US3565071A - Self-regulating therapeutic inhaler - Google Patents

Self-regulating therapeutic inhaler Download PDF

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Publication number
US3565071A
US3565071A US3565071DA US3565071A US 3565071 A US3565071 A US 3565071A US 3565071D A US3565071D A US 3565071DA US 3565071 A US3565071 A US 3565071A
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Prior art keywords
inhaler
mouthpiece
body
drug
opening
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Expired - Lifetime
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Sanford Cobb
Dean Richard Katerndahl
William Emmett Murphy
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Abbott Laboratories
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Abbott Laboratories
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M15/00Inhalators
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M15/00Inhalators
    • A61M15/06Inhaling appliances shaped like cigars, cigarettes or pipes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M2202/00Special media to be introduced, removed or treated
    • A61M2202/02Gases
    • A61M2202/0241Anaesthetics; Analgesics

Abstract

An inhaler for self-administration of a volatile drug for analgesic purposes and comprising a tubular body with a mouthpiece at one end for insertion into a patient''s mouth, an absorbent material within the tubular body for holding the liquid agent and a cap on the end of the tubular body opposite the mouthpiece, the cap having openings therein arranged to provide evenly distributed charging of liquid drug.

Description

United States Patent Sanford Cobb Lake Forest;

Dean Richard Katerndahl, Wheaton; William Emmett Murphy, Waukegan, Ill.

[72] Inventors 50 FieldofSearch 128/188, 197,19s,2o9,z10,20o;131/17 5,191;222/3,4, 5;l28/20l,208;l3l/l74,l7l,198

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 363,067 5/1887 Heintzelman 128/200 1,470,124 10/1923 Stricker 128/200 1,974,242 9/1934 Jordan 131/198(X) 2,633,131 3/1953 Grosuenor 128/200 2,860,638 11/1958 Bartolomeo 128/201 Primary Examiner-Richard A. Gaudet Assistant Examiner-G. F. Dunne Attorney- Robert L. Niblack ABSTRACT: An inhaler for self-administration of a volatile drug for analgesic purposes and comprising a tubular body with a mouthpiece at one end for insertion into a patients mouth, an absorbent material within the tubular body for holding the liquid agent and a cap on the end of the tubular body opposite the mouthpiece, the cap having openings therein arranged to provide evenly distributed charging of liquid drug.

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SHEET 2 BF 2 -wMkDZQITmZE- mm om m0 mm om mu on m 0 m 2 s jmudu 0 om 5-. 0 M A l X 7 .0T oom ou r N w v v V D0 M T f A J0- oom- NTw 04 w I 2 wm m3u muzaszmoumum Inventors Sanford Cobb Dean. Richard Katerndahl William. Emmett Murphg/ SELF -REGULATING THERAPEUTIC INHALER The present invention provides an inhaler for self-administration of analgesia by a patient which may be simplymanipulated, is of light weight and of low cost so that it can be disposed of after a single use. Present types of inhalers for selfadministration of analgesia by the patient are generally somewhat heavy, bulky,'expen'sive pieces'of equipment. In contrast, the inhaler of thepresent inventionis small and of light weight, thereby greatly simplifying logistic problems of storage and availability. It can easily be stocked and used in delivery rooms, emergency rooms, wards, ambulances, rescue vehicles, and it may be carried by the physician and used in the office for painful procedures or minor surgery. Repeated inhalations through the inhaler relieve pain on demand without inducing unconsciousness. With the remission of pain,

the patient loses the ability to concentrate on mouth breathing and to hold the inhaler to his motith,1thus avoiding excessive described hereinafter, the cap is formed in the shape of a shallow liquid drug into the inhaler, the openings being arranged,

together with several small ribs, to produce uniform charging of the unit and minimize the possibility ofdroplets of liquid drug from escaping throughthe mouthpiece or dilution' openings during the charging.

DRAWINGS The invention will be better understood upon consideration of the following description with reference to the drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a top perspective view of'one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2 is aside elevation view, in cross section.

enlarged portion and shoulder 16 ofthe mouthpiece I2 is a short continuous peripheral lip 18. The lip 18 in effect serves as a baffle and prevents droplets of liquid anesthetic or drug I from entering the mouthpiece l2, Positioned between the in ing. It is apparent that inhalation through the mouthpiece I2 with the diluter opening 20 uncovered will result in the inhalation of air containing a very low concentration of drug vapor. Because the opening 20 is positioned beyond the end of the wick l9 and close to the mouthpiece 12, when it is uncovered, air will be drawn through the opening 20 and directly into the mouthpiece 12 without first passing over the surface ofthe absorbent material 19 and therefore will contain very little drug vapor. Thus the opening 20 must be covered in order to pro vide an effective concentration of drug vapor. Inhalation through the inhaler 10 therefore becomes self-limiting since when somnolence occurs, the patients hand will fall away uncovering the opening 20. Even if breathing through the inhaler 10 is continued thereafter, air will be passing directly into the mouthpiece 12 through the opening 20 and will contain very little drug vapor so that surgical anesthesia will be avoided, This aspect becomes particularly important when the inhaler 10 is used with a face mask (not shown). With some prior devices, which are set to deliver a specified and relatively constant drug vapor concentration and which concentration can- FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view, taken along the line3-3 .of

- 5 and taken along the line-6-6 of FIGS.

FIG. 7 is a rear elevation view of the cap of FIG. 5, taken along the line 7-7 of FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is a graph showing the vapor concentration of drug as a function of time as produced with a mechanical ventilator connected to the mouthpiece of the inhaler,

DETAILED DESCRIPTION 7 I Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2 of the illustrative drawings, there is shown an inhaler 10 made in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention and comprising a'tubular body 1!. with a mouthpiece l2 projecting fronrone end thereof. As illustrated, the mouthpiece comprises an elongated oblong portion R3 for insertion into a patient's mouth and having an inhalation orifice Mand an enlarged portion l5of substantially equal diameter or cross section asthe tubular body ill. in the embodiment illustrated, the enlarged portion 115 of the mouthpiece is a slightly smali diameter than the body lill in order to provide a shoulder 16. By making the shoulder 16 of approximately Ira-inch diameter, the mouthpiece 12 of the inhaler 10 may be inserted into a standard anesthesia mask or other standard Iii-inch inside diameter anesthesia fitting. The mouthpiece 12 may be a unitary part of the tubular body 11 or may be formed separately and then affixed to one end of the body ll. Projecting internally from the elongated oblong por tion 13 of the mouthpiece into thecharnber 16 defined by the not easily be reduced by the patient, unconsciousness may occur if the patient continues to inhale through the device once drowsiness occurs. With the inhaler ofthe present invention, once drowsiness'occurs, the patient will lose his ability to hold the inhaler and even if it is retained in his mouth, drug vapor concentration will decline to a relatively ineffective concentration with the opening 20 uncovered. Contained within the tubular body II is absorbent liquid retaining material, which in the illustrated embodiment is a rolled wick 19 of polypropylene felt, which is charged with liquid drug immediately prior to use of the inhaler 10. To prevent the absorbent material from entering the mouthpiece I2 or impeding the flow of air through the diluter opening 20, one or more retaining means such as ribs 21 may be formed in the tubular body 1] extending inwardly away from the mouthpiece I2 to a point just beyond the opening 20. A second opening is positioned in the tubular body II to permit air to pass over substantially all of the absorbent liquid retaining means 19. When the first opening 20 is covered, inhaled air will pass only through the second opening and over the surface of the wick 19 thereby providing an effective concentration ofdrug vapor. With the first opening 20 uncovered, most of the air will pass through the opening 20 and directly into the mouthpiece 12 so that the patient will breath a relatively ineffective drug vapor concentration as described above. In the illustrated embodiment there is shown a cap 22 sealing the end of the tubular body 11 opposite from the mouthpiece I2 and having openings therein. In addition to serving as a source of entry for air, the cap 22 serves as a retainer for the absorbent material or wick l9 and may be used as a convenient means for charging the inhaler 10 with liquid drug. The cap 22 illustrated in FIGS. 5, 6, and 7 comprises a ring portion 23 having a peripheral ridge 24 extending therefrom. The outside diameter of the ring 23 of the cap 22 corresponds to the inside diameter of the tubular body ll so that the cap 22 may be inserted within the body 11,, the ridge 24 acting as a stop to prevent the cap 22 from being inserted too far into the tubular body 11. Affixed by means of bridges 25 to the end of the ring 23 opposite the ridge 25 is a flat circular plate 26 of slightly lesser diameter than the ring 23 so that arcuate openings 27 result through which the liquid drug may be charged. It can be seen that the ring 23 and plate 26 define a cap 22 which has the general configuration of a shallow cup having a small cavity 28. Extending from the bridge 25 and the plate 26 are several small ribs 29 which, when the cap is inserted into the tubular body 11, project inwardly toward the mouthpiece 12. A cap 22 having the illustrated configuration serves a number of purposes. it serves as a retainer for the absorbent wick l9 and it facilitates convenient, evenly distributed charging of the liquid drug. Thus, in charging the inhaler 10, it is held vertically with the mouthpiece 12 down. The liquid drug is poured into the cavity 28 of the cap 22 where it flows through the arcuate openings 27 and around the small ribs 29. Too rapid charging of the liquid drug, which might cause it to flow past the absorbent wick 19 and into the mouthpiece 12 is thus minimized. if desired, instead of using a cap 22, the end of the tubular body 11 away from the mouthpiece 12 may be formed as a solid piece with an opening therein or the end may be solid and an opening can be formed in the tubular body 11 positioned so as to permit air to pass over most of the wick 19. An eyelet 30 may be formed in the body 11 of the inhaler 10 through which may be threaded a wrist tie 31 which is fastened to a patients wrist to prevent dropping of the inhaler should the patient become drowsy or forgetful.

The tubular body 11, mouthpiece l2 and cap 22 may be injection molded in one piece or separately, from high-density polyethylene. Other suitable materials are nylon, polypropylene or acetal. The absorbent material 19 may be polypropylene felt, woven cotton, nylon felt or even absorbent paper.

Use of the inhaler 10 will be described with reference to methoxyflurane as the volatile drug. With a charge of l milliliters (ml.) of methoxyflurane, the inhaler will deliver 0.5 to 0.8 percent methoxyflurane vapor for up to 2 hours of intermittent use. To activate the inhaler 10 for use, it is held vertically with the mouthpiece 12 down and ml. of methoxyflurane is poured into the cup-shaped cap 21. The inhaler 10 is then attached to a patients wrist by means of the tie 31 and the patient is instructed to inhale through the inhaler 10 by mouth and exhale through the nose. A number of inhalations can be taken by the patient with the diluter orifice 20 open in order to become accustomed to the taste of vapor. Thereafter, the patient can close the orifice 20 with a finger in order to increase the concentration of drug and obtain analgesia.

Using a mechanical ventilator to simulate human breathing, variation in drug vapor concentration delivered by different inhalers 10 was found to be minimal. For the first 10 minutes of use, concentrations were found to fall slightly which may be caused by equalization of saturation of the absorbent material 19. Thereafter, the output is steady until the concentration begins an exponential decline as the liquid drug is exhausted. This is illustrated by the curves of HO. 8 which were produced with a ventilator connected to the mouthpiece of an inhaler l0 and ad usted to breathe" with different rates and tidal volumes. The ventilator did not exhale" through the inhaler, but vented to the room.

Vapor concentrations of methoxyflurane adequate for analgesia were produced for an hour of continuous use. in clinical practice, with the patient laying the inhaler l0 aside from time to time, much longer periods of effective concentrations can he expected.

The curves were drawn from gas chromatographic analysis Iii H; plotted against time, when inhalers of the present inventiov. were breathed through" by a mechanical ventilator at dithrent respiratory rates (F) tidal Volumes (V and minute volumes (i7). Ventilator breathing" was continuous over the whole time scale, not intermittent as in clinical practice. With intermittent use, one lS-ml. methoxyfluranc charge may be expected to last for 2 or more hours.

The middle curve is best taken as the usual or mean" performance of the inhaler, at a "normal" respiratory rate of 20 breaths/minute and with a SOO-mlv volume at each breath. It will be seen that effective concentration of delivered vapor rises, and duration of effect is extended, when slower respiratory rates (upper curve) are in o eration. Conversely, during hyperventila 1011 with a resprra ory rate of 27 and a larger tidal volume (lower curve) concentrations fall slightly and duration of the charge is decreased.

All three of the curves were derived from the results oftests performed with the diluter hold 20 closed. When similar testing was performed on inhalers 10 with the diluter opening 20 of each left open, the height of the curves was decreased by about 50 percent in every case; i.e., vapor concentration with the orifice 20 open was about half that with the opening 20 covered, and duration of vaporization was prolonged.

We claim:

1. A self-limiting inhaler for analgesic purposes and adapted for self-administration of a volatile drug by a patient, the inhaler comprising a substantially tubular body, a mouthpiece projecting from one end of the body, said mouthpiece having an elongated oblong portion with an inhalation orifice adapted for insertion into a patients mouth, absorbent liquid-retaining means for storing the volatile drug positioned within the tubular body along the walls thereof to thereby define a longitudinal passageway through the absorbent material, a first opening which may be covered by the patients finger to provide effective vapor concentration and positioned in the inhaler between the inhalation orifice of the mouthpiece and the end of the absorbent liquid retaining means proximate to the mouthpiece to permit the inhalation of relatively ineffective drug concentrations when said first opening is uncovered, retaining means positioned internally in the inhaler on the side of the first opening away from the mouthpiece to prevent the absorbent liquid-retaining means from obstructing the first opening or entering the mouthpiece, and a second opening positioned in the inhaler communicating with said longitudinal passageway to permit air inhaled through said second opening to pass through said longitudinal passageway and over substantially the entire surface of the absorbent liquid-retaining means when the first opening is covered.

2. The inhaler ofclaim 1 including a cap in the tubular body opposite the mouthpiece, said cap having the general configuration of a cup and providing the second opening, said cap comprising: a ring portion, the outside diameter of the ring corresponding to the inside diameter of the tubular body so that the cap may be inserted within the tubular body, a plate of lesser diameter than the ring affixed to the ring by a plurality ofbridges, the ring, plate and bridges defining a plurality of arcuate openings through which liquid drug can be charged into the inhaler and through which air can be inhaled to pass over substantially the entire surface of the absorbent liquid-retaining means prior to reaching the mouthpiece.

3. The inhaler of claim 2 which includes a continuous lip projecting internally from the oblong portion of the mouthpiece into the tubular body to prevent passage of liquid drug into the oblong portion.

4. The inhaler of claim 3 wherein the absorbent liquidrctaining means comprises a rolled wick.

Claims (4)

1. A self-limiting inhaler for analgesic purposes and adapted for self-administration of a volatile drug by a patient, the inhaler comprising a substantially tubular body, a mouthpiece projecting from one end of the body, said mouthpiece having an elongated oblong portion with an inhalation orifice adapted for insertion into a patient''s mouth, absorbent liquid-retaining means for storing the volatile drug positioned within the tubular body along the walls thereof to thereby define a longitudinal passageway through the absorbent material, a first opening which may be covered by the patient''s finger to provide effective vapor concentration and positioned in the inhaler between the inhalation orifice of the mouthpiece and the end of the absorbent liquid retaining means proximate to the mouthpiece to permit the inhalation of relatively ineffective drug concentrations when said first opening is uncovered, retaining means positioned internally in the inhaler on the side of the first opening away from the mouthpiece to prevent the absorbent liquid-retaining means from obstructing the first opening or entering the mouthpiece, and a second opening positioned in the inhaler communicating with said longitudinal passageway to permit air inhaled through said second opening to pass through said longitudinal passageway and over substantially the entire surface of the absorbEnt liquid-retaining means when the first opening is covered.
2. The inhaler of claim 1 including a cap in the tubular body opposite the mouthpiece, said cap having the general configuration of a cup and providing the second opening, said cap comprising: a ring portion, the outside diameter of the ring corresponding to the inside diameter of the tubular body so that the cap may be inserted within the tubular body, a plate of lesser diameter than the ring affixed to the ring by a plurality of bridges, the ring, plate and bridges defining a plurality of arcuate openings through which liquid drug can be charged into the inhaler and through which air can be inhaled to pass over substantially the entire surface of the absorbent liquid-retaining means prior to reaching the mouthpiece.
3. The inhaler of claim 2 which includes a continuous lip projecting internally from the oblong portion of the mouthpiece into the tubular body to prevent passage of liquid drug into the oblong portion.
4. The inhaler of claim 3 wherein the absorbent liquid-retaining means comprises a rolled wick.
US3565071A 1968-09-19 1968-09-19 Self-regulating therapeutic inhaler Expired - Lifetime US3565071A (en)

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Cited By (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3881482A (en) * 1972-11-06 1975-05-06 Octagon Med Prod Device for moistening and heating inhalation air with tracheotomy and endotracheal intubation
US3980074A (en) * 1973-07-18 1976-09-14 Beecham Group Limited Device for the administration of powders
US4184496A (en) * 1978-02-23 1980-01-22 Adair Virginia M Air moving simulated cigarette device
US4674494A (en) * 1985-05-10 1987-06-23 The Kendall Company Humidifying device
US5255674A (en) * 1990-09-28 1993-10-26 Forsvarets Forskningsinstitutt Portable heating and humidifying device
US5488947A (en) * 1994-08-30 1996-02-06 Frankel; Henry Sleep aid device
US5690101A (en) * 1995-07-14 1997-11-25 Kutta; Helmuth W. Portable air purifier with chemical reaction zone
US5810003A (en) * 1997-03-04 1998-09-22 Findlater; Barrington M. Infant decongester
US6293279B1 (en) 1997-09-26 2001-09-25 Trudell Medical International Aerosol medication delivery apparatus and system
US6345617B1 (en) 1997-09-26 2002-02-12 1263152 Ontario Inc. Aerosol medication delivery apparatus and system
US20080308102A1 (en) * 2005-12-12 2008-12-18 Glaxo Group Limited Manifold for Use in Medicament Dispenser
US20090314291A1 (en) * 2005-12-12 2009-12-24 Anderson Gregor John Mclennan Medicament dispenser
US20100000528A1 (en) * 2004-12-20 2010-01-07 Glaxo Group Limited Manifold for use in medicament dispenser
WO2010017586A1 (en) * 2008-08-11 2010-02-18 Silphion Pty Limited Inhaler with piercable vial and drug in liquid form
US20100037894A1 (en) * 2004-12-20 2010-02-18 Colin John Rouse Manifold for use in medicament dispenser
USRE43174E1 (en) 2000-04-11 2012-02-14 Trudell Medical International Aerosol delivery apparatus
US20120305009A1 (en) * 2011-06-04 2012-12-06 Morgan Christopher D Cigar shaped smoking device
US8495998B2 (en) 2009-06-17 2013-07-30 British American Tobacco (Investments) Limited Inhaler
US20140283855A1 (en) * 2013-03-22 2014-09-25 Altria Client Services Inc. Electronic smoking article
US20140360513A1 (en) * 2011-06-04 2014-12-11 Christopher D. Morgan Cigar shaped smoking device with reverse calabash chamber
WO2015066738A3 (en) * 2013-08-21 2015-07-09 Aiken Darren James A device for curbing addictive behaviour
WO2017011865A1 (en) * 2015-07-20 2017-01-26 Medical Developments International Limited Inhaler device for inhalable liquids
WO2017011866A1 (en) * 2015-07-20 2017-01-26 Medical Developments International Limited Inhaler device for inhalable liquids
US9700689B2 (en) 2002-05-21 2017-07-11 Trudell Medical International Medication delivery apparatus and system and methods for the use and assembly thereof

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
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US363067A (en) * 1887-05-17 Bush b
US1470124A (en) * 1921-04-30 1923-10-09 Stricker William Inhaler
US1974242A (en) * 1933-09-06 1934-09-18 Jr James L Jordan Device for medicating smoke
US2633131A (en) * 1949-03-03 1953-03-31 White John H Medicament inhaler
US2860638A (en) * 1956-02-21 1958-11-18 Bartolomeo Frank Smoking device

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US363067A (en) * 1887-05-17 Bush b
US1470124A (en) * 1921-04-30 1923-10-09 Stricker William Inhaler
US1974242A (en) * 1933-09-06 1934-09-18 Jr James L Jordan Device for medicating smoke
US2633131A (en) * 1949-03-03 1953-03-31 White John H Medicament inhaler
US2860638A (en) * 1956-02-21 1958-11-18 Bartolomeo Frank Smoking device

Cited By (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3881482A (en) * 1972-11-06 1975-05-06 Octagon Med Prod Device for moistening and heating inhalation air with tracheotomy and endotracheal intubation
US3980074A (en) * 1973-07-18 1976-09-14 Beecham Group Limited Device for the administration of powders
US4184496A (en) * 1978-02-23 1980-01-22 Adair Virginia M Air moving simulated cigarette device
US4674494A (en) * 1985-05-10 1987-06-23 The Kendall Company Humidifying device
US5255674A (en) * 1990-09-28 1993-10-26 Forsvarets Forskningsinstitutt Portable heating and humidifying device
US5488947A (en) * 1994-08-30 1996-02-06 Frankel; Henry Sleep aid device
US5690101A (en) * 1995-07-14 1997-11-25 Kutta; Helmuth W. Portable air purifier with chemical reaction zone
US5810003A (en) * 1997-03-04 1998-09-22 Findlater; Barrington M. Infant decongester
US6293279B1 (en) 1997-09-26 2001-09-25 Trudell Medical International Aerosol medication delivery apparatus and system
US6345617B1 (en) 1997-09-26 2002-02-12 1263152 Ontario Inc. Aerosol medication delivery apparatus and system
US6435177B1 (en) 1997-09-26 2002-08-20 Trudell Medical International Aerosol medication delivery apparatus and system
USRE45068E1 (en) 2000-04-11 2014-08-12 Trudell Medical International Aerosol delivery apparatus
USRE43174E1 (en) 2000-04-11 2012-02-14 Trudell Medical International Aerosol delivery apparatus
USRE46050E1 (en) 2000-04-11 2016-07-05 Trudell Medical International Aerosol delivery apparatus
US9700689B2 (en) 2002-05-21 2017-07-11 Trudell Medical International Medication delivery apparatus and system and methods for the use and assembly thereof
US9814849B2 (en) 2002-05-21 2017-11-14 Trudell Medical International Medication delivery apparatus and system and methods for the use and assembly thereof
US20100000528A1 (en) * 2004-12-20 2010-01-07 Glaxo Group Limited Manifold for use in medicament dispenser
US8590531B2 (en) 2004-12-20 2013-11-26 Glaxo Group Limited Manifold for use in medicament dispenser
US20100037894A1 (en) * 2004-12-20 2010-02-18 Colin John Rouse Manifold for use in medicament dispenser
US8534281B2 (en) 2005-12-12 2013-09-17 Glaxo Group Limited Manifold for use in medicament dispenser
US20090314291A1 (en) * 2005-12-12 2009-12-24 Anderson Gregor John Mclennan Medicament dispenser
US20080308102A1 (en) * 2005-12-12 2008-12-18 Glaxo Group Limited Manifold for Use in Medicament Dispenser
WO2010017586A1 (en) * 2008-08-11 2010-02-18 Silphion Pty Limited Inhaler with piercable vial and drug in liquid form
US8495998B2 (en) 2009-06-17 2013-07-30 British American Tobacco (Investments) Limited Inhaler
US20120305009A1 (en) * 2011-06-04 2012-12-06 Morgan Christopher D Cigar shaped smoking device
US9848638B2 (en) * 2011-06-04 2017-12-26 Christopher D. Morgan Cigar shaped smoking device with reverse calabash chamber
US20140360513A1 (en) * 2011-06-04 2014-12-11 Christopher D. Morgan Cigar shaped smoking device with reverse calabash chamber
US20140283855A1 (en) * 2013-03-22 2014-09-25 Altria Client Services Inc. Electronic smoking article
WO2015066738A3 (en) * 2013-08-21 2015-07-09 Aiken Darren James A device for curbing addictive behaviour
WO2017011865A1 (en) * 2015-07-20 2017-01-26 Medical Developments International Limited Inhaler device for inhalable liquids
WO2017011866A1 (en) * 2015-07-20 2017-01-26 Medical Developments International Limited Inhaler device for inhalable liquids

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DE1815796A1 (en) 1970-06-25 application
ES144790Y (en) 1970-02-01 grant
GB1237223A (en) 1971-06-30 application

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