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US3593717A - Reservoir menstrual napkin - Google Patents

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US3593717A
US3593717A US3593717DA US3593717A US 3593717 A US3593717 A US 3593717A US 3593717D A US3593717D A US 3593717DA US 3593717 A US3593717 A US 3593717A
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napkin
absorptive
section
area
menstrual
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John Leslie Jones Sr
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JOHN LESLIE JONES
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Jones Sr John L
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F13/00Bandages or dressings; Absorbent pads
    • A61F13/15Absorbent pads, e.g. sanitary towels, swabs or tampons for external or internal application to the body; Supporting or fastening means therefor; Tampon applicators
    • A61F13/56Supporting or fastening means
    • A61F13/64Straps, belts, ties or endless bands

Abstract

This invention teaches a new menstrual napkin embodying multiple-ply tissue paper sheets lying coplanarly adjacent and forming an absorptive section. The absorptive section has a multiple, spaced pattern of coaxially concentric openings, in at least an appreciable fraction of the multiple plies of tissue paper, forming reservoir for the menstrual fluid volume prior to absorption of the fluid by the tissue paper. A pair of mounting and securing openings are provided, one at each opposed end of the napkin which pierces all layers of the napkin and is suitable for adaptively securing he napkin to a sanitary napkin support belt.

Description

United States Patent [72] Inventor John Leslie Jones, Sr.

1070 Glen Oaks Blvd., Pasadena, Calif.

91105 {211 App]. No. 742,922 [22] Filed July 5, 1968 [45] Patented July 20, 1971 [54] RESERVOIR MENSTRUAL NAPKIN 7 Claims, 10 Drawing Figs.

[52] 11.8. C1 128/290 [51] Int. A61t 13/16 [50] Field of Search 128/284, 287, 286, 290

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,043,325 6/1936 Jackson, Jr. 128/290 2,929,379 3/1960 Pouls en 128/290 3,046,986 7/1962 Harwood 128/290 3,059,644 10/1962 Atkinson 128/290 3,364,931 1/1968 Hirsch 128/290 Primary ExaminerCharles F. Rosen'baum Attorney-J. L. Jones, Sr,

ABSTRACT: This invention teaches a new menstrual napkin embodying multiple-ply tissue paper sheets lying coplanarly adjacent and forming an absorptive section. The absorptive section has a multiple, spaced pattern of coaxially concentric openings, in at least an appreciable fraction of the multiple plies of tissue paper, forming reservoir for the menstrual fluid volume prior to absorption of the fluid by the tissue paper. A pair of mounting and securing openings are provided, one at each opposed end of the napkin which pierces all layers of the napkin and is suitable for adaptively securing he napkin to a sanitary napkin support belt.

PMENIEU m2 0 [an wag.

INVENTOR.

RESERVOIR MENSTRUAL NAPKIN BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Menstrual fluid is commonly absorbed by commercial sanitary napkins having a relatively thick mass (about threefourths inch thick) of low-density, flufl'y, bleached woodpulp. The napkin is typically about 8% inch long X 2% inch wide, and the low-density woodpulp pad is held together as a coherent mass by a shaping, exterior layer of an open network gauze or scrim material. The gauze or scrim material is also formed into tab extensions at the elongated napkin ends, forming tab securing means for attaching the napkin to a sanitary napkin support belt.

This invention provides a sanitary napkin with a reservoir capacity for menstrual fluid. The napkin is more compact than the prior art and greatly decreases menstrual fluid leakage problems. Further, this invention provides a simple and very cheap slotted napkin support means, which is particularly useful in adaptively securing the napkin to a sanitary napkin support belt.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to my copending U.S. Pat. application titled MENSTRUAL NAPKIN AND ITS MANUFACTUR- ING PROCESS, Ser. No. 720,500; my U.S. Pat. application titled RETICULATED PAPER TAMPON, Ser. No. 720,50l; my U.S. Pat. application titled SANITARY BELT, Ser. No. 720,502, all filed Apr. ll, I968; and my U.S. Pat. application titled SANITARY NAPKIN, Ser. No. 675,556.

This improvement in menstrual napkin modifies my earlier teaching of a multiplicity of tissue paper sheet layers bonded together in coplanarly adjacent plies. I now teach forming a multiplicity of spaced, patterned coaxially concentric openings, in at least an appreciable adjacent fraction of the coplanar multiple plies of tissue paper. The concentric openings cooperatively with a bottom ply form a multiple of fluid reservoirs into which menstrual fluid can surge, when it gushes or spurts from the vagina in a uneven flow rate. The few cubic centimeters in a gush can then be absorbed by the surrounding multiple plies of tissue paper sheets.

A pair of slot openings are placed one opening at each of the opposed obtuse tapered ends of my menstrual napkin taught in my.ap at qv,L.. bl2.]ZQJOQTM two 9EEl9 Pi all tissue paper plies and the final exterior impermeable plastic film membrane. One of my sanitary belts taught in my application Ser. No. 720,502 can be used to support this improved napkin by separately threading the front and rear support straps, through the napkin slot openings, pulling the napkin into a functional position with the straps. Then, each support strap is adhesively secured to itself, providing a napkin tightly positioned for functional use. Likewise, my other sanitary belt modification utilizing one support strap can be used by threading the one longer support strap through both slot openings and along the exterior impermeable membrane face of the napkin, finally to be secured to the waist belt, as also taught in my copending Pat. application, Ser. No. 720,502.

Included in the objects of my invention are:

First, to provide an inexpensive, dry, single-use, multiple ply tissue paper menstrual sanitary napkin having reservoirs for menstrual fluid.

Second, to provide a dry, single-use, multiple-ply tissue paper menstrual napkin having a pair of simple securing openings, one opening at each end of each napkin.

Third, to provide a manufacturing process for an improved menstrual napkin, forming reservoir capacity for menstrual fluid in said napkin.

Other objects and advantages of this invention are taught in the following description and claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING The description of this invention is to be read in conjunction with the following drawing in which:

FIG. I is a plan view of one modification of the improvement in menstrual napkin.

FIG. 2 is an elevation view through 22 ofFIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is an elevation view through 3-3 of FIG. I, illustrating one modification ofthe menstrual fluid reservoir.

FIG. 4 is an elevation view of another modification of the menstrual fluid reservoir, shown in an elevational sectional view similar to FIG. 3.

FIGS. 5a, 5b and 5c illustrate in plan view other geometrically shaped menstrual fluid reservoir openings.

FIG. 6 illustrates in plan view still another modification applied to the menstrual napkin of my U.S. Pat. application, Ser. No. 720,500, and embodying new multiple menstrual fluid reservoirs.

FIG. 7 is an elevation view through 7-7 of FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is a frontal elevational view of one modification of the improvement in reservoir menstrual napkin in functional position on a female torso, utilizing the napkin securing openings in conjunction with my sanitary napkin support belt of U.S. Pat. application, Ser. No. 720,502.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to FIG. l in detail, a menstrual sanitary napkin I is shown in plan view and it embodies an absorptive section 4, having an obtuse diamond planar shape area taught in my U.S. Pat. application Ser. No. 720,500. The absorptive section 4 comprises a multiplicity of tissue paper sheets, coplanarly, adjacently laid together. A pair of oval, slot shaped, securing openings 5 are shown, one placed at each tapered napkin end and located symmetrically across the line of center 22. The pair of openings 5 extend completely through the napkin 1 structure. The of adhesive plug bonding means 6, as earlier taught in my above-numbered patent application, extend through and secure together the multiple ply of tissue paper sheets of absorptive section 4. The multiple menstrual fluid reservoirs 9 are shown arranged in a pattern array adapted to confront the vaginal opening, and to catch and receive the fluid as it flows from the opening. The reservoirs 9 are circular openings in the multiple ply of tissue paper sheets, of size diameters as required for the napkin utility.

More construction detail of my improvement in menstrual napkin l are shown in the cross-sectional view of FIG. 2. The napkin I has an absorptive section 4. The pair of napkin securing openings 5 pierce completely through all layers of the napkin 1, providing a pair of oval slot shaped mounting openings, through which the napkin ll can be attached to a sanitary napkin support belt. The two adhesive plug bonding means 6 are shown extending through the multiple ply of tissue paper sheets, from exterior napkin surface 10 through the thin, flexible, impermeable plastic membrane film II. An interface bond means 12 secures the absorptive section 4 and the impermeable membrane film 11 together. The bond means 12 can be an adhesive bonding layer, or it can be the type of interface 12 formed between a tissue paper sheet and a thin thermoplastic film, heat-sealed together.

An adhesive layer can be spread as a thin layer on the surface 13 of the absorptive section 4, or it can be spread on the interior surface 14 of the plastic film Ill, the adhesive can then bond the absorptive section 4 to the fillm Ill, applying heat if necessary to facilitate the bonding process. A pressure-sensitive adhesive layer can be used for this purpose. An impermeable plastic film II can be formed directly on a tissue paper sheet face 13, by extrusion laminating of a thermoplastic such as polyethylene by known processes.

FIG. 3 illustrates in enlarged sectional detail, the construction of one modification of my menstrual fluid reservoir 9. The absorptive section 4 comprises multiple ply of tissue paper sheets, coplanarly, adjacently laid together. One subgroup 15 of coplanar, multiple-ply tissue paper sheets have the circular openings coaxially formed in the adjacent sheets. A second subgroup 16 of coplanar multiple-ply tissue paper sheets do not have any openings therein. Collectively, the multiple, individual circular openings, coaxially aligned and having a bottom tissue paper sheet, form the reservoirs 9.

Typically, the multiple-ply tissue paper sheets of subgroup 15 can be 10 to 30 paper sheets, and subgroup 16 can be 5 l5 sheets, and the numbers of paper sheets in each subgroup are adjusted to the required number for utility. The single paper sheets are preferably tissue paper stock, with or without wet-strength resin, and can range in paper weight from 0.010 to 0.020 gr./sq. in. Typically the sheets are 9l0 lb. tissue paper stock, uncalendared or crimped. They may be colored and perfumed for feminine appeal.

In my earlier teaching of menstrual napkin, Ser. No. 720,500, the adhesive plug bonding means 12 and 12 of that application do not extend through the fluid impermeable plastic membrane 7. In the present teaching, I extend the adhesive plug bonding means 6 through the impermeable plastic film 11. I may also form the adhesive plug bonding means invention as in the earlier teaching.

Another modification of the menstrual fluid reservoir construction is shown in enlarged cross-sectional detail in FIG. 4, being similar to and a modification of FIG. 3. The reservoir 20 is formed by a multiplicity of concentric circular openings in a multiplicity of tissue paper sheets 23, the openings being coaxially, adjacently aligned to form the reservoir 20. The reservoir 20 extends from the exterior surface 21 to the interface bond means 24, which secures the thin impermeable mem' brane plastic film 22 to the multiplicity of tissue paper sheets 23. There are no absorptive tissue paper sheets forming the reservoir 20 bottom or floor, as there are in FIGS. l--3. If an adhesive layer bonds 22 and 23, the bond means 24 may physically exist at reservoir 20, if the adhesive is prior spread on the film 22 before forming bond means 24. Otherwise 24 may not exist at reservoir 20.

FIGS. 5a, 5b and 5c illustrate in planar view, from the type of surface ofa napkin l or the like, other typical geometrical shapes of the reservoir openings which can be formed in the napkin modifications. In FIG. 5a, the surface 50 corresponds to the surface 10 of napkin l, and the typical reservoir 51 has a square-shaped opening. In FIG. 5b, the surface 52 corresponds to surface 10 of napkin I, and the reservoir 53 has a triangular-shaped opening.

Likewise, in FIG. 5c, the reservoir 55 in the surface 54 is hexagonal shaped. Other geometrical shaped reservoir openings may be formed in the multiple ply of tissue paper sheets, as desired.

Typically the reservoir 9 of FIGS. l3 may range in plan diameter from one-eighth to one-half inch, and the reservoir may be spaced in a patterned array as needed to receive menstrual fluid as it flows from the vagina. The number of reservoir in the patterned array are those required to receive the flow of fluid without leaking, corresponding to the volume of fluid in a menstrual fluid gush which sometimes occurs.

FIGS. 6 and 7 together illustrate another modification of this napkin invention, wherein the primary absorptive section 60 of the napkin 61 has a multiplicity of reservoirs 63. The primary absorptive section 60 and the secondary absorptive section 62, together with the two adhesive plug bonding means 64, which secure the sections 60 and 62 together, are disclosed, taught and claimed in the earlier patent application, Ser. No. 720,500. The pair of oval slot shaped napkin securing openings 65 pierce through all layers of the secondary absorptive section 62, as disclosed and taught in FIG. 1 and 2 above, providing openings to which a sanitary belt of my invention, Ser. No. 720,502, may be secured. Other sanitary belts may also be used to secure this napkin in a functional position. The cross-sectional view through 7-7 of FIG. 6 is shown in FIG. 7. The reservoirs 63 are shown in FIG. 7 to pierce completely through the primary absorptive section 60, and the secondary absorptive section 62 forms the bottom of the reservoirs 63. The interface bond means 66 secures the secondary absorptive section 62 to the menstrual fluid impermeable membrane 67.

FIG. 8 illustrates the advance in the menstrual napkin application art made by the napkin having a pair of mounting openings. The female torso 80 is shown in frontal view, having a sanitary napkin support belt 81 of applicant's invention, Ser.

No. 720,502. The waist belt 82 has two support straps secured thereto, a front support strap 83 passes through the front napkin slotted securing opening 84, and the strap 83 is folded upward, terminating at the support strap terminus 85. The pressure sensitive adhesive bonding means 86, located between the two opposed faces of the support strap 83 bond the strap faces together to form a supporting loop for the sanitary napkin 87. A similar rear support strap (not shown here), as illustratcd in FIG. 4 of the earlier patent application, secures the rear tapered end of the sanitary napkin 87, passing through a second napkin slotted securing opening, as typified by one opening 65 of FIG. 6, or one opening 5 of FIGS. I2.

A pair of oval slotted shaped napkin securing means are one modification of this invention and is not to be restricted to oval slotted shaped openings in the napkin. The napkin-securing means can be a pair of any geometric shaped openings, circular, triangular, rectangular or of other required geometric figures permitting the passage ofa napkin support strap of the copending application Ser. No. 720,502. Likewise the napkinsecuring openings can be adapted cooperatively in combination with other sanitary napkin support belt devices. Typically the oval slots disclosed in FIGS. I, 2, 6 and 8 are approximately one-fourth inch wide by one-half inch long, as shown in the plan view of FIG. 1. Other suitable opening sizes may be selected. The pair of sanitary belt-securing means can be utilized with my sanitary napkins disclosed and claimed in my US. Pat. application Ser. No. 675,556.

The menstrual napkins of this invention can be manufactured at high production speed on comparatively wide web paper processing machinery. As disclosed and claimed in my copending application Ser. No. 720,500, the obtuse diamond planar shaped area napkins disclosed in FIG. 1 of this invention are adapted to manufacturing simultaneously in multiple numbers. A subgroup of multiple ply tissue paper sheets corresponding to 15, typically 20 sheets, are continuously, coplanarly, adjacently laid together, in a web width suitable for forming l020 napkins wide, as in the configuration shown in FIG. 8 of copending application Ser. No. 720,500. The subgroup of sheets 15 are typically shear cut completely through all sheets, in a plural set of patterned array forming a multiplicity of menstrual fluid reservoir 9 openings, or the like 50, Sb, 5c and equivalent openings, one set for each potential napkin. A positive-die shear punch, combined with a vacuum applied to the shear punch die box, both assist in removal of all tissue paper sheets from the reservoirs 9 openings, or the like. A second subgroup of multiple-ply tissue paper sheets 16, typically I0 sheets, are continuously, coplanarly, adjacently laid together, in a web width equal to subgroup 15 above. An impermeable plastic film membrane 11, or the like, is also laid coadjaccntly together with subgroup 15. The three layers, subgroup I5, subgroup 16 and impermeable plastic film membrane 11, or the like, are then die-cut in a registered position with respect to the plural set of patterned array of menstrual fluid reservoirs 9, or the like, centering one set of reservoirs 9 array in a planar, obtuse diamond shaped napkin. The openings for 5 and 6 are simultaneously formed, with the cutting of each napkin shape. The adhesive plug bonding means 6 are formed in a later step, by injecting a hot melt adhesive into the required openings.

The menstrual fluid reservoirs are defined within the scope of this invention as the coaxially aligned openings, of uniform geometrical shape, in a multiplicity of tissue paper sheets, having a reservoir bottom selected from tissue paper sheet and a thin, flexible, impermeable plastic film membrane. Typically, as shown in FIG. 1, the total volume of the 29 reservoir openings, having circular diameters of one-fourth inch by three thirty-seconds inch deep, corresponds to approximately 9 cc. Thus, the collective reservoir openings, when properly functionally positioned, can receive a typical surge or gush of menstrual fluid without leaking, for the reservoirs will hold the fluid, allowing the fluid to be absorbed in the pulp of the surrounding tissue paper sheets.

Many modifications and variations of my improvements in reservoir menstrual sanitary napkins and process for their manufacture may be made within the light of my teachings. it is therefore understood that within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described.

lclaim:

l. A menstrual napkin comprising:

a. an elongated planar area, multiple-ply, tissue paper sheet absorptive section, said area greater than the vaginal vestibula area,

b. a thin flexible, fluid-impermeable plastic membrane equal in planar area to said absorptive section and coplanarly bonded to said absorptive section,

0. a plurality of adhesive plug bonding means bonding together said absorptive section and said impermeable membrane,'and

d. a multiple, patterned array of menstrual fluid reservoirs disposed normal to and including the exterior face of said absorptive section, each said reservoir formed of multiple axially concentric openings, of uniform geometrical shape, in an exterior portion of the adjacent a multiplicity of tissue paper sheets, including the face sheet, and having a reservoir bottom selected from at least one tissue paper sheet.

2. In the menstrual napkin of claim l, the modification wherein the reservoir bottom is a thin, flexible impermeable plastic film membrane.

3. In the menstrual napkin of claim 1, the modification wherein there is a multiple-ply tissue paper sheet absorptive section disposed between said reservoir bottom and said impermeable membrane, free of said reservoir openings.

4. A menstrual napkin modification comprising:

a. an elongated planar, multiple-ply, tissue paper sheet first absorptive section area, said area greater than the vaginal vestibula area,

b. a multiple, patterned array of menstrual fluid reservoirs disposed in and normal to and including the exterior first face of said first absorptive section area, each said reservoir formed of multiple axially concentric openings, of uniform geometrical shape, disposed in the adjacent multiplicity of tissue paper sheets of said first absorptive section area,

c. an elongated planar, multipleply tissue paper sheet second absorptive section area, said second absorptive section area substantially greater in area than said first absorptive section area, and coplanarly, adjacently, symmetrically disposed adjacent to the second face of said first absorptive section area, and

d. a plurality of adhesive plug bonding means bonding together said first absorptive section area and said second absorptive section area.

5. In the menstrual napkin modification of claim ll, the

further modification comprising a. a thin flexible, fluid-impermeable plastic membrane, equal in planar area to said second absorptive section area, coplanarly adjacently disposed to the face of the second absorptive section area opposite the face to which said first absorptive section is disposed, and

b. said plurality of adhesive plug bonding means bonding said fluid-impermeable plastic membrane.

6. A menstrual napkin modification comprising:

a. an elongated planar, multiple-ply, tissue paper sheet first absorptive section area, said area greater than the vaginal vestibula area,

b. a multiple, patterned array of menstrual fluid reservoirs disposed in and normal to and including the exterior first face of said first absorptive section area, each said reservoir formed of multiple axially concentric openings, of uniform geometrical shape, in said first absorptive section area of the adjacent multiplicity of tissue paper sheets,

c. an elongated planar, multiple-ply tissue paper sheet second absorptive section area, equal in area and coplanarly ad acent to the second face of said first absorptive section area, and

d. a plurality of adhesive plug bonding means bonding together said first absorptive section area and said second absorptive section area.

7. In the menstrual napkin modification of claim 6, the

further modification comprising:

a. a thin, flexible fluid impermeable plastic membrane, equal in planar area to said second absorptive section area, coplanarly adjacently disposed to the face of the second absorptive section area opposite the face to which said first absorptive section is disposed, and

b. said plurality of adhesive plug bonding means bonding said fluid-impermeable plastic membrane.

Claims (7)

1. A menstrual napkin comprising: a. an elongated planar area, multiple-ply, tissue paper sheet absorptive section, said area greater than the vaginal vestibula area, b. a thin flexible, fluid-impermeable plastic membrane equal in planar area to said absorptive section and coplanarly bonded to said absorptive section, c. a plurality of adhesive plug bonding means bonding together said absorptive section and said impermeable membrane, and d. a multiple, patterned array of menstrual fluid reservoirs disposed normal to and including the exterior face of said absorptive section, each said reservoir formed of multiple axially concentric openings, of uniform geometrical shape, in an exterior portion of the adjacent a multiplicity of tissue paper sheets, including the face sheet, and having a reservoir bottom selected from at least one tissue paper sheet.
2. In the menstrual napkin of claim 1, the modification wherein the reservoir bottom is a thin, flexible impermeable plastic film membrane.
3. In the menstrual napkin of claim 1, the modification wherein there is a multiple-ply tissue paper sheet absorptive section disposed between said reservoir bottom and said impermeable membrane, free of said reservoir openings.
4. A menstrual napkin modification comprising: a. an elongated planar, multiple-ply, tissue paper sheet fiRst absorptive section area, said area greater than the vaginal vestibula area, b. a multiple, patterned array of menstrual fluid reservoirs disposed in and normal to and including the exterior first face of said first absorptive section area, each said reservoir formed of multiple axially concentric openings, of uniform geometrical shape, disposed in the adjacent multiplicity of tissue paper sheets of said first absorptive section area, c. an elongated planar, multiple-ply tissue paper sheet second absorptive section area, said second absorptive section area substantially greater in area than said first absorptive section area, and coplanarly, adjacently, symmetrically disposed adjacent to the second face of said first absorptive section area, and d. a plurality of adhesive plug bonding means bonding together said first absorptive section area and said second absorptive section area.
5. In the menstrual napkin modification of claim 4, the further modification comprising a. a thin flexible, fluid-impermeable plastic membrane, equal in planar area to said second absorptive section area, coplanarly adjacently disposed to the face of the second absorptive section area opposite the face to which said first absorptive section is disposed, and b. said plurality of adhesive plug bonding means bonding said fluid-impermeable plastic membrane.
6. A menstrual napkin modification comprising: a. an elongated planar, multiple-ply, tissue paper sheet first absorptive section area, said area greater than the vaginal vestibula area, b. a multiple, patterned array of menstrual fluid reservoirs disposed in and normal to and including the exterior first face of said first absorptive section area, each said reservoir formed of multiple axially concentric openings, of uniform geometrical shape, in said first absorptive section area of the adjacent multiplicity of tissue paper sheets, c. an elongated planar, multiple-ply tissue paper sheet second absorptive section area, equal in area and coplanarly adjacent to the second face of said first absorptive section area, and d. a plurality of adhesive plug bonding means bonding together said first absorptive section area and said second absorptive section area.
7. In the menstrual napkin modification of claim 6, the further modification comprising: a. a thin, flexible fluid impermeable plastic membrane, equal in planar area to said second absorptive section area, coplanarly adjacently disposed to the face of the second absorptive section area opposite the face to which said first absorptive section is disposed, and b. said plurality of adhesive plug bonding means bonding said fluid-impermeable plastic membrane.
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US4988344A (en) * 1988-05-24 1991-01-29 The Procter & Gamble Company Absorbent articles with multiple layer absorbent layers
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US5134007A (en) * 1988-05-24 1992-07-28 The Procter & Gamble Company Multiple layer absorbent cores for absorbent articles
US5507735A (en) * 1994-08-05 1996-04-16 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Absorbent article having moveable attachment means
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US5675079A (en) * 1995-06-07 1997-10-07 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Apparatus for measuring the crush recovery of an absorbent article
US5762642A (en) * 1993-05-24 1998-06-09 The Procter & Gamble Company Absorbent article, particularly sanitary napkin
US5803920A (en) * 1995-06-07 1998-09-08 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Thin absorbent article
US5810798A (en) * 1995-06-30 1998-09-22 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Absorbent article having a thin, efficient absorbent core
US5941864A (en) * 1993-08-17 1999-08-24 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable absorbent article having improved fecal storage
US5957906A (en) * 1997-11-14 1999-09-28 The Procter & Gamble Company Diaper with improved feces management properties
US5977430A (en) * 1997-11-14 1999-11-02 The Procter & Gamble Company Absorbent article with macro-particulate storage structure
US6010491A (en) * 1997-11-14 2000-01-04 The Procter & Gamble Company Viscous fluid bodily waste management article
US6156020A (en) * 1997-11-15 2000-12-05 The Procter & Gamble Company Absorbent article with micro-particulate storage member
US6206865B1 (en) 1995-11-13 2001-03-27 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Absorbent article having a cellulosic transfer layer
US6423884B1 (en) * 1996-10-11 2002-07-23 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Absorbent article having apertures for fecal material
US6680422B2 (en) * 1993-08-17 2004-01-20 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable absorbent article having capacity to store low-viscosity fecal material
US6703537B1 (en) 1997-11-15 2004-03-09 The Procter & Gamble Company Absorbent article having improved fecal storage structure
US20040122394A1 (en) * 2002-12-23 2004-06-24 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. High capacity absorbent structure and method for producing same
US20040127870A1 (en) * 2002-12-27 2004-07-01 Dipalma Joseph Thin curved elasticized absorbent article with absorbent concentration profile
US20060047257A1 (en) * 2004-08-31 2006-03-02 Maria Raidel Extensible absorbent core and absorbent article
US20060069371A1 (en) * 2004-09-30 2006-03-30 Uni-Charm Corporation Absorbent pad
US7772455B1 (en) 1997-11-14 2010-08-10 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable article providing improved management of bodily exudates

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US3441023A (en) * 1965-02-12 1969-04-29 Page Zellstoffkrepp Gmbh Absorption pad for the treatment of wounds and for infant care
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US7589251B2 (en) * 1993-08-17 2009-09-15 The Procter & Gamble Co. Disposable absorbent article having capacity to store low-viscosity fecal material
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US5507735A (en) * 1994-08-05 1996-04-16 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Absorbent article having moveable attachment means
US5803920A (en) * 1995-06-07 1998-09-08 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Thin absorbent article
US5675079A (en) * 1995-06-07 1997-10-07 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Apparatus for measuring the crush recovery of an absorbent article
US5810798A (en) * 1995-06-30 1998-09-22 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Absorbent article having a thin, efficient absorbent core
US6206865B1 (en) 1995-11-13 2001-03-27 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Absorbent article having a cellulosic transfer layer
US6423884B1 (en) * 1996-10-11 2002-07-23 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Absorbent article having apertures for fecal material
US6013063A (en) * 1997-11-14 2000-01-11 The Procter & Gamble Company Viscous fluid bodily waste management article
US5977430A (en) * 1997-11-14 1999-11-02 The Procter & Gamble Company Absorbent article with macro-particulate storage structure
US6010491A (en) * 1997-11-14 2000-01-04 The Procter & Gamble Company Viscous fluid bodily waste management article
US20100274209A1 (en) * 1997-11-14 2010-10-28 Roe Donald C Disposable Article Providing Improved Management of Bodily Exudates
US7772455B1 (en) 1997-11-14 2010-08-10 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable article providing improved management of bodily exudates
US5957906A (en) * 1997-11-14 1999-09-28 The Procter & Gamble Company Diaper with improved feces management properties
US8981177B2 (en) 1997-11-14 2015-03-17 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable article providing improved management of bodily exudates
US6703537B1 (en) 1997-11-15 2004-03-09 The Procter & Gamble Company Absorbent article having improved fecal storage structure
US8569568B2 (en) 1997-11-15 2013-10-29 The Procter & Gamble Company Article having improved fecal storage structure
US6156020A (en) * 1997-11-15 2000-12-05 The Procter & Gamble Company Absorbent article with micro-particulate storage member
US20110172623A1 (en) * 1997-11-15 2011-07-14 Donald Carroll Roe Article Having Improved Fecal Storage Structure
US20040147889A1 (en) * 1997-11-15 2004-07-29 The Procter & Gamble Company Article having improved fecal storage structure
US7935859B2 (en) 1997-11-15 2011-05-03 The Procter & Gamble Company Article having improved fecal storage structure
US6673984B1 (en) 1997-11-15 2004-01-06 The Procter & Gamble Company Absorbent article with macro-particulate storage member
US20040122394A1 (en) * 2002-12-23 2004-06-24 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. High capacity absorbent structure and method for producing same
US6888044B2 (en) 2002-12-23 2005-05-03 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. High capacity absorbent structure and method for producing same
US20040127870A1 (en) * 2002-12-27 2004-07-01 Dipalma Joseph Thin curved elasticized absorbent article with absorbent concentration profile
US20060047257A1 (en) * 2004-08-31 2006-03-02 Maria Raidel Extensible absorbent core and absorbent article
US7547815B2 (en) * 2004-09-30 2009-06-16 Uni-Charm Corporation Absorbent pad having zones with different flexibilities
US20060069371A1 (en) * 2004-09-30 2006-03-30 Uni-Charm Corporation Absorbent pad

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