US3625791A - Moistener for bias-laying machine - Google Patents

Moistener for bias-laying machine Download PDF

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US3625791A
US3625791A US3625791DA US3625791A US 3625791 A US3625791 A US 3625791A US 3625791D A US3625791D A US 3625791DA US 3625791 A US3625791 A US 3625791A
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Prior art keywords
roll
nip
embossing
plies
water
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Charles A Lee
Warren R Furbeck
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International Paper Co
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International Paper Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B31MAKING ARTICLES OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER; WORKING PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31CMAKING WOUND ARTICLES, e.g. WOUND TUBES, OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31C3/00Making tubes or pipes by feeding obliquely to the winding mandrel centre line
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B31MAKING ARTICLES OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER; WORKING PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31FMECHANICAL WORKING OR DEFORMATION OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31F5/00Attaching together sheets, strips or webs; Reinforcing edges
    • B31F5/02Attaching together sheets, strips or webs; Reinforcing edges by crimping or slotting or perforating
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T156/00Adhesive bonding and miscellaneous chemical manufacture
    • Y10T156/10Methods of surface bonding and/or assembly therefor
    • Y10T156/1002Methods of surface bonding and/or assembly therefor with permanent bending or reshaping or surface deformation of self sustaining lamina
    • Y10T156/1007Running or continuous length work
    • Y10T156/1023Surface deformation only [e.g., embossing]

Abstract

A continuous cohesive multi-ply ribbon is made by forming a continuous spiral wound tube of creped tissue, flattening the tube and joining the plies of the flattened tube by embossing the plate together. After the spiral wound tube is formed, it is passed through a pressure nip formed by two rolls, thereby flattening the tube. Droplets of water are sprayed on one of the rolls. The water is carried to the pressure nip on the one roll and there transferred to the flattened tube as it enters the pressure nip. The moistened flattened tube is then passed through an embossing nip where the plies of the tube are pressed together at spaced locations with pressure sufficient to crush the fibers of the respective plies into one another, the water thus added to the creped tissue being sufficient for the crushing of the fibers to attach the plies together at said spaced locations with a glassine-type attachment.

Description

United States Patent [72] Inventors Charles A. Lee;

Warren R. Furbeck, both of Knoxville, Tenn. [21] Appl. No. 845,477 [22] Filed July 28, 1969 [45] Patented Dec. 7, 1971 [73] Assignee International Paper Company New York, N .Y. Continuation-impart of application Ser. No. 719,986, Apr. 9, 1969, now abandoned. This application July 28, 1969, Ser. No. 845,477

[54] MOISTENER FOR BIAS-LAYING MACHINE 6 Claims, 10 Drawing Figs.

[52] US. Cl 156/194, 156/183, 156/195, 156/209, 156/290, 156/306, 156/429 [51] Int. Cl B65h 81/06 [50] Field ofSearch 156/183, 191, 194, 209, 429, 432, 195, 184, 300, 290

[5 6] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,300,368 1/1967 Cooper et a1. 156/183 X Primary ExaminerCarl D. Quarforth Assistant Examiner-Gary G. Solyst AllorneyAnderson, Luedeka, Fitch, Even and Tabin ABSTRACT: A continuous cohesive multi-ply ribbon is made by forming a continuous spiral wound tube of creped tissue. flattening the tube and joining the plies of the flattened tube by embossing the plate together. After the spiral wound tube is formed, it is passed through a pressure nip formed by two rolls, thereby flattening the tube. Droplets of water are sprayed on one of the rolls. The water is carried to the pressure nip on the one roll and there transferred to the flattened tube as it enters the pressure nip. The moistened flattened tube is then passed through an embossing nip where the plies of the tube are pressed together at spaced locations with pressure sufficient to crush the fibers of the respective plies into one another, the water thus added to the creped tissue being sufficient for the crushing of the fibers to attach the plies together at said spaced locations with a glassine-type attachment.

PATENTED DEE 71971 SHEET 1 OF 5 PATENTEDUEB H971 11625791 SHEEI 2 [IF 5 FIG.4

INVENTORS CHARLES A. Lil WARREN R- FURIEGK INVENTORS GHlRLES A. Lil WARREN R. FURBEOK ATTY8.

PATENIEUnEc 7|97l SHEET 3 OF 5 FIG.5

PATENTED UEB 7|97l 3325791 sum u or 5 FIG] .NVINTO CHARLES A. LI! Ullllll R. FURIEOK PATENTEUflEc H97! 3625791 SHEET 5 OF 5 luv'nrroaa caAnLea A. LEE WARREN a. FURBEGK ATTYS.

- sued May 25,1971.

This invention relates to a method of and apparatus for producing a multiply paper product and more particularly to conditioning the plies of a continuous multiply ribbon and thereafter attaching the plies together by embossing.

Paper productsare enjoying substantial success as a substitute for cloth fabrics in a number of fields and product lines such as clothing, disposable diapers, disposable bed sheets and disposable pillow cases. Disposable products should be sufficiently inexpensive that they may be discarded after a short period of use and have strength to ensure that they will function adequately as a substitute for cloth products. It has been found that products of sufficient strength can be obtained by bias laying webs of paper such as creped tissue to form a multilayered continuous ribbon which is then fonned into the products. In bias-laid creped tissue products, the lines of creping of one ply are disposed at an angle to the lines of creping of another ply. The lines of strength of creped tissue is normal to the lines of creping and thus the lines of strength of the respective plies are at an angle to one another. The plies therefore reinforce one another, provided they are in some way attached to one another. An inexpensive way of fastening the respective plies together is by embossing. No glue or other adhesive is required, the fibers of one ply being joined to the fibers of another ply by the embossing.

It has been discovered however that such bonding is uncertain unless the moisture content of the plies is carefully controlled. If the moisture in the sheets is less than about 6 percent, the plies cannot be effectively emboss bonded. To this end, in accordance with the present invention, moisture is added to the plies prior to embossing. Preferably, the added moisture brings the moisture content of the web to about 8 percent. Although greater moisture'content might permit improved bonding in some instances, too much added water may result in a commercially unacceptable product which tends to mold. The upper limit of moisture depends upon the ambient conditions to which the resulting ribbon is to be exposed. Temperature and humidity are perhaps the two most important factors. For most expected conditions, an upper limit of about percent is tolerable. The lower limit depends upon how strong a bond is required and upon the physical properties of the web. When high wet strength tissue is used, a higher level of moisture is required for effective bonding.

It has further been found that the water must be applied to the creped tissue while it isheld in place, or the water causes the tissue to lose its crepe in a nonuniform manner, resulting in a wrinkled product. Therefore, in accordance with the present invention, water is sprayed in a controlled manner in small, evenly distributed droplets onto a nip roll prior to the nip, and the web is held by the nip of the roll as the water is transferred to the web.

To bond the plies by embossing, one ply is forced against another with sufiicient pressure to crush the fibers of the respective plies. With the plies of tissue conditioned asabove, the plies are attached by attachments of the glassine type where the fibers are relatively permanently held together, particularly against shear forces.

Accordingly, it is an object of the invention to provide an improved method and apparatus for controlling the moisture content of a multiply web and bonding the plies together by embossing. Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a bias-laid according to the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged plan view of a portion of the product shown in FIG. 1, showing the lines of embossing.

FIG. 3 is a further enlarged sectional view of the product taken along line 33 of FIG. 2;

product formed FIG. 4 is a side view, partly in section, of one form of apparatus for forming the product shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is an end view of the bias-laying machine shown in FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a top sectional view of the moistening and embossing apparatus shown in FIG. 4, taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged top view of a portion of the embossing apparatus shown in FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is an end sectional view of the moistening apparatus shown in FIG. 4, taken along line 8-8 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 9 is a side sectional view of the moistening apparatus shown in FIG. 8, taken along line 99 of FIG. 8; and

FIG. 10 is a side view of apparatus for forming the product shown in FIG. 1, showing alternative moistening and embossing apparatus.

In FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 is illustrated the product formed by the present invention. A web 8 of creped tissue is formed into a bias-laid ribbon 10. The ribbon 10 is formed by spirally wrapping a single web 8 of creped tissue into a tubular shape, flattening the tube, and embossing the plies together. This forms a two-ply ribbon 10 as shown in FIG. 1 comprising an upper ply l2 and a lower ply 14, both made from the same continuous creped tissue web 8. Because the web 8 is initially wound spirally, the upper ply 12 is disposed at a bias with respect to the lower ply l4 and both are disposed at a bias with respect to the longitudinal direction of the ribbon 10. The lines of creping run normal to the longitudinal direction of the web 8 and hence the lines of creping 16 of the upper ply lie at a bias to the lines of creping 18 of the lower ply, and all lie at a bias with respect to the longitudinal direction of the bias-laid ribbon 10. The line of strength of creped tissue is normal to the lines of creping. Hence the lines of strength of the respec tive plies l2, 14 of the ribbon 10 are at an angle with respect to each other. Thus, each ply reinforces the other, each providing particular strength in a different respective direction.

Depending upon the angle of pitch at which the initial web 8 is wrapped to form the tube and upon the width of the web, the successive turns of the web 8 may overlap to a certain degree as shown at 19. It is preferable that there be some overlap in order to provide a more coherent sheet; indeed the overlap may be to such an extent that a four-ply or greater ply ribbon 10 may be produced with the same web 8. Alternatively, multiple plies may be formed from more than one initial web. As shown in FIG. 1, the overlap 19 may typically be about a quarter of the web.

To provide coherence in the resulting ribbon 10, the respective plies 12 and 14 are welded together at lines of embossing 20. As will be explained further below, this welding of the plies together may be achieved by exerting great local pressure at spaced locations sufficient to crush the fibers of the respective plies into one another at these locations. As shown more particularly in FIGS. 2 and 3, these lines of embossing may comprise rows of patterned separate embossed spots 21. When the plies have been properly hydrated, this produces an attachment of the glassine type, as shown best in FIG. 3, thus causing the plies to adhere to one another. This type of attachment is particularly strong in shear. With the plies thus fastened to each other and with the lines of creping l6, 18 at a bias both to each other and to the longitudinal direction of the ribbon 10, a strong and coherent ribbon is formed.

Such bias-laid ribbon may be formed with the apparatus shown in FIGS. 4-10. As shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, the creped tissue web 8 is supplied from a parent roll 22 and wrapped around a tubular mandrel 24 to form a spiral wrapped tube. In order to wrap the web 8 on the mandrel 24, the parent roll 22 is rotated about its axis 26 to pay out the web 8, and at the same time it is rotated about an axis 28 which is perpendicular to the axis 26 and extends through the center of the mandrel 24. The parent roll 22 is mounted on a carriage 30 for rotation about the axis 26, the carriage 30 being mounted for rotation on an overhead supporting column 32 for rotation about the axis 28. The carriage 30 and the parent roll 22 may be driven by a motor 34. The motor 34 acts through a variable speed transmission 35, sprockets 36 and 38 and chain 40 to drive the bearing 42 which supports the carriage 30 on the supporting column 32. This drives the carriage about its axis 28. At the same time a sprocket 44 is rigidly mounted to the column 32 and is connected by a chain 46 to a sprocket 48 rotatably mounted on the carriage 30 so that upon rotation of the carriage 30 the sprocket 48 turns and operates through a transmission 50 to drive an endless drive belt 52 which engages the parent roll 22. The drive belt 52 is mounted in a well-known manner to engage the surface of the web 8 on the parent roll 22, even as the roll is used up, thus always driving the web 8 at a speed directly proportional to the speed of rotation of the carriage 30.

For reasons that will become apparent subsequently, the mandrel 24 must remain stationary relative to the supporting column 32, yet it must depend from the carriage 30. To this end another sprocket 54 is rigidly fastened to the supporting column 32. It is connected by a chain 56 and a sprocket 58 to a shaft 60 rotatably mounted on the carriage 30. The shaft 60 is in turn connected by a sprocket 62, a chain 64 and a sprocket 66 to the mandrel 24 which is rotatably mounted on the bottom of the carriage 30. With this arrangement, upon rotation of the carriage 30 relative to the supporting column 32, the mandrel 34 is rotated in the opposite direction at the same rate so as to remain stationary with respect to the column 32.

The web 8 paid out from the parent roll 22 is directed over a guide roll 68 and then over a shaped chute or guide 70 which directs the web 8 at the desired angle to the mandrel 24. The chute 70 and guide roll 68 are mounted on the carriage 30 so that upon the driving of the carriage 30, the web 8 is paid out around the mandrel 24 at the desired angle. This forms the web 8 into a spiral wound tube around the mandrel 24. The tube is withdrawn from the mandrel 24 at the same rate at which it is formed by pulling the tube downwardly along the mandrel. The lower part of the mandrel is flattened, although of substantially constant circumference, so that as the tube is withdrawn downwardly it is flattened.

The web 8 wound into a spiral wound tube is drawn downwardly by a pressure nip 72 formed by a pair of rolls 74 and 76 disposed just below the end of the mandrel 24. The rolls 74 and 76 pinch the flattened tube into the ribbon and at the same time pull the tube downwardly from the mandrel 24 at the rate at which it was being formed. From the pressure nip 72 the ribbon passes to an embossing nip 78 between the roll 76 and an embossing roll 80. At this nip the lines of embossing 20 are embossed into the ribbon 10. The ribbon 10 then passes over a guide roll 82 to a winder 84 which operates in a conventional manner to wind the ribbon 10 in rolls. As shown in FIG. 4 the ribbon 10 is a single piece; however these ribbons may be made in widths of more than I00 inches, in which case it is frequently desirable to cut the ribbon into strips of lesser width. A slitter may then be provided to cut the ribbon to any desired width.

For effective embossing, it is necessary to control the moisture in the web 8 at the time of embossing. As mentioned above, the moisture content should be at least 6 percent and preferably about 8 percent. To control the moisture content of the web at the time of embossing, moisture is added to the flattened tube at the nip 72 from a moisture unit 86. The moisture unit 86 is shown in detail in FIGS. 6, 8 and 9.

The moisture unit 86 may comprise a housing 88 in which are rotatably mounted a dip roll 90 and a brush roll 92. The housing includes a tank 93 containing water 94. Water may be supplied through a pipe 96 from a source of water supply not shown. In order to assure a constant water level, the water may be added faster than it is used, any excess flowing out through an overflow pipe 98. Alternatively, a float valve could be used to control the supply of water through the supply pipe 96. The dip roll 90 is rotatably mounted in bearings 100 rigidly secured to the housing 88. The clip roll 90 may be a stainless steel roll and is mounted to rotate with its lower part in the water 94 so that, as it rotates, it carries water upward to the brush roll 92. The brush roll 92 is rotatably mounted in bearings 102 also secured to the housing 88. The brush roll 92 is formed with bristles 104, preferably of nylon, extending from a central core 106. The bristles are ground to form a generally precise outer cylindrical surface in order that the ends of the bristles maintain a predetermined relationship with the dip roll. The brush roll is mounted for rotation about an axis parallel to the axis of rotation of the dip roll and spaced therefrom so that the bristle ends are slightly spaced from the surface of the dip roll 90. For example, the dip roll 90 may be 5% inches in diameter and the brush roll 6% inches in diameter, with their axes spaced 6 inches apart plus a slight clearance.

To facilitate alignment of the brush roll 92 in proper relationship to the dip roll 90, the bearings 102 are mounted for vertical adjustment through vertically elongated slots 108. The bearings 102 are fastened to the housing 88 by nuts and bolts slideably adjustable in vertically elongated slots 112. The bearings 102 are adjusted vertically to bring the brush rolls 92 into proper contact with the upper surface of the dip roll 90, and the nuts are tightened to lock the brush roll in place.

A motor 114 is coupled by a belt 116 to a pulley 118 which drives one end of the shaft 120 on which the brush roll 92 is mounted. On the other end of the shaft 120 is a pulley 122. The pulley 122 is coupled through a belt 124 to a pulley 126 which drives a variable speed transmission 128 through a shaft 130. The variable speed transmission drives an output shaft 132 at a selectable speed. A pulley 134 on the output shaft 132 is connected to a belt 136 to drive a pulley 138 affixed to the shaft 140 on which the dip roll 90 is secured. When the motor 114 is energized (from a power source not shown), it drives the brush roll 92 at a uniform speed. The variable speed transmission, deriving its power from the motor 114, drives the dip roll 90 at a selectable speed, in general substantially slower than the speed of rotation of the brush roll 92. The dip roll 90 and brush roll 92 rotate in the same angular direction. Their adjacent surfaces at their closest points are therefore moving in opposite linear directions, the surface of the brush roll moving toward the nip roll 74. Thus the dip roll 90 picks up water 94 and carries a film of water upward to the brush roll 92, where the bristles 104 flick the film of water from the dip roll 90. The brush roll 92 is rotated so rapidly that droplets of water are flicked from the brush roll as a spray. As mentioned above, the water is not sprayed directly upon the creped tissue web 8 but rather is sprayed against the nip roll 74 at a point remote from the nip 72. Splash guards 141 define the opening in the housing 88 through which the water is sprayed, limiting the spray to the desired area. The amount of water sprayed onto the roll 74 is determined by the rate of rotation of the dip roll 90 carrying the water to the brush roll 92. inasmuch as the rate of rotation of the dip roll 90 is determined by the speed of the output shaft 132 of the variable speed transmission 128, the rate at which water is sprayed is controlled by the adjustment of the variable speed transmission 128.

The moistening unit 86 sprays small droplets of water uniformly across the nip roll 74 at a point upstream from the nip 72. The nip roll 74 may be a rubber-covered roll. The water adheres to the outside of the roll and is carried by the roll to the nip 72 where the roll comes in contact with the collapsing tube. The water is absorbed by the web 8 by capillary action. If the droplets are applied to the roll rather than directly to the web 8, the water may be distributed more evenly on the web 8. When the droplets are sprayed directly upon the creped tissue web, water is concentrated at each droplet resulting in substantial loss of creping at each droplet, in turn producing a puckering in the resultant product. Further, the nip 72 holds the flattened tube as water is applied, thus permitting the water to distribute itself through the web 8 while the creping is held in place. It may be noted that the moistened roll 74 actually comes in contact with the web 8 a short distance before the nip 72. This distance is so short that the nip 72 engages the web 8 before any substantial loss of creping. When the water is said to be applied while the plies 12, 14 are held in the pressure nip 72, this includes the configuration disclosed where the water is actually applied just before the nip as the plies enter the nip. The moistened web is then carried about the roll 76 to the nip 78 where the moistened flattened web is embossed. By using a continuous even pressure nip to draw the tube from the mandrel 24, a flat uniform ribbon is formed; whereas if embossing rolls are used directly to draw the tube from the mandrel 24, the ribbon is differentially stretched, resulting in wrinkling and tearing.

As seen best in FIG. 6, the rolls 74, 76, 80 and 82 are rotatably mounted in a frame 142. The roll 74 may be a rubber-covered steel roll. The roll 76 acts as both a nip roll for the pressure nip 72 and as an anvil roll for the embossing nip 78. It is therefore preferably a hardened steel plain roll. The embossing roll 80 is shown formed of a steel cylinder on which are affixed a series of embossing rings 144. The embossing rings 144 are urged against the anvil roll 76 with the ribbon therebetween in order to impress the lines of embossing into the ribbon 10. The embossing may be performed with any of a number of desired patterns. A patterned embossing ring permits a greater localized pressure than a broader unpatterned ring. In the rings as shown, the pattern is a diamond shaped pattern formed by knurling the rings and grinding off the tips of the knurling. The embossing rings may be about one-fifth inch wide and spaced about 2% inches apart with the lands on the embossing rings constituting about one-fourth of the total area of the rings.

The embossing must be performed under great pressuresufficient to crush the individual fibers and cause them to flow together, locking the fibers of the upper layer 12 to the fibers of the lower layer 14 with a glassine-type attachment. Because of the great force required to achieve the pressures needed to fuse the fibers together, a backup roll is provided to keep the embossing roll from bending, for bending would result in unequal pressures on the respective embossing rings and hence unequal embossing. To equalize the pressures, a backup roll is supplied in the form of a plurality of backup wheels 146. The wheels, each comprising two rims 147, are rotatably mounted on respective fork frames 148. Each rim 147 exerts pressure against shoulders 149 on adjacent embossing rings 144. The fork frames are triangular with one apex rotatably supported on a crossbeam 150, the crossbeam 150 being movably supported on a bed 152. The bearings 153 for the backup wheels are at respective apices of the respective fork frames 148. The remaining apex of each fork frame is coupled to the crossbeam 150 by a jackscrew 154, so that by adjustment of the jackscrew 154 the position of the respective backup wheel may be adjusted relative to the crossbeam 150. This adjusts the relative pressure applied by the respective embossing rings 144 to assure that the same pressure is applied by each embossing ring. To provide the proper pressure, force is applied to the crossbeam 150. Such force may be applied by hydraulic or pneumatic means, as by a pneumatic bladder 156 disposed between the crossbeam 150 and a fixed support 158 secured to the bed 152.

The roll 74 is driven from a line shaft 159 connected to the motor 34 that drives the carriage 30. Roll 76 is friction driven by the roll 74; the embossing roll 80 is in turn friction driven by the roll 76; and the backup wheels 146 are in turn friction driven by the embossing roll 80. The variable speed transmission 35 is adjusted so that the rolls 74 and 76 draw the formed tube from the mandrel 24 at the rate the tube is formed. The web is moistened by the moistener 86 as it is flattened. The flattened assembly is then carried about the roll 76 at the same rate that it is withdrawn from the mandrel 24 and is embossed at nip 78 at this same rate. The embossed ribbon, now in the form shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, passes over the guide roll 82 to the winder 84.

The apparatus as shown in FIGS. 4 to 9 embosses the ribbon directly afterit has been compressed. In FIG. 10 an alternative construction is shown wherein flattened ribbon is transported some distance before being embossed. In this case, an endless carrier 160 is passed through a pressure nip 162 between nip rolls 164, 165, the nip rolls 164, 165 both being like the roll 74 described above. The ribbon is then carried out of the nip on the carrier 160 to an embossing nip 166 between an embossing roll 168 and an anvil roll 170. These rolls correspond to rolls 76 and 80 described above, and means as described above may be used to create and equalize the pressure at the various embossing rings. An additional backup roll 171 below the anvil roll keeps the latter straight and aids in the application of pressure. The carrier 160 may be made of polyester fibers sold under the trademark Dacron. In such case, the carrier 160 and the ribbon 10 may both become charged with static electricity, causing the ribbon 10 to billow from the carrier 160. To reduce such static electricity an additional moisture unit 172 is disposed adjacent the roll I65 around which the carrier 160 is disposed, and moisture is applied directly to the carrier 160 to reduce or eliminate the accumulation of static electricity. The moisture unit 86 is disposed adjacent the roll 164 to spray droplets of water thereon as described above in connection with roll 74 and FIGS. 4 to 9. Some of the moisture applied to the carrier 160 is transferred to the ribbon 10 at the nip 162. The total moisture applied to the ribbon by both moisture units 86 and 172 is comparable to that supplied by the single moisture unit 86 in the apparatus of F 10$. 4 to 9.

Alternative constructions and further details, particularly of the bias-laying machine, are set forth in the aforesaid parent application, Ser. No. 719,986. Various other modifications may also be made within the scope of the present invention.

For example, other embossing patterns may be used. Instead of straight and parallel lines of embossing 20, the lines may intersect, as in a diamond pattern. Further, the embossing rings 144 may be separately rotatably mounted, forming a multipart embossing roll 80. It is also possible that the water not be directly sprayed upon the roll 74 but rather sprayed upon a transfer roll and then printed on the roll 74. Various features believed to be novel are included in the following claims.

What is claimed is:

l. A method of forming a cohesive multiply ribbon of creped tissue comprising passing overlaid plies of creped tissue continuously through a pressure nip defined by a pair of rotating rolls, moistening at least one of the rolls and transferring the moisture therefrom to the plies of tissue while they are held in said pressure nip whereupon the moisture content of the creped tissue is between about 6 to 10 percent, passing the moistened plies through an embossing nip, and at said embossing nip crushing the fibers of the respective plies into one another at spaced locations to form glassine-type attachments by pressing the plies together at said spaced locations.

2. A method of forming a cohesive multiply ribbon of creped tissue comprising passing overlaid plies of creped tis-' sue through a pressure nip formed by two rolls, applying droplets of water to one of said rolls, carrying said water on said one roll to said pressure nip and transferring the water to said plies of creped tissue as they enter said pressure nip whereupon the moisture content of the creped tissue is between about 6 to 10 percent, passing the moistened plies through an embossing nip, and in said embossing nip crushing the fibers of the respective plies into one another at spaced locations to form glassine-type attachments by pressing the plies together at said spaced locations.

3. The method according to claim 2 wherein the water added to said plies of creped tissue raises their water content to about 8 percent.

4. The method according to claim 2 wherein an endless carrier web is passed around the other of said two rolls and through said pressure nip with said overlaid plies and supports said plies between said pressure nip and said embossing nip, and water is sprayed on said carrier web prior to its passage through said pressure nip.

pressure nip whereupon the moisture content of the creped tissue is between about 6 to 10 percent, passing the moistened flattened tube through an embossing nip, and in said embossing nip crushing the fibers of the respective plies into one another at spaced locations to form glassine-type attachments by pressing the plies of the tube together at said spaced locatrons.

Patent No.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Dated December 7, 1971 Column 1, Column 1, Column 1, Column 6, Column 6, Column 7,

Signed (SEAL) Attest:

It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

line 4 (Abstract), change "plate" to --n-plies--. lines 7 and 8, change "multiply" to -multiply-. line 65, change "multiply" to --multi-ply-.

line 44, change "multiply" to -multi-ply-.

line 55, change "multiply" to --multi-ply-.

line

3, change "multiply" to --multiply-.

and sealed this l th day of July 1972.

EDWARD M.FLE'ICHER, JR. Attesting Officer R0 BERT GOTT SC HALK Commissioner of Patents )RM PO-105O (10-69)

Claims (5)

  1. 2. A method of forming a cohesive multiply ribbon of creped tissue comprising passing overlaid plies of creped tissue through a pressure nip formed by two rolls, applying droplets of water to one of said rolls, carrying said water on said one roll to said pressure nip and transferring the water to said plies of creped tissue as they enter said pressure nip whereupon the moisture content of the creped tissue is between about 6 to 10 percent, passing the moistened plies through an embossing nip, and in said embossing nip crushing the fibers of the respective plies into one another at spaced locations to form glassine-type attachments by pressing the plies together at said spaced locations.
  2. 3. The method according to claim 2 wherein the water added to said plies of creped tissue raises their water content to about 8 percent.
  3. 4. The method according to claim 2 wherein an endless carrier web is passed around the other of said two rolls and through said pressure nip with said overlaid plies and supports said plies between said pressure nip and said embossing nip, and water is sprayed on said carrier web prior to its passage through said pressure nip.
  4. 5. The method according to claim 2 wherein the pressure at each of said spaced locations is substantially the same.
  5. 6. A method of forming a continuous cohesive multiply ribbon of creped tissue comprising forming a continuous spiral wound tube of creped tissue, passing the tube through a pressure nip formed by two rolls and thereby flattening the tube, spraying droplets of water on one of said rolls, carrying said water On said one roll to said pressure nip and transferring the water to the flattened tube of creped tissue as it enters said pressure nip whereupon the moisture content of the creped tissue is between about 6 to 10 percent, passing the moistened flattened tube through an embossing nip, and in said embossing nip crushing the fibers of the respective plies into one another at spaced locations to form glassine-type attachments by pressing the plies of the tube together at said spaced locations.
US3625791A 1969-07-28 1969-07-28 Moistener for bias-laying machine Expired - Lifetime US3625791A (en)

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US3625791A Expired - Lifetime US3625791A (en) 1969-07-28 1969-07-28 Moistener for bias-laying machine

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3943224A (en) * 1970-08-21 1976-03-09 Drostholm F H Method and apparatus for making continuous lengths of resin tubes
FR2637220A1 (en) * 1988-09-30 1990-04-06 Datapac Srl Method and device for sealing sheets of paper
EP0516488A2 (en) * 1991-05-30 1992-12-02 Sonoco Products Company Method of and apparatus for the manufacture of paperboard tubes having controlled outside diameter
US6913673B2 (en) * 2001-12-19 2005-07-05 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Heated embossing and ply attachment

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1504255A (en) * 1924-08-12 Method of manufacturing bias fabric and apparatus therefor
US2822855A (en) * 1952-06-19 1958-02-11 Sprague Electric Co Method for producing a high density paper
US3157545A (en) * 1961-03-30 1964-11-17 Dunlop Rubber Co Method and apparatus for making continuous lengths of rubberized bias-cut fabric from a tubular length
US3300368A (en) * 1964-12-11 1967-01-24 Crown Zellerbach Corp Creped sheet materials and the process of producing the same
US3488242A (en) * 1966-06-23 1970-01-06 Kimberly Clark Co Apparatus for making multi-ply sheet product

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1504255A (en) * 1924-08-12 Method of manufacturing bias fabric and apparatus therefor
US2822855A (en) * 1952-06-19 1958-02-11 Sprague Electric Co Method for producing a high density paper
US3157545A (en) * 1961-03-30 1964-11-17 Dunlop Rubber Co Method and apparatus for making continuous lengths of rubberized bias-cut fabric from a tubular length
US3300368A (en) * 1964-12-11 1967-01-24 Crown Zellerbach Corp Creped sheet materials and the process of producing the same
US3488242A (en) * 1966-06-23 1970-01-06 Kimberly Clark Co Apparatus for making multi-ply sheet product

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3943224A (en) * 1970-08-21 1976-03-09 Drostholm F H Method and apparatus for making continuous lengths of resin tubes
FR2637220A1 (en) * 1988-09-30 1990-04-06 Datapac Srl Method and device for sealing sheets of paper
BE1003006A5 (en) * 1988-09-30 1991-10-22 Datapac Srl Method and device for sealing sheets of paper.
EP0516488A2 (en) * 1991-05-30 1992-12-02 Sonoco Products Company Method of and apparatus for the manufacture of paperboard tubes having controlled outside diameter
EP0516488A3 (en) * 1991-05-30 1993-09-15 Sonoco Products Company Method of and apparatus for the manufacture of paperboard tubes having controlled outside diameter
US6913673B2 (en) * 2001-12-19 2005-07-05 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Heated embossing and ply attachment
US20050241788A1 (en) * 2001-12-19 2005-11-03 Baggot James L Heated embossing and ply attachment

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