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US3613758A - Propagation primer - Google Patents

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Publication number
US3613758A
US3613758A US3613758DA US3613758A US 3613758 A US3613758 A US 3613758A US 3613758D A US3613758D A US 3613758DA US 3613758 A US3613758 A US 3613758A
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Prior art keywords
percent
primer
charge
composition
propagation
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Expired - Lifetime
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Heinz Gawlick
Gunther Marondel
Hellmut Bendler
Werner Siegelin
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Dynamit Nobel AG
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Dynamit Nobel AG
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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C06EXPLOSIVES; MATCHES
    • C06CDETONATING OR PRIMING DEVICES; FUSES; CHEMICAL LIGHTERS; PYROPHORIC COMPOSITIONS
    • C06C5/00Fuses, e.g. fuse cords
    • C06C5/06Fuse igniting means; Fuse connectors
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F42AMMUNITION; BLASTING
    • F42CAMMUNITION FUZES; ARMING OR SAFETY MEANS THEREFOR
    • F42C19/00Details of fuzes
    • F42C19/08Primers; Detonators
    • F42C19/0803Primers; Detonators characterised by the combination of per se known chemical composition in the priming substance
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F42AMMUNITION; BLASTING
    • F42CAMMUNITION FUZES; ARMING OR SAFETY MEANS THEREFOR
    • F42C19/00Details of fuzes
    • F42C19/08Primers; Detonators
    • F42C19/0815Intermediate ignition capsules, i.e. self-contained primary pyrotechnic module transmitting the initial firing signal to the secondary explosive, e.g. using electric, radio frequency, optical or percussion signals to the secondary explosive

Abstract

A propagation primer containing a primer charge having a composition comprising, by weight, approximately: 40-60 PERCENT OF BARIUM NITRATE 10-20 PERCENT OF AN ALUMINUM-MAGNESIUM ALLOY 5-20 PERCENT OF LEAD DIOXIDE 6-10 PERCENT OF ZIRCONIUM HYDRIDE, AND 1-5 PERCENT OF BORON The composition is substantially insensitive to friction and shock. For propagation over larger distances, additional specific primer compositions may be employed.

Description

United States Patent Inventors Heinz Gawlick Furth; Giinther Marondel, Erlangen; Hellmut Bendler, Nuremberg; Werner Siegelin, Stein, all of Germany Appl. No. 788,435 Filed Jan. 2, 1969 Patented Oct. 19, 1971 Assignee Dynamit Nobel Aktiengesellschait Troisdorf, Germany Priority Jan. 13, 1968 Germany P l,646,350.6

PROPAGATION PRIMER 10 Claims, 3 Drawing Figs.

US. Cl. 149/15, l49/22, 149/43, 149/28, 149/61, 149/62 149/88 lnt. (l C06c 3/10 FieldoiSeareh 149/61,43, 22, 62, 28,15, 88

Primary ExaminerCarl D. Quarforth Assistant ExaminerStephen J. Lechert, Jr Attorney-Craig, Antonelli, Stewart & Hill ABSTRACT: A propagation primer containing a primer charge having a composition comprising, by weight, approximately:

40-60 percent of barium nitrate 10-20 percent of an aluminum-magnesium alloy 5-20 rcent of lead dioxide 6-10 percent of zirconium hydride, and

1-5 ercent of boron The composition is substantially insensitive to friction and shock. For propagation over larger distances, additional specific primer compositions may be employed.

PATENTEDucT 19 I97l 3. 6 1 3 .7 58

INVENTORS HglNZ GAWUCK GUNTHER MARONDEL HElLMUT BENDLER BY WERNER SIEGEUN ATTORNEY 5 PROPAGATION PRIMER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a propagation primer. More particularly, it relates to propagation primers which are insensitive to friction and shock and which contain a primer charge of particular constituents and/or particular primer compositions.-

For use in priming systems, particularly those of the military type, propagation or transmission primers are known having a primer composition containing up to about 60 percent by weight and more of an explosive. These primers, also called flash or flame primers, serve for the transfer or transmission of an ignition impulse, optionally with simultaneous boosting, over a more or less long distance. The operation of such primers involves ignition on one side, called the igniting side, by a flame arriving at said side and then the emission by the primer itself of a flame on the other side, called the firing side, whereby a further ignition is triggered by means of the latter flar ne at a certain distance. Thus, the provision can be made, for example, in the case of aircraft or missiles, to ignite a propagation primer by means of a conventional perforating, percussion or electrical primer provided at the head of the aircraft, the propagation primer then, in turn, emitting a flame and igniting, for example, through a tube or the like, a further detonation-triggering primer element disposed at a detonator, an explosive charge, or the like, provided in the center or also at the end of the aircraft. Such a provision is made because the primer element is too far apart from the conventional primer to be ignited directly thereby.

. Forcertain purposes, it is required that the device provided for transmitting the ignition flash be most extensively insensitive against outside influences, i.e., it should not become effective unintentionally or inadvertently by mechanical effects, such as impacts, shocks, or the like: In connection with propagation charges, the propagation primer must thus exhibit a shock and friction sensitivity which is lower than that of the propagation charge. Since compact bodies of tetryl (trinitrophenylmethylnitramine) or penthrite (pentaerythrite tetranitrate) are usually employed in the art as the propagation charge, there is hence the requirement for the propagation primers that the sensitivity to shock and friction be lower than that of the substances tetryl and penthrite.

One of the objects of the present invention is to provide a propagation primer having properties and advantages superior to those of the prior art.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a propagation primer which is extremely insensitive to friction and shock.

A further object of the invention is to provide primer charges and primer compositions which can be used advantageously in primers used for the transmission of an ignition impulse over a more or less long distance.

A still further object of the invention is to provide ad vantageous propagation primers which may be manufactured readily.

These and other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art from a consideration of the following specification and claims.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with the present invention, it has been found that the above advantages and requirements are met by a primer containing a primer charge consisting essentially of, by weight, about:

a. 40-60% of barium nitrate,

l20% of an aluminum-magnesium allo -201: of lead dioxide, 640% of zirconium hydride, and l-Sk of boron;

and/or a primer charge consisting essentially of, by weight, either approximately:

40-60% of barium nitrate,

l3-25i: of calcium silicide,

10-20% of lead dioxide,

844% of an aluminum-magnesium alloy, as well as optionally an addition of about l-6% of boron;

or approximately:

-45% of lead tricinate (lead trinitroresorcinatc) 340% of nitroguanidine,

25-45% of barium nitrate, and

82S% of calcium silicide.

When accommodated in a metallic part dammed up toward the igniting side, or in a correspondingly constructed primer case or cup, the first-mentioned primer charge composition a satisfactorily ignites propellant charges, as well as pyrotechnical mixtures, over short distances. If propagation is to be executed over larger distances, then the first-mentioned primer charge mixture 0 is suitably maintained as the initial igniting composition, but as the propagation charge, there is employed one of the two additionally mentioned primer charge mixtures b, or b,, depending on the particular requirements involved. The addition of boron mentioned in connection with the primer charge composition b, is employed for reinforcing the initial ignition. For the propagation of the ignition over a distance of about -120 cm., perhaps through a narrow tube, the utilization of an explosive cannot be avoided. Thus, in this case, the primer composition b is suitable. In the latter case, it may well be advisable, although it is not always necessary, to employ in conjunction with this primer charge composition also the primer charge composition a. As for the geometric arrangement of the mixture, the same requirements and considerations are applicable as in the utilization of a composition mixture which is free of explosives.

All primer composition mixtures wherein the individual components are employed in quantities ranging within the above-stated limits are substantially less sensitive against shock and friction than the conventional primer charges, and they are also less sensitive than tetryl and penthrite. In this connection, the shock sensitivity thereof is between 0.6 and 1.5 mkp. (meters'kilopond), depending uponthe ratios in which the individual composition components are employed within the above-mentioned permissible limits. The friction sensitivity of all the compositions in accordance with the present invention is above 30 kp. load, as measured in the friction apparatus according to Rathsburg.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING The present invention will become more fully understood from the detailed description given hereinbelow and the accompanying drawing which is given by way of illustration only and thus is not limiting of the present invention and wherein,

FIG. 1 shows a primer with an igniting charge and a subsequent firing element;

FIG. 2 shows a primer having a booster charge interposed; and

FIG. 3 shows a schematic view of an ignition chain or sequence.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to the drawings, wherein like reference numerals are used throughout the various figures to designate like parts, embodiments for propagation primerswith the use of a primer charge in accordance with the present invention are illustrated.

The igniting composition 3 and the firing charge 4 are disposed one behind the other in the primer case I, which latter is open on both ends and is made of, for example, a metal such as brass. The firing charge is covered by a thick foil or the like. The opening in the primer case on the igniting side is provided with the funnel-shaped widened section 2. A flame arriving in the direction of the upper arrow ignites the igniting charge 3 which, in turn, ignites the igniting charge 3 which, in turn, ignites the firing charge 4 and sends, after destroying the cover, an igniting flame in the direction of the lower arrow.

According to FIG. 2, the booster charge 5 is disposed in the primer case 1, provided with an annular flange, between the igniting charge 3 and the firing charge 4. The firing charge is again covered by a foil or the like, and the opening on the ig niting side is again provided with the funnellike widened section 2. The propagation primer provided for bridging a distance of, for example, more than 200 mm., is again ignited by a flame arriving at the igniting side. The igniting charge 3 then ignites the booster charge 5, and the latter ignites the firing charge 4, with a simultaneous reinforcement of the ignition jet being sent out by the firing charge. The booster charge, shielded by the igniting charge 3, the firing charge 4 and the case 1 can, in this embodiment, be provided with an explosive without incurring any disadvantages.

1n the ignition chain of FIG. 3, the primer element 7 is provided in the igniter (detonator) 6, which primer element can be, for example, a conventional perforation (pin-actuated) primer or a percussion primer or, also, a likewise known electrical primer. After being triggered, this primer element ignites, by means of its ignition flame sent out in the direction of the arrow, the propagation primer 9a disposed at the upper end of the tube 8 and provided with the primer composition of the present invention. The propagation primer 9a effects the ignition of the identical propagation primer 9b disposed in the center of the tube. Finally, the ignition is propagated from the latter primer 9b to the propagation primer 90 provided at the lower end of the tube, which primer is likewise identical with the primers 9a and 9b. This ignition chain can be made as long as desired. In this connection, the spacing between the propagation primers depends, of course, on the particular primer charge employed. At the front end of the ignition chain there is then provided a primer element which, in turn, ignites an explosive charge or the like.

It has been found that an especially advantageous primer charge composition a is the following:

60 percent of barium nitrate 15 percent of an aluminum-magnesium alloy 12 percent of lead dioxide percent of zirconium hydride, and

3 percent of boron.

Other preferred compositions include, for example, a propagation system containing a primer charge b disposed on the firing side and comprising:

50 percent of barium nitrate 20 percent of calcium silicide 15 percent of lead dioxide 12 percent of an aluminum-magnesium alloy, and

3 percent of boron or a propagation primer containing a primer charge b having the following composition:

30 percent of lead tricinate 5 percent of nitroguanidine 45 percent of barium nitrate, and

percent of calcium silicide The invention being thus described, it will be obvious that the same may be varied in many ways. Such variations are not to be regarded as a departure from the spirit and scope of the invention, and all such modifications as would be obvious to one skilled in the art are intended to be included herein.

We claim:

1. A propagation primer, composition substantially insensitive to friction and shock comprising, by weight, approximatel y 40-60 percent of barium nitrate 10-20 percent of an aluminum-magnesium alloy 5-20 percent of lead dioxide 6-10 percent of zirconium hydride, and

l-5 percent of boron.

2. A propagation primer composition substantially insensitive to friction and shock comprising a first primer charge having a composition comprising, by weight, approximately:

40-60 percent of barium nitrate 10-20 percent of an aluminum-magnesium alloy 5-20 percent of lead dioxide 6-10 percent of zirconium hydride, and

l-5 percent of boron contiguous to a second primer charge having a composition comprising, by weight, approximately:

40-60 percent of barium nitrate 13-25 percent of calcium silicide 10-20 percent of lead dioxide 8-14 percent of an aluminum-magnesium alloy and, if

desired,

1-6 percent of boron.

3. A propagation primer composition substantially insensitive to friction and shock comprising a first primer charge having a composition comprising, by weight, approximately:

40-60 percent of barium nitrate 10-20 percent of an aluminum-magnesium alloy 5-20 percent of lead dioxide 6-10 percent of zirconium hydride, and

l-S percent of boron contiguous to a second primer charge having a composition comprising, by weight, approximately:

25-45 percent of lead tricinate 3-10 percent of nitroguanidine 24-45 percent of barium nitrate, and

8-25 percent of calcium silicide.

4. A propagation primer composition substantially insensitive to friction and shock comprising a first primer charge having a composition comprising, by weight, approximately:

40-60 percent of barium nitrate 10-20 percent of an aluminum-magnesium alloy 5-20 percent of lead dioxide 6-10 percent of zirconium hydride, and

1-5 percent of boron contiguous to a second primer charge having a composition comprising, by weight, approximately:

50 percent of barium nitrate 20 percent of calcium silicide 15 percent of lead dioxide 12 percent of an aluminum-magnesium alloy, and

3 percent of boron.

5. A propagation primer composition substantially insensitive to friction and shock comprising a first primer charge having a composition comprising, by weight, approximately:

40-60 percent of barium nitrate 10-20 percent of an aluminum-magnesium alloy 5-20 percent of lead dioxide 6-10 percent of zirconium hydride, and

l-5 percent of boron contiguous to a second primer charge having a composition comprising, by weight, approximately:

30 percent of lead tricinate 5 percent of nitroguanidine 45 percent of barium nitrate, and

20 percent of calcium silicide.

6. A propagation primer composition substantially insensitive to friction and shock comprising, by weight, approximately:

40-60 percent of barium nitrate 13-25 percent of calcium silicide 10-20 percent of lead dioxide 8-14 percent of an aluminum-magnesium alloy and, if

desired,

l-6 percent of boron.

7. A propagation primer composition substantially insensitive to friction and shock comprising, by weight, approximately:

25-45 percent of lead tricinate 3-10 percent of nitroguanidine 24-54 percent of barium nitrate, and

5 percent of nitroguanidine 45 percent of barium nitrate, and

20 percent of calcium silicide.

10. A propagation primer composition substantially insensitive to friction and shock consisting of, by weight, approximately:

60 percent of barium nitrate 15 percent of an aluminum-magnesium alloy 12 percent of lead dioxide 10 percent of zirconium hydride, and

3 percent of boron.

Claims (9)

  1. 2. A propagation primer composition substantially insensitive to friction and shock comprising a first primer charge having a composition comprising, by weight, approximately: 40-60 percent of barium nitrate 10- 20 percent of an aluminum-magnesium alloy 5- 20 percent of lead dioxide 6- 10 percent of zirconium hydride, and 1- 5 percent of boron contiguous to a second primer charge having a composition comprising, by weight, approximately: 40- 60 percent of barium nitrate 13- 25 percent of calcium silicide 10-20 percent of lead dioxide 8- 14 percent of an aluminum-magnesium alloy and, if desired, 1- 6 percent of boron.
  2. 3. A propagation primer composition substantially insensitive to friction and shock comprising a first primer charge having a composition comprising, by weight, approximately: 40-60 percent of barium nitrate 10- 20 percent of an aluminum-magnesium alloy 5- 20 percent of lead dioxide 6- 10 percent of zirconium hydride, and 1- 5 percent of boron contiguous to a second primer charge having a composition comprising, by weight, approximately: 25- 45 percent of lead tricinate 3- 10 percent of nitroguanidine 24- 45 percent of barium nitrate, and 8- 25 percent of calcium silicide.
  3. 4. A propagation primer composition substantially insensitive to friction and shock comprising a first primer charge having a composition comprising, by weight, approximately: 40- 60 percent of barium nitrate 10- 20 percent of an aluminum-magnesium alloy 5- 20 percent of lead dioxide 6- 10 percent of zirconium hydride, and 1- 5 percent of boron contiguous to a second primer charge having a composition comprising, by weight, approximately: 50 percent of barium nitrate 20 percent of calcium silicide 15 percent of lead dioxide 12 percent of an aluminum-magnesium alloy, and 3 percent of boron.
  4. 5. A propagation primer composition substantially insensitive to friction and shock comprising a first primer charge having a composition comprising, by weight, approximately: 40- 60 percent of barium nitrate 10- 20 percent of an aluminum-magnesium alloy 5- 20 percent of lead dioxide 6- 10 percent of zirconium hydride, and 1- 5 percent of boron contiguous to a second primer charge having a composition comprising, by weight, approximately: 30 percent of lead tricinate 5 percent of nitroguanidine 45 percent of barium nitrate, and 20 percent of calcium silicide.
  5. 6. A propagation primer composition substantially insensitive to friction and shock comprising, by weight, approximately: 40- 60 percent of barium nitrate 13- 25 percent of calcium silicide 10- 20 percent of lead dioxide 8- 14 percent of an aluminum-magnesium alloy and, if desired, 1- 6 percent of boron.
  6. 7. A propagation primer composition substantially insensitive to friction and shock comprising, by weight, approximately: 25- 45 percent of lead tricinate 3- 10 percent of nitroguanidine 24- 54 percent of barium nitrate, and 8- 25 percent of calcium silicide.
  7. 8. A propagation primer composition substantially insensitive to friction and shock consisting of, by weight, approximately: 50 percent of barium nitrate 20 percent of calcium silicide 15 percent of lead dioxide 12 percent of an aluminum-magnesium alloy, and 3 percent of boron.
  8. 9. A propagation primer composition substantially insensitive to friction and shock consisting of, by weight, approximately: 30 percent of lead tricinate 5 percent of nitroguanidine 45 percent of barium nitrate, and 20 percent of calcium silicide.
  9. 10. A propagation primer composition substantially insensitive to friction and shock consisting of, by weight, approximately: 60 percent of barium nitrate 15 percent of an aluminum-magnesium alloy 12 percent of lead dioxide 10 percent of zirconium hydride, and 3 percent of boron.
US3613758A 1968-01-13 1969-01-02 Propagation primer Expired - Lifetime US3613758A (en)

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BE (1) BE726679A (en)
DE (1) DE1646350C3 (en)
FR (1) FR1599961A (en)
GB (1) GB1246409A (en)
NL (1) NL6817605A (en)

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4691633A (en) * 1985-06-06 1987-09-08 Societe Nationale Des Poudres Et Explosifs Igniter intended for gas-generating charges in shells
US5741999A (en) * 1995-06-22 1998-04-21 Kazumi; Takashi Gas generating agent composition
US6086693A (en) * 1999-02-02 2000-07-11 Autoliv Asp, Inc. Low particulate igniter composition for a gas generant
FR2863352A1 (en) * 2003-12-03 2005-06-10 Armement Et D Etudes Alsetex S Anti-riot grenade propulsion device, has propulsive shell with gun powder housed in cup inserted in orifice traversing partition, where cup has low resistance zone at its bottom to break bottom under pressure of combustion gas of powder
US20060139748A1 (en) * 2004-12-14 2006-06-29 Ahn Seong D Color electrophoretic display and method of manufacturing the same
US20080060541A1 (en) * 2006-08-29 2008-03-13 Daicel Chemical Industries, Ltd. Electric igniter and method of manufacturing same

Families Citing this family (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2438821B1 (en) * 1978-10-13 1981-03-27 France Etat

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2038097A (en) * 1931-07-01 1936-04-21 Remington Arms Co Inc Priming mixture
US3238076A (en) * 1963-01-07 1966-03-01 Taylor George William Charles Process for primary explosives containing boron having reduced electrostatic sensitivity
US3257801A (en) * 1962-07-09 1966-06-28 North American Aviation Inc Pyrotechnic composition comprising solid oxidizer, boron and aluminum additive and binder

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2038097A (en) * 1931-07-01 1936-04-21 Remington Arms Co Inc Priming mixture
US3257801A (en) * 1962-07-09 1966-06-28 North American Aviation Inc Pyrotechnic composition comprising solid oxidizer, boron and aluminum additive and binder
US3238076A (en) * 1963-01-07 1966-03-01 Taylor George William Charles Process for primary explosives containing boron having reduced electrostatic sensitivity

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4691633A (en) * 1985-06-06 1987-09-08 Societe Nationale Des Poudres Et Explosifs Igniter intended for gas-generating charges in shells
US5741999A (en) * 1995-06-22 1998-04-21 Kazumi; Takashi Gas generating agent composition
US6086693A (en) * 1999-02-02 2000-07-11 Autoliv Asp, Inc. Low particulate igniter composition for a gas generant
FR2863352A1 (en) * 2003-12-03 2005-06-10 Armement Et D Etudes Alsetex S Anti-riot grenade propulsion device, has propulsive shell with gun powder housed in cup inserted in orifice traversing partition, where cup has low resistance zone at its bottom to break bottom under pressure of combustion gas of powder
US20060139748A1 (en) * 2004-12-14 2006-06-29 Ahn Seong D Color electrophoretic display and method of manufacturing the same
US7564615B2 (en) * 2004-12-14 2009-07-21 Electronics And Telecommunications Research Institute Color electrophoretic display
US20080060541A1 (en) * 2006-08-29 2008-03-13 Daicel Chemical Industries, Ltd. Electric igniter and method of manufacturing same

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
DE1646350A1 (en) 1971-08-05 application
BE726679A (en) 1969-06-16 grant
NL6817605A (en) 1969-07-15 application
FR1599961A (en) 1970-07-20 grant
GB1246409A (en) 1971-09-15 application
DE1646350B2 (en) 1973-08-16 application
DE1646350C3 (en) 1974-04-18 grant

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