US3597120A - Injector-recirculation pump - Google Patents

Injector-recirculation pump Download PDF

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US3597120A
US3597120A US3597120DA US3597120A US 3597120 A US3597120 A US 3597120A US 3597120D A US3597120D A US 3597120DA US 3597120 A US3597120 A US 3597120A
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bellows
means
flow
pump
piston
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John H Reed
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JOHN H REED
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JOHN H REED
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01LCYCLICALLY OPERATING VALVES FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES
    • F01L23/00Valves controlled by impact by piston, e.g. in free-piston machines
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04BPOSITIVE DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS
    • F04B53/00Component parts, details or accessories not provided for in, or of interest apart from, groups F04B1/00 - F04B23/00 or F04B39/00 - F04B47/00
    • F04B53/06Venting
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04BPOSITIVE DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS
    • F04B9/00Piston machines or pumps characterised by the driving or driven means to or from their working members
    • F04B9/08Piston machines or pumps characterised by the driving or driven means to or from their working members the means being fluid
    • F04B9/12Piston machines or pumps characterised by the driving or driven means to or from their working members the means being fluid the fluid being elastic, e.g. steam or air
    • F04B9/123Piston machines or pumps characterised by the driving or driven means to or from their working members the means being fluid the fluid being elastic, e.g. steam or air having only one pumping chamber
    • F04B9/127Piston machines or pumps characterised by the driving or driven means to or from their working members the means being fluid the fluid being elastic, e.g. steam or air having only one pumping chamber rectilinear movement of the pumping member in the working direction being obtained by a single-acting elastic-fluid motor, e.g. actuated in the other direction by gravity or a spring

Abstract

A reciprocating pump for delivering a metered amount of fluid per stroke to a desired destination while recirculating the balance of the fluid drawn into the pump to the container from which it is drawn, the pump being operated by a fairly constant, pressurized fluid source.

Description

United States Patent [72] lnventor John H. Reed P.O. Box 321, Kermit, Tex. 79745 [21] Appl. No. 824,503

{22] Filed May 14, 1969 [45] Patented Aug. 3, 1971 [54] INJECTOR-RECIRCULATION PUMP 4 Claims, 6 Drawing Figs.

[52] US. Cl 417/394, 417/521 [51] Int. Cl. F0411 43/10, F04b 45/00, F04b 23/04 [50] Field of Search 103/2, 4, 152, 168; 230/162; 91/347; 417/394, 395, 399, 401, 521

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,090,575 8/1937 De Motte 91/347 2,622,372 12/1952 Moulden 91/347 2,658,485 11/1953 91/347 2,943,765 7/1960 103/48 3,204,631 9/1965 103/150 3,314,594 4/1967 103/150 3,320,859 5/1967 Poffenbarger. 91/347 3,492,946 2/1970 Martin 103/4 3,524,714 8/1970 Grove et a1. 417/394 Primary Examiner-Carlton R. Croyle Assistant Examiner-John J. Vrablik Attorne Marcus L. Bates ABSTRACT: A reciprocating pump for delivering a metered amount of fluid per stroke to a desired destination while recirculating the balance of the fluid drawn into the pump to the container from which it is drawn, the pump being operated by a fairly constant, pressurized fluid source.

Patented Aug. 3, 1971 3,597,120

2 Shoots-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. John H. Reed ATTORNEY Patented Aug. 3, 1971 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

John H. Reed ATTORNEY INJECTOR-RECIRCULATION PUMP This invention relates to pumps, and more particularly to positive displacement pumps for use in providing metered amounts of liquid to a desired source by means of a fluid pressure or a motor.

In the oil production industry it is often necessary periodically to provide a metered amount of chemical or other fluid to an oil well at a remote or inaccessible location. In this case it is necessary to have a pump which can be commenced to operate and left unattended for extended periods of time. At such locations a cheap source of power to operate the pump is the high-pressure gas obtained from the oil and gas reservoir being tapped.

Usually, the chemical or other fluid being added to the oil well is provided at the location in a large drum or other container. Unless the chemical is stirred or recirculated in some manner, it will settle out of the solution, coagulate, or otherwise become unacceptable when pumped into the well. Of course, if it is found that recirculation of the chemical or other fluid is unnecessary, such can be eliminated.

Accordingly, an object ofmy invention is to provide a pump for use in remote or inaccessible locations which will provide a metered amount of chemical or other fluid to a desired loca tion utilizing gas pressure found at the location.

Another object of my invention is to provide such a pump which is throttled by the chemical being recirculated to pro vide a metered amount of the chemical to the oil well.

Additional objects will be apparent from a study of the following disclosure and attached claims in conjunction with the drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a front elevational view, in secton, of my invention.

FIG. 2 is a side, elevational view, in section, of a portion of my invention (FIG. 1 having been rotated counterclockwise 90 FIG. 3 is a plan view, in section, ofa portion of my invention shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3A is a enlarged view of the cam shown in FIGS. 1 and 3.

FIG. 4 is a side view, in section, of a portion of my invention shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is a schematic representation of my invention when in use.

CONSTRUCTION Referring to FIG. 1, it is seen that my invention is comprised of three basic structural, or housing, members, to wit: the lower casting 11, bellows casting 12, and regulator casting l3. Castings 11 and 12 are secured by a plurality of bolts 31, and castings 12 and 13 are secured by a plurality of bolts 34.

Bellows casting 12 has a cavity N within which is positioned a bellows 20. (It has been found that a metal bellows withstands the corrosive actions of oilfield gas better than rubber or other synthetic materials.) Bellows is secured to the lower internal portion of casting 12 by welding at 29 or other means. The upper portion of bellows 20 is sealed by connection to spring guide 21. The bellows is shown in its fully expanded state in FIG. 1. When collapsed as much as possible within casting 12, the bellows would be in such a position that the underside of spring guide 21 will rest easily on the upper end 16a ofpipe 16.

Casting 11 contains a passageway B having an inlet A. Check valve 17 is threadily positioned in bellows 20 in such manner as to provide communication between passageway B and the bellows cavity G through passageway F of the check valve. A gasket 28 is positioned between castings 11 and 12 to prevent fluid within the bellows or passageway B from escaping to the atmosphere between castings l1 and 12. Check valve 17 contains a seat 17a on which ball 18 can set to prevent fluid in cavity G from escaping back into passageway B when bellows 20 is forced downwardly. Also, check valve 17 contains retainer means 19 to prevent ball 18 from being forced out ofthe check valve.

A combination plug-check valve 14 is sealably secured in the underside of casting 11 in such manner as to permit communication between passageway B and pump chamber E (described more fully hereinafter) through passageway C. Ball 15 is contained within chamber E in such manner that it may rest on check valve seat 14a to prevent fluid from flowing from chamber E into passageway C but not to prevent fluid from flowing through passageway C into chamber E.

A pump cylinder 24 is positioned in cavity G and extends into casting 11 where it is threadily connected to casting 11. O-ring 26 is positioned between cylinder 24 and casting 11 in such manner as to prevent fluid from escaping from chamber E outwardly to the atmosphere between casting 11 and cylinder 24. Cylinder 24 extends upwardly into cavity G a distance just less than does pipe '16.

Spring guide 21 has a concave undersurface. Spring 23 is positioned around cylinder 24 and abuts the lower interior surface of casting l2 and the concave surface of spring guide 21 when bellows 22 is in its most extended position, as shown in FIG. 1.

Plunger 30 is secured at its upper end to the concave surface of spring guide 21. The plunger extends downwardly into chamber E of cylinder 24. Cylinder 24 contains an O-ring 25 which will prevent fluid within chamber E from escaping upwardly into cavity G when plunger 30 is forced downwardly.

Connector 22 is secured to the upper surface of spring guide 21 and is rigidly secured to the lower end of valve rod 35 (more particularly described hereinafter).

Pipe 16 extends downwardly from upper end 16a through the lower portion of casting 12 in such manner as to connect with passageway H contained in casting l1. Passageway H in turn connects with pipe 65. Gasket 27 is positioned between castings I1 and 12 to prevent fluid from escaping from cavity G to the atmosphere between castings l1 and 12.

Referring now to FIG. 2 (depicting casting 11 when rotated counterclockwise) it is seen that passageway W connects with chamber E through opening D. Check valve 69 is positioned in casting 11 and is maintained therein by retainer nut 71 threadily connected to casting 11. Ball 70 is positioned within passageway Y in such manner as to seal off communication between passageways W and Y. Fluid can be forced from passageway W into passageway Y but the reverse cannot be accomplished because of ball 70.

Valve 68 is threadily connected into casting 11 in such manner as to permit fluid or air to be bled from passageway W to the atmosphere.

As shown in FIG. 1, gaskets 32 and 33 are positioned between castings l2 and 13 to prevent the escape of fluids in cavity N or cavity S (casting 13) into the atmosphere. Also, gaskets 32 and 33 form a seal for passageway M contained in castings 12 and 13.

Cavity S is filled with oil for lubricating the moving parts therein, described hereinbelow. Plug 58 can be removed for adding this oil.

Casting 13 contains a pressure-supply cavity L which can communicate with passageway M and which does at all times communicate with actuator supply inlet K. Passageway M communicates at all times with exhaust cavity Q. Cavity Q can communicate with outlet R which is open to the atmosphere. Cavity L and cavity Q contain valve seats 53 and 56, respectively, which are flxably secured within the cavities. These valve seats contain O-rings 54 and 56, respectively, in the positions shown.

Pressure-supply valve rod 48 extends into cavity L in such manner as to permit contact with O-ring 53 and to disrupt communication between cavity L and passageway M. Rod 48 is positioned within cavity L by guide 52, 52a which is secured within and to casting 13 in such manner as to prevent communication between cavity L and cavity S. O-ring 51 is positioned within guide 52, 52a in such manner as to seal the interface between guide 52 and rod 48. Of course, rod 48 extends into cavity S as shown.

ln exactly the same manner valve rod 46 extends into cavity in such manner as to permit it to abut O-ring 55 to prevent communication between cavity Q and outlet R. Also, guide 50, 50a, containing O-ring 49, is positioned within and secured to casting 13 to prevent communication between cavity Q and cavity S. Both rods 48 and 46 are slidably contained in their guides.

Referring to FIG. 4, it is seen that inlet K can communicate with passageway M and that passageway M can communicate through passageway P with cavity Q. FIG. 4 portrays a portion of casting 13 rotated 90 clockwise.

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 4, it is seen that when rods 48 and 46 are in the positions shown with respect to O-rings 53 and 55, respectively, inlet K communicates with passageway M through cavity L, that passageway M and Q communicate through passageway P, and that cavity Q and outlet R are not in communication. However, as will be explained later, when rod 48 abuts O-ring 54, rod 46 will be withdrawn from O-ring 55 to permit the following communication between spaces: inlet K will still communicate with cavity L, but cavity L will be sealed with respect to passageway M; and passageway M will communicate with outlet R through passageway P and cavity Q.

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 3, valve rod 35, in the configuration shown, extends upwardly from connector 22 slidably through castings 12 and 13 into cavity S. The interface of casting 13 and valve rod 35 is sealed by O-rings 35a. Upper stroke actuator 36 and lower stroke actuator 38 are releasably secured to rod 35 as shown by setscrews 37. Two brackets 13a comprise a portion of the interior of casting 13 and extend into cavity S. A valve lever 40 is secured to each bracket 13a by pin 44 in such manner that levers 40 can rotate with respect to the brackets. A cam 43 is positioned on pin 44 between levers 40 in such manner that it can rotate on pin 44 relative to levers 40. Cam 43 (FIG. 3A) contains a V-shaped slot through which pin 42 extends. Pin 42 is rigidly secured to each of the levers 40.

A wheel 66, or other member wider than lever 40, is secured to each lever 40 by pin 39. Levers 40 extend outwardly into cavity S beyond and on each side of rod 35 but are not secured to rod 35.

Springs 41 are secured at one end to pin 39 and at the other end to pins 13c which are rigidly secured to brackets 13a.

Cam 43 is connected at each ofits ends to rods 46 and 48 by pins 45 and 47, respectively, in such manner that cam 43 can rotate relative to the rods.

Throttle-valve assembly 59 may be an integral part of casting 13 or it may be manufactured separately and secured to casting 13 in the position shown. Assembly 59 contains cavities I and T which are sealably separated by throttle-valve diaphragm 60. Pipe 65 connects with cavity 1 and is secured to assembly 59 by adapter 67. Cavity E is open to the atmosphere through passageway V. Passageway J in assembly 59 communicates with cavity I through valve seat 620. passageway communicates with connection 62b which in turn will be connected to chemical return line 74 (FIG. leading into drum 75. Handle-diaphragm connector 61 is secured to the upper surface of diaphragm 60. Handle 64 is passed threadedly through the assembly 59 housing, extends downwardly into cavity T, and is secured to connector 61. Valve stem 62 is rigidly secured to the underside of diaphragm 60, extends downwardly into cavity I and, when desired, extends into passageway J to prevent communication between passageway .I and cavity I.

Spring 63 is positioned around the lower portion of handle 64 and abuts the upper surface of connector 61 and the upper, interior surface of the assembly 59 housing. Handle 54 can be screwed into assembly 59 in such manner as to increase the force exerted by spring 63 on connector 61 and the upper, interior surface of the assembly 59 housing.

Referring to FIG. 5, fluid can flow from tank, or barrel, 75 through line 77, into the pump and out either through connection 71 to the oil well or other desired point or through line 74 and back to tank 75. Also, high-pressure gas can flow through line 73, into the pump and out outlet R.

OPERATION A description of the operation of my invention will be commenced assuming that the various components are in the positions shown in FIG. 1. Cavity S is filled with oil for lubrication purposes; cavity G, passageway F, passageway B, passageway C, chamber E, passageway W, pipe 16, passageway H, pipe 65, cavity I, and passageway .I are filled with the chemical to be pumped; line 77 is in position to supply chemical from drum 76 to inlet A; fitting 71 is connected to outlet Y to provide chemical to the oil well; high-pressure gas line 73 is connected to inlet K; and return line 74 is connected to fitting 62b to return excess chemical to drum 75.

Momentarily, before the configuration shown in FIG. 1 was reached, upper stroke actuator 36 pushed wheel 66 and hence, levers 40 upwardly past dead center (horizontal) position, thus permitting spring 41 to instantaneously close valve seat 56 and to open valve seat 53 by causing pin 42 to strike the upper V-shaped surface of cam 43 to rotate the cam to the position shown.

Now, high-pressure gas enters through inlet K, cavity L, and passageway M into cavity N to cause bellows 20 to commence to collapse.

As bellows 20 commences to collapse, piston 30 is forced downwardly into chamber E causing chemical to be forced through opening D into passageway W and out passageway Y as ball is forced from its seat 69a. This chemical is forced on to the oil well or other desired location.

As bellows 20 continues to collapse, balls 14a and 18 are maintained on their valve seats 14a and 17a, respectively, thus preventing the flow of chemical to passageway B. During this time chemical in cavity G is being forced through pipe 16, passageway H, and pipe 65 into cavity I, from where it is forced out through passageway J and returned to drum 74.

During this time spring guide 21 and connector 22 are being forced downwardly, compressing spring 23 and pulling valve rod 35 downwardly, also.

As rod 35 continues to move downwardly lower stroke actuator 38 eventually contacts wheels 66 and commences to force wheels 66 and rods 40 downwardly. After rods 40 reach dead center (horizontal position) they are forced another increment downwardly and springs 41 pull levers 40 to their lowest position instantaneously. At this time pin 42 has struck the lower V-shaped surface of cam 43, causing the cam to rotate instantaneously to such position that rod 48 is forced against valve seat 53 to close the passageway between cavity L and passageway M. Also, at this time, valve rod 46 was withdrawn from valve seat 56 permitting communication between cavity Q and outlet R.

At the instant valve seats 53 and 56 were closed and opened, respectively, the high-pressure gas in cavity N commenced to be evacuated through passageways M and P, cavity Q and outlet R to the atmosphere, thus reducing the pressure within cavity N.

At this moment the high-pressure gas at inlet K cannot enter passageway M because of valve seat 53 being closed by rod When the pressure within cavity N began to be reduced, spring 23 had sufficient compression to force spring guide 21 and connector 22 upwardly, thus expanding bellows 20.

As the bellows 20 expands more gas is forced from cavity N outwardly through passageway M as explained above. Also, during this time chemical, or other fluid, is drawn through opening A, passageways B and F, and check valve 17 into cavity G. Fluid is not permitted to return to cavity G through pipes 65 and 16 via passageway H because the pressure within cavity I is reduced sufficiently to permit spring 63 to force diaphragm 60 downwardly, thus causing stem 62 to seal seat 620.

Spring 63 is positioned around the lower portion of handle 64 and abuts the upper surface of connector 61 and the upper, interior surface of assembly 59. Handle 54 can be screwed into assembly 59 in such manner as to increase the force exerted by spring 63 on connector 61 and the upper, interior surface of assembly 59. Thus, the compressive force under which spring 63 operates directly controls the rate at which the pump is actuated.

Referring to FIG. 5, fluid can flow from tank, or barrel, 75 through line 77, into the pump and out either through connection 71 to the oil well or other desired point or through line 74 and back to the tank 75. Also, high-pressure gas can flow through line 73 into the pump at inlet K and out outlet R.

As bellows is expanding and piston is moving upwardly within cylinder 24, chamber E enlarges and chemical is drawn through passageway C, past ball 15 (raised from its seat 140) and into chamber E. Fluid cannot be withdrawn from passageway Y through passageway W because ball 70 is seated on its seat 690.

As connector 22 is moving upwardly rod likewise moves upwardly and upper actuator 36 eventually makes contact with wheels 66. As such upward movement continues, actuator 36 pushes wheels 66 and, hence, levers 40 upwardly to their dead center positions. At the next instant, when levers 40 move upwardly another increment, springs 41 move levers 40 to the position shown in FIG. 1 and another cycle is ready to commence.

In the event that recycle of chemical at 74 is found to be unnecessary, the life of the bellows can be prolonged by circulating lubricant therethrough. This is best accomplished by connecting the outflow chamber J to the oil-filled chamber S by merely removing plug 58 and connecting flow conduit 74 thereto; and by further providing the suction side of the bellows at F with a flow conduit or passageway which extends into the lower extremity of chamber S. This expedient provides a closed loop flow circuit with the chamber S, check valve 18, bellows, and assembly 59 being series connected together into an isolated flow system.

The volume of fluid to be pumped on each stroke of the pump is regulated by adjusting the positions of actuators 36 and 38 on valve rod 35. As the distance between actuators 36 and 38 is decreased, the stroke of the pump is shortened and less volume of fluid is transferred per stroke. Of course, the opposite is true as the difference between actuators 36 and 38 is increased.

From the foregoing it is seen that l have provided a pump for use in remote or inaccessible locations which will provide a metered amount of chemical or other fluid to a desired location utilizing gas pressure found at the location.

It is further seen that I have provided such a pump that will simultaneously recirculate the chemical or other fluid not injected into the oil well.

It is also seen that l have provided such a pump which is throttled by the chemical being recirculated to provide a metered amount of the chemical to the oil well.

It is to be understood that the form of the invention shown and described is to be taken as a preferred embodiment of the same and that various changes in the shape, size, and arrangements of parts may be resorted to without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the attached claims.

I claim:

1. An injector-recirculation pump adapted to be flow connected to a source of power fluid and further adapted to be flow connected to a source of treatment chemical and to a wellhead so that chemical can be injected into the wellhead and at the same time a portion of the chemical can be recirculated back to the source of chemical; said pump comprising:

a housing forming a chamber, a bellows, an over the center actuator, a power fluid valve means adapted to be moved from one to another flow control position, a pump means having a cylinder and a piston with said piston being reciprocatingly received within said cylinder; flow conduit means connected to provide flow path to and from said pump means; check valve means within said flow conduit and located upstream and downstream of said pump means;

said bellows being housed within said chamber; a flow conduit means connected to provide a flow path to and from the interior of said bellows, a check valve means located upstream and downstream of said bellows and within the last said conduit means for permitting flow to occur in one direction through said bellows;

means connecting said over the center actuator to said power fluid valve means for connecting the power fluid to the housing when the power fluid valve means is in said one position and for connecting the housing to the atmosphere when the power fluid valve means is in said another flow control position;

means connecting said piston to said bellows and to said over the center actuator means so that said bellows, when contracted, reciprocates said piston to thereby force fluid within said cylinder to flow along a first flow path while fluid contained within said bellows is forced to flow along another flow path;

and means including a valve downstream of said bellows for controlling the rate of response of said piston.

2. The pump set forth in claim 1, wherein said cylinder has a longitudinally extending marginal portion thereof axially disposed within said bellows, and said piston has a marginal portion thereof axially disposed within said bellows;

said cylinder and said piston having diametrically opposed end portions, the last-recited end portions extending exteriorly of said bellows.

3. The pump set forth in claim 1 wherein said flow conduit which permits flow from said bellows is in the form of a standpipe and has a terminal end portion which is disposed within said bellows,

said bellows having a fixed end portion and a free end portion;

a member on said free end portion of said bellows adapted to engage the end of said standpipe when the bellows is in a contracted configuration.

4. The pump set forth in claim 1 wherein said bellows has a free end portion and a fixed end portion, means by which said fixed end portion is attached to said housing; said piston having one free end thereof affixed to said free end of said bellows; said free end of said bellows having a lever depending therefrom and through said housing; seal means between said housing and said lever for slidably engaging said lever;

said lever being connected to said over the center actuator;

and biasing means for biasing said free end of said bellows away from said fixed end of said bellows.

Claims (4)

1. An injector-recirculation pump adapted to be flow connected to a source of power fluid and further adapted to be flow connected to a source of treatment chemical and to a wellhead so that chemical can be injected into the wellhead and at the same time a portion of the chemical can be recirculated back to the source of chemical; said pump comprising: a housing forming a chamber, a bellows, an over the center actuator, a power fluid valve means adapted to be moved from one to another flow control position, a pump means having a cylinder and a piston with said piston being reciprocatingly received within said cylinder; flow conduit means connected to provide flow path to and from said pump means; check valve means within said flow conduit and located upstream and downstream of said pump means; said bellows being housed within said chamber; a flow conduit means connected to provide a flow path to and from the interior of said bellows, a check valve means located upstream and downstream of said bellows and within the last said conduit means for permitting flow to occur in one direction through said bellows; means connecting said over the center actuator to said power fluid valve means for connecting the power fluid to the housing when the power fluid valve means is in said one position and for connecting the housing to the atmosphere when the power fluid valve means is in said another flow control position; means connecting said piston to said bellows and to said over the center actuator means so that said bellows, when contracted, reciprocates said piston to thereby force fluid within said cylinder to flow along a first flow path while fluid contained within said bellows is forced to flow along another flow path; and means including a valve downstream of said bellows for controlling the rate of response of said piston.
2. The pump set forth in claim 1, wherein said cylinder has a longitudinally extending marginal portion thereof axially disposed within said bellows, and said piston has a marginal portion thereof axially disposed within said bellows; said cylinder and said piston having diametrically opposed end portions, the last-recited end portions extending exteriorly of said bellows.
3. The pump set forth in claim 1 wherein said flow conduit which permits flow from said bellows is in the form of a standpipe and has a terminal end portion which is disposed within said bellows, said bellows having a fixed end portion and a free end portion; a member on said free end portion of said bellows adapted to engage the end of said standpipe when the bellows is in a contracted configuration.
4. The pump set forth in claim 1 wherein said bellows has a free end portion and a fixed end portion, means by which said fixed end portion is attached to said housing; said piston having one free end thereof affixed to said free end of said bellows; said free end of said bellows having a lever depending therefrom and through said housing; seal means between said housing and said lever for slidably engaging said lever; said lever being connected to said over the center actuator; and biasing means for biasing said free end of said bellows away from said fixed end of said bellows.
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US5308230A (en) * 1993-03-08 1994-05-03 Stainless Steel Products, Inc. Bellows pump
WO2001029416A1 (en) * 1999-10-22 2001-04-26 David Charles Tyrer Fluid operated hydraulic pump
EP1156218A1 (en) * 1999-11-29 2001-11-21 Nippon Pillar Packing Co., Ltd. Fluid device with bellows
US20040126256A1 (en) * 1999-11-29 2004-07-01 Kiyoshi Nishio Fluid apparatus having a pump and an accumulator
US20050002810A1 (en) * 2002-11-26 2005-01-06 William Gould Portable vacuum system
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US20100178182A1 (en) * 2009-01-09 2010-07-15 Simmons Tom M Helical bellows, pump including same and method of bellows fabrication
US20100178184A1 (en) * 2009-01-09 2010-07-15 Simmons Tom M Bellows plungers having one or more helically extending features, pumps including such bellows plungers, and related methods
RU2451832C1 (en) * 2008-03-20 2012-05-27 Гарниман С.А. Hydraulic diaphragm pump
US8770293B2 (en) * 2008-10-07 2014-07-08 Schlumberger Technology Corporation Multiple activation-device launcher for a cementing head

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US3314594A (en) * 1963-10-25 1967-04-18 Philips Corp Apparatus for compressing or expanding a medium, which apparatus includes a control device for regulating the amount of dead space
US3320859A (en) * 1965-10-04 1967-05-23 Perry S Poffenbarger Hydraulic actuator
US3492946A (en) * 1968-05-23 1970-02-03 Union Carbide Corp Dual volume fluid sample pump
US3524714A (en) * 1968-10-30 1970-08-18 Us Air Force Pneumatic bellows pump

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3861217A (en) * 1972-03-15 1975-01-21 Draegerwerk Ag Gas detection device
EP0192246A2 (en) * 1985-02-19 1986-08-27 The Coca-Cola Company Single-acting,gas operated pump
EP0192246A3 (en) * 1985-02-19 1988-09-28 The Coca-Cola Company Single-acting,gas operated pump
US4836756A (en) * 1986-08-28 1989-06-06 Nippon Pillar Packing Co., Ltd. Pneumatic pumping device
GB2229773B (en) * 1989-03-02 1993-05-26 Jr Howard William Cole Method for separating mineral particles from mineral-bearing ore
GB2229773A (en) * 1989-03-02 1990-10-03 Jr Howard William Cole Apparatus and method for providing a controlled flow of foam
US5308230A (en) * 1993-03-08 1994-05-03 Stainless Steel Products, Inc. Bellows pump
WO2001029416A1 (en) * 1999-10-22 2001-04-26 David Charles Tyrer Fluid operated hydraulic pump
US7284970B2 (en) * 1999-11-29 2007-10-23 Nippon Pillar Packing Co., Ltd. Fluid apparatus having a pump and an accumulator
EP1156218A1 (en) * 1999-11-29 2001-11-21 Nippon Pillar Packing Co., Ltd. Fluid device with bellows
US6685449B1 (en) * 1999-11-29 2004-02-03 Nippon Pillar Packing Co., Ltd. Fluid apparatus including gravity induced check valves and downwardly inclined lower lamella portion of a bellows
EP1156218A4 (en) * 1999-11-29 2010-07-28 Nippon Pillar Packing Fluid device with bellows
US20040126256A1 (en) * 1999-11-29 2004-07-01 Kiyoshi Nishio Fluid apparatus having a pump and an accumulator
US20050002810A1 (en) * 2002-11-26 2005-01-06 William Gould Portable vacuum system
US20060159574A1 (en) * 2003-07-02 2006-07-20 Gerhard Winiger Piston pump
EP1947331A1 (en) * 2007-01-19 2008-07-23 Garniman SA Hydraulically Driven Machine Improvement
RU2451832C1 (en) * 2008-03-20 2012-05-27 Гарниман С.А. Hydraulic diaphragm pump
US8770293B2 (en) * 2008-10-07 2014-07-08 Schlumberger Technology Corporation Multiple activation-device launcher for a cementing head
US20100178182A1 (en) * 2009-01-09 2010-07-15 Simmons Tom M Helical bellows, pump including same and method of bellows fabrication
US20100178184A1 (en) * 2009-01-09 2010-07-15 Simmons Tom M Bellows plungers having one or more helically extending features, pumps including such bellows plungers, and related methods
US8636484B2 (en) 2009-01-09 2014-01-28 Tom M. Simmons Bellows plungers having one or more helically extending features, pumps including such bellows plungers, and related methods

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