US3595302A - Cooling structure for continuous-casting mold - Google Patents

Cooling structure for continuous-casting mold Download PDF

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US3595302A
US3595302A US3595302DA US3595302A US 3595302 A US3595302 A US 3595302A US 3595302D A US3595302D A US 3595302DA US 3595302 A US3595302 A US 3595302A
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mold
grooves
portions
plates
ducts
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Paul Mallener
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Schloemann AG
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Schloemann AG
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B22CASTING; POWDER METALLURGY
    • B22DCASTING OF METALS; CASTING OF OTHER SUBSTANCES BY THE SAME PROCESSES OR DEVICES
    • B22D11/00Continuous casting of metals, i.e. casting in indefinite lengths
    • B22D11/04Continuous casting of metals, i.e. casting in indefinite lengths into open-ended moulds
    • B22D11/055Cooling the moulds

Abstract

In an open-ended continuous-casting mold in which molten metal poured in the top of the open-ended mold cavity is cooled by the mold and withdrawn from the bottom as a partially solidified strand, and in which the mold cavity is defined by the face surfaces of mold plates attached to backing plates, structure for cooling the mold comprises ducts for cooling fluid integral with the mold plates. The ducts are formed at the interface between the backing plates and the mold plates, the cross-sectional dimensions of the ducts, their arrangement, and the thicknesses through the walls of the mold plates from the ducts to the face surfaces of the mold plates being such that fluid flowing through the ducts abstracts more heat in a given time from the upper portions of the mold cavity than from its lower portions. In molds for casting slabs having elongated, generally rectangular cross sections the thickness of the mold plate walls, between the ducts and the face surfaces of the mold plates, are less at their central portions than at their side edge portions, so that the cooling fluid will abstract more heat from the central portions of the elongated sides of the mold cavity than from the end portions of said sides.

Description

United States Patent [72] Inventor Paul Mallener Dusseldorf, Germany I21] Appl. No. 728,732 [22] Filed May 13, 1968 [45] Patented July 27.1971 [73] Assignee Schloenlaun Aktiengesellschaft Dusseldorf, Germany [32] Priority May 11,1967 {33] Germany [31] P1558312.7

[54] COOLING STRUCTURE FOR CONTINUOUS- CASTING MOLD 9 Claims, 7 Drawing Figs.

[52] U.S.Cl 164/283, 164/82 [51] Int. Cl ..B22d 11/00 [50] Field of Search 164/82, 83, 89, 273, 283,276

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,169,893 8/1939 Crampton et al. 164/283 2,264,288 12/1941 Betterton et al. 164/283 3,262,164 7/1966 Meues 164/341 3,416,222 12/1968 Pearson. 164/82 X 425,846 4/1890 Atha 164/283 X 3,447,480 6/1969 Bodine,.lr.

3,447,592 6/1969 Wertli 164/283 3,461,950 8/1969 Michelson l64/83X FOREIGN PATENTS 35,476 2/1965 Germany 1 164/283 Primary ExaminerR. Spencer Annear Attorney-Sandoe, Neill, Schottler & Wikstrom ABSTRACT: ln an open-ended continuous-casting mold in which molten metal poured in the top of the open-ended mold cavity is cooled by the mold and withdrawn from the bottom as a partially solidified strand, and in which the mold cavity is defined by the face surfaces of mold plates attached to backing plates, structure for cooling the mold comprises ducts for cooling fluid integral with the mold plates. The ducts are formed at the interface between the backing plates and the mold plates, the cross-sectional dimensions of the ducts, their arrangement, and the thicknesses through the walls of the mold plates from the ducts to the face surfaces of the mold plates being such that fluid flowing through the ducts abstracts more heat in a given time from the upper portions of the mold cavity than from its lower portions. ln molds for casting slabs having elongated, generally rectangular cross sections the thickness of the mold plate walls, between the ducts and the face surfaces of the mold plates, are less at their central portions than at their side edge portions, so that the cooling fluid will abstract more heat from the central portions of the elongated sides of the mold cavity than from the end portions of said sides.

COOLING STRUCTURE FOR CONTINUOUS-CASTING MOLD The present invention relates to structure for cooling continuous casting molds. open-ended mold cooled In continuous casting a stream of molten metal, such as steel, poured in the top of an open-ended cavity is cooled mold by the mold and a partially solidified strand of the metal is withdrawn from the bottom end.

The present invention relates particularly to continuous casting molds in which the mold cavity is defined by the face surfaces of mold plates that are attached to backing plates, which form or are incorporated in supporting structure for the mold plates. For the casting to proceed continuously, heat must be continually abstracted from the mold and this is customarily accomplished by circulating cooling fluid, such as water, through ducts or chambers, in, or adjacent, the mold walls. In known constructions wherein the mold is formed by mold plates attached on backing plates, it is known to provide ducts for the cooling fluid within the mold at the interfaces between the mold plates and the backing plates. However, in known constructions the structure and arrangement of the ducts and the direction of flow of the cooling fluid are such that more heat is abstracted from the lower portions of the mold cavity than from its top portions, whereas it is believed that for the most effective casting the greatest amount of heat should be abstracted from the upper portions of the mold cavity and that the amount of heat abstracted from the various portions of the mold should be abstracted at a substantially constant temperature gradient in thedirection in which the metal moves through the mold cavity.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a cooling duct structure that is adapted to abstract more heat from the upper portions of the mold cavity than at the lower portions and that is better adapted to provide for abstraction of heat at a uniform temperature gradient from one end of the mold cavity to the other than previously known cooling structures.

In accordance with the invention the ducts are formed by undercutting at least one of the surfaces at the interfaces between the mold plates and the backing plates, and the crosssectional dimensions of the ducts, their arrangement, and the thickness through the walls of the mold plates from the ducts to the face surfaces of the mold are adjusted so that cooling fluid flowing through the ducts abstracts more heat, in a given time, from the upper portions of the mold cavity than from its lower portions-and at a substantially constant temperature gradient,

In one embodiment of the invention the ducts are formed by parallel grooves cut in the backs of the mold plates extending laterally across the mold plates at right angles to the direction in which metal being cast moves through the mold cavity. The grooves are equally spaced apart and their depths are such that the wall thicknesses of the mold plates, from the grooves through to the face surfaces of the mold plates at right angles to the face surfaces, are substantially equal. The cooling fluid enters and exits from the mold through suitable inletsand outlets. Conduits between the inlets and outlets and the grooves at the upper portions of the mold plates are larger than the conduits between the inlets and outlets and the grooves at the lower portions. Thus, a greater volume of cooling fluid flows through the grooves at the upper portions of the mold plates per unit of time so that more heat is abstracted from the upper portions of the mold cavity than from its lower portions, the sizes of the respective conduits being selected to provide a uniform heat abstraction gradient from the upper to the lower portions.

In other embodiments wherein grooves in the mold plates extend laterally across the mold plates at right angles to the direction of metal through the mold cavity, the degree of heat abstraction from the various portions of the mold plates is adjusted by the spacing of the grooves from each other, the cross-sectional dimensions of the grooves, and/or the depth,

and location of the grooves-in the back surfaces of the mold plates or in the from surfaces of the backing plates. The dimensions and depths of the grooves determine the thickness, and hence the heat contact resistance, of the wall portions of the mold plates from the grooves through to the face surfaces of the mold plates. 7

In another embodiment the ducts are provided by one broad undercut groove in each mold plate, the upper portions of the groove being deeper than the lower portions so that the upper portions of the wall of the mold plates are thinner, and thus provide greater heat abstraction, than the bottom portions.

For molds in which the cross section of the mold cavity is elongated and generally rectangular for casting relatively wide, flat slabs, the walls of the central portions of the mold plates, which form the elongated sides of the mold cavity, are thinner than their side edge portions so that more heat will be abstracted from the central portions of the elongated sides of the mold cavity than from the end portions of the sides in order to provide uniform cooling across the width of the slab being cast.

In all the embodiments, the fluid flow rate may also be utilized, as in the first-mentioned embodiment, to adjust the heat abstraction rate by providing different size channels to deliver a greater volume of fluid to the ducts at the upper portions of the mold plates.

Illustrative embodiments of cooling structures in accordance with the invention are described below with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a vertical cross section through a model which has one form of cooling structure embodying the invention;

FIG. 2 is a top view of a horizontal cross section through the mold shown in FIG. 1, taken along the lines 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a partial vertical section through another mold, which has a modified form of cooling structure embodying the invention;

FIG. 4 is a vertical cross section through still another mold having another modified from of cooling structure embodying the invention and also showing means for attaching the mold plates to the backing plates;

FIG. 5 is a partial vertical cross section through a mold showing a novel bolt device for attaching the mold plates to the backing plates;

FIG. 6 is a vertical cross section through yet another mold illustrating a further modified form of cooling structure embodying the invention; and

FIG. 7 is a horizontal cross section along the lines 77 of FIG. 6.

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, a continuous-casting mold 10, in which the cooling structure of this invention is adapted to be incorporated, is formed by mold plates 11 attached to backing plates 12, in a closed arrangement so that the face surfaces 13 of the mold plates 11 define an open end mold cavity 14. The several molds shown in the drawings to illustrate the invention are each shown as having a curved mold cavity 14, but it will be appreciated that the construction and mode of operation of cooling structure in accordance with this invention is not affected by, or restricted to, use with mold cavities of any particular axial or cross-sectional configuration.

Cooling structure for the mold 10 is provided by ducts in the interfaces 15 between the mold plates 11 and the backing plates 12, and the ducts are formed by a plurality of parallel grooves 16 cut into the rear surfaces of the mold plates 11 to extend laterally across the mold plates II at right angles to the direction of metal through the mold cavity 14. As shown, the grooves 16 are in three groupsat the upper, middle, and lower portions of the mold plates llwith the grooves in each group approximately equally spaced apart. The depths of the grooves 16 are such that the thickness of the wall of each mold plate, between the grooves 16 and its face surface 13, is'approximately the same from the upper to the lower portions of the mold plate.

Cooling fluid, such as water, from a source, not shown, is pumped through inlet openings 17 into inlet chambers 18 in the respective backing plates 12. The chamber 18 in each backing plate 12 is the middle one of the three separate chambers which are in a vertical line, the upper and lower inlet chambers being designated 18a and 18!) respectively. Fluid from the middle inlet chamber 18 flows into the inlet chambers 18a and 18b through passages 19a and 19b respectively.

The surface ofeach backing plate 12 at the interface 15 has three vertical header grooves 20, a and 20b cut therein; header groove 20a is at the upper portion of the backing plate 12 and opens into the upper group of grooves 16 in the mold plate 11, and the other two header grooves 20 and 20b, in the middle and lower portions of the backing plate, open respectively into the middle and lower groups of the grooves 16. The upper header groove 20a is connected to the upper inlet chamber 1811 by a passage 21 and to the middle inlet chamber 18 by a passage 22. The middle header groove 20 is connected to the middle inlet chamber 18 by a pair of passages 23, and the lower header groove 20b is connected to the lower inlet chamber 18b by a single passage 24. As shown, the passages 19a, 21 and 22 which direct fluid from the inlet chambers 18a and 18 to the upper group of grooves 16 through upper header groove 20:: are larger than the passages 23, and passages 19b and 24 which direct fluid from the middle and lower inlet chambers 18 and 18b respectively through header grooves 20 and 20b to the middle and lower groups of grooves 16, and there are two passages 23 from the middle inlet chamber 18 to the middle header groove 20, while there is only one passage 24 from the lower inlet chamber 18!) to the lower header groove 20b. Fluid is conducted out of the grooves 16, through another set of header grooves, indicated at 25 in FIG. 2, through passages (not shown) comparable to passages 19a, 19b and 21 to 24 to outlet chambers (of which only a middle outlet chamber 18 is shown), which are comparable to inlet chambers 18, 18a and 18b and from which the fluid flows out through an outlet opening 171:. Thus, in a given period of time a greater volume of cooling fluid is conducted through the grooves 16 in the top portion of each mold plate 11 than through the grooves 16 in the bottom portion, with an intermediate amount being conducted through the grooves 16 in the middle portion, so that more heat is abstracted from the top portions of the mold cavity than from the bottom portions with an intermediate amount being abstracted from the middle portions.

In addition to the accurate control of heat abstraction along the axis of the mold cavity by having the grooves 16 arranged laterally across the mold plates 11, this arrangement simplifies the fabrication of a grooved mold plateparticularly a mold plate having curved face surface 13since the grooves can be milled in straight passes of even depth across the back of the mold plate.

FIG. 3 shows a different embodiment in which the amounts of heat abstracted respectively through the upper and lower portions of mold plates 11a are selected, particularly, by varying the depths and spacing of the grooves at the upper and lower portions of the mold plates 11a. The grooves 16a at the middle and upper portions are closer together and deeper (so that the wall thickness from the grooves 16a through to the face surfaces 130 is relatively thinner) than the grooves 16a at the lower portion. Thus, more heat will be abstracted through the upper and middle portions in a given period than through the lower portion.

In FIG. 4 the grooves 16b and 16b are at the upper portion of the interfaces 15b between the mold plates 11b and backing plates 12b and have different cross-sectional dimensions and different depths, to provide thinner mold plate walls at the upper portions for achieving greater heat abstraction through the upper portions. This embodiment also illustrates formation of grooves, 16b, in the surfaces of the backing plates 12b, at the lower portions of the interfaces 15b. By thus undercutting the backing plates, instead of the mold plates 11b, to form these grooves 16b, the effective wall thicknesses through to the face surfaces 13b at these points are the full thicknesses of the mold plates, yet the grooves 161; are nonetheless integral with the mold plates.

FIG. 4 also illustrates simple and effective means for attaching the mold plates 11b to the backing plates 12b consisting of hooks 26 pivotally mounted on the upper edges of the backing plates to hook over edges of the mold plates 11b.

FIG. 5 illustrates a particularly suitable form of bolt 27 for attaching mold plates 11 to backing plates 12. At one end each bolt 27 has an enlarged head 28 with a cup shaped washer 29 loosely carried on the bolt. Skirt portions 29a ofthe washer 29 extend along the sides of the head 28 and are externally threaded into an appropriate aperture in the wall surface of the mold plate 11 at the interface 15. The interior base portion 29b of the washer 29 is hemispherically curved, and another washerwasher 30 on the bolt 27 between the head 28 and base portion 29b of the washer 29-has an annular, hemispherically curved surface matching the curved portion 29b of washer 29. The shaft of the bolt 27 extends out through an enlarged clearance hole 31 through in the backing plate 12 and its outer end is attached to the backing plate 12. The matching washers 29 and 30 thus provide a form of universal joint which permits the mold plate 11 to move relative to the backing plate 12 due to unequal amounts of thermal expansion of the two plates. The diameter of the clearance hole 31 is made sufficiently larger than the diameter of the shaft of bolt 27 to accommodate any expected degree of angular shifting of the bolt 27 due to relative movements of the plates.

FIG. 6 illustrates another embodiment of the invention in which the grooves 160 cut in the surfaces of the mold plates at the interfaces between the mold plates 11c and backing plates (not shown) are laterally across the mold plates and extend as single grooves from the upper portions to the lower portions of the mold plates. In this instance the greater heat abstraction at the upper portions is provided primarily by making the upper portions deeper, thereby reducing the thicknesses of the walls of the mold plates at these portions.

FIG. 7 illustrates the manner of forming a groove (or any of the other grooves 16 described herein) in the mold plates 11c which define the elongated sides of an elongated, generally rectangular mold cavity 140, which is indicated in dashlines, for casting a relatively wide flat slab. As shown, the central portion 32 of each groove 160 is made deeper than its end portions 33 and progressively shallower toward the ends so that the central portion of the walls of the mold plate 110 is correspondingly thinner, which increases the heat abstraction along that portion. Since the central portion of a flat slab being cast requires more cooling than the edge portions, this variation in the depth of the grooves 160 laterally across the mold plates 110 is adapted to provide uniform cooling across the width of the slab.

What I claim is:

1. Cooling structure for a continuous-casting mold wherein molten metal poured in the top end of an open-ended mold cavity is cooled by the mold and withdrawn from the bottom end as a partially solidified strand, comprising, mold plates having face surfaces which define said mold cavity, backing plates attached to said mold plates and forming a supporting frame therefor, said mold plates having ducts for cooling fluid formed therein which extend perpendicularly to the direction of travel of the strand, inlet means in said backing plates for conducting cooling fluid into the ducts and outlet means in said backing plates for conducting cooling fluid out of the ducts, said ducts and said inlet and outlet means being of a size and capacity such as to conduct more cooling fluid through the upper portions of the mold plates than through their lower portions in order to abstract more heat in a given time from the upper portions of the mold cavity than from its lower portrons.

2. The structure of claim 1 in which the mold plates are attached to the backing plates by bolts, each of which has an end attached to one of said backing plates and an enlarged head at the other end, each of said bolts having a cup-shaped washer loosely carried thereon with the skirt of the washer extending along the sides of said head and being attached in an aperture in the adjacent mold plate, the interior of the base of said cupshaped washer being hemispherically rounded and there being an element on each bolt between the head and the interior of the washer thereon having a rounded annular surface adapted to engage and slide on the interior of said base of the washer, thereby to permit relative lateral movement of each mold plate and the backing plate attached thereto.

3. The cooling structure of claim 1 in which, for molds having a mold cavity with an elongated generally rectangular cross section for casting slabs, the thicknesses of the mold plates defining the elongated opposite sides of the mold cavity, as measured from the ducts through to said face surfaces at right angles thereto, are less at the central portions of the mold plates than at their side edge portions, as means for cooling fluid flowing through the ducts to abstract more heat in a given time from the central portions of the elongated sides of the mold cavity than from the end portions of said elongated sides.

4. The structure of claim 1 in which the ducts are formed by grooves in at least one of the surfaces at the interfaces between the backing plates and the mold plates, said grooves extending in a direction substantially at right angles to the direction of metal through the mold cavity, said inlet means including separate channels respectively for conducting fluid to grooves at the upper portions of the interfaces and to grooves at the lower portions of the interfaces, with said channels to the grooves at the upper portions being larger in diameter than the channels to the grooves at the lower portions for providing a larger volume of fluid flow through the grooves at the upper portions as means for cooling fluid flowing through the ducts to abstract more heat in a given time from the upper portions of the mold cavity than from its lower portions 5. The structure of claim 1 in which the ducts are formed by grooves in at least one of the surfaces at the interfaces between the backing plates and the mold plates, said grooves extending in a direction substantially at right angles to the direction of metal through the mold cavity, the thicknesses of the mold plates from the respective grooves through to said face surfaces at right angles thereto being less at the upper portions of said interfaces than at their lower portions as means for cooling fluid flowing through the ducts to abstract more heat in a given time from the upper portions of the mold cavity than from its lower portions.

6. The structure of claim I in which the ducts are formed by grooves in at least one of the surfaces at the interfaces between the backing plates and the mold plates, said grooves extending in a direction substantially at right angles to the direction of metal through the mold cavity, the grooves all being substantially the same cross-sectional width, the depths of the grooves at the respective upper and lower portions of said interfaces being such that the thicknesses of the mold plates from the respective grooves through to said face sur faces at right angles thereto are less at the upper portions of said interfaces than at their lower portions as means for cooling fluid flowing through the ducts to abstract more heat in a given time from the upper portions of the mold cavity than from its lower portions.

7. The structure of claim 6 in which the grooves are spaced closer together at the upper portions of the interfaces than at the lower portions as additional means for abstracting more heat in a given time from the upper portions of the mold cavity.

8. The structure of claim 1 in which the ducts are formed by grooves in at least one of the surfaces at the interfaces between the backing plates and the mold plates, said grooves extending in a direction substantially at right angles to the direction of metal through the mold cavity, grooves at the upper portions of said interfaces respectively having greater cross-sectional areas than grooves at the lower portions, and the depths of grooves respectively at the upper and lower portions of the interfaces being such that the thicknesses of the mold plates from the respective grooves through to said face surfaces at right angles thereto are less at the upper portions of the interfaces than at their lower portions as means for abstracting more heat in a given time from the upper portions of the mold cavity than at its lower portions.

9. The structure of claim 1 in which the ducts are formed by at least one of the surfaces at the interfaces between the backing plates'and the mold plates being undercut from their upper portions to their lower portions with the depth and location of the undercutting at the upper and lower portions being such that the thicknesses of the mold plates from the undercut portions through to said face surfaces at right angles thereto are less at the upper portions than at their lower portions as means for cooling fluid flowing through the ducts to abstract more heat in a given time from the upper portions of the mold cavity-than from its lower portions.

Claims (8)

  1. 2. The structure of claim 1 in which the mold plates are attached to the backing plates by bolts, each of which has an end attached to one of said backing plates and an enlarged head at the other end, each of said bolts having a cup-shaped washer loosely carried thereon with the skirt of the washer extending along the sides of said head and being attached in an aperture in the adjacent mold plate, the interior of the base of said cup-shaped washer being hemispherically rounded and there being an element on each bolt between the head and the interior of the washer thereon having a rounded annular surface adapted to engage and slide on the interior of said base of the washer, thereby to permit relative lateral movement of each mold plate and the backing plate attached thereto.
  2. 3. The cooling structure of claim 1 in which, for molds having a mold cavity with an elongated generally rectangular cross section for casting slabs, the thicknesses of the mold plates defining the elongated opposite sides of the mold cavity, as measured from the ducts through to said face surfaces at right angles thereto, are less at the central portions of the mold plates than at their side edge portions, as means for cooling fluid flowing through the ducts to abstract more heat in a given time from the central portIons of the elongated sides of the mold cavity than from the end portions of said elongated sides.
  3. 4. The structure of claim 1 in which the ducts are formed by grooves in at least one of the surfaces at the interfaces between the backing plates and the mold plates, said grooves extending in a direction substantially at right angles to the direction of metal through the mold cavity, said inlet means including separate channels respectively for conducting fluid to grooves at the upper portions of the interfaces and to grooves at the lower portions of the interfaces, with said channels to the grooves at the upper portions being larger in diameter than the channels to the grooves at the lower portions for providing a larger volume of fluid flow through the grooves at the upper portions as means for cooling fluid flowing through the ducts to abstract more heat in a given time from the upper portions of the mold cavity than from its lower portions.
  4. 5. The structure of claim 1 in which the ducts are formed by grooves in at least one of the surfaces at the interfaces between the backing plates and the mold plates, said grooves extending in a direction substantially at right angles to the direction of metal through the mold cavity, the thicknesses of the mold plates from the respective grooves through to said face surfaces at right angles thereto being less at the upper portions of said interfaces than at their lower portions as means for cooling fluid flowing through the ducts to abstract more heat in a given time from the upper portions of the mold cavity than from its lower portions.
  5. 6. The structure of claim 1 in which the ducts are formed by grooves in at least one of the surfaces at the interfaces between the backing plates and the mold plates, said grooves extending in a direction substantially at right angles to the direction of metal through the mold cavity, the grooves all being substantially the same cross-sectional width, the depths of the grooves at the respective upper and lower portions of said interfaces being such that the thicknesses of the mold plates from the respective grooves through to said face surfaces at right angles thereto are less at the upper portions of said interfaces than at their lower portions as means for cooling fluid flowing through the ducts to abstract more heat in a given time from the upper portions of the mold cavity than from its lower portions.
  6. 7. The structure of claim 6 in which the grooves are spaced closer together at the upper portions of the interfaces than at the lower portions as additional means for abstracting more heat in a given time from the upper portions of the mold cavity.
  7. 8. The structure of claim 1 in which the ducts are formed by grooves in at least one of the surfaces at the interfaces between the backing plates and the mold plates, said grooves extending in a direction substantially at right angles to the direction of metal through the mold cavity, grooves at the upper portions of said interfaces respectively having greater cross-sectional areas than grooves at the lower portions, and the depths of grooves respectively at the upper and lower portions of the interfaces being such that the thicknesses of the mold plates from the respective grooves through to said face surfaces at right angles thereto are less at the upper portions of the interfaces than at their lower portions as means for abstracting more heat in a given time from the upper portions of the mold cavity than at its lower portions.
  8. 9. The structure of claim 1 in which the ducts are formed by at least one of the surfaces at the interfaces between the backing plates and the mold plates being undercut from their upper portions to their lower portions with the depth and location of the undercutting at the upper and lower portions being such that the thicknesses of the mold plates from the undercut portions through to said face surfaces at right angles thereto are less at the upper portions than at their lower portions as means for cooling fluId flowing through the ducts to abstract more heat in a given time from the upper portions of the mold cavity than from its lower portions.
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US3763920A (en) * 1972-03-16 1973-10-09 United States Steel Corp Water inlet construction for continuous-casting molds
US3866664A (en) * 1973-06-01 1975-02-18 United States Steel Corp Mold for use in continuous-casting of metals
US4129172A (en) * 1976-10-27 1978-12-12 Lukens Steel Company Mold for electroslag remelting process
US4129175A (en) * 1977-08-01 1978-12-12 Gladwin Floyd R Continuous slab casting mold
FR2429282A1 (en) * 1978-06-19 1980-01-18 Rca Corp Development brings to the processes of dyeing textiles
FR2478502A1 (en) * 1980-03-19 1981-09-25 Clesid Sa Plate lingotiere for continuous casting machine
US4416827A (en) * 1981-08-28 1983-11-22 Degussa Aktiengesellschaft Process for the resolution of the racemate (1RS,2SR)-2-amino-1-phenyl-propan-1-ol
US4457354A (en) * 1981-08-03 1984-07-03 International Telephone And Telegraph Corporation Mold for use in metal or metal alloy casting systems
US4518027A (en) * 1980-03-29 1985-05-21 Kabushiki Kaisha Kobe Seiko Sho Mold adapted to house electromagnetic stirrer coil for continuous casting equipment
US4535832A (en) * 1981-04-29 1985-08-20 Gus Sevastakis Continuous casting apparatus
US5117895A (en) * 1987-12-23 1992-06-02 Voest-Alpine Industrieanlagenbau Gesellschaft M.B.H. Continuous casting mold arrangement
EP0730923A1 (en) * 1995-03-08 1996-09-11 KM Europa Metal Aktiengesellschaft Mould for continuous casting of metals
EP0931609A1 (en) * 1998-01-27 1999-07-28 KM Europa Metal AG Fluid cooled mould
US6273177B1 (en) * 1996-09-25 2001-08-14 Sms Schloemann-Siemag Aktiengesellschaft Continuous casting mould
WO2003092931A1 (en) * 2002-04-27 2003-11-13 Sms Demag Aktiengesellschaft Adjustment of heat transfer in continuous casting moulds in particular in the region of the meniscus
US20070125512A1 (en) * 2005-12-05 2007-06-07 Hans-Gunter Wober Permanent chill mold for the continuous casting of metals
US20080073483A1 (en) * 2005-08-27 2008-03-27 Hans Streubel Unknown
US20120080159A1 (en) * 2010-10-02 2012-04-05 Egon Evertz Continuous-casting mold

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US3416222A (en) * 1964-05-05 1968-12-17 British Iron Steel Research Manufacture of elongate articles
US3447592A (en) * 1965-05-03 1969-06-03 Alfred J Wertli Cooling apparatus for differentially cooling a continuous casting
US3461950A (en) * 1966-10-28 1969-08-19 Bliss Co Apparatus for producing adjustable reciprocation of a continuous casting mold
US3447480A (en) * 1967-07-24 1969-06-03 Bodine Albert G Method and apparatus for gravity flow casting utilizing sonic energization

Cited By (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3763920A (en) * 1972-03-16 1973-10-09 United States Steel Corp Water inlet construction for continuous-casting molds
US3866664A (en) * 1973-06-01 1975-02-18 United States Steel Corp Mold for use in continuous-casting of metals
US4129172A (en) * 1976-10-27 1978-12-12 Lukens Steel Company Mold for electroslag remelting process
US4129175A (en) * 1977-08-01 1978-12-12 Gladwin Floyd R Continuous slab casting mold
FR2429282A1 (en) * 1978-06-19 1980-01-18 Rca Corp Development brings to the processes of dyeing textiles
FR2478502A1 (en) * 1980-03-19 1981-09-25 Clesid Sa Plate lingotiere for continuous casting machine
US4518027A (en) * 1980-03-29 1985-05-21 Kabushiki Kaisha Kobe Seiko Sho Mold adapted to house electromagnetic stirrer coil for continuous casting equipment
US4535832A (en) * 1981-04-29 1985-08-20 Gus Sevastakis Continuous casting apparatus
US4457354A (en) * 1981-08-03 1984-07-03 International Telephone And Telegraph Corporation Mold for use in metal or metal alloy casting systems
US4416827A (en) * 1981-08-28 1983-11-22 Degussa Aktiengesellschaft Process for the resolution of the racemate (1RS,2SR)-2-amino-1-phenyl-propan-1-ol
US5117895A (en) * 1987-12-23 1992-06-02 Voest-Alpine Industrieanlagenbau Gesellschaft M.B.H. Continuous casting mold arrangement
EP0730923A1 (en) * 1995-03-08 1996-09-11 KM Europa Metal Aktiengesellschaft Mould for continuous casting of metals
US6273177B1 (en) * 1996-09-25 2001-08-14 Sms Schloemann-Siemag Aktiengesellschaft Continuous casting mould
US6926067B1 (en) * 1998-01-27 2005-08-09 Km Europa Metal Ag Liquid-cooled casting die
AU756323B2 (en) * 1998-01-27 2003-01-09 KME Germany GmbH & Co., KG A fluid-cooled chill mould
CZ300075B6 (en) * 1998-01-27 2009-01-21 Km Europa Metal Aktiengesellschaft Liquid cooled cast-iron mold
EP0931609A1 (en) * 1998-01-27 1999-07-28 KM Europa Metal AG Fluid cooled mould
US20050115695A1 (en) * 2002-04-27 2005-06-02 Dirk Mangler Adjustment of heat transfer in continuous casting moulds in particular in the region of the meniscus
WO2003092931A1 (en) * 2002-04-27 2003-11-13 Sms Demag Aktiengesellschaft Adjustment of heat transfer in continuous casting moulds in particular in the region of the meniscus
US20080073483A1 (en) * 2005-08-27 2008-03-27 Hans Streubel Unknown
US7798202B2 (en) * 2005-08-27 2010-09-21 Sms Siemag Aktiengesellschaft Wide side of a funnel mold
US20070125512A1 (en) * 2005-12-05 2007-06-07 Hans-Gunter Wober Permanent chill mold for the continuous casting of metals
JP2007152432A (en) * 2005-12-05 2007-06-21 Km Europ Metal Ag Metallic mold for continuous casting of metal
US20120080159A1 (en) * 2010-10-02 2012-04-05 Egon Evertz Continuous-casting mold

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