm shuttle 141 communicates with the flow conduit 124 and its ends are charged with air pressure. When the lower end of arm shuttle valve is exhausted through bleed valve 100, valve shuttle 142 moves in a downward direction. Prior to its downward movement, the air pressure from flow conduit 124 communicated with the upper end of stacker arm ram 95. Upon downward movement of valve shuttle 142, the air pressure communicates with the lower end of stacking cylinder 95 and the upper end of stacking cylinder 95 is allowed to bleed through arm shuttle valve 141 to the atmosphere. Thus, stacker arm 75 is pivoted around its lower end away from work table 26 and generally over conveyor 35.

As stacker arm 75 moves away from work table 26 and generally over conveyor 35, bleed valve 101 will be engaged by its cam and will function to bleed the upper end of clamp shuttle valve 138, causing valve shuttle 140 to move in an upward direction. This causes the pressure from flow conduit 124 to be cut off from clamp ram 84 and clamp ram 84 is bled to the atmosphere. The coil compression spring 87 of clamp ram 84 then causes drive shaft 86 of clamp ram 84 to be retracted into the ram, and movable clamp plate 82 will be moved away from stationary clamp 81, thereby releasing the material grasped by clamp mechanism 80.

Further movement of stacker arm 75 away from work table 26 causes bleed valve 102 to be engaged by its cam, which functions to bleed the upper ends of holding ram shuttle valve 132 and arm shuttle valve 141. When holding ram shuttle valve 132 is bled in this manner, its valve shuttle 133 moves in an upward direction which causes the air pressure from air flow conduit 139 to be directed to holding ram 98, thus causing its drive shaft to protrude. When the air pressure is bled from the upper end of arm shuttle valve 141, its valve shuttle 142 moves in an upward direction, thereby diverting the air pressure from the lower end of stacker arm ram 95 to the upper end thereof, which causes stacker arm 75 to reverse its direction of movement.

As stacker arm 75 moves back toward work table 26, it will be engaged by the drive shaft 99 of holding ram 98, so that its clamp mechanism is held away from the edge of work table 26. Coil compression spring 92 in lost motion bracket of stacking ram allows the stacking ram to fully retract while accommodating the position of stacker arm 75. In this position, stacker 34 is ready for another cycle and will respond to photocell when the photocell senses a change from dark to light.

As is illustrated in H6. 5, some garments are of such width or breadth that the arrangement of the cutting blades in the cutter apparatus 31 of P16. 2 will not accommodate the garments, and the lengths of the garments are so short or so long that their stacking movements must be precisely controlled. As an example, the front panel of a woman's dress or shift is illustrated which includes a center neck opening edge 151, shoulder edges 152, arm opening edges 153, side edges 154, and tail edge 155. The center plait 156 must be attached to the center of the garment part at the center of the neck opening edge 151 and the width of the garment part and the placement of center plait 156 at the center of the garment part is such that cutter apparatus 31 of P16. 2 would not accommodate the garment part in performing the cutting function on the ends of the center plait. To accommodate the placement of the center plait on the relatively wide garment, cutter mechanism 161 (FIG. 6) is provided which is positioned behind sewing machine 128. The cutter mechanism 161 includes a pair of inverted U-shaped support bars 162 mounted upon work table 26 and braced by struts 163. Support bars 162 define a passage or tunnel 164 of a width extending across a major portion of the width of the work table. Support plate 165 is connected to and is supported between support bars 162, alignment plate 166 is positioned vertically above support plate 165, and ram support plate 168 is positioned vertically above alignment support plate 166. Pneumatic cutter ram 169 is mounted on ram support plate 168, and alignment bearings 170 are positioned between ram support plate 168 and alignment plate 166. Guide tubes 171 extend between alignment plate 166 and support plate 165 and accommodate the movable shafts (not shown) of alignment bearings 170 and cutter ram 169.

Cutter housing 172 is positioned below support plate 165 and above and in alignment with the opening 174 in work table 26. As is illustrated in FIG. 8, curved cutter blade 175 is held in a blade support block 176 below cutter housing 172. Support pin extends from blade support block 176 in an upward direction through an opening in cutter housing 172 and boss 179 is rigidly connected to support pin 178 within the cutter housing. Leaf spring 180 is engaged at one end by set screw 181 and is bowed about upright screw 183 into engagement with extension 182 of boss 179. Thus, curved cutter blade 175 is urged to pivot about the axis of its support pin 178; however, abutment 185 is connected to cutter housing 172 and extends down below the lower limits of cutter housing 172 into the path of blade support block 176. Set screw 186 extends through abutment 185 to adjustably engage blade 175 and limit the movement of curved cutter blade 175. The arrangement is such that curved cutter blade 175 will always be urged toward the leading edge 186 of the cutter opening 174 in the work table 26.

Straight cutter blade 188 is supported in its blade support block 189 on the rear of cutter housing 172. Blade support block 189 of straight blade 188 is rigidly connected to cutter housing 172 and is positioned to move closely adjacent the trailing edge 190 of cutter blade opening 174 in the work table. Thus, curved cutter blade 175 and straight cutter blade 188 move with a guillotine motion with respect to cutter blade opening 174, and the path across the work table 26 beneath cutter mechanism 161 is thus unencumbered for the entire width of the passage 164 beneath support bars 162. With this arrangement, the leading end 157 of the center plait 156 will be cut by curved cutter blade 175 with a curved cut 159 while the trailing end 158 of the center plait will be cut with a straight cut by straight cutter blade 188.

As is illustrated in FIG. 7, curved cutter blade 175 has a radius of curvature which is greater than the curvature ofleading edge 186 of cutter blade opening 174. While the enlarged base portion of the cutter blade is positioned so that it will always be received in the confines of cutter blade opening 174, its smaller end overlaps leading edge 186 of the cutter blade opening 174. With this arrangement, when curved cutter blade 175 is thrust in a downward direction, its enlarged base end will be received in cutter blade opening 174 and the inclined cutting edge 177 of the blade will progressively en gage the leading edge 186 of the cutter blade opening 174, across the leading edge 186 and along the inclined curved edge 177 of the cutter blade.

Cutter housing 172 is positioned with respect to the sewing head of the sewing machine so that the center plait 156 of the garment will normally travel beneath the inclined portion of the curved cutter blade, and when the curved cutter blade is moving in a downward direction, its base and a portion of its inclined edge adjacent the base will be received in the cutter opening 174 before the inclined portion of the blade makes engagement with the leading edge 186 of cutter blade opening 174. As the cutter blade moves further into blade opening 174 it engages the center plait of the garment. With this arrangement, if any lateral blade bounce or vibration is encountered in the movement of the cutting blade in a downward direction upon its initial engagement with the leading edge 186 of cutter blade opening 174, the bounce or vibration will have been dampened by the time the center plait of the garment is engaged by the cutting edge of the cutting blade. Ofcourse, the amplitude of the bounce or vibration can be controlled to a certain extent by adjustment of screw bearing 183 in cutter housing 172.

As is illustrated in FIG. 6, stacker 194 is positioned behind work table 26 and includes support frame 195, spaced apart upwardly extending parallel drive arms 196 and 197, and a pair of spaced apart downwardly extending support arms 198 and 199. Drive arms 196 and 197 are pivotally connected at their lower ends to frame 195, and support arms 198 and 199 are pivotally connected at their upper ends to the movable upper ends of drive arms 196 and 197 respectively. Crank linkages 200 and 201 are mounted at the sides of the frame 195 adjacent the drive and support arms, and each crank linkage includes an upwardly extending link 202 pivotally connected at its lower end to frame and pivotally connected at its upper end to one end of lateral link 203. The other end of lateral link 203 is rigidly connected to a support arm 198 or 199 by means of connecting strut 205. Thus, the connecting strut 205, support arms I98 and 199, and the lateral links 203 of the crank linkages 200 and 201 are rigidly connected together. Thus, when the drive arms 196 and 197 move in unison in the directions indicated by arrow 206, crank linkages 200 and 201 will cause the lower ends of support arms 198 and 199 to move in unison and in the directions indicated by arrow 208. It should be noted that when drive arms, 196 and 197 move away from work table 26, the upper ends of support arms 198 and 199 will be carried with the drive arms and the crank linkages 200 and 201 will cause the lower ends of support arms 198 and 199 to move in the same direction. The arrangement is such that the lower ends of support arms 198 and 199 will move in a generally lateral direction without any substantial change in elevation.

A pair of clamp struts 209 and 210 are pivotally connected at their ends to the lower ends of support arms 198 and 199. Engaging gears 211 and 212 are rigidly connected to clamp struts 209 and 210 causing these struts to move in unison, but in opposite rotational directions. Clamp plates 213 and 214 are rigidly connected to clamp struts 209 and 210 and are rotatable with toward and away from each other with a clamping or grasping movement. Clamp plates 213 and 214 are arranged to move toward each other and engage the lateral ledge of the L-shaped plate 216 extending from the trailing edge of work table 26. When the clamp plates 213 and 214 are opened and are away from each other, the lateral ledge 216 at the edge of the work table will be unencumbered.

Pneumatic clamp ram 218 is connected to support arm 199 and its drive shaft 219 operates crank 220 connected to clamp strut 210 to provide rotational movement to clamp struts 209 and 210.

Drive arm ram 221 is connected to frame and its drive shaft 222 is connected to drive arm 196 to provide movement to drive arms 196 and 197 and support arms 198 and 199.

Conveyor 224 is positioned beneath frame 195 at a position generally at the end of the movement of clamp plates 213 and 214 away from work table 26. Conveyor 224 is generally similar to conveyor 35 of FIG. 2.

Bleed valves 225 and 226 are mounted on frame 195 and arranged to be engaged by the movement of drive arm 197. As an alternative, these valves can be made responsive to cams connected to a drive arm 196 or 197 in a manner similar to the bleed valves 100, 101 and 102 in FIG. 2.

Photocells 228 and 229 are positioned behind sewing machine 28 and on opposite sides of the path usually travelled by the center plait of a garment passing from sewing head 29. Photocells 228 and 229 are arranged so that either one or the other photocells will function to control the system, as will be explained hereinafter. A switch is provided (not shown) for switching to one or the other of the photocells.

As is illustrated in FIG. 9, when a garment passing from sewing head 29 causes a photocell 228 or 229 to sense a change from light to dark, cutter mechanism 161 will be energized through an air flow arrangement identical to that illustrated in FIG. 4 and the stacker 194 will not be energized until the photocell senses a change from dark to light.

When the change is detected photocell 228 causes a momentary actuation of solenoid 240 which shifts bleed valve 241 to its open position to vent the lower end of clamp shuttle valve 236. Since both ends of the shuttle valve are charged by flow conduit 234, the shuttle 238 shifts to the lower vented end of the valve housing and the high pressure air from air flow conduit 234 then charges clamp ram 218 to close clamp plates 213 and 214 toward each other against the bias to the internal spring 239 within the clamp ram. Thus, clamp plates 213 and 214 come together with their grasping motion at the protruding lateral edge 216 of work table 26.

As clamp plates 213 and 214 engage the protruding edge 216 of the work table, solenoid 230 is momentarily actuated in response to photocell 228 and a controlled delay. Solenoid 230 causes bleed valve 231 to evacuate the lower end of shuttle valve 232 and since flow conduit 234 charges both ends of arm shuttle valve 232, the evacuation of the lower end of the shuttle valve causes the valve shuttle 235 to move in a downward direction and air flow conduit 234 then communicates through arm shuttle valve 232 to the lower end of stacker ram 221. This causes the lower end of stacker ram 221 to be charged with pressure while the upper end of the stacker ram is vented to the atmosphere and drive arms [96 and 197 are moved away from work table 26.

As drive arm 197 approaches the end of its outward movement, it engages bleed valve 225, which functions to bleed the upper end of clamp shuttle valve 236, causing valve shuttle 238 to move in an upward direction. This blocks the pressure from air flow conduit 234 to clamp ram 218. and bleeds clamp ram 218 to the atmosphere. The coil compression spring 239 within the clamp ram 218 then causes ram drive shaft 219 to retract and open clamp plates 213 and 214. [n the meantime, further backward movement of drive arms 196 and 197 causes drive arm 197 to engage bleed valve 226 which vents the upper end of arm shuttle valve 232 causing its valve shuttle 235 to move in an upward direction. This causes the lower end of stacker ram 221 to be bled to the atmosphere and pressurizes the upper end of the stacker ram, causing the drive arms 196 and 197 to reverse their movement and generally move back toward work table 26.

This mode of operation causes the material passing from sewing machine 28 to be grasped by stacker 194 as the material passes beyond photocells 228 and 229 and to be carried toward conveyor 224. When the material has been moved above the conveyor, it will be released and will fall to the conveyor. The stacker then returns to its ready position where it is available for the next garment portion passing from sewing machine 28.

The configuration of stacker 194 is such that garments of virtually any length can be handled by merely repositioning conveyor 224 at the desired location beneath frame 195. For instance, to accommodate an extremely long garment conveyor 224 would be placed close to work table 226, so that the portion of the garment grasped by clamp plates 213 and 214 would be carried well beyond the conveyor, and the garment would tend to have its center portion draped over the conveyor. To stack a smaller garment, conveyor 224 would be moved away from work table 26, so that the stacker would tend to lay the center portion of the garment across the conveyor.

The configuration of cutter apparatus 161 and its support is such that garments of a width as wide as the passage 164 beneath support bars 162 can be accommodated, and the cutter will tend to cut the portion of the garment passing from cutter had 29.

While this invention has been described in detail with particular reference to preferred embodiments thereof, it will be understood that variations and modifications can be effected within the spirit and scope of the invention as described hereinbefore and as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A method of attaching a center plait to a garment part of a shirt or the like comprising:

matching the center plait with a garment part with the ends of the center plait extending beyond the limits of the garment part,

progressively passing the matched center plait and garment part through a sewing machine and stitching the center plait to the garment part with the sewing machine,

cutting the leading end of the center plait at a position approximately coextensive with the leading edge of the garment part while the center plait is being stitched to the garment part cutting the trailing end of the center plait at a position approximately coextensive with the trailing edge of the garment part as the center plait moves away from the sewing machine.

2. The method of claim 1 and wherein the step of cutting the leading end of the center plait comprises cutting the leading end of the center plait with a curved cut.

3. The method of claim 1 and wherein the step of cutting the leading end of the center plait comprises cutting the leading end of the center plait as the leading edge of the garment part reaches a predetermined position.

4. The method of claim 1 and wherein the step of cutting the trailing end of the center plait comprises cutting the trailing end of the center plait as the trailing edge of the garment part reaches a predetermined position.

5. The method of claim 1 and further including the step of grasping the garment part and center plait as the garment part and center plait move away from the sewing machine and moving the garment part and center plait to a remote location.

6. The method of claim 1 and further including the step of grasping the garment part and center plait as the trailing edge of the garment part reaches a predetermined position and moving the garment part and center plait to a remote location.

Claims (6)

1. A method of attaching a center plait to a garment part of a shirt or the like comprising: matching the center plait with a garment part with the ends of the center plait extending beyond the limits of the garment part, progressively passing the matched center plait and garment part through a sewing machine and stitching the center plait to the garment part with the sewing machine, cutting the leading end of the center plait at a position approximately coextensive with the leading edge of the garment part while the center plait is being stitched to the garment part, cutting the trailing end of the center plait at a position approximately coextensive with the trailing edge of the garment part as the center plait moves away from the sewing machine.
2. The method of claim 1 and wherein the step of cutting the leading end of the center plait comprises cutting the leading end of the center plait with a curved cut.
3. The method of claim 1 and wherein the step of cutting the leading end of the center plait comprises cutting the leading end of the center plait as the leading edge of the garment part reaches a predetermined position.
4. The method of claim 1 and wherein the step of cutting the trailing end of the center plait comprises cutting the trailing end of the center plait as the trailing edge of the garment part reaches a predetermined position.
5. The method of claim 1 and further including the step of grasping the garment part and center plait as the garment part and center plait move away from the sewing machine and moving the garment part and center plait to a remote location.
6. The method of claim 1 and further including the step of grasping the garment part and center plait as the trailing edge of the garment part reaches a predetermined position and moving the garment part and center plait to a remote location.
US3675604D 1970-10-08 1970-10-08 Garment cutting and stacking method Expired - Lifetime US3675604A (en)

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US7903170A true 1970-10-08 1970-10-08
US24375372A true 1972-04-13 1972-04-13
US05391645 US3871309A (en) 1970-10-08 1973-08-27 Shirt front assembly, method and apparatus
US05467052 US3886879A (en) 1970-10-08 1974-05-06 Shirt front assembly, method and apparatus

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US05391645 Expired - Lifetime US3871309A (en) 1970-10-08 1973-08-27 Shirt front assembly, method and apparatus
US05467052 Expired - Lifetime US3886879A (en) 1970-10-08 1974-05-06 Shirt front assembly, method and apparatus

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US05467052 Expired - Lifetime US3886879A (en) 1970-10-08 1974-05-06 Shirt front assembly, method and apparatus

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US3780682A (en) 1973-12-25
US3871309A (en) 1975-03-18
US3886879A (en) 1975-06-03

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