US3635175A - Incinerator system - Google Patents

Incinerator system Download PDF

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US3635175A
US3635175A US3635175DA US3635175A US 3635175 A US3635175 A US 3635175A US 3635175D A US3635175D A US 3635175DA US 3635175 A US3635175 A US 3635175A
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incinerator
air
opening
means
fire
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Russell I Peterson Jr
William E Sauter
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CUMBERLAND ENG CO
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CUMBERLAND ENG CO
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23GCREMATION FURNACES; CONSUMING WASTE PRODUCTS BY COMBUSTION
    • F23G5/00Incineration of waste; Incinerator constructions; Details, accessories or control therefor
    • F23G5/44Details; Accessories
    • F23G5/442Waste feed arrangements
    • F23G5/444Waste feed arrangements for solid waste

Abstract

The invention is an improved incinerator system including an improved manner of feeding the incinerator with the products to be burned and air. Both the air and products are fed through an inlet chute with the product discharging from the bottom of the chute laterally across the fire bed of the incinerator proper, with a large proportion of the air conveying the products being exhausted at the upper end of the chute. The products to be burned are distributed over the fire bed but below or into the fire line or fire zone.

Description

United States Patent Peterson, Jr. et al.

[4 Jan. 18,1972

[54] INCINERATOR SYSTEM [72] inventors: Russell 1. Peterson, Jr., Seekonk, Mass;

William E. Sauter, Harrington, R.1.

[73] Assignee: Cumberland Engineering Company, Inc.,

Pawtucket, R.I.

[22] Filed: June 8, 1970 [21] Appl. No.: 44,081

[52] US. Cl. [5 1 Int. Cl. [5 8] Field of Search ..11o/s R,ll0/18R ..F23g7/00 ..110/7,7S,8R, 18R

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,022,753 Montgomery ..110/7 X 3,163,133 12/1964 Montgomery ..ll0/l8 3,387,574 6/1968 Mullen ..1 10/7 3,453,976 7/1969 Burden, Jr. et a1 ..1 10/7 X Primary Examiner-Kenneth W. Sprague Attorney-Kenway, Jenney & Hildreth [57] ABSTRACT The invention is an improved incinerator system including an improved manner of feeding the incinerator with the products to be burned and air. Both the air and products are fed through an inlet chute with the product discharging from the bottom of the chute laterally across the tire bed of the incinerator proper, with a large proportion of the air conveying the products being exhausted at the upper end of the chute. The products to be burned are distributed over the fire bed but below or into the fire line or fire zone.

6 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures INVENTORS T. PETERSON,JR. WILLIAM E. SAUTER RU$SELL BY We? n4 7 PATENTED JAN: 8 1972 z lzlzlll rl N wE ATTORNEYS INCINERATOR SYSTEM BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION One of the problems in connection with the use of incinerators is minimizing fly-ash. The reason for this is that when many articles are burned, incomplete combustion results with the result that partly burned particles of the combustible material rise above the incinerator fire zone and are light enough to be borne (as fly-ash) out of the incinerator by the exhaust gases. This contributes to pollution of the areas outside the incinerator.

Many attempts have been made to cure or at last alleviate this problem. but only those which are relatively expensive have been found to be satisfactory at all.

It is the general purpose of this invention to provide an incinerator system in which the above problem is answered or at least greatly alleviated in a simple and economical way, the system providing a means whereby the material to be consumed is spread out by an inlet chute over the fire bed at or just below the fireline, the latter being defined as that level at which flame starts. Material is carried by air into the incinerator by a chute. Inside the incinerator enough air is left in the inlet chute to spread the products to be burned out over the fire bed, while a large portion or most of the entering air is exhausted at the top of the chute above the fire zone of the incinerator, the latter being defined as the general zone in which flame occurs.

Therefore, one object of the invention is to provide an incinerator so constructed and operated as to minimize the production of fly-ash.

Another object of the invention is the provision of an incinerator of the above kind which means are provided to distribute the products to be burned at such a place in respect to the fire bed that maximum, complete combustion is obtained, without undue disturbance of the fire bed.

Yet another object of the invention is the provision of an incinerator of the above kinds, having means first to comminute the products to be burned, and having means for conveying the comminuted products into the incinerator by means of a stream of air in such manner that a large portion or most of the air passes above the fire bed but a residual amount of air is provided to spread the products to be consumed over the fire bed.

A further object of the invention is to provide an incinerator in which all of the products to be burned are introduced into the incinerator over the bed but at or into the flame at the base of the fireline where they are heated and volatilized and then the resulting gases burn, with none of the products being dis tributed in the incinerator above the fire zone.

Other objects and advantages will be in part obvious and in part pointed out hereinafter.

The invention accordingly comprises the elements and combinations of elements, features of construction, arrangement of parts, and manipulation of the apparatus all of which will be exemplified in the structures hereinafter set forth, and the scope of the application of which will be indicated in the appended claims.

In the accompanying drawings, in which is illustrated one embodiment of the invention:

FIG. I is an elevation of a complete system of this invention, partly in section to illustrate more clearly a main feature of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional elevation of a portion of an incinerator of this invention showing in detail an inlet chute for the introduction of air and particles to be burned, into the incinerator;

FIG. 3 is an end elevation of the incinerator of FIG. 2, showing an elevation of the inlet chute thereof; and

FIG. 4 is a plan view of a portion of the incinerator, given to show a sectional plan view of the chute of FIGS. 2 and 3, taken in the direction of sight lines 4-4 on FIG. 3.

Similar reference characters indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views of the drawings, and the dimensions of certain of the parts as shown in the drawings may have been modified and/or exaggerated for the purposes of clarity ofillustration and understanding of the invention.

Referring now to the drawings, there is illustrated in FIG. 1 an elevation showing a complete incinerator system of this invention, partly in section. The system comprises a material granulator system illustrated generally by the numeral 2, a hopper 4 into which the granulator feeds comminuted particles of the material. a duct 6 for conveying the particles to an inlet 10 at the outlet side of a rotary centrifugal type blower l2 driven by motor l4. From the inlet side of the blower 12, a duct 16 of sufficient size leads to a horizontal-type incinerator burner 18, passes through the end wall 19 thereof and is attached to the distributing chute 20 which forms a part of this invention. The incinerator I8 is of convention type, and is supported on the legs 20 and has a door 22 hinged to the other end of the incinerator so that the door may be opened or closed when it is desired to have access to the fire bed 24 of the incinerator. In the duct 16 is provided a fire gate 23 which moves to close off the duct in the event the air or gas pressure in the incinerator becomes higher than the air pressure in duct 16, in order to prevent blowback. Gate 23 opens automatically when the pressure in duct 16 becomes greater than that in the incinerator. An air supply of conventional type (not shown) supplies primary air for incinerator l8 (conventionally beneath the fire bed therein) and also to a duct 26 which provides secondary air via duct 28 to secondary incinerator 30. From the latter an exhaust chimney 32 leads to the atmosphere. If desired, a duct 34 can lead air to the interior periphery of door 22 for establishing an air curtain to prevent blowback of flame if the door is opened. Incinerators l8 and 30 are connected by short breech 35.

An incinerator system such as described above, but without the novel air feed mechanism described above and comminuting means described below may be purchased from the Ross Engineering Division (of Midland Ross Corporation), New Brunswick, N.J., the combination being known as the RFC Eradicator Incinerator. Other like incinerators may be com monly purchased. However, it has been found in experience that such incinerators do not eliminate as much unburned products as could be desired.

The granulator system 2 includes a conventional granulator 38 such as, for example, Model No. 24 manufactured by Cumberland Engineering Company, Inc. of Pawtucket, RI. Other like granulators are available. At the inlet side of the granulator there is established a feed trough 36 into which material to be comminuted and burned is placed. A ram plate 40 at one end of the trough is actuable by motivating means such as, for example, a pair of air cylinders 42, or mechanical or electrical motors, (one on each side of the trough) to move the refuse into the cutting knives of the granulator 38.

From the granulator an exit chute 44 conveys the chopped up refuse to the hopper 4 and from the latter the particles of refuse traverse a flexible duct 6 to an inlet 10 to an impellertype blower 12. The latter then blows air and the particles through duct 16 into the interior of the incinerator 18. At that point, the particles enter one of the features of this invention, mainly the discharge and distributing chute 20. An important advantage of this means for introducing the material is that the material is kept below its melting point (for example, scrap plastic material) prior to being deposited over the fire bed, with the result that melted or fused plastic does not clog up the incinerator feed mechanism.

The discharge chute is made of sheet metal, preferably stainless steel, but other alloys can be used if they are such as to withstand the temperature within the incinerator 18 during a burning operation. The chute is a hollow tubular member such as a flat rectangularly shaped box (although the cross section could be other shapes), and preferably has the sloping shoulders 48, the front and backwalls 50 and 52, and the sidewalls 54. It will be noted that the front wall 50 is shorter than the back wall 52, and that the bottom of the chute is closed by a slant bottom end 56 in such manner as to leave a discharge opening 58 extending across the entire width of the chute.

The shoulders 48 are also open, but are perforated, such as by being provided with a mesh or grille 60 (or perforations) whose openings are of such size as to permit the passage of air therethrough, but to retard the passage therethrough of particles of refuse. This provides over fire air for the incinerator.

Chute has an upper neck 62 which conveniently is rectangular or square in shape and which in turn fastens to a flange 64. Flange 64 is attached to a flange 66 which is part of an inlet conduit 68 and flange 70. Flanges 66 and 70 with conduit 68 are securely fastened to end 19 of the incinerator. By this means, chute 20 is positioned and held in place within the incinerator adjacent the end wall 18 of the incinerator in upright position. Duct 16 connects to flange 70.

There is illustrated schematically a fire bed 24 and illustrated generally at the level indicated by arrow 72 is the fireline. The zone of combustion is indicated by the bracket 74. The relationship of the opening 58 and the fire zone and fireline of the burning products .is such when particles are delivered by air from opening 58 of chute 20, they will be spread out over bed 24 but at or just below the fireline 72. This is essential to the invention, because by doing this one is assured that complete combustion of the particles will be effectuated with a minimum disturbance of fly-ash.

Operation of the device is as follows:

Refuse is dumped into the trough 36 and by means of the ram plate 40 is continuously fed into the granulator 38 where it is comminuted. Comminuted particles then drawn into the blower 12 as described above, and are then blown into chute 20 via the duct 16, the air of the blower conveying the particles. Much of the conveying air passes out of the open shoulders 48, but sufficient air is permitted to go down through the chute to carry particles therewith and emerge from the opening 58 with sufficient velocity to convey the particles in the direction shown by the arrow 76 and spread them over the fire bed as described above. The air from the vents 60 supplies over fire or secondary air for the lower incinerator.

The products of combustion of the fire bed 24 then pass through breech 35 into the upper high-temperature incinerator 32 where any residual, nonburned material that escapes burner 18 is thoroughly burned, with the resulting gasses of combustion then passing out of the incinerator system via the chimney 32.

The above description is schematic, and as expressed above, many of the parts of the system are conventional. The chute 20 is not conventional, and it and its location are features of this invention.

The blower 12 is also conventional, and can be, for example, a size 4 blower obtained from Sterling Manufacturing Company, Hartford, Conn.

In view of the above it will be seen that the several objects of the invention are achieved and other advantageous results attained.

It is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of construction and arrangement of parts illustrated in the accompanying drawings, since the invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced or carried out in various ways. Also, it is to be understood that the phraseology or terminology employed herein is for the purpose of description and not of limitation.

As many changes could be made in the above constructions without departing from the scope of the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings, shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense, and it is also intended that the appended claims shall cover all such equivalent variations as come within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

Having described the invention, what is claimed is:

1. An incinerator system for burning materials comprising:

first mans for comminutating the materials;

an incinerator adapted to hold a fire bed and maintain a fireline and fire zone over said bed; second means for moving by air particles of comminuted material from the first mans to an inlet to the incinerator;

air and particle distribution means within the incinerator connected to said inlet and positioned to utilize at least a portion of said air to distribute said particles over said fire bed at or just below said fireline but not above the fireline; and

means for conducting products of combustion from the incinerator.

2. The incinerator of claim 1 in which the distribution means distributes at least a portion of said air within the incinerator above the fire zone.

3. The incinerator of claim 1 in which the distribution means comprises a chute having a first opening at one end thereof and a second opening remote from the first opening, the chute being positioned in the incinerator so that the first opening is adapted to direct said particles over the fire bed at or just below said fireline, and the second opening is adapted to direct air into the incinerator above said fire zone.

4. The incinerator of claim 3 in which said second opening is provided with means to minimize the escape therefrom of said particles.

5. The incinerator of claim 1 in which the second means includes an air blower, the inlet of which is connected to the outlet side of said first means, and the outlet of the blower is connected to said distribution means.

6. The incinerator of claim 3 in which said chute comprises a hollow tubular body vertically mounted at one end of the incinerator, the lower end of the body being provided with a closure means closing the end of the body in such manner as to leave a particle distribution opening at said lower end directed toward said fire bed and at a height approximately that of said fireline, the closure means being angled to the horizontal so as to deflect particles through said distribution opening; the body being provided with a second opening at a height above said fireline, the second opening being provided with openings therein to permit the passage of air therethrough but to minimize the passage of particles therethrough.

Claims (6)

1. An incinerator system for burning materials comprising: first mans for comminutating the materials; an incinerator adapted to hold a fire bed and maintain a fireline and fire zone over said bed; second means for moving by air particles of comminuted material from the first mans to an inlet to the incinerator; air and particle distribution means within the incinerator connected to said inlet and positioned to utilize at least a portion of said air to distribute said particles over said fire bed at or just below said fireline but not above the fireline; and means for conducting products of combustion from the incinerator.
2. The incinerator of claim 1 in which the distribution means distributes at least a portion of said air within the incinerator above the fire zone.
3. The incinerator of claim 1 in which the distribution means comprises a chute having a first opening at one end thereof and a second opening remote from the first opening, the chute being positioned in the incinerator so that the first opening is adapted to direct said particles over the fire bed at or just below said fireline, and the second opening is adapted to direct air into the incinerator above said fire zone.
4. The incinerator of claim 3 in which said second opening is provided with means to minimize the escape therefrom of said particles.
5. The incinerator of claim 1 in which the second means includes an air blower, the inlet of which is connected to the outlet side of said first means, and the outlet of the blower is connected to said distribution means.
6. The incinerator of claim 3 in which said chute comprises a hollow tubular body vertically mounted at one end of the incinerator, the lower end of the body being provided with a closure means closing the end of the body in such manner as to leave a particle distribution opening at said lower end directed toward said fire bed and at a height approximately that of said fireline, the closure means being angled to the horizontal so as to deflect particles through said distribution opening; the body being provided with a second opening at a height above said fireline, the second opening being provided with openings therein to permit the passage of air therethrough but to minimize the passage of particles therethrough.
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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3791318A (en) * 1973-03-30 1974-02-12 I Oseroff Apparatus for pulverizing and incinerating household waste

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3022753A (en) * 1955-01-11 1962-02-27 Jacksonville Blow Pipe Company Incinerator
US3163133A (en) * 1960-06-29 1964-12-29 Jacksonville Blow Pipe Company Incinerator
US3387574A (en) * 1966-11-14 1968-06-11 Combustion Eng System for pneumatically transporting high-moisture fuels such as bagasse and bark and an included furnace for drying and burning those fuels in suspension under high turbulence
US3453976A (en) * 1967-01-30 1969-07-08 Gen Incinerators Of California Method and apparatus for destroying bulk paper and other bulk materials

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3022753A (en) * 1955-01-11 1962-02-27 Jacksonville Blow Pipe Company Incinerator
US3163133A (en) * 1960-06-29 1964-12-29 Jacksonville Blow Pipe Company Incinerator
US3387574A (en) * 1966-11-14 1968-06-11 Combustion Eng System for pneumatically transporting high-moisture fuels such as bagasse and bark and an included furnace for drying and burning those fuels in suspension under high turbulence
US3453976A (en) * 1967-01-30 1969-07-08 Gen Incinerators Of California Method and apparatus for destroying bulk paper and other bulk materials

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3791318A (en) * 1973-03-30 1974-02-12 I Oseroff Apparatus for pulverizing and incinerating household waste

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