US3621685A - Cylindrical lock - Google Patents

Cylindrical lock Download PDF

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Publication number
US3621685A
US3621685A US3621685DA US3621685A US 3621685 A US3621685 A US 3621685A US 3621685D A US3621685D A US 3621685DA US 3621685 A US3621685 A US 3621685A
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Prior art keywords
deadbolt
latchbolt
knob
retractor
cup
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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Thomas J Sargent
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Thomas J Sargent
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E05LOCKS; KEYS; WINDOW OR DOOR FITTINGS; SAFES
    • E05BLOCKS; ACCESSORIES THEREFOR; HANDCUFFS
    • E05B59/00Locks with latches separate from the lock-bolts or with a plurality of latches or lock-bolts
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T292/00Closure fasteners
    • Y10T292/08Bolts
    • Y10T292/0801Multiple
    • Y10T292/0834Sliding
    • Y10T292/0836Operating means
    • Y10T292/0843Gear
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T70/00Locks
    • Y10T70/50Special application
    • Y10T70/5093For closures
    • Y10T70/5155Door
    • Y10T70/5199Swinging door
    • Y10T70/5226Combined dead bolt and latching bolt
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T70/00Locks
    • Y10T70/50Special application
    • Y10T70/5093For closures
    • Y10T70/5155Door
    • Y10T70/5199Swinging door
    • Y10T70/5372Locking latch bolts, biased
    • Y10T70/5381Projectable beyond normal biased position
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T70/00Locks
    • Y10T70/70Operating mechanism
    • Y10T70/7441Key
    • Y10T70/7915Tampering prevention or attack defeating
    • Y10T70/7949Yielding or frangible connections

Abstract

A CYLINDRICAL LOCK HAVING A DEADBOLT AND A GUARDED LATCHBOLT, THE DEADBOLT BEING ACTUATED BY TURN BUTTON MEANS ON THE INSIDE AND KEY MEANS ON THE OUTSIDE. THE DEADBOLT PROJECTS A SUBSTANTIAL DISTANCE BEYOND THE LATCHBOLT WHEN BOTH ARE IN FULLY PROJECTED POSITION PROVIDING AN ADDED SAFETY FEATURE. ALSO PROVIDED ARE A PICK-PROOF CYLINDER UNIT AND A SPINNING KNOB ARRANGEMENT FOR FRUSTRATING ENTRY BY FORCING THE OUTSIDE KNOB.

Description

Nov. 23, 1971 T. J. SARGENT CYLINDRICAL LOCK 4 Sheets-Shoot 1 Filed Oct. 1. 1969 INVENTOR. THOMAS J. SARGENT Nov. 23, 1971 T. J. SARGENT GYLINDRICAL LOCK 4. Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 1, 1969 T. J. SARGENT GYLINDRICAL LOCK Nov. 23, 1971 4 Sheets-Sheet 4.

Filed Oct. 1, 1969 United States Patent US. Cl. 70-107 12 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A cylindrical lock having a deadbolt and a guarded latchbolt, the deadbolt being actuated by turn button means on the inside and key means on the outside. The deadbolt projects a substantial distance beyond the latchbolt when both are in fully projected position providing an added safety feature. Also provided are a pick-proof cylinder unit and a spinning knob arrangement for frustrating entry by forcing the outside knob.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates generally to door locks, and has particular reference to a cylindrical lock having, in addition to its latchbolt, a deadbolt and a guardbolt whereby a safer than conventional cylindrical lock is provided.

In commercially available hotel function mortise locks, guard means are provided for the latchbolt as well as providing a deadbolt and sometimes stop-works. Mortise locks, however, are relatively expensive and difficult to install and for this reason, less expensive and easier to install cylindrical type locks are frequently used in apartment buildings, housing units and the like. Unfortunately, cylindrical locks have the disadvantage of not being as safe as mortise locks because, while they may have either a deadbolt or guard means for the latchbolt, none have both insofar as applicant is aware. One readily apparent reason for this is that the cylindrical latch case of a cylindrical type lock has a very limited amount of space making it difiicult to fit a latchbolt, a deadbolt and a guardbolt within its interior.

The closest prior art known to the applicant is US. Pat. No. 3,018,651 granted Jan. 30, 1962 to D. Morrison, Jr. for Lock. This patent discloses a cylindrical type lock having a deadbolt but no guard means is provided for the latchbolt. Therefore, if the outside knob has been locked without having moved the deadbolt into locking position, it might still be possible for an intruder to gain entry by forcing the latchbolt to retract using a thin, fiat instrurnent such as a nail file or credit card in a manner known to those familiar with the art.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The cylindrical lock of the invention offers all of the features of a hotel function mortise lock without unduly complicating the lock structure or making it any more difficult to install. The latch case contains, in addition to the latchbolt, both a deadbolt and a guardbolt, the latter preventing unauthorized entry in the manner described above when the outside knob has been locked and the deadbolt has not. The deadbolt has the advantage that it extends outwardly a substantial distance beyond the latchbolt when both are in fully projected position. This provides an added safety factor over, for example, the deadbolt of the Morrison patent which can extend no far ther than the latchbolt because of the manner in which the two bolts and their respective retractors are arranged.

In addition to its novel latch assembly, the lock to be disclosed herein has an essentially pick-proof cylinder unit whereby even if someone succeeds in aligning the tumblers so that the cylinder can be rotated, no lock function will occur. Thus, the cylinder unit does not become operatively connected to the lock works until the key is fully inserted in the unit. Another feature of the lock of the invention is its spinning knob arrangement wherein the sleeve to which the outside knob is secured is formed of two parts that are normally rigidly connected together but capable of movement relative to one another in the event that the knob has been locked and an extreme turning force is thereafter applied to it as by means of a pipe wrench.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is an exploded view of the latch and lock assemblies of the cylindrical lock of the invention;

FIG. 2 is an exploded view of the essential parts of the two assemblies of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a horizontal section through the assembled lock taken substantially on line 3-3 of FIG: 1;

FIG. 4 is a vertical axial section through the lock taken substantially on line 4-4 of FIG. 3;

FIGS. 5 and 6 are vertical cross sections through the assembled lock taken substantially on line 5-5 of FIG. 3, FIG. 5 showing the deadbolt in retracted position and FIG. 6 showing it in projected position;

FIG. 7 is a vertical cross section through the lock taken substantially on line 7-7 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 8 is an exploded view of the latchbolt, deadbolt and guardbolt assemblies;

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of the assembly of FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a front end elevation thereof;

FIGS. 11 and 12 are enlarged perspective views of the latchbolt and deadbolt retractors, respectively;

FIG. 13 is an enlarged perspective view of the retractor gear and pinion detail;

FIG. 14 is an enlarged rear elevation of the latchbolt retractor;

FIG. 15 is an enlarged exploded view of the detent mechanism for the turn button spindle;

FIG. 16 is a side elevation of the turn button sub assembly;

FIG. 17 is a perspective view of one part of the subassembly;

FIG. 18 is an end elevation of the outside cap and hub;

FIG. 19 is a right side elevation of the retractor showing in dash lines the position of the inside actuator sleeve relative thereto;

FIG. 20 is a left side elevation of the retractor showing in dash lines the position of the outside actuator sleeve relative thereto;

FIG. 21 is an exploded view of an interior sub-assembly of the outside actuator sleeve;

FIG. 22 is an exploded view of the exterior parts of the outside actuator sleeve;

FIG. 23 is an exploded view of the key cylinder unit;

FIG. 24 is a side elevation of the cylinder unit without the key inserted therein; and

FIG. 25 is a view corresponding to FIG. 24 but with the key inserted.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT In the cylindrical lock shown in FIG. 1, the inside and outside knobs 25, 26 are respectively provided with turn-push button and key means, the turn-push button 27 being capable of both rotational and axial movement but being referred to elsewhere in the specification as simply the turn button. In a manner to be explained hereinafter, the latchbolt can be retracted by turning either knob, pushing the button inwardly locks the outside knob and turning the inside knob or the key in the outside knob automatically releases the turn button. Closing the door does not release the turn button but when the door is closed the latchbolt is automatically dogged by the guardbolt.

' unlocked by means of the key and similarly, the deadbolt can be locked or unlocked by the key.

As is well known in the art, the lock assembly indicated generally at 28 is positioned in a transverse bore near the free edge of the door (not shown), while the latch assembly indicated generally at 29 is received in a bore that extends from the free edge and intersects the transverse bore. The lock case includes a central housing 30, FIGS. 1 and 2, that is located wholly within the door, the housing receiving therein the parallel top and bottom flanges 31 of a cap 32 mounted on a hub 34, see FIG. 2. A second cap and hub is positioned in the housing 30 with the cap 35 abutting against the sidewall 36 f the housing and hub 37 projecting outwardly through a hole 38 in the sidewall.

An inside escutcheon plate 39 is threaded onto hub 37 so that it abuts against the inside surface of the door and the shank 40 of the inside knob is received in an annular space between the end of the hub and a collar 41 on the escutcheon plate, the knob being rotatable relative to both the hub and collar which are normally fixed. A conventional anchor spring 42 and anchor 44 are mounted in the usual manner on the outside hub 34, the opposing sidewalls 45 of the anchor overlying the cap flanges 31 and being telescopically received in the housing when the parts are assembled. The anchor and anchor spring are optional and do not per se play a part of the present invention.

An outside escutcheon plate 46 is threaded onto the hub 34 so that it abuts against the outside surface of the door. As in the case of the inside knob, the shank 47 of the outside knob 26 is received in an annular space between the end of hub 34 and a collar 48 on the escutcheon plate, the knob being rotatable relative to both parts.

An inside actuator sleeve 49, FIG. 2, is journalled in the inside hub 37 and projects into the interior of the inside knob 25 so that the turn button 27 carried by the sleeve normally projects through an opening in the knob as shown in FIG. 1. As is conventional, the knob is secured to the sleeve by a spring catch 49a, FIG. 3, so that when the knob is turned the sleeve turns with it. At its inner end, the sleeve 49 is formed with a pair of generally radially projecting ears 50a, 50b and when the parts are assembled, these ears abut against and slide on the inside face of cap 35. The purpose of the ears is to actuate the latchbolt retractor 51 when the inside knob is turned, as will be more fully described hereinafter.

An outside actuator sleeve 52 is journalled in the outside hub 34 and projects into the outside knob 26 where it telescopically receives the key cylinder unit 53, FIGS. 24 and 25, the sleeve having a longitudinally extending slot 54 at its outer end to accommodate the radially projecting tumbler pin housing 55. Like the inside knob, outside knob 26 is secured to the sleeve by a spring catch 52a, FIG. 3, whereby the knob and sleeve turn together. Sleeve 52 also has a pair of ears 56, 57 at its inner end but only one is integral with the sleeve as will be presently explained. The cars 56, 57 abut against the inside face of cap 32 and like ears 50a, 50b, their function is to actuate the retractor 51 which is slidably mounted for back and forth movement between the cap flanges 31.

The housing 30, FIGS. 1, 2, and 6, is formed with a front opening 58 for communication with the rear end of the latch assembly 29. Thus, the latch assembly, which is inserted in its bore first during installation, is provided with a pair of diametrically opposed lugs 59 which engage the housing adjacent the upper and lower edges of the opening 58 as the housing is pushed into place in its bore. In this manner the latch and lock assemblies are secured together and maintained in proper registry with one another.

Latch assembly 29 includes a cylindrical latch case 60 and face plates 61a, 61b, all of which are substantially conventional. Contained within the latch case, FIGS. 3, 5, 6 and 8-10, are the latchbolt 62, deadbolt 64 and guardbolt 65 arranged with respect to one another as best shown in FIGS. 8 and 9. The bevelled latchbolt is formed with a relatively large, axially extending channel 66 which extends, in the widthwise direction, from one side of the bolt approximately of the way thereacross as indicated by FIG. 10. On its back side, latchbolt 62 is formed with a centrally disposed vertical slot 67 in which the forward end portions of a bifurcated plate 68 are pinned or otherwise secured.

The space 69 between the end portions or arms of the plate '68 is equal in width to the height of the latchbolt channel 66 and forms a rearward extension thereof. The deadbolt 64 is slidably mounted in the channel and is provided with a vertical slot or channel 70 in which the center portion of the plate 68 is received. With this arrangement, the arms 71 on either side of the deadbolt slot extend rearwardly on opposite sides of the center portion of plate 68 while the arms of the latter extend forwardly above and below the unslotted forward end of the deadbolt. Rearward movement of the deadbolt is thus limited by engagement of the end of its slot with the end of the space 69 between the arms of the plate.

A rocker arm 72 is pivotally connected at 74 to the rear end of plate 68, and the T-shaped rear end of the arm interengages with a loose fit shoulders 75 at the forward end of the retractor 51, FIGS. 5, 6 and 11. Rearward movement of the retractor thus operates through the arm 72 and plate 68 to withdraw or retract the latchbolt 62, the latter being normally biased into its outwardly projecting or latching position by a compression spring 76, FIGS. 3 and 8, the opposite ends of which embrace a rearwardly extending pin 77 on the latchbolt and a forwardly extending pin 78 in the latch case. The biasing action of spring 76 is aided by a corresponding guardbolt spring to be presently described. Forward or outward movement of the latchbolt is limited by shoulders 79 thereon, FIGS. 9 and 10, which abut against the back of the face plate 61a. Thus, as best shown in FIG. 1, the opening in the face plate is shaped so that only the guardbolt 65 and the portion of the latchbolt forward of the shoulders 79 can project through the opening.

The deadbolt 64 can be moved independently of the latchbolt and to this end, the rearwardly extending arms 71 of the deadbolt are notched for interengagement with a pair of spaced fingers 80 at the forward end of an actuator member 81, FIGS. 5, 6 and 12. The actuator 81 is slidably mounted in a way 82 in the retractor 51 and can be moved longitudinally by means described hereinafter to project or retract the deadbolt. In either extreme position of the actuator, however, its forward end and fingers 80 are always in front or outward of the forward end of the retractor as shown in FIGS. 5 and 6.

The guardbolt 65 has a flat side and an arcuate side as shown in FIG. 10, and the flat side engages a side of the deadbolt 64, FIGS. 8 and 9. The forward portion of the guardbolt is reduced in height and fits between the latchbolt shoulders 79, the guardbolt being slidable longitudinally relative to both the latchbolt and deadbolt. Forward movement of the guardbolt is limited by shoulders 84 on the upper and lower edges thereof which abut against the back side of the latchbolt shoulders 79. When such abutment occurs, the forward end of the guardbolt is flush with the forward end of the latchbolt as shown in FIGS. 1 and 3.

In order to dog or deadlock the latchbolt 62, the guardbolt 65 must be in the position shown in FIG. 9 wherein it is retracted with respect to the latchbolt. As

is well known in the art, the guardbolt is adapted to be held in this position by the strike (not shown) on the door jamb when the door is closed. When the guardbolt is retracted and the latchbolt is not, a dog 85 that is pivotally connected at 86 to the bifurcated plate 68 falls down in front of a laterally projecting lug 87 on the guardbolt which lug overlies the top of the right arm 71 of the deadbolt, as viewed in FIGS. 8 and 9. With the dog 85 in this position (and assuming that the outside knob has been locked), the latchbolt cannot be pushed into retracted position by slipping a flat instrument between the door edge and strike because the engagement of the dog with the lug prevents rearward movement of the latchbolt relative to the guardbolt. Moreover, the guardbolt cannot be forced back with the latchbolt because in its retracted position shown in FIG. 9 it is already back as far as it can go with its rear end against the rear wall 88, FIG. 3, of the latch case 60.

There is a lower dog 85 and lower lug 87 so that the lock will be reversible. The upper and lower lugs 87 on the guardbolt engage the upper and lower surfaces of the deadbolt arm 71 and help to guide the guardbolt in its longitudinal movement. The deadbolt channel 70 is wide enough to accommodate both the center portion of the bifurcated plate 68 and the forward portion of the rocker arm 72 with a clearance fit. When the parts are assembled, the forward hammer-headed end 89 of arm 72 is positioned near the end of the deadbolt channel, FIG. 3, and when the dog 85 drops down in front of the lug 87 it also depresses this hammer-head causing the forward portion of the arm to be rocked downwardly through a small angular increment permitted by the loose fit between the rear end of the arm and shoulders 75 on the retractor 51.

With the arrangement described above, 'whenever the retractor is moved rearwardly, as by turning the inside knob, the horizontal force on the rear end of the rocker arm causes it to rock back into horizontal position whereby the hammer-head 89 lifts the dog 85 out of engagement with the guardbolt lug S7. Disengagement of the dog from the lug enables a compression spring 90, which was compressed by the retraction of the guardbolt, to start to move the guardbolt forwardly. One end of the spring 90, FIGS. 3 and 8, is received in a bore 91 in the guardbolt while the other end embraces a pin 92 in the latch case. As the guardbolt moves forward, it is met by the rearwardly moving latchbolt 62 which is being positively retracted by the turning action of the knob on retractor 51. The shoulders 79 on the latchbolt thus engage the shoulders 84 on the guardbolt so that both are fully retracted and the door can be opened.

After the door has been opened and the knob released, both the latchbolt and guardbolt are returned to their outwardly projecting positions shown in FIGS. 1 and 3 by their respective compression springs 76 and 90 with the latter aiding the former, as previously noted. In normal operation, any time the guardbolt is not held in retracted position by the strike, retraction of the latchbolt will effect simultaneous retraction of the guardbolt due to the engagement of their respective shoulders 79 and 84. Thus, for example, whenever the door is closed by simply pushing it, the strike forces the bevelled latchbolt to retract which in turn causes the guardbolt to retract.

As noted above, turning the inside knob 25 in either direction operates through the inside actuator sleeve 49, FIG. 2, to retract the latchbolt 62. More specifically, the ears 50a, 50b on the inner end of the sleeve engage camming edges or shoulders 94a, 94b on the side of the retractor 51, FIGS. 11 and 19, and cause the retractor to move rearwardly; the rearward movement of the retractor is transmitted through rocker arm 72 and bifurcated plate 68 to the latchbolt. FIG. 19 illustrates the relationship between the right side (with respect to FIG. 2) of the retractor and the ears 50a, 5011, the latter together with sleeve 49 being shown in dash lines. As will be apparent, clockwise rotation of the knob and sleeve will cause car 5011 to push against the camming edge 94a and move the retractor rearwardly, while counterclockwise rotation will cause ear 50b to push against camming edge 94b to achieve the same result.

The cap flanges 31 between which the retractor 51 is positioned are lined with bearing metal strips 95, FIG. 18, and the retractor is provided with upper and lower rollers 96 to facilitate its back and forth movement. When either knob is released after being turned to retract the latchbolt, the retractor is immediately returned to its normal forward position by a pair of compression springs '97, FIGS. 3-6.. The forward ends of these springs are positioned in bores 98, FIG. 14, in the rear wall of the retractor and the rear ends thereof are held in position by tabs 99 on a spring clip 100, FIG. 18, that engages the cap flanges 31.

The actuator sleeve 49 carries a turn button subassembly, FIGS. 3. 4, 16 and 17, which includes a cup or tube 101 having one closed end. The open end .102 of this cup is rigidly secured as by a press fit in a recess 104 in the turn button 27 and in between the turn button and the closed end 105 of the cup, the cup is cut away on opposite sides so that the ends 102 and 105 thereof are connected only by a pair of relatively narrow sidewall strips 106, see FIG. 17. The end wall 105 of the cup has an opening in which the end of a spindle 107 is inserted, the spindle end being swaged over the wall as indicated at 108 in FIGS. 3 and 16 so that the turn button, cup and spindle are all rigidly connected together.

The end 105 of the cup 101 is telescopically received in a second cup 109 the closed end 110 of which has a central hole through which the spindle 107 passes with a free fit. Cup 109 is provided with a sidewall opening or cut-out 111 having a helically disposed camming edge 112. The end 105 of cup 101 is formed with a small lug 114 which projects into the opening 111, and a compression spring 115 positioned in cup 109 between its bottom and the end 105 of cup 101 biases the lug into engagement with the camming edge.

The cup 109 of the turn botton sub-assembly is telescopically received in the actuator sleeve 49 and is secured thereto by bending a tab 116, cut from the cup wall opposite opening 111, outwardly into a corresponding opening 117 in the sleeve as shown in FIG. 4. With this arrangement of parts, the turn button sub-assembly will turn with the sleeve when the latter is turned by the inside knob, but movement of the turn button 27 entirely independent of the knob is also possible. Thus, the turn button can be pushed inwardly against the action of spring 115 until the lug 114 contacts the inner edge 118 of the opening 111, FIG. 16. The turn button can also be turned (in the counter-clockwise direction as viewed from the right end of FIG. 16) through approximately 180", the angular extent of the opening 111, and at the same time it will be caused to move inwardly because lug 114 is riding on camming edge 112 as the button is being turned.

The turn button spindle 107 has a splined portion 119 which passes with a sliding fit through a gear 120 having a corresponding opening, FIGS. 3-6. The gear is positioned in a central opening 121 in retractor 51, the top and bottom walls of the opening being formed with oppositely disposed channels 122, FIGS. 5, l1 and 14, to provide clearance for the gear. The previously mentioned way 82, formed in the retractor to slidably receive deadbolt actuator 81, has intersecting horizontal and vertical legs, being essentially in the shape of a sidewise T as best shown in FIGS. 11 and 14. The upper channel 122 for gear 120 opens into the horizontal leg of the way permitting the gear to mesh with a rack 124 on the underside of a horizontal plate 125 which forms a part of the actuator 81 and is received in the horizontal leg of the way.

With the arrangement described, turning the turn button 27 counterclockwise through approximately 180 will rotate gear 120 correspondingly and drive actuator 81 outward relative to the retractor, the actuator having a central longitudinal slot 126 to accommodate the turn button spindle which extends beyond the gear for a purpose to be explained. The movement of the actuator positively drives deadbolt 64 outwardly, the latter being moved from its retracted position shown in FIGS. 3 and 5 to its fully projected position shown in FIG. 6 (and by dash lines in FIG. 9). As will be apparent from FIGS. 6 and 9, the deadbolt in fully projected position extends a substantial distance beyond the latchbolt 62 in fully projected position making the lock safer because forceable entry is rendered more difiicult. The unusually long projection or throw of the deadbolt is possible because of its being centrally disposed in the latchbolt and because it is connected to its actuator at a point forward of the connection between the retractor and rocker arm 72.

As gear 120 is rotated in the course of projecting the deadbolt, its teeth ride past a tooth 127 on a pawl 128, FIG. 2, that is rockably connected adjacent its lower edge to the back part of retractor 51 and biased into engagement with the gear by a spring 129. The pawl tooth prevents rotation of the gear in the opposite or clockwise direction whereby the deadbolt is positively held in projected position. The deadbolt can, however, be immediately retracted from deadlocking position by simply turning the inside knob 25 in either direction whereby immediate exit from inside is always possible.

To this end, a pair of gears 130, 131 are fixed on opposite ends of a sleeve 132, FIGS. 2, 4-7 and 13, rotatably mounted on a shaft 134 that spans an opening 135 in the top flange 31 of cap 32. The gears are thus positioned in the opening for rotation on the shaft, and the larger gear 130 is adapted to mesh with a rack 136 on the top edge of the vertical portion of the actuator 81, FIGS. 4-7 and 12. The smaller gear 131 is adapted to mesh with a rack 137 formed in the top of the retractor 51 whereby rearward movement of the retractor, FIGS. 11-13, as caused by turning a knob, rotates gears 130, 131 in the counterclockwise direction whereby the latter drives the actuator rearwardly and retracts the projecting deadbolt. Rearward movement of the retractor withdraws the pawl tooth 127 from gear 120 and permits it to rotate as the actuator 81 moves back. Since the normal length of travel of the retractor is only one-half of that needed to retract the fully projected deadbolt, the larger gear 130 has twice as many teeth as gear 131 so that the rearward movement of the actuator is twice as fast as that of the retractor.

As best shown in FIGS. 5-7, 11 and 12, there is a dwell area 138 just to the rear of the retractor rack 137 and a dwell'area 139 just forward of the actuator rack 136. When the retractor is in its normal forward position and the actuator in its normal rear position, FIGS. 5 and 7, gear 130 extends into dwell area 139 and gear 131 into dwell area 138. This arrangement is provided because if the actuator is in retracted position and the retractor is moved rearwardly as by turning a knob, the retractor rack 137 will be moved into engagement with gear 131 causing both gears to be driven in the counterclockwise direction. However, since further rearward movement of the actuator is not possible, dwell area 139 permits gear 130 to turn without effecting movement of the actuator. Similarly, if the retractor is in normal forward position and it is desired to project the deadbolt by turning the turn button 27, the forward movement of the actuator caused by gear 120 will move it rack 136 into engagement with gear 130 causing both gears to be driven in the clockwise direction. In this case, since further forward movement of the retractor is not possible, dwell area 138 permits gear 131 to turn Without affecting the retractor. As described above, inter-action of the retractor and actuator does occur through gears 130, 131 when the deadbolt 8 is in its projected position and the retractor is moved rearwardly as by turning a knob.

The inner end of the turn button spindle 107 is rectangular in cross section, FIG. 16, and projects into a conforming slot 140 in the closed end of a cup 141 that is a part of the outside actuator sleeve assembly to be described, see FIGS. 3, 4 and 21. A ring 142 is rotatably mounted on the closed cup end and has a radially projecting tab 144 that lies in a slot 145 formed in the outside hub 34, FIG. 18. The slot 145 is in registry with a slot 146, FIG. 22, at the inner end of the outside actuator sleeve 52 when the latter is in its normal position with the latchbolt fully projected.

Cup 141, with associated parts to be described, is positioned in the inner end of sleeve 52 and is movable longitudinally relative thereto. The cup is normally biased by a compression spring 147 into a position in which its ring tab 144 is in the hub slot 145 but not in the sleeve slot 146, the tab being opposite the edge sector 148 of the sleeve. When the cup is in this position, the turn button 27 is in its normal outermost position as indicated in FIGS. 3, 4 and 16. When the push button is pushed inwardly until lug 114 contacts the inner edge 118 of the opening 111, cup 141 is moved by the turn button spindle farther into the sleeve 52 causing the tab 144 to enter the sleeve slot 146. Since the tab now bridges the hub and sleeve slots 145, 146, this locks outside knob 26 because it is fixed on the sleeve. In the same manner, the outside knob is locked when the turn button is turned to project the deadbolt because as it turns it also moves inwardly due to the engagement of lug 114 with the camming edge 112.

When the turn button is pushed inwardly to lock the outside knob, it is held in locking position by the entry of a spring biased detent 149, FIGS. 4 and 15, into a notch 150 in the turn button spindle 107, which notch comes into registry with the detent at the limit of the inward movement of the button. The detent is carried in a correspondingly shaped opening 151, FIG. 11, in the retractor 51 and is normally held in depressed position by the unnotched part of the spindle as shown in FIG. 4. When the retractor is moved rearwardly as by turning the inside knob, the detent moves with it, out of engagement with the spindle notch, whereupon the turn button and spindle are returned to their normal outer position by the action of springs 11 5 and 147. The outside knob is thus always unlocked by turning the inside knob.

When the outside knob is locked simultaneously with the projecting of the deadbolt, the turn button is maintained in the inner position into which it is camrned by engagement of the pawl 128 with gear 120, FIG. 2. Rearward movement of the retractor by the inside knob moves the pawl back out of engagement with the gear and the rearward movement of the actuator 81, through the action of gears 130, 131, rotates the gear 120 in the reverse direction. This causes the spindle and turn button to return to their outer position thereby unlocking the outside knob. The return movement of the turn button and spindle is aided by the action of springs 115 and 147 as described just above.

The outside actuator sleeve 52 is made in two parts 52a, 52b for a purpose to be described, and carries in its inner end portion 52a the key lock sub-assembly, FIGS. 2, 21 and 22. This sub-assembly comprises three telescopically assembled coaxial cups 141, 154- and 155 which are rotatable relative to one another. Cup 141, described above, is received in cup 154 and is held therein with its ring 142 abutting against the edge 156 of the cup by means of a retaining pin 157 that rides in a circumferential slot 158 in cup 154. The closed end of cup 154 has a rectangular opening 159, and this cup is received in cup 155 with the compression spring 147 interposed between the closed ends of the two cups. Cup 154 is held in position in cup 155 by a retaining pin 160 that projects into a slot 161 in the outer cup.

The closed end of cup 155 has a circular hole 162 with a diameter that is slightly larger than the length of the slot 159 in cup 154. Cup 155 has the previously mentioned car 56 at its inner end and is rotatably received in the inner end portion 52a of the sleeve 52 with its car 56 adjacent the sleeve ear 57, as indicated in FIGS. 2 and 20, and its inner end cut away sector 164 behind the sleeve slot 146. When the lock is assembled, the ring tab 144 lies in slot 145 in the hub 34 as previously described, and the sleeve slot 146 and sector 164 are in registry therewith.

When the cup 141 is pushed inwardly by the push button spindle 107, it moves farther into cup 155, carrying cup 154 with it. The cut away sector 164 accommodates the ring tab 144 during such movement allowing it to enter the sleeve slot 146 without being obstructed by cup 155. Retaining pin 157 projects through slot 158, beyond the wall of cup 154, and into a registering slot 165 in cup 155. The slots 161 and 165 in cup 155 are substantially wider than required for free rotation of the retaining pins 160 and 157 to enable the pins to move axially with respect to cup 155 when cups 141 and 154 are pushed inwardly relative to cup 155 as just described.

The key cylinder unit 53 includes a cylinder body 167, cylinder plug 168, and cylinder cap 169, all of which are conventional. Coacting with the cap in a known manner is the cylinder driver 170 and associated cap pin 171 and cap spring 172. The cylinder unit also includes a cylinder bar 174 and, in accord with the in- 'vention, this bar is slidable longitudinally in the cylinder body 167 and is normally biased into a retracted position, as shown in FIG. 24, by a compression spring 175 which encircles the bar between a flange 176 at its inner end and the driver 170. When the proper key 177 is inserted in the unit far enough to turn the cylinder plug, the inner end of the :key pushes the cylinder bar outwardly to the position shown in FIG. 25 and the bar turns with the plug because of a spline interconnection (not shown).

As noted above, turning the outside knob 26 in either direction operates through the actuator sleeve 52 to retract the latchbolt 62. More specifically, the cars 56, 57 at the inner end of the sleeve engage camming edges or shoulders 179a, 1791) on the left side (as viewed in FIG. 2) of the retractor 51, FIG. 20, and cause the retractor to move rearwardly. The rearward movement of the retractor is transmitted through rocker arm 72 and bifucated plate 68 to the latchbolt.

FIG. 20 illustrates the relationship between the left side of the retractor and ears 56, 57, the latter together with sleeve 52 and cup 155 being shown in dash lines. As will be apparent, clockwise rotation of knob 26 will operate through sleeve 52, to which it is secured, and cause car 57 to push against the camming edge 17% and move the retractor rearwardly. counterclockwise rotation of the knob will cause the ear 57 to move in the opposite direction and carry with it ear 56, against which it normally bears, causing the latter to push against camming edge 179a to achieve the same result. The car 56, as has been described, is on cup 155 which is rotatably received in sleeve 52 but is not otherwise connected thereto in order to permit various key functions, to be described.

When the cylinder bar 174 of the key cylinder unit is moved by key 177 so that it projects farther out of the unit, FIGS. 24 and 25, the flattened inner end of the bar enters the correspondingly shaped slot 159 in the closed end of cup 154. With this arrangement, turning the key normally operates to turn the cup.

If the outside knob 26 is locked by pushing in the turn button 27, the key can be turned to unlock the knob. As described above, the knob is locked because the ring tab 144 has been pushed into slot 146 in sleeve 52 thus bridging the hub and sleeve slots 145, 146. If the key is turned in the clockwise direction, FIGS. 2, 20 and 21, the engagement of cylinder bar 174 with cup 154 will cause the latter to turn in the same direction, with its retaining piu 160 moving in slot 161 in cup 155. When the pin reaches the end of the slot, it will attempt to move cup with it but this cannot be done because ear 56 at the end of the cup is prevented from moving in the clockwise direction, FIG. 20, by the car 57 on sleeve 52, the latter being held against movement by the bridging tab 144.

Turning the key in the counterclockwise direction, on the other hand, will turn cup 154 and its pin in the opposite direction until the pin reaches the other end of slot 161. When this happens, cup 155 will also be made to turn in the counterclockwise direction whereupon its ear 56 will push against the retractor camming edge 179a, FIG. 20, and move the retractor rearwardly which releases the turn button 27 and unlocks the outside knob. During the counterclockwise movement of cup 154, the end of its slot 158 may pick up retaining pin 157 and cause cup 141 to move with it. This is possible, even though the ring tab 144 has been pushed into the slot 146, because the cup is rotatable relative to the ring 142.

The deadbolt 64 can be moved into fully projected position from the outside by turning the key approximately 180 in the clockwise direction. This causes cup 154 to turn in the same direction and as it does so, the end of its slot 158 picks up retaining pin 157 causing cup 141 to turn with it. In this connection, the pin in normal position, with the deadbolt retracted, is located adjacent the far end 180 of slot 158 (as viewed in FIG. 21). When the cup 141 turns in the clockwise direction, the turn button spindle 107 and gear 120 turn with it to drive the deadbolt outwardly as previously described. At the same time, the spindle 107 moves inwardly due to the camming edge 12, FIG. 16, and pushes ring tab 144 into the slot 146 of sleeve 52 to lock the outside knob.

As the cups 154 and 141 turn in the clockwise direction, their retaining pins 160 and 157 move through substantially the full length of their respective slots 161 and 165 in cup 155. The turning of the key in the clockwise direction is limited by engagement of the pin 160 with the far end 181 (FIG. 21) of slot 161, movement of cup 155 in the clockwise direction being prevented by engagement of its ear 56 with ear 57 as described above.

The deadbolt can be retracted by the key by turning it approximately 225 in the opposite or counterclockwise direction. This causes cup 154 to turn in the same direction whereby its retaining pin 160 moves the full length of slot 161 in cup 155, or through approximately 180. When the pin reaches the near end 182 (FIG. 21) of the slot, it picks up cup 155 so that the latter is also made to turn in the counterclockwise direction. Both cups continue to move in this direction for approximately another 45 with the result that car 56 moves retractor 51 rearwardly, FIG. 20, which disengages the pawl 127 from gear 120 and at the same time retracts the deadbolt through the action of gears 130, 131 and actuator 81, as previously described. After actuation of the car 56 to retract the retractor, leeway is provided to permit additional movement of the key, without performing any further lock functions, so that the key can be moved to the upright position in which it must be to remove it from the cylinder unit.

As already noted, the sleeve 52 to which the outside knob 26 is secured is formed in two parts 52a, 52b, FIGS. 2 and 22. These parts are normally connected together by a boss 184 on part 5211 which projects into a complementary hole 185 in the otherwise closed bottom of part 52a, the boss having a groove 186 for receiving a sna ring 186a (FIG. 4) that holds the parts in assembled relation. Relative rotation between the two parts is normally prevented by ball detents 187 biased by springs 188 into recesses 189 in part 52a the springs and detents being carried in bores 190 in part 5217. Springs 188 are sufliciently heavy so that relative rotation between the parts is prevented under normal conditions but the construction provides the spinning knob feature whereby if an extreme force is applied to the locked outer knob, as by means of a pipe wrench, the ball detents will permit part 52b to rotate relative to part 52a and the lock will remain locked.

The pick-proof feature of the lock results from the construction of the key cylinder unit 53 wherein the cylinder bar 174 must be projected outwardly by the key before engaging slot 159-in cup 154. Thus, even if someone without a key succeeds in aligning the tumblers so that the cylinder plug 168 can be rotated, no lock function will occur because the key is needed to operably connect the bar 174 to the remainder of the lock works.

From the foregoing description, it will be apparent that the invention disclosed herein provides a novel and very useful cylindrical lock, the construction of the lock being such that in addition to its own particular novel features it can be readily adapted to perform a variety of conventional lock functions. As will be understood by those familiar with the art, the invention may be embodied in other specific for-ms without departing from the spirit or essential characteristics thereof.

I claim:

1. In a cylindrical lock having coacting latch and lock assemblies: the latch assembly including a normally projecting latchbolt and a normally retracted deadbolt, the deadbolt being centrally disposed in the latchbolt and movable relative thereto; the lock assembly including inside and outside knobs; means in the lock assembly for moving the deadbolt into projecting, locking position and at the same time locking the outside knob; and means responsive to the turning of the inside knob to unlock the outside knob and retract both the latchbolt and the projected deadbolt.

2. A lock as defined in claim 1 wherein said deadbolt in fully projected position extends a substantial distance beyond the latchbolt in fully projected position.

3. A look as defined in claim 1 wherein the latch assembly includes a guard for the latchbolt.

4. A lock as defined in claim 1 wherein said responsive means includes a retractor for the latchbolt and means actuated by the operation of the retractor-to effect the retraction of the deadbolt, said last-named means including a pinion engageable by a rack on the retractor.

5. A lock as defined in claim 4 wherein the lock assembly includes a sleeve having the outside knob secured to one end and having means at its other end engaging the retractor to actuate same when the knob is turned, the sleeve being formed of two parts normally rigidly connected together but capable of being moved relative to one another upon the application of extreme force to the knob.

6. In a cylindrical lock having coacting latch and lock assemblies: the latch assembly including a cylindrical housing and a normally projecting latchbolt, a normally retracted deadbolt and a guardbolt all mounted in the housing; the lock assembly including inside and outside knobs; turn button means in the inside knob and key means in the outside knob both operable to move the deadbolt into projecting, locking position; the deadbolt being arranged and dimensioned with respect to the latchbolt so that it extends a substantial distance beyond the latchbolt when both are in fully projected position; a retractor in the lock assembly actuatable by either knob to retract the latchbolt; and means responsive to the actuation of the 12 retractor to also effect the retraction of the projected deadbolt.

7. A lock as defined in claim 6 wherein said responsive means comprises a pair of gears fixed on opposite ends of a sleeve journalled in the lock assembly, one of the gears being engageable with a rack on the retractor and the other gear being engageable with rack means operatively connected to the deadbolt.

8. A lock as defined in claim '6 wherein said deadbolt is centrally disposed in the latchbolt to enable the guardbolt to abut against one side of the latchbolt.

9. A look as defined in claim 6 including coacting means on the latchbolt and guardbolt to prevent retraction of the former by the application of a pry force against the bolt itself when the latter is in the guard position, the coacting means being rendered inoperative by actuation of the retractor.

10. A lock as defined in claim 6 wherein the lock assembly includes a sleeve having the outside knob secured to one end and having means at its other end engaging the retractor to actuate same when the knob is turned, the sleeve being formed of two parts normally rigidly connected together but capable of being moved relative to one another upon the application of extreme force to the knob.

11. A look as defined in claim 6 wherein the key means includes a cylinder unit having a longitudinally movable cylinder bar, and means in the unit to hold the bar in a retracted, inoperable position until the key is fully inserted in the unit.

12. In a lock: a latchbolt; a retractor for the latchbolt; knob means for actuating the retractor; a sleeve member comprising inner and outer interconnected parts; detent means releasably holding the parts against movement relative to one another; the knob means being fixed on the outer part; means on the inner part operably connected to the retractor for actuating same in response to move ment of the knob means; and means engageable with the inner part to prevent its actuation of the retractor and thereby lock the knob means; the outer part being movable relative to the inner part, when the knob means has been locked by said actuation preventing means, upon the application of an extreme force to the knob means whereby the means engageable with the inner part continues to be effective to prevent actuation of the retractor.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 929,638 7/1909 Voight -107 1,772,790 8/1930 Weaver 70361 X 2,181,762 11/1939 Milligan 70 142 X 2,497,750 2/ 1950 Wardwell 70 -217 2,836,452 5/1958 Kubik 292169 2,885,880 5/ 1959 Muttart 70l46 2,890,074 6/ 1959 Wardwell 292169.13 3,018,651 1/1962 Morrison 70146 3,390,558 7/1958 Tornoe 70107 GEORGE F. MAUTZ, Primary Examiner E. J. MCCARTHY, Assistant Examiner U.S. Cl. XJR.

US3621685A 1969-10-01 1969-10-01 Cylindrical lock Expired - Lifetime US3621685A (en)

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Cited By (32)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4073518A (en) * 1976-05-28 1978-02-14 Goodwin Charles M Electrically and manually actuatable door locking structure
US4195502A (en) * 1978-06-02 1980-04-01 Best Lock Corporation Break-away door knob
US4201069A (en) * 1977-11-29 1980-05-06 Akira Katayama Knob for a door lock
US4312201A (en) * 1979-08-31 1982-01-26 Best Lock Corporation Cylinder lock with force-immune knob
US4370875A (en) * 1978-02-17 1983-02-01 Oy Wartsila Ab Slipping cylinder lock
US4394821A (en) * 1981-06-05 1983-07-26 Best Lock Corporation Door lock mechanism
US4573334A (en) * 1983-01-24 1986-03-04 Alois Crepinsek Deadbolt lock adjustable for mounting in doors of various thicknesses
US4679420A (en) * 1985-01-02 1987-07-14 Yang Tai Her Force immune door latch
US4838053A (en) * 1988-03-21 1989-06-13 Richard Shen Heavy-duty panic proof lock unit
US4921289A (en) * 1988-01-13 1990-05-01 Shen Chao C Cylindrical lever type lock structure for handicapped people
US4947664A (en) * 1988-08-12 1990-08-14 Daimler-Benz Ag Lock cylinder
US5335950A (en) * 1992-08-13 1994-08-09 Emhart Inc. Door lockset with spindle bearing
US5368345A (en) * 1990-10-12 1994-11-29 Watts; John R. Door lock
US5657652A (en) * 1995-09-05 1997-08-19 Frank J. Martin Company Pin tumbler cabinet door and drawer deadlocking latch-lock
US5794472A (en) * 1995-05-01 1998-08-18 Best Lock Corporation Disconnecting drive mechanism for cylindrical lockset
US5816086A (en) * 1996-08-15 1998-10-06 Schlage Lock Company Axial moving pushbutton for a lock having rotary locking and release motions
US5868018A (en) * 1996-08-26 1999-02-09 Hyundae Metal Co., Ltd. Door lock
US6101856A (en) * 1998-12-14 2000-08-15 Sargent Manufacturing Company Free-wheeling lever handle lock mechanism
US6189351B1 (en) * 1997-01-27 2001-02-20 Schlage Lock Company Door lock with clutching mechanism
US6615630B2 (en) * 2000-12-05 2003-09-09 Tong-Lung Metal Industry Co., Ltd. Door lock
US20070180876A1 (en) * 2006-02-08 2007-08-09 I-Tek Metal Mfg. Co., Ltd. Protective sleeve for latch mechanism for lock
WO2007134383A1 (en) * 2006-05-18 2007-11-29 Assa Abloy Australia Pty Limited Cylindrical lock set and bolt assembly
US20080098775A1 (en) * 2006-10-31 2008-05-01 Lan-Kun Don Door lock assembly that causes a handle to idle when placed in a locking position
US20090273195A1 (en) * 2008-05-01 2009-11-05 Jerry Forrester Free turn
US20110252840A1 (en) * 2010-04-14 2011-10-20 Cutrer Robert E Entrance Door Security System
US20120200095A1 (en) * 2011-02-09 2012-08-09 Eversafety Precision Industry (Tianjin) Co., Ltd. Tubular lever lock
US20130269402A1 (en) * 2012-04-17 2013-10-17 Schlage Lock Company Llc Door lock assembly
US20140001772A1 (en) * 2012-06-27 2014-01-02 Schlage Lock Company Llc Lever droop adjuster for a door latch actuator
CN101666179B (en) 2008-09-03 2014-05-07 亚萨合莱澳洲有限公司 Adjustable bolt assembly for use of cylindrical lock set
US8844330B2 (en) 2012-03-14 2014-09-30 Townsteel Inc. Cylindrical lockset
US9394722B2 (en) 2013-01-15 2016-07-19 Townsteel, Inc. Attack-thwarting cylindrical lockset
US9528300B2 (en) 2012-03-14 2016-12-27 Townsteel, Inc. Cylindrical lockset

Cited By (35)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4073518A (en) * 1976-05-28 1978-02-14 Goodwin Charles M Electrically and manually actuatable door locking structure
US4201069A (en) * 1977-11-29 1980-05-06 Akira Katayama Knob for a door lock
US4370875A (en) * 1978-02-17 1983-02-01 Oy Wartsila Ab Slipping cylinder lock
US4195502A (en) * 1978-06-02 1980-04-01 Best Lock Corporation Break-away door knob
US4312201A (en) * 1979-08-31 1982-01-26 Best Lock Corporation Cylinder lock with force-immune knob
US4394821A (en) * 1981-06-05 1983-07-26 Best Lock Corporation Door lock mechanism
US4573334A (en) * 1983-01-24 1986-03-04 Alois Crepinsek Deadbolt lock adjustable for mounting in doors of various thicknesses
US4679420A (en) * 1985-01-02 1987-07-14 Yang Tai Her Force immune door latch
US4921289A (en) * 1988-01-13 1990-05-01 Shen Chao C Cylindrical lever type lock structure for handicapped people
US4838053A (en) * 1988-03-21 1989-06-13 Richard Shen Heavy-duty panic proof lock unit
US4947664A (en) * 1988-08-12 1990-08-14 Daimler-Benz Ag Lock cylinder
US5368345A (en) * 1990-10-12 1994-11-29 Watts; John R. Door lock
US5335950A (en) * 1992-08-13 1994-08-09 Emhart Inc. Door lockset with spindle bearing
US5794472A (en) * 1995-05-01 1998-08-18 Best Lock Corporation Disconnecting drive mechanism for cylindrical lockset
US5657652A (en) * 1995-09-05 1997-08-19 Frank J. Martin Company Pin tumbler cabinet door and drawer deadlocking latch-lock
US5816086A (en) * 1996-08-15 1998-10-06 Schlage Lock Company Axial moving pushbutton for a lock having rotary locking and release motions
US5868018A (en) * 1996-08-26 1999-02-09 Hyundae Metal Co., Ltd. Door lock
US6189351B1 (en) * 1997-01-27 2001-02-20 Schlage Lock Company Door lock with clutching mechanism
US6101856A (en) * 1998-12-14 2000-08-15 Sargent Manufacturing Company Free-wheeling lever handle lock mechanism
US6615630B2 (en) * 2000-12-05 2003-09-09 Tong-Lung Metal Industry Co., Ltd. Door lock
US20070180876A1 (en) * 2006-02-08 2007-08-09 I-Tek Metal Mfg. Co., Ltd. Protective sleeve for latch mechanism for lock
US7281401B2 (en) * 2006-02-08 2007-10-16 I-Tek Metal Mfg. Co., Ltd. Protective sleeve for latch mechanism for lock
WO2007134383A1 (en) * 2006-05-18 2007-11-29 Assa Abloy Australia Pty Limited Cylindrical lock set and bolt assembly
US20080098775A1 (en) * 2006-10-31 2008-05-01 Lan-Kun Don Door lock assembly that causes a handle to idle when placed in a locking position
US20090273195A1 (en) * 2008-05-01 2009-11-05 Jerry Forrester Free turn
CN101666179B (en) 2008-09-03 2014-05-07 亚萨合莱澳洲有限公司 Adjustable bolt assembly for use of cylindrical lock set
US20110252840A1 (en) * 2010-04-14 2011-10-20 Cutrer Robert E Entrance Door Security System
US20120200095A1 (en) * 2011-02-09 2012-08-09 Eversafety Precision Industry (Tianjin) Co., Ltd. Tubular lever lock
US8844330B2 (en) 2012-03-14 2014-09-30 Townsteel Inc. Cylindrical lockset
US9528300B2 (en) 2012-03-14 2016-12-27 Townsteel, Inc. Cylindrical lockset
US9284749B2 (en) * 2012-04-17 2016-03-15 Schlage Lock Company Llc Door lock assembly
US20130269402A1 (en) * 2012-04-17 2013-10-17 Schlage Lock Company Llc Door lock assembly
US20140001772A1 (en) * 2012-06-27 2014-01-02 Schlage Lock Company Llc Lever droop adjuster for a door latch actuator
US9127484B2 (en) * 2012-06-27 2015-09-08 Schlage Lock Company Llc Lever droop adjuster for a door latch actuator
US9394722B2 (en) 2013-01-15 2016-07-19 Townsteel, Inc. Attack-thwarting cylindrical lockset

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