US3626184A - Detector system for a scanning electron microscope - Google Patents

Detector system for a scanning electron microscope Download PDF

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US3626184A
US3626184A US3626184DA US3626184A US 3626184 A US3626184 A US 3626184A US 3626184D A US3626184D A US 3626184DA US 3626184 A US3626184 A US 3626184A
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electrons
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detector means
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Albert V Crewe
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J37/00Discharge tubes with provision for introducing objects or material to be exposed to the discharge, e.g. for the purpose of examination or processing thereof
    • H01J37/26Electron or ion microscopes; Electron or ion diffraction tubes
    • H01J37/28Electron or ion microscopes; Electron or ion diffraction tubes with scanning beams
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J37/00Discharge tubes with provision for introducing objects or material to be exposed to the discharge, e.g. for the purpose of examination or processing thereof
    • H01J37/02Details
    • H01J37/04Arrangements of electrodes and associated parts for generating or controlling the discharge, e.g. electron-optical arrangement, ion-optical arrangement
    • H01J37/045Beam blanking or chopping, i.e. arrangements for momentarily interrupting exposure to the discharge
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J37/00Discharge tubes with provision for introducing objects or material to be exposed to the discharge, e.g. for the purpose of examination or processing thereof
    • H01J37/02Details
    • H01J37/04Arrangements of electrodes and associated parts for generating or controlling the discharge, e.g. electron-optical arrangement, ion-optical arrangement
    • H01J37/05Electron or ion-optical arrangements for separating electrons or ions according to their energy or mass
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J37/00Discharge tubes with provision for introducing objects or material to be exposed to the discharge, e.g. for the purpose of examination or processing thereof
    • H01J37/02Details
    • H01J37/22Optical or photographic arrangements associated with the tube
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J37/00Discharge tubes with provision for introducing objects or material to be exposed to the discharge, e.g. for the purpose of examination or processing thereof
    • H01J37/02Details
    • H01J37/244Detectors; Associated components or circuits therefor
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J49/00Particle spectrometers or separator tubes
    • H01J49/44Energy spectrometers, e.g. alpha-, beta-spectrometers
    • H01J49/46Static spectrometers
    • H01J49/48Static spectrometers using electrostatic analysers, e.g. cylindrical sector, Wien filter
    • H01J49/484Static spectrometers using electrostatic analysers, e.g. cylindrical sector, Wien filter with spherical mirrors
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J2237/00Discharge tubes exposing object to beam, e.g. for analysis treatment, etching, imaging
    • H01J2237/244Detection characterized by the detecting means
    • H01J2237/2446Position sensitive detectors
    • H01J2237/24465Sectored detectors, e.g. quadrants
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J2237/00Discharge tubes exposing object to beam, e.g. for analysis treatment, etching, imaging
    • H01J2237/244Detection characterized by the detecting means
    • H01J2237/24475Scattered electron detectors
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J2237/00Discharge tubes exposing object to beam, e.g. for analysis treatment, etching, imaging
    • H01J2237/244Detection characterized by the detecting means
    • H01J2237/24485Energy spectrometers
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J2237/00Discharge tubes exposing object to beam, e.g. for analysis treatment, etching, imaging
    • H01J2237/244Detection characterized by the detecting means
    • H01J2237/2449Detector devices with moving charges in electric or magnetic fields
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J2237/00Discharge tubes exposing object to beam, e.g. for analysis treatment, etching, imaging
    • H01J2237/245Detection characterised by the variable being measured
    • H01J2237/24507Intensity, dose or other characteristics of particle beams or electromagnetic radiation
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J2237/00Discharge tubes exposing object to beam, e.g. for analysis treatment, etching, imaging
    • H01J2237/245Detection characterised by the variable being measured
    • H01J2237/24571Measurements of non-electric or non-magnetic variables
    • H01J2237/24585Other variables, e.g. energy, mass, velocity, time, temperature

Abstract

In an electron microscope transmitted electrons are detected according to whether they are unscattered, elastically scattered or inelastically scattered by the specimen. The elastically scattered electrons are further separated according to the magnitude of the scattering. Signals from the separate detectors can be used separately or combined as desired to enhance the information obtained from a specimen.

Description

United States Patent Inventor Albert V. Crewe Palos Park, Ill.

App]. No. 168,020

Filed Mar. 5, 1970 Patented Dec. 7, 1971 Assignee The United Slates of America as represented by the United States Atomic Energy Commission DETECTOR SYSTEM FOR A SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPE 7 Claims, 4 Drawing Figs.

US. Cl 250/495 A, 250/49.5 E, 250/495 AE Int. Cl IIOlj 37/28 Field of Search 250/495 A.

49.5 E, 49.5 PE, 49.5 AE

S/G/WL PROCESSOR [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,l9l,028 6/1965 Crewe 250/495 A OTHER REFERENCES Denbigh et al.; Journal of Scientific Instr; Vol. 42, No. 5, May, 1965, pp. 305- 31];

Primary Examiner-Anthony L. Birch AnorneyRoland A. Anderson ABSTRACT: In an electron microscope transmitted electrons are detected according to whether they are unscattered, elastically scattered or inelastically scattered by the specimen. The elastically scattered electrons are further separated according to the magnitude of the scattering. Signals from the separate detectors can be used separately or combined as desired to enhance the information obtained from a specimen.

POWER 5 supPzy PATENTED DEE Hen SHEET 1 {1F 2 V J 4 T? 7 Yo 1 M 175 m I6 3% 25 a) SWEEP, l3 GENE/iflffif? DETECTOR OUTPUT X [ill/612601 DETECTOR ourpur flzbem M Crewe flf far/ray DETECTOR SYSTEM FOR A SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPE CONTRACTUAL ORIGIN OF THE INVENTION The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In the scanning electron microscope a small focused spot of electrons is scanned across the specimen being observed. Any physical effect caused by the incident beam can be detected and displayed as an intensity variation on a synchronously scanned display oscilloscope. The area scanned may be rectangular, as in a television picture, or it may be any other shape which is desirable.

The electrons transmitted by the specimen can be divided into three groups: those elastically scattered, those inelastically scattered and those that are unscattered. In prior art electron microscopes the transmitted electrons have been detected without separation or they have been separated by energy content before detection. Thus the elastically scattered and unscattered electrons have not been separated before detection and information about the specimen has been lost.

It is therefore an object of this invention to provide an improved detection system for a scanning electron microscope.

Another object of this invention is to provide an electron microscope wherein the transmitted electrons are separated according to whether they are elastically or inelastically scattered or are unscattered before detection.

Another object of this invention is to provide an electron microscope wherein the elastically scattered electrons are separated according to the degree of scattering before detection.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In practicing this invention a detector for a scanning electron microscope is provided which separately detects the elastic electrons, the inelastic electrons and the unscattered electrons. The inelastic electrons are deflected through only a very small angle and thus remain in the cone of illumination of the beam after it leaves the specimen together with the unscattered electrons. An annular detector permits the inelastic and unscattered electrons to pass through a hole therein to a separate detector where the electrons are separated according to energy; that is, no energy lossunscattered electrons; energy lossinelastic electrons. The elastic electrons are deflected outside the cone of illumination and are detected by the annular detector. A series of annular detectors can be provided to measure the intensity of the transmitted elastic electrons vs. degree of deflection. The signals from the various detectors can be combined as desired to provide information about the specimen.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The invention is illustrated in the drawings, of which:

FIG. I is a drawing of a scanning electron microscope;

FIG. 2 is a drawing of the detection system of this invention;

FIG. 3 is a drawing of another embodiment of the detection system of this invention; and

FIG. 4 is a .curve showing the output from the detection system of this invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION respectively, to provide the required voltages for electron acceleration and focusing.

The electron beam which impinges on specimen I3 is focused to as small a spot as possible. Therefore, in order to illuminate the desired area of the specimen, the beam is scanned over this desired area in a manner similar to a TV scan. Sweep generator 22 provides scanning voltages to deflection plates in the microscope (represented by deflection plates 23 and 25). The voltages on the deflection plates act to move the electron beam across the specimen in a desired manner.

Sweep voltages from sweep generator 22 are also applied to the deflection plates of CRT 26 (represented by deflection plates 28 and 29). The sweep voltages applied to the CRT 26 are in synchronism with the sweep voltages applied to the electron microscope so that the electron beam in the CRT 26 traces a raster on the face of the tube as the specimen I3 is scanned.

A detector 31 placed beneath specimen 113 receives elec trons transmitted through the specimen. Detector 311 is coupled to cathode 32 of CRT 26 to modulate the intensity of the electron beam in CRT 26 according to the electrons received by detector 31. The modulated electron beam forms a picture on the face of CRT 26 representative of the specimen being observed.

The electrons which reach the plane of detector 31 comprise three components, those elastically scattered, those in elastically scattered or energy loss electrons, and the unscattered electrons. The elastically scattered electrons have a very wide angular distribution and most of them reach the plane of detector 31 outside of the cone of illumination. The inelastic electrons are scattered according to the energy loss involved in the inelastic event. Since the majority of the energy loss events are in the range 040 volts and the energy of the incident electrons is several tens of kilovolts, the scattering angle is very smalla milliradian or less. The unscattered electrons fill the cone of illumination and the intensity of this component is the intensity of the original beam minus the elastic and inelastic electrons.

These three groups of electrons can be separated from one another so that they can be separately used. Referring to FIG. 2, there is shown a detection system which can separate the three groups of electrons. The cone of illumination 35 from specimen 36 passes through a hole in annular detector 40. If the hole in detector 40 is just large enough to allow the illuminating cone 35 to pass through, it will detect the elastically scattered electrons which are outside the cone of illumination 35. The elastically scattered electrons are within cone 38 and outside of the cone of illumination 35. The electrons in the cone of illumination and which pass through the hole can be physically separated into unscattered electrons and inelastically scattered electrons by detector 399. The operation of detector 39 in separating the unscattered electrons and the inelastically scattered electrons will be described in a subsequent portion of the specification.

In FIG. 3, there is a detailed drawing of detectors suitable for use in this electron microscope system. The cone of illumination 46 passes through a series of annular detectors 48 to 51 into an electrostatic spherical analyzer 54 of conventional design. Analyzer 54 includes electrodes 54 and 55 which are connected to power supply 57. Power supply 57 acts to develop an electric field between electrodes 54 and 55 to deflect electrons which enter the analyzer. The amount of deflection is determined by the energy of the electrons. Thus, with the field adjusted so that the unscattered electrons strike detector 59, the inelastic electrons which have lost energy will strike detectors 60 and 61. While three detectors are shown, any number (two or greater) may be used, consistent with the requirements of the system. Detectors 59, 60 and 61 may be, for example, scintillation detectors or silicon surface barrier detectors.

The elastically scattered electrons from specimen 45 fall outside the cone of illumination 46 and are detected by the annular detectors 48 to 51. Detectors 48 to 51 may be, for example, silicon surface barrier detectors. Each of the detectors 48 to 51 detect the electrons which are elastically scattered at different angles.

The signals from each of the detectors 48 to 51 and 59 to 61 are amplified in amplifiers 63 to 69. The amplified signals are combined in a desired manner in signal processor 71 and displayed by display unit 72. The signals may be displayed as a television like picture, as photographs, as graphs or in other known ways.

Different specimens will partition the electrons in different ways so that in some cases it will be preferable to use one of the signals while in other cases a combination of the signals would be used. If the three signals are denoted by A (unscattered electrons), A* (inelastically scattered electrons) and B (elastically scattered electrons), a signal of the form:

would be useful. A suitable electronic signal processor could be used to perform this function. The signal processor would have two controls for controlling the values of x and y (where x and y can assume positive or negative values) to develop the contrast of interest to the microscopist.

Consider, for example, a specimen consisting of alternating areas of 50 A of carbon and 5 A of tungsten. A plot of the elastic, inelastic and unscattered electrons as a function of the spatial distribution of the electrons on the detector aperture plane is shown in FIG. 4. The cone of illumination of milliradians and the inelastic electrons are shown within the 10 milliradian section of the plot as curves 75. The unscattered electrons are also shown within the 10 milliradian section of the plot (separated from the inelastic electrons) as curves 76. The elastic electron intensity is plotted as a function of the angular distance from the cone of illumination as curves 77. The tungsten contrast is small and negative for the unscattered electrons, positive and larger for the inelastic electrons and either positive or negative for the elastically scattered electrons depending upon the angle of observation.

Picture contract can therefore be enhanced as desired depending on the choice of the electron groups which are used. If the ratio of the inelastic electrons to the elastic electrons is used, the picture contrast is proportional to 25/Z, where Z is the atomic number of the element. This signal is substantially independent of the thickness of the specimen so that noise" which is caused by thickness variations is reduced and specimen detail due to different atoms is enhanced. In another example the signal from the elastically scattered electrons below 50 milliradians (the crossover point) could be subtracted from the signal above 50 milliradians to increase contrast. The resulting signal would then be particularly sensitive to the relative thickness of the carbon and the tungsten. The contrast of a particular area could be enhanced by choosing the dividing line between the positive and negative signals from a series of detectors such as 48 to 51 (HO. 3).

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:

1. A detector system for examination of a specimen by an electron microscope having a source of electrons for irradiating the specimen, the microscope acting to focus the electrons on a spot on the specimen and further to scan the focused spot of electrons over the specimen, the irradiating electrons after passing through the specimen developing into groups of unscattered, inelastically scattered and elastically scattered electrons, substantially all of the unscattered and inelastically scattered electrons forming a cone of illumination with substantially all of the elastically scattered electrons being outside of the cone of illumination, including in combination, first detection means positioned to receive only electrons outside of the cone of illumination and to detect all said received electrons and to develop a first output signal representative of all of said received and detected electrons said first output signal being representative of the elastically scattered electrons only, and utilization means coupled to said first detector means for utilizing said first output signal.

2. The detector system of claim 1 further including, second detector means positioned to reject electrons outside of the cone of illumination to detect at least one of the groups of inelastically scattered and unscattered electrons in the cone of illumination and to develop a second output signal representative of the group of electrons detected, said utilization means being coupled to said second detector means for utilizing said second output signal.

3. The detector system of claim 2 wherein, said second detector means includes third detector means for detecting said inelastically scattered electrons and to develop a third output signal representative of the inelastically scattered electrons detected, and fourth detector means for detecting said unscattered electrons and to develop a fourth output signal representative of the unscattered electrons detected, and utilization means coupled to said third and fourth detector means for utilizing said third and fourth output signals therefrom.

4. The detector system of claim 3 wherein, said first detector means includes an opening therein substantially the size of the cone of illumination of said inelastically scattered electrons and said unscattered electrons, said first detector means being positioned to permit electrons in said cone of illumination to pass through said opening and to detect electrons outside of said cone of illumination, said third and fourth detector means being positioned to detect electrons within said cone of illumination.

5. The detector system of claim 4 wherein, said first detector means includes a plurality of first detectors, each of said first detectors being positioned to detect electrons outside of said cone of illumination and scattered at an angle different from the angle of scatter of the electrons detected by any other of said second detectors.

6. The detector system of claim 5 wherein, each of said plurality of first detectors is in the form of an annular ring detector, said plurality of annular first detectors being positioned concentrically to detect electrons scattered to different angles outside of said cone of illumination.

7. The detector system of claim 6 wherein, said third and fourth detector means comprise a spherical analyzer, said spherical analyzer being positioned to receive said electrons within said cone of illumination and to separate the same according to the energy thereof, said fourth detector means being positioned to detect unscattered electrons, said third detector means including at least one third detector positioned to detect inelastically scattered electrons.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,626,18H Date d December 7, 1971 Inventor(s) Albert V. Crewe It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

On cover page, change the Appl. No. from "168,020" to "16,802".

Column 3, line L1, change "contract" to --contrast--.

Column L, line 12, after "electrons" insert a'comma.

Column 1, line 18, after "illumination" insert --and to receive electrons in the cone of illumination.

Signed and sealed this 30th day of May 1972.

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD M.FLETCI IER,JR. ROBERT GOTTSGHALK -Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents P011050 USCOMM-DC 60376-P69 [1.5. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE Ii, 0366'3!

Claims (7)

1. A detector system for examination of a specimen by an electron microscope having a source of electrons for irradiating the specimen, the microscope acting to focus the electrons on a spot on the specimen and further to scan the focused spot of electrons over the specimen, the irradiating electrons after passing through the specimen developing into groups of unscattered, inelastically scattered and elastically scattered electrons, substantially all of the unscattered and inelastically scattered electrons forming a cone of illumination with substantially all of the elastically scattered electrons being outside of the cone of illumination, including in combination, first detection means positioned to receive only electrons outside of the cone of illumination and to detect all said received electrons and to develop a first output signal representative of all of said received and detected electrons, said first output signal being representative of the elastically scattered electrons only, and utilization means coupled to said first detector means for utilizing said first output signal.
2. The detector system of claim 1 further including, second detector means positioned to reject electrons outside of the cone of illumination and to receive electrons in the cone of illumination to detect at least one of the groups of inelastically scattered and unscattered electrons in the cone of illumination and to develop a second output signal representative of the group of electrons detected, said utilization means being coupled to said second detector means for utilizing said second output signal.
3. The detector system of claim 2 wherein, said second detector means includes third detector means for detecting said inelastically scattered electrons and to develop a third output signal representative of the inelastically scattered electrons detected, and fourth detector means for detecting said unscattered electrons and to develop a fourth output signal representative of the unscattered electrons detected, and utilization means coupled to said third and fourth detector means for utilizing said third and fourth output signals therefrom.
4. The detector system of claim 3 wherein, said first detector means includes an opening therein substantially the size of the cone of illumination of said inelastically scattered electrons and said unscattered electrons, said first detector means being positioned to permit electrons in said cone of illumination to pass through said opening and to detect electrons outside of said cone of illumination, said third and fourth detector means being positioned to detect electrons within said cone of illumination.
5. The detector system of claim 4 wherein, said first detector means includes a plurality of first detectors, each of said first detectors being positioned to detect electrons outside of said cone of illumination and scattered at an angle different from the angle of scatter of the electrons detected by any other of said second detectors.
6. The detector system of claim 5 wherein, each of said plurality of first detectors is in the form of an annular ring detector, said plurality of annular first detectors being positioned concentrically to detect electrons scattered to different angles outside of said cone of illumination.
7. The detector system of claim 6 wherein, said third and fourth detector means comprise a spherical analyzer, said spherical analyzer being positioned to receive said electrons within said cone of illumination and to separate the same according to the energy thereof, said fourth detector means being positioned to detect unscattered electrons, said third detector means including at least one third detector positioned to detect inelastically scattered electrons.
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Cited By (30)

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DE2221151A1 (en) * 1971-04-30 1972-11-16 Thomson Csf Arrangement for measuring the radiation dose of an ionizing Strahlungsbuendels
US3833811A (en) * 1972-07-11 1974-09-03 Jeol Ltd Scanning electron microscope with improved means for focusing
US3857034A (en) * 1970-08-31 1974-12-24 Max Planck Gesellschaft Scanning charged beam particle beam microscope
US3908124A (en) * 1974-07-01 1975-09-23 Us Energy Phase contrast in high resolution electron microscopy
US3909610A (en) * 1973-08-22 1975-09-30 Jeol Ltd Apparatus for displaying the energy distribution of a charged particle beam
US3914606A (en) * 1973-03-12 1975-10-21 Jeol Ltd Electron detector
US3917946A (en) * 1972-04-12 1975-11-04 Philips Corp Electron-optical device for the recording of selected diffraction patterns
DE2526116A1 (en) * 1974-06-14 1976-01-02 Cgr Mev Device for checking the centering, intensity, uniformity and richtungsbuendelung an ionizing strahlenbuendels
US3965351A (en) * 1974-10-30 1976-06-22 The United States Of America As Represented By The United States Energy Research And Development Administration Differential auger spectrometry
US4058730A (en) * 1974-09-12 1977-11-15 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Irradiating device with an electronic accelerator
USRE29500E (en) * 1970-08-31 1977-12-20 Max-Planck-Gesellschaft Zur Forderung Der Wissenschaften E.V. Scanning charged beam particle beam microscope
US4068123A (en) * 1973-07-27 1978-01-10 Nihon Denshi Kabushiki Kaisha Scanning electron microscope
US4097740A (en) * 1975-09-19 1978-06-27 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Method and apparatus for focusing the objective lens of a scanning transmission-type corpuscular-beam microscope
US4099055A (en) * 1975-10-17 1978-07-04 Hitachi, Ltd. Scanning transmission electron microscope
FR2423860A1 (en) * 1978-04-17 1979-11-16 Philips Nv Electronic microscope for the formation of a phase image which is not deducted from difference images
US4514629A (en) * 1982-07-07 1985-04-30 National Research Development Corporation Scanning transmission electron microscopes
US4596928A (en) * 1979-07-03 1986-06-24 Unisearch Limited Method and apparatus for an atmospheric scanning electron microscope
GB2173666A (en) * 1985-04-12 1986-10-15 Plessey Co Plc Scanning optical microscopes
US4760567A (en) * 1986-08-11 1988-07-26 Electron Beam Memories Electron beam memory system with ultra-compact, high current density electron gun
EP0308953A1 (en) * 1987-09-25 1989-03-29 Hitachi, Ltd. Charged particle detector
US4877961A (en) * 1988-10-26 1989-10-31 Varian Associates, Inc. In-line electron beam energy monitor and control
EP0348992A2 (en) * 1988-07-01 1990-01-03 Hitachi, Ltd. Apparatus and method of pattern detection based on a scanning transmission electron microscope
EP0390118A2 (en) * 1989-03-30 1990-10-03 Hitachi, Ltd. Field emission scanning electron microsope and method of controlling beam aperture angle
US5008535A (en) * 1988-09-02 1991-04-16 U.S. Philips Corporation Energy analyzer and spectrometer for low-energy electrons
US5475228A (en) * 1994-11-28 1995-12-12 University Of Puerto Rico Unipolar blocking method and apparatus for monitoring electrically charged particles
WO2005006384A2 (en) * 2003-07-09 2005-01-20 Carl Zeiss Nts Gmbh Detector system for a scanning electron microscope and scanning electron microscope with a corresponding detector system
US20060097166A1 (en) * 2004-10-27 2006-05-11 Hitachi High-Technologies Corporation Charged particle beam apparatus and sample manufacturing method
US20060169894A1 (en) * 2005-01-18 2006-08-03 International Business Machines Corporation Method of forming images in a scanning electron microscope
EP1437759A3 (en) * 2003-01-07 2008-02-27 Hitachi High-Technologies Corporation Electron beam device
WO2008152464A2 (en) * 2007-06-11 2008-12-18 C.N.R. Consiglio Nazionale Delle Ricerche Detection device for electron microscope

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Patent Citations (1)

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Non-Patent Citations (1)

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Title
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Cited By (42)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USRE29500E (en) * 1970-08-31 1977-12-20 Max-Planck-Gesellschaft Zur Forderung Der Wissenschaften E.V. Scanning charged beam particle beam microscope
US3857034A (en) * 1970-08-31 1974-12-24 Max Planck Gesellschaft Scanning charged beam particle beam microscope
US3808441A (en) * 1971-04-30 1974-04-30 Thomson Csf Devices for measuring the dose rate of a beam of ionising radiation
DE2221151A1 (en) * 1971-04-30 1972-11-16 Thomson Csf Arrangement for measuring the radiation dose of an ionizing Strahlungsbuendels
US3917946A (en) * 1972-04-12 1975-11-04 Philips Corp Electron-optical device for the recording of selected diffraction patterns
US3833811A (en) * 1972-07-11 1974-09-03 Jeol Ltd Scanning electron microscope with improved means for focusing
US3914606A (en) * 1973-03-12 1975-10-21 Jeol Ltd Electron detector
US4068123A (en) * 1973-07-27 1978-01-10 Nihon Denshi Kabushiki Kaisha Scanning electron microscope
US3909610A (en) * 1973-08-22 1975-09-30 Jeol Ltd Apparatus for displaying the energy distribution of a charged particle beam
DE2526116A1 (en) * 1974-06-14 1976-01-02 Cgr Mev Device for checking the centering, intensity, uniformity and richtungsbuendelung an ionizing strahlenbuendels
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DE2110325A1 (en) 1971-09-16
GB1294440A (en) 1972-10-25
JPS5411664B1 (en) 1979-05-16
CH520927A (en) 1972-03-31
BE763456A1 (en)
FR2084007A5 (en) 1971-12-17
BE763456A (en) 1971-07-16

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