Connect public, paid and private patent data with Google Patents Public Datasets

Method for attaching suture and needle

Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3611551A
US3611551A US3611551DA US3611551A US 3611551 A US3611551 A US 3611551A US 3611551D A US3611551D A US 3611551DA US 3611551 A US3611551 A US 3611551A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
needle
channel
suture
annealing
walls
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
William H Shave
Leonard D Kurtz
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Deknatel Inc
Original Assignee
Deknatel Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for suturing wounds; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials
    • A61B17/06Needles ; Sutures; Needle-suture combinations; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials
    • A61B17/06004Means for attaching suture to needle
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B21MECHANICAL METAL-WORKING WITHOUT ESSENTIALLY REMOVING MATERIAL; PUNCHING METAL
    • B21GMAKING NEEDLES, PINS OR NAILS OF METAL
    • B21G1/00Making needles used for performing operations
    • B21G1/08Making needles used for performing operations of hollow needles or needles with hollow end, e.g. hypodermic needles, larding-needles
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49826Assembling or joining
    • Y10T29/49908Joining by deforming
    • Y10T29/49925Inward deformation of aperture or hollow body wall

Abstract

A METHOD OF ATTACHING A SUTURE TO A SUTURE NEDDLE OF THE TYPE INITIALLY HAVING A V-SHAPED CROSS-SECTION CHANNEL WHILE SUBSTANTIALLY ELIMINATING ANNEALING. THE CHANNEL IS FORCEFULLY PARTIALLY CLOSED BEFORE HARDENING THE NEDDLE, AFTER WHICH THE NEDDLE IS HARDENED, AFTER WHICH SUTURE IS PLACED INTO THE CHANNEL. THE WALLS OF THE CHANNEL ARE THEN FURTHER AND FINALLY CLOSED AGAINST EACH OTHER NORMALLY WITHOUT ANNEALING, SO HOLD THE SUTURE.

Description

Oct. 12, 1971 w. H. SHAVE METHOD FOR ATTACHING SUTURE AND NEEDLE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Aug. ,25, 1969 IINV ENTORS WILLIAM H SHAVE LEONARD D.

KURTZ ATTORNEYS ON. 12, w, H, SHAVE EI'AL 3,611,!

uswaoo FOR AT'IAGBING suruaa mo NEEDLE Filed Aug. 25. 1969 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INV EN'I'DIS WILLIAM H. SHAVE LEONARD D. KURTZ United States 3,611,551 METHOD FOR ATTACHTNG SUTURE AND NEEDLE William H. Shave, Roosevelt, and Leonard D. Kurtz, Woodmere, N.Y., assignors to lDeknatel, incorporated, Queens Village, NY.

Filed Aug. 25, 1969, Ser. No. 852,785 Int. Cl. B21d 39/00; 1823p 11/00 US. Cl. 29515 6 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to suture needles, and in particular, it relates to the attachment of a suture to a suture needle.

Suture needles are formed from a relatively soft metal wire-like material. A length of wire of sufiicient length for both the needle and a handle (for holding the needle during the manufacture thereof) is cut from the main wire source. The length is then straightened, formed with a point at the front end, and a part of the shank to the rear of the point may be flattened to provide a place for the surgeon to grip the needle.

When using the channel method for attaching the suture to the needle, a channel is formed in the needle, rearward of the shank while the needle is still in its initial, relatively soft condition. This groove is stamped into the needle by means of a V-shaped die. The V-shape of the die is necessary to assure that a sufiicient force is concentrated at the appropriate place on the channel to form a groove of a sufficient depth without damaging the walls of the newly formed channel.

The needle point is now bent to the desired curvature and the needle is hardened. This may be accomplished by placing the needles into a vacuum furnace at approximately 1800 F. to 1900 F. followed by tempering at about 500 F. to take out the brittleness. The finished needle may have a Rockwell hardness of approximately 49 to 55.

Since the suture could not withstand the heat treatments, it must of course be attached to the needle after hardening. However, it is impossible to bend the hardened channel walls to close them onto a suture without cracking or twisting the walls. Thus, before closing the channel walls onto suture it is necessary to soften the channel walls by annealing. Of course, care must be taken to prevent the softening effect of the annealing procedure from being felt forward of the channel walls along the shank or the needle point.

Following annealing the needle is electroplated, and the handle part is chopped off leaving the channel open to the rear. The suture is then inserted and the channel Walls are closed onto the suture, preferably by crimping to hold the suture.

Notwithstanding the necessity of the annealing procedure, it has been found that annealing has several detrimental etfects. First, there is an inevitable drift of heat down the shank of the needle causing some undesirable annealing effect on the shank of the needle itself. In addition, the annealing process invariably decreases the atent stainlessness of the needle, that is the ability of the needle to resist rust.

Further, the chop off of the handle from the main part of the needle is less clean with a softer annealed needle than with a harder needle. This chop off is accomplished through that portion of the needle which has the channel formed into it. The harder the material of the channel, the cleaner the chop off, and the smaller the resultant burr. The annealing process by softening the channel prevents a clean chop off and makes it more likely for burrs to occur.

Moreover, the above disadvantages can become even more significant when the needle is treated to obtain a very high Rockwell hardness. In this case it may be necessary to anneal the needle several times, thereby sign1ficantly increasing the above noted undesirable effects.

Indeed, with a very hard needle, it is frequently impossible or diflicult to accomplish the necessary softness for bending the needle material without cracking or twisting the same regardless of the number of annealing steps.

Thus, there exists a need for improvements which will permit the use of the advantageous channel method of at taching the suture to the needle while concurrently eliminating the disadvantages which result from annealing.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Thus, it is a purpose of the invention to provide a new and improved method for attaching a suture to a suture needle by the channel method While eliminating the detrimental effects of annealing.

The purpose of the present invention is achieved by partially closing the V-shaped groove while the needle is still in its initial relatively soft condition before the hardening step. Because of this preclosing step, it is possible to later close the channel of the hardened needle without annealing, or at worst (in the case of very hard needles) by substantially reducing the required number of annealing steps.

A preferred embodiment of the invention is as follows: First, while the length of needle wire still has its initial softness, the' needle point and the V-shaped channel are formed in the conventional manner. The said V-shaped channel is stamped out by applying a V-shaped die against the wire. Next, and before hardening takes place, the Walls of the channel are partially closed. The extent of this closing will depend upon specific operating conditions. As a lower limit, the channel should be closed enough so that after subsequent hardening and the insertion of the suture, further and final closing will not cause the channel walls to crack or twist. As an upper limit, the channel opening should be left wide enough to permit insertion of the suture into the channel. In this condition the channel walls may still diverge, although of course less than the initial V-shape. Or the channel Walls may be parallel to each other or they may even converge towards each other. The needle is then hardened in a conventional manner, for example by heating in a vacuum furnace at 1800-1900" F. followed by tempering at about 500 F. to remove brittleness. The suture end is then placed into the partially closed, hardened channel after which the channel is finally closed onto the suture to hold the same without annealing (or if working with a very hard needle, with a substantially reduced number of annealings) and also without cracking or twisting the walls of the channel and without otherwise compromising the structural integrity of the channel walls or of the needle as a whole.

For example, we have been able to close Without cracking or twisting the channels of hard needles up to 0.040

inch in diameter without annealing. Needles of 0.060 inch in diameter, previously requiring from three to eight annealings were closed successfully with only one annealing.

In addition, since there is no annealing, there is no drift of heat down the shank to cause an annealing effect on the shank of the needle. The needle is now uniformly hard along its length and it is possible to place the needle holder at any position along the length of the needle. The resistance to bending is now as high as possible since the needle is as hard as possible, without brittleness. This is in contrast with annealed needles of the prior art wherein the surgeon had to be careful in the placement of the needle holder on the needle to be sure that he did not grasp a spot which had become soft from the annealing.

Another advantage of the present invention is that the stainlessness, that is the ability of the needle to resist rust is maintained.

Another advantage of the present invention is that the tendency for burr formation at the chop off is greatly decreased or eliminated.

Another advantage of the present invention is that the time of the final closing procedure is significantly reduced. Without the preclosure step, it was frequently found that the hardened needle channel had to be closed gradually in steps. This procedure has been eliminated, however, by using the preclosing step. It is now possible to close the hardened channel in one single step or at most two. Moreover, it has been found that the holding power of this channel is not reduced by the process of the present invention. The final closing procedure is further enhanced since the operator requires less skill to finally close the previously preclosed channel onto the suture. With previous procedures, there was a tendency for the needle to twist as the walls were closed. However, with the preclosed needle the tendency for twisting is completely eliminated. Finally, the symmetry of the closure has been enhanced by the preclosing step.

Thus, it is an object of this invention to provide a new and improved method for attaching a suture to a suture needle.

It is another object of this invention to provide a new and improved method for attaching a suture to a suture needle by the channel procedure wherein the need for annealing is substantially reduced and/or eliminated.

It is another object of this invention to preclose the channel of a suture needle prior to hardening theref.

Another object of this invention is to provide a new and improved method for attaching a suture to a suture needle of the type having a channel formed in the end thereof remote from the needle point, the method including preclosing the channel of the conventional needle before hardening the needle, and then hardening the needle, inserting the suture into the channel, and closing the channel about the suture.

Other objects and the attendant advantages of the present invention will become apparent from a detailed description to follow together with the accompanying draw- 1ngs.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS There follows a detailed description of a preferred embodiment of the invention to be read together with the accompanying drawings. However, it is to be understood that both the description and the drawings are provided only to describe a preferred embodiment of the invention, and that the invention is capable of numerous further modifications and variations.

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a conventional suture needle having a conventional stamped V-shaped channel formed in the end thereof.

FIG. 2 is a plan view taken in the direction of the arrow A of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is an end elevational view taken in the direction of the arrow B in FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view similar to FIG. 1 but showing the suture needle after the preclosing step.

.4 FIG. 5 is a plan view taken in the direction of the arrowAin FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 is an end elevational view taken in the direction of the arrow B in FIG. 4.

FIGS. 7 and 8 show one arrangement for carrying out the preclosing operation of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawings, like numerals represent like elements throughout the several views.

FIGS. 1 through 3 illustrate a conventional suture with the needle point formed at the front end and with a V- shaped channel 11 having walls 12 and 13 stamped into the rear end, the needle being ready for further treatment. The additional portion of wire normally used as a handle and chopped off just prior to the insertion of the suture is omitted for purposes of clarity. For holding the suture in place, the channel includes nibs 15. A shank 16 extends from the channel 11 to the point 17.

Normally the needle as illustrated in FIGS. 1 through 3 would now be hardened, and then the channel would be annealed a sufficient number of times, depending upon the exact composition of the material of the needle and upon the size of the channel. After the channel had reached a sufficient softness, the suture end would be placed in the stamped out V-shaped channel 11 and the walls 12 and 13 would be closed about the suture to firmly hold the same. However, as noted earlier, annealing causes several undesirable effects.

FIGS. 4 through 6 illustrate the same needle as FIGS. 1 through 3 but after a preclosing operation has been performed. It can be seen that the walls 12 and 13 are now closer together than in FIGS. 1-3. It has been found that by first bending the needle channel into this shape before hardening the needle wire, then after hardening the walls 12 and 13 could be bent onto a suture normally without annealing, by crimping or the like to firmly hold the suture without causing cracks or twisting of the metal channel walls. Actually, in practice for large needles wherein a large number of annealings have been required, with the present invention only a single annealing was necessary. However, it is believed that even this single annealing could possibly be eliminated.

FIGS. 7 and 8 illustrate the tools for carrying out the preclosing step. These include first and second opposed dies 20 and 22 having opposed cylindrical recesses 21 and 23 formed therein. As can be seen by observing FIGS. 7 and 8, the radius of the cylindrical recesses 21 and 23 is such that when the parts 20 and 22 are brought together the outer ends of walls 12 and 13 are forced together for example, into the U shape as shown in FIG. 8.

Although the invention has been described in considerable detail with respect to a preferred embodiment thereof, it will be apparent that the invention is capable of numerous modifications and variations, apparent to those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

We claim:

1. A method of attaching a suture to a suture needle comprising the steps of: heating a metallic suture needle to soften it, and while the needle is still hot and soft, and without annealing at this time, (a) flattening a portion of the needle remote from the point, (b) forming said flattened part into a generally V-shaped channel in which the side walls of the channel diverge away from each other, and (0) partially preclosing the V-shaped channel by bringing the walls of the channel closer to each other; hardening the partially closed suture needle, locating a suture in said partially closed channel, and subsequently forcing the walls of the channel closer together to hold the suture in the channel.

2. The method of claim 1, wherein said preclosing step is performed by placing the said channel, while still of 5 V shaped cross-section, into a die comprising a pair of opposed semi-cylindrical recesses, such that the axes of the recesses are parallel to the axis of the channel, and urging the dies together such that the walls of the channel are bent towards each other.

3. The method of claim 1, wherein the step of attaching the suture to the needle is performed without annealing the needle.

4. The method of claim 1, wherein after hardening, the suture is placed into the channel and the walls of the channel are closed onto the suture in the absence of annealing and without cracking the channel walls.

5. The method of claim 1 wherein the further closing is performed while retaining the structural integrity of the channel walls by preventing cracking or twisting thereof.

6. The method of claim 1, wherein after hardening the needle has a Rockwell hardness of between 49 and 55.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,250,114 12/1917 Bigelow et al. 128-339 1,441,459 1/1923 Small 29-517 X 1,636,615 7/1927 Quint 163-5 X 2,534,867 12/1950 Hennessey 29-517 X 2,620,028 12/1952 Kohut 128-339 X 2,865,375 12/1958 Banks et a1. 128-339 2,865,376 12/1958 Pellier et a1. 128-339 CHARLIE T. MOON, Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R. 128-339; 163-5

US3611551A 1969-08-25 1969-08-25 Method for attaching suture and needle Expired - Lifetime US3611551A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US85278569 true 1969-08-25 1969-08-25

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3611551A true US3611551A (en) 1971-10-12

Family

ID=25314212

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3611551A Expired - Lifetime US3611551A (en) 1969-08-25 1969-08-25 Method for attaching suture and needle

Country Status (5)

Country Link
US (1) US3611551A (en)
CA (1) CA921350A (en)
DE (1) DE2000602A1 (en)
FR (1) FR2057630A5 (en)
GB (1) GB1284594A (en)

Cited By (35)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3736646A (en) * 1971-10-18 1973-06-05 American Cyanamid Co Method of attaching surgical needles to multifilament polyglycolic acid absorbable sutures
US3835912A (en) * 1973-06-25 1974-09-17 S K S Ltd Method of joining a filament to a metal rod
US4072041A (en) * 1976-05-28 1978-02-07 American Cyanamid Company Short-crimp surgical needle
US4306443A (en) * 1979-01-29 1981-12-22 Kabushiki Kaisha Matsutani Seisakusho Crimping apparatus
US4341094A (en) * 1978-12-13 1982-07-27 Joh. Moritz Rump Circular knitting needle
US4662056A (en) * 1984-01-03 1987-05-05 Becker W Michael Method of affixing ornamentation support members to a cord-like member
US4672734A (en) * 1986-02-19 1987-06-16 Yasuo Nakamura Suture needle and its manufacturing processes
US4890614A (en) * 1986-02-19 1990-01-02 Yasuo Nakamura Suture needle and its manufacturing process
US4922904A (en) * 1988-06-18 1990-05-08 Keisei Medical Industrial Company Limited Apparatus for connecting thread to surgical needle
US5201760A (en) * 1990-12-24 1993-04-13 American Cyanamid Company Surgical needle-suture combination and apparatus and method for attaching the same
US5207701A (en) * 1990-12-24 1993-05-04 American Cyanamid Company Surgical needle-suture combination, and apparatus and method for attaching the same
US5224955A (en) * 1991-08-15 1993-07-06 American Cyanamid Company Surgical needle-suture combination and apparatus and method for attaching the same
US5358498A (en) * 1990-02-01 1994-10-25 Deknatel Technology Corporation, Inc. Needled suture
US5383902A (en) * 1993-06-02 1995-01-24 United States Surgical Corporation Surgical needle-suture attachment for controlled suture release
US5438746A (en) * 1994-01-13 1995-08-08 Ethicon, Inc. Needle threading and swaging system
US5452636A (en) * 1994-01-13 1995-09-26 Ethicon, Inc. Cutter assembly
US5473810A (en) * 1994-01-13 1995-12-12 Ethicon, Inc. Needle-suture assembly and packaging system
US5477609A (en) * 1994-01-13 1995-12-26 Ethicon, Inc. Needle and suture swaging station
US5487216A (en) * 1994-01-13 1996-01-30 Ethicon, Inc. Control system for an automatic needle-suture assembly and packaging machine
US5487308A (en) * 1994-01-13 1996-01-30 Ethicon Inc Needle and suture automatic pull-test system
US5511670A (en) * 1994-01-13 1996-04-30 Ethicon, Inc. Needle sorting device
US5568593A (en) * 1994-01-13 1996-10-22 Ethicon, Inc. Robotic control system for a needle sorting and feeding apparatus
US5707391A (en) * 1995-06-07 1998-01-13 United States Surgical Corporation Apparatus and method for attaching surgical needle suture components
US5722991A (en) * 1995-06-07 1998-03-03 United States Surgical Corporation Apparatus and method for attaching surgical needle suture components
US5956927A (en) * 1998-02-06 1999-09-28 Ethicon, Inc. Suture capture and tensioning arrangement in a machine for the automated packaging of needles and attached sutures
US5964075A (en) * 1998-02-06 1999-10-12 Ethicon, Inc. Cover or label-applying arrangement in a machine for the automated packaging of needles and attached sutures
US5983601A (en) * 1998-02-06 1999-11-16 Ethicon, Inc. Machine for the automated packaging of needles and attached sutures
US5987848A (en) * 1998-02-06 1999-11-23 Ethicon, Inc. Needle transfer arrangement in a machine for the automated packaging of needles and attached sutures
US6014851A (en) * 1998-02-06 2000-01-18 Ethicon, Inc. Package feed arrangement in a machine for the automated packaging of needles and attached sutures
US6128816A (en) * 1994-01-13 2000-10-10 Ethicon, Inc. Suture cutting method
US6644464B1 (en) 1994-01-13 2003-11-11 Ethicon, Inc. Needle sorting device
US20120209298A1 (en) * 2011-02-10 2012-08-16 Coloplast A/S Suture system and assembly including a suture clip
WO2012174464A2 (en) * 2011-06-17 2012-12-20 Tautona Group Lp Needle for delivery of dermal filler threads
US9161751B2 (en) 2010-12-02 2015-10-20 Coloplast A/S Suture system and assembly
US9861570B2 (en) 2008-09-02 2018-01-09 Allergan Holdings France S.A.S. Threads of hyaluronic acid and/or derivatives thereof, methods of making thereof and uses thereof

Families Citing this family (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2492900B (en) * 2012-07-17 2013-07-10 Falah Hasan Ali Modified silhouette facelift surgical suture
GB2495653B (en) * 2012-12-24 2013-11-20 Falah Hasan Ali Super silhouette facelift suture

Cited By (49)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3736646A (en) * 1971-10-18 1973-06-05 American Cyanamid Co Method of attaching surgical needles to multifilament polyglycolic acid absorbable sutures
US3835912A (en) * 1973-06-25 1974-09-17 S K S Ltd Method of joining a filament to a metal rod
US4072041A (en) * 1976-05-28 1978-02-07 American Cyanamid Company Short-crimp surgical needle
US4341094A (en) * 1978-12-13 1982-07-27 Joh. Moritz Rump Circular knitting needle
US4306443A (en) * 1979-01-29 1981-12-22 Kabushiki Kaisha Matsutani Seisakusho Crimping apparatus
US4662056A (en) * 1984-01-03 1987-05-05 Becker W Michael Method of affixing ornamentation support members to a cord-like member
US4890614A (en) * 1986-02-19 1990-01-02 Yasuo Nakamura Suture needle and its manufacturing process
US4672734A (en) * 1986-02-19 1987-06-16 Yasuo Nakamura Suture needle and its manufacturing processes
US4922904A (en) * 1988-06-18 1990-05-08 Keisei Medical Industrial Company Limited Apparatus for connecting thread to surgical needle
US5358498A (en) * 1990-02-01 1994-10-25 Deknatel Technology Corporation, Inc. Needled suture
US5201760A (en) * 1990-12-24 1993-04-13 American Cyanamid Company Surgical needle-suture combination and apparatus and method for attaching the same
US5207701A (en) * 1990-12-24 1993-05-04 American Cyanamid Company Surgical needle-suture combination, and apparatus and method for attaching the same
US5224955A (en) * 1991-08-15 1993-07-06 American Cyanamid Company Surgical needle-suture combination and apparatus and method for attaching the same
US5383902A (en) * 1993-06-02 1995-01-24 United States Surgical Corporation Surgical needle-suture attachment for controlled suture release
US5568746A (en) * 1993-06-02 1996-10-29 United States Surgical Corporation Surgical needle-suture attachment for controlled suture release
US6128816A (en) * 1994-01-13 2000-10-10 Ethicon, Inc. Suture cutting method
US5473810A (en) * 1994-01-13 1995-12-12 Ethicon, Inc. Needle-suture assembly and packaging system
US5477609A (en) * 1994-01-13 1995-12-26 Ethicon, Inc. Needle and suture swaging station
US5485668A (en) * 1994-01-13 1996-01-23 Ethicon, Inc. Needle and suture swaging method
US5487216A (en) * 1994-01-13 1996-01-30 Ethicon, Inc. Control system for an automatic needle-suture assembly and packaging machine
US5487212A (en) * 1994-01-13 1996-01-30 Ethicon, Inc. Assembly and packaging method for needle and suture assemblies
US5487308A (en) * 1994-01-13 1996-01-30 Ethicon Inc Needle and suture automatic pull-test system
US5495420A (en) * 1994-01-13 1996-02-27 Ethicon, Inc. Control system for an automatic needle-suture assembly and packaging machine
US5500991A (en) * 1994-01-13 1996-03-26 Ethicon, Inc. Needle and suture swaging and pull-testing method
US5452636A (en) * 1994-01-13 1995-09-26 Ethicon, Inc. Cutter assembly
US5568593A (en) * 1994-01-13 1996-10-22 Ethicon, Inc. Robotic control system for a needle sorting and feeding apparatus
US5438746A (en) * 1994-01-13 1995-08-08 Ethicon, Inc. Needle threading and swaging system
US6997305B2 (en) 1994-01-13 2006-02-14 Ethicon, Inc. Needle sorting device
US6800231B2 (en) 1994-01-13 2004-10-05 Ethicon, Inc. Method for cutting suture
US5727668A (en) * 1994-01-13 1998-03-17 Ethicon, Inc. Needle sorting device
US20040007445A1 (en) * 1994-01-13 2004-01-15 Ethicon, Inc. Needle sorting device
US6644464B1 (en) 1994-01-13 2003-11-11 Ethicon, Inc. Needle sorting device
US6309202B1 (en) * 1994-01-13 2001-10-30 Ethicon, Inc. Suture cutting system
US6264456B1 (en) 1994-01-13 2001-07-24 David Demarest Suture cutting system
US5511670A (en) * 1994-01-13 1996-04-30 Ethicon, Inc. Needle sorting device
US6206677B1 (en) * 1994-01-13 2001-03-27 Ethicon, Inc. Suture cutting system
US5722991A (en) * 1995-06-07 1998-03-03 United States Surgical Corporation Apparatus and method for attaching surgical needle suture components
US5707391A (en) * 1995-06-07 1998-01-13 United States Surgical Corporation Apparatus and method for attaching surgical needle suture components
US5983601A (en) * 1998-02-06 1999-11-16 Ethicon, Inc. Machine for the automated packaging of needles and attached sutures
US5964075A (en) * 1998-02-06 1999-10-12 Ethicon, Inc. Cover or label-applying arrangement in a machine for the automated packaging of needles and attached sutures
US5956927A (en) * 1998-02-06 1999-09-28 Ethicon, Inc. Suture capture and tensioning arrangement in a machine for the automated packaging of needles and attached sutures
US5987848A (en) * 1998-02-06 1999-11-23 Ethicon, Inc. Needle transfer arrangement in a machine for the automated packaging of needles and attached sutures
US6014851A (en) * 1998-02-06 2000-01-18 Ethicon, Inc. Package feed arrangement in a machine for the automated packaging of needles and attached sutures
US9861570B2 (en) 2008-09-02 2018-01-09 Allergan Holdings France S.A.S. Threads of hyaluronic acid and/or derivatives thereof, methods of making thereof and uses thereof
US9161751B2 (en) 2010-12-02 2015-10-20 Coloplast A/S Suture system and assembly
US20120209298A1 (en) * 2011-02-10 2012-08-16 Coloplast A/S Suture system and assembly including a suture clip
US9220495B2 (en) * 2011-02-10 2015-12-29 Coloplast A/S Suture system and assembly including a suture clip
WO2012174464A2 (en) * 2011-06-17 2012-12-20 Tautona Group Lp Needle for delivery of dermal filler threads
WO2012174464A3 (en) * 2011-06-17 2014-05-08 Tautona Group Lp Needle for delivery of dermal filler threads

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
FR2057630A5 (en) 1971-05-21 application
CA921350A1 (en) grant
CA921350A (en) 1973-02-20 grant
DE2000602A1 (en) 1971-03-25 application
GB1284594A (en) 1972-08-09 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3259969A (en) Method of making butt welded joints
US3252643A (en) Instrument for suturing living tissue
US3583060A (en) Method of swaging a metal fitting on a steel wire
US5171252A (en) Surgical fastening clip formed of a shape memory alloy, a method of making such a clip and a method of using such a clip
US5843244A (en) Shape memory alloy treatment
US4201215A (en) Apparatus and method for closing a severed sternum
US5342396A (en) Staples
US5009664A (en) Marrow nail for the treatment of bone fractures
US3289675A (en) Tubular hypodermic needle
DE19547617C1 (en) Appliance for inserting and replacing surgical implant
US5001825A (en) Catheter guidewire fabrication method
US20070173866A1 (en) Surgical hemostatic clip
US3877281A (en) Method for producing a high strength bolt
US4981481A (en) Marrow nail for the treatment of bone fractures according to the marrow cavity nailing procedure and marrow nail tool
US5776268A (en) Process for manufacturing surgical needles
US4844066A (en) Surgical clip
US5330441A (en) Surgical suturing needle and method for making same
US4802478A (en) Medical staple and removal method
US6322581B1 (en) Suturing needle for medical use
US4527554A (en) Method and device for making a twisted wire connection with reduced incidence of breakage
US5201760A (en) Surgical needle-suture combination and apparatus and method for attaching the same
US1954868A (en) Method and means for treatment by radiations
US6848152B2 (en) Method of forming barbs on a suture and apparatus for performing same
US2620028A (en) Method of manufacturing surgeons' needles
US1558037A (en) Surgical needle and suture assembly and method of making the same