US3605839A - Slicing device - Google Patents

Slicing device Download PDF

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US3605839A
US3605839A US3605839DA US3605839A US 3605839 A US3605839 A US 3605839A US 3605839D A US3605839D A US 3605839DA US 3605839 A US3605839 A US 3605839A
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Prior art keywords
bars
cutters
array
blades
rack
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Samuel L Gerson
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Lincoln Foodservice Products Inc
RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT DESIGN CO
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RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT DESIGN CO
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Assigned to ALCO FOODSERVICE EQUIPMENT COMPANY reassignment ALCO FOODSERVICE EQUIPMENT COMPANY CONDITIONAL ASSIGNMENT (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: GERSON, SAMUEL L.
Assigned to LINCOLN FOODSERVICE PRODUCTS, INC. reassignment LINCOLN FOODSERVICE PRODUCTS, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST. Assignors: ALCO FOODSERVICE EQUIPMENT COMPANY, A FL. CORP.
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B26HAND CUTTING TOOLS; CUTTING; SEVERING
    • B26DCUTTING; DETAILS COMMON TO MACHINES FOR PERFORATING, PUNCHING, CUTTING-OUT, STAMPING-OUT OR SEVERING
    • B26D1/00Cutting through work characterised by the nature or movement of the cutting member or particular materials not otherwise provided for; Apparatus or machines therefor; Cutting members therefor
    • B26D1/01Cutting through work characterised by the nature or movement of the cutting member or particular materials not otherwise provided for; Apparatus or machines therefor; Cutting members therefor involving a cutting member which does not travel with the work
    • B26D1/547Cutting through work characterised by the nature or movement of the cutting member or particular materials not otherwise provided for; Apparatus or machines therefor; Cutting members therefor involving a cutting member which does not travel with the work having a wire-like cutting member
    • B26D1/553Cutting through work characterised by the nature or movement of the cutting member or particular materials not otherwise provided for; Apparatus or machines therefor; Cutting members therefor involving a cutting member which does not travel with the work having a wire-like cutting member with a plurality of wire-like cutting members
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B26HAND CUTTING TOOLS; CUTTING; SEVERING
    • B26DCUTTING; DETAILS COMMON TO MACHINES FOR PERFORATING, PUNCHING, CUTTING-OUT, STAMPING-OUT OR SEVERING
    • B26D7/00Details of apparatus for cutting, cutting-out, stamping-out, punching, perforating, or severing by means other than cutting
    • B26D7/06Arrangements for feeding or delivering work of other than sheet, web, or filamentary form
    • B26D7/0608Arrangements for feeding or delivering work of other than sheet, web, or filamentary form by pushers
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/647With means to convey work relative to tool station
    • Y10T83/6584Cut made parallel to direction of and during work movement
    • Y10T83/6587Including plural, laterally spaced tools
    • Y10T83/6588Tools mounted on common tool support

Abstract

AN ARRAY OF SPACED PARALLEL BARS IS ROTATABLY MOUNTED TO MESH BETWEEN A RACK OF LINEAR CUTTERS. THE BARS ROTATE TOWARDS THE CUTTERS FROM AN OPEN ANGLE TO INITIALLY SLIDE THE OBJECT ACROSS THE CUTTERS TO PUNCTURE IT. THE ACTION CHANGES IN FINAL CLOSING STAGES TO PRIMARILY PUSHING TO HELP DISCHARGE THE SLICED OBJECT FROM BETWEEN THE CUTTERS. THIS ACTION IS FACILITATED BY MAKING THE PORTIONS OF THE BARS EXTENDING THROUGH THE CUTTER OF SCYTHE SHAPE. THE BARS ARE CONVENIENTLY ROTATED BY CONNECTING THE BOSS OF AN OPERATING HANDLE TO THEM ADJACENT THEIR PIVOT UPON THE BASE. OPERATION DOWNWARD VERTICALLY IS HIGHLY EFFICIENT AND TOGETHER WITH SERRATED BLADES FACILITATES SLICING HARDER VEGETABLES LIKE ONIONS.

Description

Sept. 20, 1971 5. GERSQN 3,605,839

SLICING DEVICE Filed Nov. 18. 1968 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 s. L. GERSON 3,605,839

SLICING DEVICE Sept. 20, 1971 Filed Nov. 18, 1968 :s Sheets-Sheet 2 .AIM

S. L. GERSON smcme DEVICE Sept. 20, 197-1 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Nov. 18. 1968 United States Patent Oce Patented Sept. 20, 1971 Int. Cl. 326d 3/26 U.S. Cl. 146-169 19 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE An array of spaced parallel bars is rotatably mounted to mesh between a rack of linear cutters. The bars rotate towards the cutters from an open angle to initially slide the object across the cutters to puncture it. The action changes in final closing stages to primarily pushing to help discharge the sliced object from between the cutters. This action is facilitated by making the portions of the bars extending through the cutter of scythe shape. The bars are conveniently rotated by connecting the boss of an operating handle to them adjacent their pivot upon the base. Operation downward vertically is highly efficient and together with serrated blades facilitates slicing harder vegetables like onions.

CROSS-REFERENCES TO RELATED APPLICATIONS This application is a continuation-in-part of copending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 673,147, filed Oct. 5,

1967 now abandoned, by this same inventor.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a device for slicing objects, such as vegetables and fruit, primarily tomatoes, potatoes, onions, oranges, etc. Preexisting slicing devices of this type have employed substantially straight line motion. This requires the use of reciprocating bearings, which are relatively complicated and expensive to manufacture and maintain and provide a uniform cutting action. This is not particularly desirable for cutting vegetables having tough skin such as tomatoes and onions. It is more difficult to initially pierce through the skin of the tomato than it is to penetrate the pulpy interior. Onions are relatively hard and tough which makes them very difficult to pierce or slice. There are preexisting multiple slicers for tomatoes but none for onions. An object of this invention is to provide a simple, economical, and dependable device for slicing hard and soft objects, such as vegetables and fruit. Another object is to provide such a device which is particularly well adapted for slicing tomatoes, potatoes, onions, oranges, etc.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with this invention an array of parallel bars are mounted to rotate through a rack of parallel linear cutters, such as sharp knife blades. The bars are arranged to close in a scissors-like action relative to the cutters from an open angle in which the object is received to fully mesh within and through the cutters. The advancing edges of the bars are maintained at a positive angle relative to the cutters during the initial phase of the cutting stroke to cause the objects to slide across the edges of the cutters as they start pushing through them. The initial Sliding action facilitates initial puncturing and piercing of the object. This is highly advantageous in slicing vegetables and fruit with relatively tough skin such as tomatoes, potatoes, onions, oranges, etc. It is also helpful but not essential to have some sliding action at the end of the cutting stroke to cleanly sever the skin at the back of the vegetable. The bars are conveniently made in the form of an array of spaced scytheshaped blades which are rotated by a handle connected to their pivot section.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING Novel features and advantages of the present invention will become apparent to one skilled in the art from a reading of the following description in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein similar reference characters refer to similar parts and in which:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a slicing device which is one embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a front view in elevation of the embodiment shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a left-side view in elevation of the embodiment shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a plan view of another slicing device which is another embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 5 is a right-side view in elevation of the embodiment shown in FIG. 4 in different phases of operation;

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional front view in elevation taken through FIG. 4 along the line 66, and;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged right-side view in elevation partially broken away and in cross section of a portion of the device in the initial phase of operation shown in FIG. 5.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT In FIGS. l3 is shown a slicer 10 for slicing soft objects such as soft vegetables. It is particularly advantageous for slicing soft vegetables with relatively tough skin, such as tomatoes. Slicer 10 includes a rack 12 of linear cutters mounted upon base 14. Table plate 16 is mounted on top of base 14 to provide a smooth readily cleaned surface, and it is thus made of a hard durable plastic such as an acrylic. An array of parallel bars 18 is rotatably mounted at one end thereof upon pivot post 20 which is anchored under base 14 as later described in detail. They form a turnstile assembly in conjunction with rack 12 as later described. The other end 22 of bar assembly 18 passes through rack 12 and is disposed at an Open angle therewith to receive an object 24, such as tomato 24, to be sliced.

Rack 12 includes a pair of channel-shaped columns 26 connected at their bases through table 16 to strengthening rib 28 under base 14 by cap screw and nut assemblies 30. A set of parallel linear cutters in the form of sharp thin stainless steel cutting blades 32 are pinned Within slots in vertical blocks 34. Blocks 34 are horizontally tensioned between columns 26 by cap screws 36 passing through apertured spacer plates 38 into threaded engagement with blocks 34. Rib 28 permits base 14 to withstand the relatively strong tension applied to blades 32 which holds them straight during their slicing action. The top of rack 12 is closed by bar 40.

Base 14 is conveniently made of a noncorrosive metal, such as cast aluminum. Table plate 16 is made of a rela tively smooth and stain resistant material, which is easy to clean, such as an acrylic plastic. A tab 42 extends from the rear of table plate 16 for directing the discharge of sliced objects. It is thus inclined downwardly to help direct such objects into a container below its level. Table plate 16 is secured to the top of base 14 by countersunk head screws 44.

Bar assembly 18 includes an array of spaced parallel bars or plates 46 which are connected and spaced from each other at their pivot end by rivets 48 passing through them and rectangular spacers 50 and spacer binding plate 76. The ends of plates 46 which receive post 20 are spaced apart by spacers 50. Bars 46 are accordingly spaced 3 and disposed in position to mesh in between cutting blades 32 as shown in FIG. 2. Washer 54 between bottom plate 46 and table top 16 may be made of an anti-friction material such as nylon or eliminated to pro ide a free clearance space.

The bottom of pivot post 20 is secured to boss 56 within base casting 14 by insertion of reduced threaded end 58 through boss 56 into threaded engagement with nut 60. Tightened nut 60 pulls shoulder 62 of post 20 into firm contact with the top of boss 56. Handle 64 is mounted upon the top of pivot post 20 with post 20 inserted within recess 66 in handle boss 67. A disc 68 of anti-friction material such as nylon is inserted within the top of recess 66 to lubricate the rotation of handle 64. Lug 70 extends from the rear of handle boss 67 to help lift it upwardly in conjunction with operating lever 72. Handle 64 is engaged to rotate bar assembly 18 by drive pin 74 secured within the underside of boss 67 and which extends through upper binding plate 76 of bar assembly 18 and through several of bars 46 to provide firm driving contact. Pin 74 is of the shear pin variety and made of an aluminum which is softer than the aluminum of which handle 64 and bars 46 are made. Handle 64 is easily lifted from engagement with bar assembly 18 by grasping lug 70 and operating lever 72 and lifting upwardly.

The ends 22 of bars 46 which extend free of each other through and in mesh with cutters 32 are made in the form shown in FIG. 1 to facilitate receiving and cutting objects 24. Ends 22 of plates 46, are for example, shaped like scythe blades with substantially straight inner edges 78 and convex rear edges 80. Inner edges 78 are joined with the roots 81 of plates 46 in a concavely curved are 82 to provide space for inserting objects 24. Rear edges 80 are conxevly curved to strengthen and stiffen plates 46.

Inner edges 78 of bars 46 are disposed at an angle a relative to adjacent front cutting edges 84 of cutting blades 32. Angle a is in the general neighborhood of or approximately 60". This causes object 24, when bar assembly 18 initiates the cutting action, to primarily slide object 24 laterally along cutting edges 84 with some subsidiary pushing action. This facilitates the initial piercing of the skin of tomato 24. When bar assembly 18 completes its rotation into mesh with rack 12, edges 78 are still at a slight positive angle relative to cutting edges 84. This maintains a slight sliding action of object 24 relative to cutting edges 84 to insure clean cutting through the skin at the back of tomato 24. The primary movement at final closure is, however, pushing perpendicular to rack 12 to discharge the tomato slices toward exit tab 42 of table 16.

The initial angle of edge 78 is highly effective for tomatoes at the illustrated 60 orientation of angle a. This advantageous angle may, however, vary approximately over an angle b centered and on either side of the illustrated position of edge 78. Angle b" may, for example, be 15.

The angle between edge 78 and cutting edges 84 when they close should be maintained positive to maintain a scissors-like action therebetween. This preserves some sliding action at closure between the edges to facilitate clean severing and discharge. The illustrated advantageous angle shown in FIG. 1 is about 7 /2 between bar edges 78 and cutting edges 84. This closure angle may vary up to angle f which is approximately 15, more effective- 1y between angles d" and e which are and and is very effective in the illustrated 7 /2 arrangement.

The slicing of tomato 24 is commenced in the full line illustration of array of bars 18 and handle 64 shown in FIG. 1. Tomato 24 is inserted between bar edges 78 and sharp edges 84 of cutters 32. Handle 64 is rotated clockwise. This imparts a sliding and pushing movement to tomato 24 relative to cutting edges 84. The initial movement is primarily sliding across cutting edges 84. This facilitates puncturing of the relatively thick skin of the tomato. As the angle between bar edges 78 and cutting edges 84 closes, the cutting action between tomato 24 and cutting edges 84 changes to primarily pushing through the relatively soft pulp of the tomato.

In the final stage of cutting movement shown in the phantom outline position of bar assembly 18 in FIG. 1, a slight positive angle is still maintained between bar edges 78 and cutting edges 84. The illustrated angle is 7 /2". This maintains some sliding action even in the final stages of the cutting stroke to facilitate the final severing through the skin at the back of the tomato.

Bars 18 continue their movement from the phantom position shown in FIG. 1 to engagement of root 81 with removable stop pin 86. The movement of outer ends 22 of bars 46 through rack 12 discharges the severed tomato slices (not shown) toward discharge tab 42 of table 16 and into a container (not shown) which may be placed beneath it.

Pin 86 may be pulled up and out of socket 88 in base 14 to permit ends 22 of bar array 18 to be swung free and clear of rack 12. Turnstile array 18 may thus be lifted off post 20 together with operating handle 64 to facilitate cleaning. Operating handle 64 may be removed from turnstile array 18 to further facilitate cleaning. These parts may thus be conveniently washed in a sink without interference with sharp cutting edges 84 of blades 32 which may be separately washed.

Device 10 by virtue of its rotational action is economical to manufacture and dependable in operation by virtue of its dependable rotational bearings which are not susceptible to fouling. The rotational bearing also facilitates rapid and trouble-free assembly and disassembly for cleaning. A rotational movement is also highly advantageous for conversion to automatic operation. The rotation of the object-confining assembly while maintaining the blades stationary helps maintain the blades rigid and connecting the pivot on the opposite side of the blades from the operating handle helps provide the aforementioned advantageous combined sliding and pushing action.

In FIGS. 47 is shown slicer 10A which is capable of slicing harder vegetables such as onions and potatoes as well as softer vegetables such as tomatoes. Device 10A has its operating movement vertical downwardly toward table top 16A instead of horizontal as for device 10. There are also other differences indicated from the following detailed description of device 10A.

In FIGS. 4 and 5 rack 12A of linear cutters 32A is mounted in frame 15A formed by end bars 26A and side bars 40A. Cutter blades 32A are secured within slits in a pair of tensioning blocks 34A. Blocks 34A are laterally pulled toward end bars 26A by cap screws 36A to tension blades 32A. Blades 32A have serrations 31A with crests 33A staggered on adjacent blades. Blades 32A are as thin as possible to withstand the force imposed upon then and are for example from 0.020 to 0.028" thick. These blades are also for example from /2 to A" wide and may be spaced from each other on 7 or 4 center spacing. Serrations 31A help hold objects, particularly hard and smooth vegetables such as onions, in place under the downward movement of bar array 18A.

Blade frame 15A is received within rectangular socket 25A in base frame 14A, which is supported above table 16A on front legs 17A and rear legs 19A. Front legs 17A are taller than rear legs 19A for tilting base frame 14A upwardly to help device 10A to resist being tipped over when it is operated and to help confine objects being sliced between bar and blade arrays 18A and 32A. The bottom ends of legs 19A are secured to table top 16A by clamps 21A. Frame 15A is secured within socket 25A by wing screws 30A extending through base frame 14A through socket 25A and into suitable holes within frame sides 40A. The removal and replacement of blade frame 15A is thereby facilitated. An array of blades 32A which are not serrated as hsown in FIGS. l-3 can be interchanged with frame 15A for cutting tomatoes (if desired) instead of the onions which are cut with the serrated blades in frame 15A. Thin serrated blades can,

however, be used for both tomatoes and onions. Blade frame 15A can also be changed to provide different blade spacings and accordingly change the thickness of the slices.

Bar assembly or array 18A includes spaced parallel bars or plates 46A which are connected and spaced from each other adjacent to their pivot end by rivets 48A passing between them and rectangular spaces 50A. Bars 46A are accordingly spaced and disposed in position to mesh in between and through cutting blades 32A as shown in FIGS. 4 and 6. Bar array 18A rotates upon the shaft of cap screw 58A secured below blade frame 15A across the short end of frame 14A by nut 60A. Bar array 18A is rotated by the side rods 71A of handle 72A, which extends through to the opposite side of blades 32A. Side rods 71A are secured on both sides of array 18A by rivets 48A which secures bars 46A together with spacers 50A.

Free ends 22A of bars 46A in array 18A are made in the scythe shape shown in FIGS. and 7 to facilitate receiving and holding an onion 24A in position for initial slicing through blades 32A. The initial directions of pressure of ends 22A of bars 46A against onion 24A is illustrated by pressure line 92A perpendicular to radius 90A through point of contact 94A between inner concave 78A of bar ends 22A and onion 24A. The angle A between line 92A and cutters 32A is approximately 60 which is similar to that for device shown in FIGS. 1-3. At the end of their operating stroke, free ends 22A of bars 46A pass completely through blades 32A as shown in FIG. 5. This insures that the sliced object is positively discharged from between blades 32A.

Handle 72A includes an optional extension 73A which can be folded out as shown in FIG. 6 for cutting larger and harder vegetables such as particularly large hard onions. Extension 73A of handle 72A includes a pair of auxiliary side rods 75A pivoted about cap screw and nut assembly 77A which also extends through lower handle tube 79A. Upper handle tube 96A is secured at the top of extension 73A by cap screw and nut assembly 98A. Extension 73A may be folded downwardly to leave lower handle tube 79A in operating position as shown in the first phase of operation in FIG. 5 in phantom outline. Handle extension 73A is shown extended in the rest of the drawings with stop lugs 100A engaging pins 102A in main handle side rods 71A. Pan 104A is inserted under base frame 14A for receiving slices discharged below device 10A. The disposition of the driving portion of handle 72A on the opposite side of blades 32A from the pivot axis, comprised by cap screw 58A, helps provide the highly unique and effective combined sliding and pushing action of this device, which makes it slice so efiiciently. This is far different from and superior to the conventional egg-slicer action in which the pivot is in line with the blades or on the same side as the operating handle.

OPERATION A relatively hard vegetable, such as an onion 24A, is sliced by inserting it between blades 32A and bar array 18A. This initial position is shown at the right-hand side of FIG. 5 and in enlarged FIG. 7. Initial piercing is facilitated by sliding the onion across serrations 31A of blades 32A into position against the inside concave surface of bars 46A. Upper handle bar 96A is then grasped and pulled downwardly counterclockwise toward the operator as shown in FIG. 5. Initial piercing may be facilitated by operating handle 72A in a jerking motion, which helps for larger onions. Serrations 31A and particularly the staggered crests 33A thereof help hold the onion in the concave pocket 78A of scythe-shaped ends 22A of bars 46A as it is remarkably cleanly and effectively sliced and discharged into pan 104A. The upward incline of blades 32A provided by higher front legs 17A also helps confine onion 24A between blades 32A and bar array 18A.

The initial primarily sliding action of the pressing surfaces 78A of bar ends 22A first helps to pierce the very tough skin of onion and then the changing angle helps to push and slice the onion between blades 32A. The curve of concave surface 78A and its changing angle of operation both facilitate the final propulsion of the slices between the blades. The combination of all of these factors makes this the first device to cleanly cut relatively thin multiple slices of onions with reasonable effort. The same action is also highly effective with potatoes, and the slices may be subsequently cut into strips or diced by placing them flat over frame 15A or blades 32A. Tomatoes may also be cut very effectively with either thin serrated blades (0.020 inch thick) or with straight blades, such as blades 32 shown in FIGS. 13.

The cutting action is also highly facilitated by the downward motion of this device and any tendency to rock over toward the operator is resisted by the inclined angle of base 14A provided by longer front legs 17A and clamps 21A connecting rear legs 19A to the rear end of table 16A. Blade frame 15A may be easily washed when it is removed from base 14A by unscrewing wing nuts 30A. The rest of the device may be easily placed in a sink to wash it clean. Handle 72A may also be easily removed for washing by removing nut 60A from cap screw 58A. Nut 60A may be made in the form of a wing nut to facilitate removal without tools.

I claim:

1. A device for slicing soft objects comprising a base, a rack of substantially parallel linear cutters having spaces therebetween mounted upon said base, an array of parallel bars having spaces therebetween, said array being arranged to mesh through said spaces in said rack of linear cutters, pivot means connected to one end of said array of parallel bars and mounted upon said one side of said rack of cutters whereby said array of bars are caused to rotate, the other end of said array of parallel bars being disposed on the other side of said rack and disposable at an open angle therewith for receiving an object to be sliced, drive means connected to said rotating array of bars for rotating them relative to said rack, the open angle between adjacent edges of said rotating bars and cutters when the slicing of said object is initiated being substantially greater than 45 to initially provide sufficient space between adjacent edges of said rotating array of bars and said linear cutters for inserting said object therebetween, the ends of the rotating bars remote from said pivot means having concave edges disposed adjacent said objects for loosely overhanging their movement against and through said cutters and the disposition of said pivot means on one side of said rack of cutters and said other end of said array of parallel bars on the other side of said rack of cutters making the slicing action of said device more efficient by initially providing a slight sliding component of force between said soft objects and said rack of cutters.

2. A device as set forth in claim 1 wherein the initial operating angle between said edges of said bars and said cutters when cutting of said vegetable is commenced is in the general neighborhood of 60.

3. A device as set forth in claim 1 wherein said portions of said bars extending through said rack are like a scythe blade in shape.

4. A device as set forth in claim 3- wherein said bars are connected to each other adjacent to said pivot means and said scythe-shaped portions are spaced apart from each other to permit them to freely mesh in between said cutters in said rack.

5. A device as set forth in claim 4 wherein a removable stopprojection is mounted upon said base in the path of movement of said array of bars for alternately limiting said movement and permitting rotation of said array of bars through and clear of said rack to facilitate removal of said array of bars from said base.

6. A device as set forth in claim 5 wherein said drive means is removable from said array of said bars to facilitate cleaning.

7. A device as set forth in claim 4 whereby said array of bars comprises spaced parallel plates connected to each other at one end thereof, said drive means comprising a handle having a boss and an operating lever, and said boss being connected to said array of bars adjacent to said pivot means.

8. A device as set forth in claim 1 where the surfaces of said bars contacting said object are concave to help hold said object under them as it is being cut.

9. A device as set forth in claim 1 wherein the cutting edges of said blade are serrated to help hold an object between said array of bars and said bars as it is being cut.

10. A device as set forth in claim 9 where serrations on adjacent bars are staggered from each other to facilitate said holding action.

11. A device as set forth in claim 1 wherein said rack of linear cutters is generally horizontally disposed and said bars are mounted to rotate in a vertical direction through said cutters to facilitate operation of said device.

12. A device as set forth in claim -11 wherein the said rack remote from said pivot means is upwardly inclined to help confine said objects between said bar array and said rack of linear cutters.

13. A device as set forth in claim 11 wherein said device includes a base frame for holding said rack of cutters.

14. A device as set forth in claim 1 including an operating handle connected to said array of bars, and said operating handle having a foldable extension to permit its length to be varied in accordance with toughness of the object to be cut.

15. A device as set forth in claim 1 wherein said pivot means is connected to a substantial distance from the side of said rack opposite to which said drive means extends whereby said reduction in said angle is facilitated.

16. A device as set forth in claim 15 wherein said drive means comprises a manually operable lever.

17. A device as set forth in claim 7 wherein said pivot means comprises a post vertically mounted upon said base and a hole through said pivot portions of said array of bars through which said post extends.

18. A device as set forth in claim 1 wherein the closing angle between said edges of said bars and said cutters ranges up to approximately 15.

19. A device as set forth in claim 18 wherein said closing angle ranges up to approximately 10.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 547,716 10/1895 Day. 1,041,221 10/1912 Wyatt 146147 2,466,121 4/1949 Norman 146-169 2,483,763 10/1949 Edwards 146147X 3,369,582 2/1968 Giangiulio 146--16-9 236,178 1/1881 Rice 146-164 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,931 1911 Great Britain.

ANDREW R. JUHASZ, Primary Examiner Z. R. BILINSKY, Assistant Examiner

US3605839D 1968-11-18 1968-11-18 Slicing device Expired - Lifetime US3605839A (en)

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Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3774490A (en) * 1968-11-18 1973-11-27 Restaurant Equipment Design Co Slicing device
US4144784A (en) * 1978-02-24 1979-03-20 Redco, Inc. Safety guard for manual food slicer
US4184397A (en) * 1978-05-17 1980-01-22 Redco, Inc. Food slicer
US4302997A (en) * 1980-05-02 1981-12-01 Alco Foodservice Equipment Company Guarded tomato slicer
US4346634A (en) * 1980-09-11 1982-08-31 Alco Foodservice Equipment Company Chopping and shredding device
US20040237741A1 (en) * 2003-05-30 2004-12-02 Lincoln Foodservice Products, Inc. Blade assembly for food slicing device
US20050217121A1 (en) * 2003-05-01 2005-10-06 World Kitchen (Ghc), Llc Food slicer
US20120055303A1 (en) * 2009-05-29 2012-03-08 Cedomir Repac Device for cutting food and multi-functional device for the kitchen
DE102011012474A1 (en) * 2011-02-25 2012-08-30 Antonio Maggio Device useful for cutting biscuits comprises transport channel for biscuit, which has first portion, in which biscuit piece is introduced into transport channel, and second portion, and cutting device comprising cutting element
US20150337889A1 (en) * 2012-12-28 2015-11-26 Genius Gmbh Food comminution device
US9511504B2 (en) 2013-01-25 2016-12-06 Edlund Company, Llc Food-product slicers having a double-beveled blade arrangement, and features usable therewith
WO2018027086A1 (en) * 2016-08-04 2018-02-08 GABRIELS, Edward Fish fillet board and method of use
US9914229B2 (en) 2014-08-29 2018-03-13 Prince Castle LLC Produce slicer
USD817712S1 (en) * 2015-02-17 2018-05-15 Prince Castle LLC Blade set
USD869904S1 (en) 2018-02-28 2019-12-17 Prince Castle LLC Blade cover
US10532480B2 (en) 2014-08-29 2020-01-14 Prince Castle LLC Slicer with blade supports
USD884414S1 (en) 2018-06-22 2020-05-19 Prince Castle LLC Produce pusher
US10695936B2 (en) * 2017-10-09 2020-06-30 Freek Arie HERMAN Bread cutting machine
USD891180S1 (en) 2018-06-01 2020-07-28 Prince Castle LLC Wedger pusher

Cited By (28)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3774490A (en) * 1968-11-18 1973-11-27 Restaurant Equipment Design Co Slicing device
US4144784A (en) * 1978-02-24 1979-03-20 Redco, Inc. Safety guard for manual food slicer
US4184397A (en) * 1978-05-17 1980-01-22 Redco, Inc. Food slicer
US4302997A (en) * 1980-05-02 1981-12-01 Alco Foodservice Equipment Company Guarded tomato slicer
US4346634A (en) * 1980-09-11 1982-08-31 Alco Foodservice Equipment Company Chopping and shredding device
US20050217121A1 (en) * 2003-05-01 2005-10-06 World Kitchen (Ghc), Llc Food slicer
US7143677B2 (en) * 2003-05-01 2006-12-05 Helen Of Troy Limited Food slicer
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