US3666750A - Hemostatic material - Google Patents

Hemostatic material Download PDF

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US3666750A
US3666750A US3666750DA US3666750A US 3666750 A US3666750 A US 3666750A US 3666750D A US3666750D A US 3666750DA US 3666750 A US3666750 A US 3666750A
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oxidized
material
cellulose
cellulosic
borohydride
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Theodore S Briskin
Allen H Remanick
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Johnson and Johnson
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Johnson and Johnson
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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C08ORGANIC MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS; THEIR PREPARATION OR CHEMICAL WORKING-UP; COMPOSITIONS BASED THEREON
    • C08BPOLYSACCHARIDES; DERIVATIVES THEREOF
    • C08B15/00Preparation of other cellulose derivatives or modified cellulose, e.g. complexes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L15/00Chemical aspects of, or use of materials for, bandages, dressings or absorbent pads
    • A61L15/16Bandages, dressings or absorbent pads for physiological fluids such as urine or blood, e.g. sanitary towels, tampons
    • A61L15/22Bandages, dressings or absorbent pads for physiological fluids such as urine or blood, e.g. sanitary towels, tampons containing macromolecular materials
    • A61L15/28Polysaccharides or their derivatives
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L2400/00Materials characterised by their function or physical properties
    • A61L2400/04Materials for stopping bleeding

Abstract

A new and improved hemostatic material formed of an oxidized cellulosic material and method for its preparation wherein an oxidized cellulosic material is treated with a borohydride under alkaline conditions.

Description

Unite States Patent Briskin et al.

[151 3,666,750 51 May 30, 1972 [5 4] HEMOSTATIC MATERIAL [72] Inventors: Theodore S. Briskin, Beverly Hills; Allen 11. Remanick, Pasadena, both of Calif.

[73] Assignee: Johnson & Johnson, New Brunswick, NJ. [22] Filed: Dec. 15, 1969 [2]] Appl. No.: 885,313

[52] U.S. Cl ..260/212, 128/156, 128/325,

424/ 180 [51] Int. Cl ..A61l 15/00, C08b 15/02, C08b 23/02 [58] Field ofSearch ..260/212; 131/2; 128/325 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,122,479 2/1964 Smith ..128/325 Primary Examiner-Donald E. Czaja Assistant Examiner-Ronald W. Grifiin Attorney-Harold 1.. Warner and Ralph T. Lilore ABSTRACT A new and improved hemostatic material formed of an oxidized cellulosic material and method for its preparation wherein an oxidized cellulosic material is treated with a borohydride under alkaline conditions.

6 Claims, No Drawings This invention relates to materials for the control of bleeding, and more particularly to hemostatic material formed of oxidized cellulose.

it is known that cellulosic material may be selectively oxidized with nitrogen dioxide to convert more than 90 percent of the methylol groups in the cellulosic molecule to yield a product which may be referred to as an oxycellulose or polyuronic acid. It is similarly known, as illustrated by US. Pat. Nos. 1,197,400 and 2,232,990, that oxidized cellulose may be used as a hemostatic material for the control of bleeding. The use of oxycellulose as compared to other hemostatic materials heretofore known, such as conventional gauze pads and the like treated with ferric chloride, thrombin, etc., represents a significant improvement since oxycellulose may be left in a closed wound without the result of a severe local tissue reaction in response to the presence of foreign material.

However, the primary disadvantage of hemostatic materials formed of oxidized cellulose heretofore known is that they lack stability whereby they must be used within a short time after manufacture, or they must be stored under refrigeration. Various attempts to overcome this disadvantage, such as by the washing of oxidized cellulose after oxidation with an anhydrous alcohol as suggested by U.S. Pat. No. 3,364,200, have been made. However, such attempts have generally been unsuccessful in that the use of an anhydrous alcohol is expensive, and does not significantly increase the stability of the resulting oxidized cellulose.

It is accordingly an object of the present invention to provide a new and improved hemostatic material formed of oxidized cellulose which is stable at room temperatures, and need not be stored under refrigeration.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a simple and inexpensive method for treating oxidized cellulose to improve the thermal stability of oxidized cellulose for use in hemostatic materials.

These and other objects and advantages of the present invention will appear hereinafter, and, it will be understood that the following specific examples are provided by way of illustration, and not by way of limitation, of the concepts of the present invention.

The present invention is addressed to a method for the treatment of an oxidized cellulosic material in order to improve the thermal stability of the oxidized cellulosic material when used as a hemostatic material. The oxidized cellulose to be treated in accordance with the practice of the present invention may be derived from any of a wide variety of cellulosic material, including but not limited to wood pulp, cotton, cotton linters, ramie, jute, paper, hemp, regenerated cellulose or rayon as well as a wide variety of others known to those skilled in the art. However, it is generally preferred to make use of cellulose in the form of cotton or regenerated cellulose, such as that prepared by the viscose process, because of their greater purity. The oxidized cellulosic material may be in the form of a knit or a woven fabric, such as gauze or in a fibrous thread or film form.

The oxidized cellulosic material may be prepared by the selective oxidation using nitrogen dioxide, using a wide variety of techniques. For example, it is possible to form the oxidized cellulosic material by treatment of the raw cellulosic material with liquid nitrogen dioxide in the ratio of 1 part by weight cellulose per 5-1 ,000 parts by weight liquid nitrogen dioxide, and preferably 1 part by weight cellulosic material to 25-50 parts by weight of the liquid nitrogen dioxide, as disclosed in copending application, Ser. No. 745,221, filed July 16, 1968, now U.S. Pat. No. 3,516,416, issued June 23, 1970. The reaction described therein is carried out at a temperature of l5-65 C., and at autogenous pressure when the reaction temperature exceeds 21 C., the boiling point of nitrogen dioxide. Another method for effecting this oxidation is disclosed in copending application, Ser. No. 745,135, filed July 16, 1968, now US. Pat. No. 3,491,766, issued Jan. 27, 1970, wherein the oxidation reaction, including reaction rate and amount of conversion, is materially improved by formulation of the oxidation reaction mixture to contain up to 8 percent by weight water in the liquid nitrogen dioxide system and by carrying out the reaction at elevated temperatures, generally about 15 C., and preferably within the range of 2045 C., depending somewhat upon the amount of moisture present in the reaction medium, whereby the reaction medium is rendered relatively non-electrically conductive so that the presence of water in the reaction medium will not result in attack or degradation of the cellulosic material to be oxidized, and wherein the formulation to include aqueous medium in the reaction mixture of liquid nitrogen dioxide also operates to adjust the specific gravity of the reaction mixture in the direction toward the specific gravity of the cellulosic material whereby suspension of the cellulosic material in the reaction medium is easier to achieve and maintain. The result is a more rapid and uniform oxidation reaction of the cellulosic material to produce a higher quality product at a more rapid rage.

It is also possible, and frequently preferred in accordance with the practice of the present invention, to employ an oxidized cellulose which has been prepared by the selective oxidation of cellulose with gaseous nitrogen dioxide or a mixture of gaseous nitrogen dioxide and nitric oxide. The reaction may be conveniently carried out by contacting the cellulose to be oxidized with the gaseous nitrogen oxide or oxides at a temperature within the range of 30-220 C. for a period of up to 40 hours to oxidize at least percent of the methylol groups present in the cellulose molecule.

A further method for effecting the gaseous phase oxidation of cellulose is disclosed in copending application, Ser. No. 774,064, filed Nov. 7, 1968, now US. Pat. No. 3,577,994, issued May II, 1971, wherein the cellulosic material is first wetted with a liquid nitrogen dioxide, which may optionally contain up to 8 percent by weight water, and then is exposed to hot gaseous nitrogen dioxide. This particular method can be advantageously used in the form of a continuous process for the production of large quantities of oxidized cellulosic material.

The concepts of the present invention reside in a process for the treatment of oxidized cellulosic material, independent of the method by which the cellulosic material is oxidized, with a borohydride under alkaline conditions to improve the thermal stability of the treated oxidized cellulose during storage. In accordance with the practice of the present invention, an oxidized cellulosic material is treated with a borohydride, such as ammonium borohydride, an alkali metal borohydride (e.g.,' lithium borohydride, sodium borohydride, potassium borohydride, etc.) or an alkaline earth metal borohydride e. g., magnesium borohydride, calcium borohydride, etc.) at an alkaline pH. Thereafter the treated oxidized cellulose is washed with dilute acid to destroy the borohydride, and then washed again with alcohol to remove any remaining acid and dried. It has been found that oxidized cellulosic materials treated in this manner may be used as hemostatic materials which are completely stable at room temperatures, and can be stored for long periods of time without the need to store under refrigeration conditions.

The treatment of the oxidized cellulosic material with the borohydride may be conveniently carried out by placing the oxidized cellulosic material in contact with a water-alcohol mixture, and then raising the pH of the resulting mixture to at least 8.5, and preferably to a pH within the range of 9-12 by adding thereto a base, such as an alkali metal hydroxide or an ammonium hydroxide. Thereafter, the borohydride may be added to the basic oxycellulose-water-alcohol mixture to provide a ratio of 1 part by weight borohydride-for every l-lOO parts by weight of oxidized cellulose. The resulting solution containing the borohydride may then be allowed to stand at a temperature within the range of 0-70 C. for a period of 0.1 to 5 hours.

The water-alcohol mixture preferably comprises a mixture of water and an alkanol having one to five carbon atoms, such as methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, etc., wherein the alcohol is present in an amount constituting at least 20 percent by weight, and preferably 50-85 percent by weight, of the wateralcohol mixture. After the treatment with the borohydride has been completed, the treated oxidized cellulose may then be removed and washed with a dilute mineral acid, such as dilute hydrochloric acid or a mixture of dilute hydrochloric acid and an aliphatic alcohol, to destroy the borohydride and to remove any metal salts which may be present in the treated oxidized cellulosic material. Thereafter, the treated oxidized cellulosic material is preferably washed again with an alcohol to remove any acid remaining. The treated cellulose may then be dried and sterilized in a conventional manner, such as by the treatment of the oxidized cellulosic material with formaldehyde.

The following examples will serve to illustrate the principal concepts of the present invention.

EXAMPLE 1 A piece of cotton gauze is oxidized by contacting it with gaseous nitrogen dioxide for a period of 25 hours at 20 C. After the oxidation reaction is completed, the gauze of oxidized cellulose is washed with a mixture of equal parts by weight of water and ethanol to remove remaining nitrogen oxides and to prevent shrinkage.

Thereafter, the gauze of oxidized cellulose is immersed in a mixture of 70 percent by weight methanol and 30 percent by weight water, and a sufficient quantity of a solution of 0.5 N sodium hydroxide is added to raise the pH of the solution to about 10.5. Next, sodium borohydride is added to the solution to provide a ratio of 0.1 parts by weight sodium borohydride per 1 part oxidized cellulose. The oxidized cellulose is allowed to remain in contact with the borohydride solution for 1 hour at room temperature, and then the treated oxidized cellulose is removed from the solution, washed with dilute hydrochloric acid, and washed with ethanol.

The resulting product is dried and sterilized, and is found to have excellent stability at room temperatures.

It will be understood that the step of washing the oxidized cellulosic material with an aliphatic alcohol, such as methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, or water, or mixtures thereof prior to the borohydride treatment(the use of an ethanol-water mibtture as exemplified in Example 1 is an optional step. It is frequently preferred to wash the oxidized cellulosic material in this manner subsequent to oxidation in order to insure the dimensional stability and thereby avoid shrinkage.

EXAMPLE 2 A gauze pad formed of rayon is wetted with liquid nitrogen dioxide at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure, and allowed to dry until it has a dry appearance. Thereafter, the pad is exposed to gaseous nitrogen dioxide at atmospheric pressure at a temperature of 70 C. An oxidation level corresponding to oxidation of about 25 percent of methylol groups present is obtained.

Repetition of the foregoing cycle of wetting with nitrogen dioxide, drying and contacting with gaseous nitrogen dioxide is repeated until the oxidation level reaches at least 90 percent.

Thereafter, the pad is immersed in a methanol-water mixture containing 65 percent by weight methanol, and the pH of the solution is raised by adding sufficient 0.5 N KOH until the pH is about 10. Then, sodium borohydride is added to the solution in an amount to provide a ratio of about 0.2 parts by weight borohydride per 1 part of oxidized cellulose, and the oxidized cellulose is allowed to remain in contact with the solution for a period of 50 minutes.

The treated oxidized cellulose is then removed from the solution, washed with a dilute I-lCl-methanol mixture and washed again with ethanol. After drying and sterilization, the pad is found to have excellent stability at room temperatures.

EXAMPLE 3 A pad of cotton fibers is wetted with liquid nitrogen dioxide containing 2 percent water, and is then exposed, while still wet with liquid nitrogen dioxide, to hot gaseous nitrogen dioxide at 70 C. and atmospheric pressure. The cellulose is found to be 45 percent oxidized based upon the methylol groups in the cellulose.

The foregoing procedure is repeated until the cellulose is at least percent oxidized, and then the pad is washed with aqueous methanol. Thereafter, the pad is immersed in an ethanol-water mixture containing 75 percent by weight methanol, and the pH of the solution is raised to about 10 by adding 0.6 N NaOH.

Potassium borohydride is added, and the mixture is allowed to stand for 1.5 hours at ambient temperatures. The treated oxidized cellulose is removed from the solution, washed in the manner shown in Example 1 dried and sterilized.

The hemostatic materials of oxidized cellulose treated in accordance with the practice of the invention are susceptible to a wide variety of uses. Oxidized cellulose treated in accordance with the present invention is a natural hemostat, and forms, when contacted with human blood, a dark gellatinous mass which in effect serves as an artificial clot within the area of the bleeding within a few minutes from the time the oxidized cellulose is applied.

One of the principal advantages of the use of an oxidized cellulose treated in accordance with the concepts of the present invention is that it gradually dissolves and/or absorbed by body fluid which makes it possible to utilize hemostatic materials formed of the material in closed wounds without the concomitant occurrence of an adverse tissue reaction.

The hemostatic materials of the present invention in the form of knitted fabrics, carded fiber pads, sutures and like articles have broad application in any type of surgery,and in other situations where the control of bleeding is required. The material is placed in contact with the bleeding vessel whereby a clot forms within a few minutes. The wound may be, if conditions dictate, closed with the hemostatic material in place, and the hemostat will be dissolved by body fluids. Alternatively, the material may be removed after a clot has formed without sticking of the material to the wound or renewed bleeding since the portion of the material directly in contact with the wound has dissolved.

it will be apparent from the foregoing that the present invention provides a new and improved oxidized cellulosic material which may be used as a hemostatic material having heretofore unattainable stability, and which may be prepared by a simple and economic process without the need to employ expensive reagents.

It will be understood that various changes and modifications may be made in the details of formulation and procedure and use which provide the characteristics of the invention without departing from the spirit thereof, particularly as defined in the following claims.

We claim:

1. In the method of stabilizing a hemostatic material consisting of an oxycellulose pad, the improvement comprising immersing said oxycellulose pad in an aqueous alcoholic solution containing a borohydride for a period of from 0.1 to 5 hours at a temperature of from 0 to 70 C. and a pH of 9-12.

2. A process as defined in claim 1 wherein said borohydride is sodium borohydride.

3. A process as defined in claim 1 wherein said solution contains at least 20 percent by weight of alcohol.

4. in the method of stabilizing a hemostatic material consisting of a cellulosic pad, the improvement comprising first oxidizing said cellulosic gauze pad with nitrogen dioxide and thereafter immersing said cellulosic pad in an aqueous alcoholic solution at a pH of from 9-12 wherein said solution contains an alkali borohydride.

dioxide is in the liquid phase.

6. A process as defined in claim 4 wherein said nitrogen dioxide is in the gaseous phase.

Claims (5)

  1. 2. A process as defined in claim 1 wherein said borohydride is sodium borohydride.
  2. 3. A process as defined in claim 1 wherein said solution contains at least 20 percent by weight of alcohol.
  3. 4. In the method of stabilizing a hemostatic material consisting of a cellulosic pad, the improvement comprising first oxidizing said cellulosic gauze pad with nitrogen dioxide and thereafter immersing said cellulosic pad in an aqueous alcoholic solution at a pH of from 9-12 wherein said solution contains an alkali borohydride.
  4. 5. A process as defined in claim 4 wherein said nitrogen dioxide is in the liquid phase.
  5. 6. A process as defined in claim 4 wherein said nitrogen dioxide is in the gaseous phase.
US3666750A 1969-12-15 1969-12-15 Hemostatic material Expired - Lifetime US3666750A (en)

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Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3902497A (en) * 1974-03-25 1975-09-02 American Cyanamid Co Body absorbable sponge and method of making
US3937223A (en) * 1974-04-19 1976-02-10 American Cyanamid Company Compacted surgical hemostatic felt
US4233976A (en) * 1978-07-06 1980-11-18 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Styptic device
US4407787A (en) * 1980-10-03 1983-10-04 Dr. Ruhland Nachf. Gmbh Collagenous dressing
US4543410A (en) * 1982-06-21 1985-09-24 Morca, Inc. Absorbent cellulosic base structures
US4626253A (en) * 1984-10-05 1986-12-02 Johnson & Johnson Products, Inc. Surgical hemostat comprising oxidized cellulose
US5134229A (en) * 1990-01-12 1992-07-28 Johnson & Johnson Medical, Inc. Process for preparing a neutralized oxidized cellulose product and its method of use
US5484913A (en) * 1993-12-23 1996-01-16 Johnson & Johnson Medical, Inc. Calcium-modified oxidized cellulose hemostat
US20020138025A1 (en) * 2001-03-09 2002-09-26 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Medical slings
US6666817B2 (en) 2001-10-05 2003-12-23 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Expandable surgical implants and methods of using them
US6689047B2 (en) 2000-11-15 2004-02-10 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Treating urinary incontinence
US20040039246A1 (en) * 2001-07-27 2004-02-26 Barry Gellman Medical slings
US6755781B2 (en) 2001-07-27 2004-06-29 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Medical slings
US6800753B2 (en) * 2001-09-04 2004-10-05 University Of Iowa Research Foundation Regenerated cellulose and oxidized cellulose membranes as potential biodegradable platforms for drug delivery and tissue engineering
US7025772B2 (en) 2001-03-09 2006-04-11 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. System for implanting an implant and method thereof
US7361138B2 (en) 2003-07-31 2008-04-22 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Bioabsorbable casing for surgical sling assembly
US7402133B2 (en) 2002-12-17 2008-07-22 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Spacer for sling delivery system
US20100087854A1 (en) * 2008-08-12 2010-04-08 Joshua Stopek Medical device for wound closure and method of use
US20110045047A1 (en) * 2008-10-17 2011-02-24 Confluent Surgical, Inc. Hemostatic implant
US20110081397A1 (en) * 2009-10-01 2011-04-07 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Mesh Implant
US8033983B2 (en) 2001-03-09 2011-10-11 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Medical implant
CN103025950A (en) * 2010-08-18 2013-04-03 科德宝两合公司 Method for the production of oxidized cellulose fibers, oxidized cellulose fiber sheet materials or oxidized cellulose nonwovens, and use thereof
US9084602B2 (en) 2011-01-26 2015-07-21 Covidien Lp Buttress film with hemostatic action for surgical stapling apparatus

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US3122479A (en) * 1957-11-14 1964-02-25 David F Smith Hemostatic surgical dressings
US3032548A (en) * 1958-02-10 1962-05-01 Mo Och Domsjoe Ab Methods of treating cellulose
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Cited By (47)

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US3902497A (en) * 1974-03-25 1975-09-02 American Cyanamid Co Body absorbable sponge and method of making
US3937223A (en) * 1974-04-19 1976-02-10 American Cyanamid Company Compacted surgical hemostatic felt
US4233976A (en) * 1978-07-06 1980-11-18 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Styptic device
US4407787A (en) * 1980-10-03 1983-10-04 Dr. Ruhland Nachf. Gmbh Collagenous dressing
US4543410A (en) * 1982-06-21 1985-09-24 Morca, Inc. Absorbent cellulosic base structures
US4626253A (en) * 1984-10-05 1986-12-02 Johnson & Johnson Products, Inc. Surgical hemostat comprising oxidized cellulose
US5134229A (en) * 1990-01-12 1992-07-28 Johnson & Johnson Medical, Inc. Process for preparing a neutralized oxidized cellulose product and its method of use
US5484913A (en) * 1993-12-23 1996-01-16 Johnson & Johnson Medical, Inc. Calcium-modified oxidized cellulose hemostat
US20070060788A1 (en) * 2000-11-15 2007-03-15 Boston Scientific Scimed Inc. Systems and methods for delivering a medical implant to an anatomical location in a patient
US7014607B2 (en) 2000-11-15 2006-03-21 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Treating urinary incontinence
US6689047B2 (en) 2000-11-15 2004-02-10 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Treating urinary incontinence
US8617048B2 (en) 2001-03-09 2013-12-31 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. System for implanting an implant and method thereof
US8162816B2 (en) 2001-03-09 2012-04-24 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. System for implanting an implant and method thereof
US8033983B2 (en) 2001-03-09 2011-10-11 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Medical implant
US6936052B2 (en) 2001-03-09 2005-08-30 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. System for implanting an implant and method thereof
US6953428B2 (en) 2001-03-09 2005-10-11 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Medical slings
US6991597B2 (en) 2001-03-09 2006-01-31 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. System for implanting an implant and method thereof
US9433488B2 (en) 2001-03-09 2016-09-06 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Medical slings
US7025772B2 (en) 2001-03-09 2006-04-11 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. System for implanting an implant and method thereof
US20100287761A1 (en) * 2001-03-09 2010-11-18 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Medical slings
US20020138025A1 (en) * 2001-03-09 2002-09-26 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Medical slings
US7235043B2 (en) 2001-03-09 2007-06-26 Boston Scientific Scimed Inc. System for implanting an implant and method thereof
US7762969B2 (en) 2001-03-09 2010-07-27 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Medical slings
US7070558B2 (en) 2001-07-27 2006-07-04 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Medical slings
US9549803B2 (en) 2001-07-27 2017-01-24 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Medical slings
US8764622B2 (en) 2001-07-27 2014-07-01 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Medical slings
US20040039246A1 (en) * 2001-07-27 2004-02-26 Barry Gellman Medical slings
US6755781B2 (en) 2001-07-27 2004-06-29 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Medical slings
US7981022B2 (en) 2001-07-27 2011-07-19 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Medical slings
US20060195013A1 (en) * 2001-07-27 2006-08-31 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Medical slings
US6800753B2 (en) * 2001-09-04 2004-10-05 University Of Iowa Research Foundation Regenerated cellulose and oxidized cellulose membranes as potential biodegradable platforms for drug delivery and tissue engineering
US8376928B2 (en) 2001-10-05 2013-02-19 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Expandable surgical implants and methods of using them
US20090076318A1 (en) * 2001-10-05 2009-03-19 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Expandable surgical implants and methods of using them
US6666817B2 (en) 2001-10-05 2003-12-23 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Expandable surgical implants and methods of using them
US7465270B2 (en) 2001-10-05 2008-12-16 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Expandable surgical implants and methods of using them
US8632453B2 (en) 2002-12-17 2014-01-21 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Spacer for sling delivery system
US7402133B2 (en) 2002-12-17 2008-07-22 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Spacer for sling delivery system
US7361138B2 (en) 2003-07-31 2008-04-22 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Bioabsorbable casing for surgical sling assembly
US7824326B2 (en) 2003-07-31 2010-11-02 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Bioabsorbable casing for surgical sling assembly
US20100087854A1 (en) * 2008-08-12 2010-04-08 Joshua Stopek Medical device for wound closure and method of use
US9271706B2 (en) 2008-08-12 2016-03-01 Covidien Lp Medical device for wound closure and method of use
US20110045047A1 (en) * 2008-10-17 2011-02-24 Confluent Surgical, Inc. Hemostatic implant
US9889230B2 (en) 2008-10-17 2018-02-13 Covidien Lp Hemostatic implant
US20110081397A1 (en) * 2009-10-01 2011-04-07 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Mesh Implant
US8470355B2 (en) 2009-10-01 2013-06-25 Covidien Lp Mesh implant
CN103025950A (en) * 2010-08-18 2013-04-03 科德宝两合公司 Method for the production of oxidized cellulose fibers, oxidized cellulose fiber sheet materials or oxidized cellulose nonwovens, and use thereof
US9084602B2 (en) 2011-01-26 2015-07-21 Covidien Lp Buttress film with hemostatic action for surgical stapling apparatus

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FR2070862A1 (en) 1971-09-17 application
CA949557A1 (en) grant
FR2070862B1 (en) 1976-02-06 grant
CA949557A (en) 1974-06-18 grant
GB1323169A (en) 1973-07-11 application
DE2061796A1 (en) 1971-07-08 application

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