US3563390A - Shoe rack cabinet - Google Patents

Shoe rack cabinet Download PDF

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US3563390A
US3563390A US3563390DA US3563390A US 3563390 A US3563390 A US 3563390A US 3563390D A US3563390D A US 3563390DA US 3563390 A US3563390 A US 3563390A
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shoe rack
shoe
means
rollers
set
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Expired - Lifetime
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David Kim
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David Kim
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47BTABLES; DESKS; OFFICE FURNITURE; CABINETS; DRAWERS; GENERAL DETAILS OF FURNITURE
    • A47B61/00Wardrobes
    • A47B61/04Wardrobes for shoes, hats, umbrellas, or the like

Abstract

A shoe rack cabinet for holding shoes in a generally vertical disposition consists of a cabinet within which are slidably mounted a plurality of shoe rack means. The latter means are adapted to be slid in and out of the cabinet to provide temporary storage and to facilitate ready access to the shoes on the shoe rack means. Suitable shoe holder elements are mounted on the shoe rack means to support shoes in a generally vertically disposed position. The shoe rack cabinet of the present invention is particularly adaptable for use at the entrances to homes to facilitate removal of shoes upon entering the home.

Description

United States Patent 1 3,563,390 [72] Inventor David Kim 1,546,276 7/1925 Woltz 211/945 82 Central Ave, Rye, N.Y. 2,326,064 8/1943 Pittman. 312/183 [2]] Appl. No. 867,665 2,606,666 8/1952 Gray 211/94.5X [22] Filed Oct. 20, 1969 2,866,559 12/1958 Byme 211/35 [45] Patented Feb. 16,1971 2,941,659 6/1960 Thrower 211/34X Primary Examiner Nile C. Byers, Jr. Attorney-Frank J. Jordan [54] ABSTRACT: A shoe rack cabinet for holding shoes in a gFlgs.

generally vertlcal dlsposltlon consists of a cabinet within U.S.

are mounted a plurality of shoe rack means Ann/o8 The latter means are adapted to be slid in and out of the (Search t u 34, cabinet to provide temporary torage and to facilitate ready 5 3 3 3 access to the shoes on the shoe rack means. Suitable shoe holder elements are mounted on the shoe rack means to sup- [561 References Cmd port shoes in a generally vertically disposed position. The shoe UNITED STATES PATENTS rack cabinet of the present invention is particularly adaptable 736,003 8/1903 Orrick 21 1/34X for use at the entrances to homes to facilitate removal of shoes 1,404,270 l/l922 Carr 211/34 upon entering the home.

2 Sheets-Sheet 2 m m' m m Lbs Fig. 3.

ENVENTOR.

David Kim an 4; WW

ATTORNEY SHOE RACK CABINET BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Virtually all oriental houses, hotels, churches, temples and restaurants provide for storing families and guests shoes at the entrances since it is an oriental custom to remove shoes before entering such buildings. Removing shoes at the entrance of such buildings has merit from the standpoint of sanitation since it is one way to separate the living rooms from the streets. Removing ones shoes also enhances relaxation. The custom of removing shoes at entrances to homes in the orient begun upon the advent of shoes and it will probably continue as long as the streets are not as clean as the living rooms. Since the end of World War II there has been a great influx of Westerners to the orient. As a result, this custom of removing shoes before entering a living room has widely been introduced to the West and practiced. Since there are no convenient facilities for people to remove shoes at the entrances of Western houses, the impracticality of doing so outweighs the persons desire to remove shoes. Thus, there exists a need for a shoe removing facility at an entrance of Western houses.

Accordingly, an object of this invention is to provide a cabinet for temporarily storing shoes but which is also provided with slidable shoe racks which may be easily pulled out of the cabinet to facilitate ready access to all of the shoes disposed on the shoe rack.

Another object is to provide a slidable support for a shoe rack which will adapt the latter to be pulled out of the cabinet to the extent of exposing all of the shoe-holder elements but which may be pushed back into the cabinet whereby doors on the latter may be closed and the cabinet will appear as a decorative item of furniture.

Additional objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent during the course of the following specification when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS DETAILED DESCRIPTIGN Before explaining this invention in detail, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of construction and arrangement of parts illustrated in the accompanying drawings, since the invention is capable of being practiced or carried out in various ways. Also it is to be understood that the phraseology or terminology employed is for the purpose of description and not of limitation.

Referring to the drawings, FIG. lshows a shoe rack cabinet constructed according to one embodiment of the invention. The shoe rack cabinet 10 is generally rectangular and has sidewalls 12, 14, a top wall 16, bottom wall 18, and two doors 20, 22 suitably hinged at 21 and 23 (FIG. 2) to the sidewalls l2 and 14 respectively.

Included in the cabinet 10 are a' pair of shoe racks 24, 26. Although only two such racks are shown in the drawings, any number of racks may be provided as desired. Each rack 24 and 26 is slidably mounted in the cabinet whereby such racks may be moved in and out of the cabinet 10. The racks 24 and 26 are identical and accordingly, only the rack 26 will be described in detail.

The rack 26 consists of a pair of spaced side supports 28 between which are mounted a plurality of spaced rods 32.

Although only three rods 32 are shown in the drawings, it will be understood that any number of rods may be provided as desired. Each rod 32 has suitably affixed thereto a plurality of spaced shoe-holder elements 34 which may have a configuration in the form of an inverted U wherein each leg of the U has a right angle bend adjacent the end. The right angle bends result in two relatively short extensions 36, 38 which are generally perpendicular to the general plane of the U. The ter' minal ends of the extensions 36, 38 are suitably secured to the rod 32 in the manner shown in the drawings so that the main part of each shoe-holder element 34 will be generally disposed in a vertical plane spaced from a vertical plane in which the associated rod 32 is contained. Accordingly, a shoe may be readily placed on the shoe'holder element 34 wit with the latter fitting into the main body of the shoe as the heel portion is disposed below the general level of the rod 32. The shoe holder element 34 may be tapered slightly, that is the two legs of the U may converge towards the connecting bridge of the U, to facilitate placement and removal of a shoe from the shoe holder element 34.

Each of the side supports 28 is adapted to be mounted for rolling movement relative to the sides of the cabinet. To this end, the sidewall 12 of the cabinet has four spaced rollers 40, 41, 42, 43 each suitably mounted on short stub shafts secured to the inside of the cabinet wall 12. Mounted for slidable movement between the spaced rollers 40, 41 and 42, 43 is a slide member 46. The latter may have longitudinal edges which are circular in cross section in order to be accommodated in the concave surfaces about the periphery of the rollers 40-43. It will be apparent, therefore, that the slide member 46 will be supported on the rollers 40-43 as the slide element 46 is slid in or out of the cabinet 10.

The slide element 46 has a pair of spaced longitudinal openings 48, 50 each of which is adapted to receive a roller 52, 54 suitably mounted on the side of the previously described side support 28. The rollers 52, 54 are rotatable about horizontal axes and may be supported by suitable short stub shafts projecting from the side of the side support 28. The rollers 52, 54 each have a concave surface about the periphery thereof whereby the smallest diameter of the rollers 52, 54 is just slightly less than the width or height of the openings 48, 50 and the largest diameter of the rollers 5.2, 54 is larger than the width of the openings 48, 50. Accordingly, the rollers 52, 54 will roll in said openings on the edges of the latter without falling out. The longitudinal edges of the openings may be circular in cross section. One end portion of each opening 48, 50 may be slightly enlarged to facilitate assembly of the rollers 52, 54 in the respective opening 48, 50.

From the above description it will be seenthat the rollers 40-43 support side support 28 and the latter in turn support the rollers 52, 54 mounted on the shoe rack 26. Accordingly, the shoe rack may be slid out to the position shown in FIG. 4 wherein the slide members 46 have slid out relative to the cabinet sidewalls 12, 14 and the side supports 28 have slid out relative to the cabinet sidewalls l2, l4 and also relative to the slide members 46. It will be apparent, therefore, that the shoe rack 26 may be pulled practically all the way out of the cabinet to facilitate full utilization while still having adequate cantilever support when it is in its full pulled out disposition as shown in FIG. 4.

Although only one shoe rack slide support assembly has been described, it will be understood that both sides of each shoe rack 24,25 are supported in the same manner.

As may be desired, additional shoe-holding means may be I provided on the insides of the doors 20, 22. Such means may comprise suitable tapered pockets 56 made of a flexible material, for example plastic or fabric. The pockets 56 are adapted to receive vertically disposed shoes and therefore are open at the top and bottom. A brush 53, shoehorn 60, and other implements (not shown) may also be mounted on the cabinet doors or in the cabinet.- A shoe rest 62 may be included on the front of the cabinet to assist people who may desire to brush or polish their shoes. The shoe rest 62 may be movably or detachably mounted to dispose it out of sight when not in use. For example, it may be mounted on a pivot support 64 so that it can be pivoted to a position completely disposed out of sight underneath the bottom wall 18 of the cabinet when not in use.

While preferred embodiments of the invention have been shown and described, it will be obvious that numerous omissions, changes and additions may be made in such embodiments without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. A shoe rack cabinet for holding shoes in a generally vertical disposition comprising enclosure means having a pair of vertically disposed sidewalls, a plurality of shoe rack means in said enclosure, operable means for sliding said shoe rack means on the sidewalls of said enclosure means between closed and extended positions, said shoe rack means having a plurality of shoe-holder elements for holding shoes, said shoeholder elements being mounted between a pair of shoe rack side supports, said operable means comprising roller means mounting said side supports on said cabinet sidewalls for sliding movement between said closed and extended positions.

2. A shoe rack cabinet according to claim 1 wherein said operable means comprises a slide member, said roller means comprising a first set of rollers slidably supporting said slide member on said cabinet sidewalls and a second set of rollers slidably supporting said shoe rack side supports on said slide member, thereby adapting said shoe rack means to be pulled out to its fully extended position to facilitate ready access to all of said shoe-holder elements on said shoe rack means while still maintaining firm support for the extended shoe rack means.

3. A shoe rack cabinet according to claim 2 wherein said first set of rollers each have a concave surface about the periphery thereof.

4. A shoe rack cabinet according to claim 3 wherein said slide member has longitudinal edges having at least a partial circular cross section, said longitudinal edges being engaged within the depression of the concave surfaces of said first set of rollers.

5. A shoe rack cabinet according to claim 2 wherein said second set of rollers are mounted on said shoe rack side supports, said slide member having a pair of longitudinally extended openings in each of which a roller of said second set of rollers is accommodated.

6. A shoe rack cabinet according to claim 5 wherein said second set of rollers each have a concave surface about the periphery thereof, said longitudinally extended openings in said slide member having a transverse width greater than the smallest diameter of said second set of rollers but less than the larger diameter of said second set of rollers.

7. A shoe rack cabinet according to claim 6 wherein the longitudinal edges of said openings in said slide member have at least a partial circular cross section, said last-mentioned longitudinal edges being engaged within the depressions of the concave surfaces of said second set of rollers.

8. A shoe rack cabinet according to claim 1 wherein said shoe rack means comprises elongated rods to which said shoeholder elements are secured, each of said latter elements being generally in the form of an inverted U, each leg of said U having a right angle bend defining short extensions generally perpendicular to the general plane of the U, the terminal ends of said extensions being secured to said rod whereby each shoe rack element is disposed in a generally vertical plane spaced from a vertical plane in which the associated rod is contained.

9. A shoe rack cabinet according to claim 9 wherein the U of said shoe rack elements converge as the connecting bridge of the U is approached.

10. A shoe rack cabinet according to claim 1 further comprising a foot rest device on said cabinet, and means for moving said foot rest device to dispose it out of sight.

Claims (10)

1. A shoe rack cabinet for holding shoes in a generally vertical disposition comprising enclosure means having a pair of vertically disposed sidewalls, a plurality of shoe rack means in said enclosure, operable means for sliding said shoe rack means on the sidewalls of said enclosure means between closed and extended positions, said shoe rack means having a plurality of shoe-holder elements for holding shoes, said shoe-holder elements being mounted between a pair of shoe rack side supports, said operable means comprising roller means mounting said side supports on said cabinet sidewalls for sliding movement between said closed and extended positions.
2. A shoe rack cabinet according to claim 1 wherein said operable means comprises a slide member, said roller means comprising a first set of rollers slidably supporting said slide member on said cabinet sidewalls and a second set of rollers slidably supporting said shoe rack side supports on said slide member, thereby adapting said shoe rack means to be pulled out to its fully extended position to facilitate ready access to all of said shoe-holder elements on said shoe rack means while still maintaining firm support for the extended shoe rack means.
3. A shoe rack cabinet according to claim 2 wherein said first set of rollers each have a concave surface about the periphery thereof.
4. A shoe rack cabinet according to claim 3 wherein said slide member has longitudinal edges having at least a partial circular cross section, said longitudinal edges being engaged within the depression of the concave surfaces of said first set of rollers.
5. A shoe rack cabinet according to claim 2 wherein said second set of rollers are mounted on said shoe rack side supports, said slide member having a pair of longitudinally extended openings in each of which a roller of said second set of rollers is accommodated.
6. A shoe rack cabinet according to claim 5 wherein said second set of rollers each have a concave surface about the periphery thereof, said longitudinally extended openings in said slide member having a transverse width greater than the smallest diameter of said second set of rollers but less than the larger diameter of said second set of rollers.
7. A shOe rack cabinet according to claim 6 wherein the longitudinal edges of said openings in said slide member have at least a partial circular cross section, said last-mentioned longitudinal edges being engaged within the depressions of the concave surfaces of said second set of rollers.
8. A shoe rack cabinet according to claim 1 wherein said shoe rack means comprises elongated rods to which said shoe-holder elements are secured, each of said latter elements being generally in the form of an inverted U, each leg of said U having a right angle bend defining short extensions generally perpendicular to the general plane of the U, the terminal ends of said extensions being secured to said rod whereby each shoe rack element is disposed in a generally vertical plane spaced from a vertical plane in which the associated rod is contained.
9. A shoe rack cabinet according to claim 9 wherein the U of said shoe rack elements converge as the connecting bridge of the U is approached.
10. A shoe rack cabinet according to claim 1 further comprising a foot rest device on said cabinet, and means for moving said foot rest device to dispose it out of sight.
US3563390D 1969-10-20 1969-10-20 Shoe rack cabinet Expired - Lifetime US3563390A (en)

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Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4485928A (en) * 1982-02-26 1984-12-04 Staashelm Henry E Article storage rack
US4699267A (en) * 1986-11-28 1987-10-13 Burke James A Portable shoe rack for travelers
US5076442A (en) * 1991-03-07 1991-12-31 Carol Hakeem Shoe organizational system for closets
US5911347A (en) * 1997-09-26 1999-06-15 Footstar, Inc. Double circle shoe hanger
US5931314A (en) * 1997-09-26 1999-08-03 Footstar Corporation Claw shoe hanger
US5960965A (en) * 1996-11-12 1999-10-05 Saunders; Todd R. Product display system
US20090008345A1 (en) * 2006-12-07 2009-01-08 Azad Sabounjian Shoe rack
US20090039747A1 (en) * 2007-08-10 2009-02-12 Webster Ii James L Footwear storage device
US20090184612A1 (en) * 2008-01-18 2009-07-23 Mcclure J William Double bench with cabinet
US20090278010A1 (en) * 2008-05-09 2009-11-12 Cotter Donna M Closet carrousel
US8540326B2 (en) 2011-06-16 2013-09-24 Joan M. Moszer Stackable footwear storage cabinet
US9004299B2 (en) 2011-03-21 2015-04-14 William R. Hardin Storage rack
US20150189964A1 (en) * 2010-11-11 2015-07-09 Yvonne Dnise Gutierrez Luggage Organizer

Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US736003A (en) * 1903-03-24 1903-08-11 Virginia P Orrick Shoe-cabinet.
US1404270A (en) * 1921-03-05 1922-01-24 Carr Ldd Display rack
US1546276A (en) * 1921-02-17 1925-07-14 M L Himmel & Son Company Inc Display rack
US2326064A (en) * 1941-04-16 1943-08-03 Walter V Pittman Rotary wardrobe
US2606666A (en) * 1950-01-17 1952-08-12 Gray George Cup rack
US2866559A (en) * 1955-06-23 1958-12-30 Byrne Irma Adjustable rack
US2941659A (en) * 1958-12-09 1960-06-21 Frank J Thrower Furniture for storing shoes and the like

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US736003A (en) * 1903-03-24 1903-08-11 Virginia P Orrick Shoe-cabinet.
US1546276A (en) * 1921-02-17 1925-07-14 M L Himmel & Son Company Inc Display rack
US1404270A (en) * 1921-03-05 1922-01-24 Carr Ldd Display rack
US2326064A (en) * 1941-04-16 1943-08-03 Walter V Pittman Rotary wardrobe
US2606666A (en) * 1950-01-17 1952-08-12 Gray George Cup rack
US2866559A (en) * 1955-06-23 1958-12-30 Byrne Irma Adjustable rack
US2941659A (en) * 1958-12-09 1960-06-21 Frank J Thrower Furniture for storing shoes and the like

Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4485928A (en) * 1982-02-26 1984-12-04 Staashelm Henry E Article storage rack
US4699267A (en) * 1986-11-28 1987-10-13 Burke James A Portable shoe rack for travelers
US5076442A (en) * 1991-03-07 1991-12-31 Carol Hakeem Shoe organizational system for closets
US5960965A (en) * 1996-11-12 1999-10-05 Saunders; Todd R. Product display system
US5911347A (en) * 1997-09-26 1999-06-15 Footstar, Inc. Double circle shoe hanger
US5931314A (en) * 1997-09-26 1999-08-03 Footstar Corporation Claw shoe hanger
US20090008345A1 (en) * 2006-12-07 2009-01-08 Azad Sabounjian Shoe rack
US20090039747A1 (en) * 2007-08-10 2009-02-12 Webster Ii James L Footwear storage device
US8562083B2 (en) 2008-01-18 2013-10-22 J. William McClure Double bench with cabinet
US20090184612A1 (en) * 2008-01-18 2009-07-23 Mcclure J William Double bench with cabinet
US7946543B2 (en) * 2008-05-09 2011-05-24 Donna M Cotter Closet carrousel
US20090278010A1 (en) * 2008-05-09 2009-11-12 Cotter Donna M Closet carrousel
US20150189964A1 (en) * 2010-11-11 2015-07-09 Yvonne Dnise Gutierrez Luggage Organizer
US9770083B2 (en) * 2010-11-11 2017-09-26 Yvonne Dnise Gutierrez Shoe traveler
US9004299B2 (en) 2011-03-21 2015-04-14 William R. Hardin Storage rack
US9427081B1 (en) 2011-03-21 2016-08-30 William R. Hardin Storage rack
US8540326B2 (en) 2011-06-16 2013-09-24 Joan M. Moszer Stackable footwear storage cabinet

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