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Flushable sanitary napkin

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US3561447A
US3561447A US3561447DA US3561447A US 3561447 A US3561447 A US 3561447A US 3561447D A US3561447D A US 3561447DA US 3561447 A US3561447 A US 3561447A
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fibers
percent
water
fabric
cover
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Robert R Alexander
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Fiber Technology Corp
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Kendall Co
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L15/00Chemical aspects of, or use of materials for, bandages, dressings or absorbent pads
    • A61L15/16Bandages, dressings or absorbent pads for physiological fluids such as urine or blood, e.g. sanitary towels, tampons
    • A61L15/42Use of materials characterised by their function or physical properties
    • A61L15/62Compostable, hydrosoluble or hydrodegradable materials
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F13/00Bandages or dressings; Absorbent pads
    • A61F13/15Absorbent pads, e.g. sanitary towels, swabs or tampons for external or internal application to the body; Supporting or fastening means therefor; Tampon applicators
    • A61F13/15203Properties of the article, e.g. stiffness or absorbency
    • A61F13/15211Properties of the article, e.g. stiffness or absorbency soluble or disintegratable in liquid
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L15/00Chemical aspects of, or use of materials for, bandages, dressings or absorbent pads
    • A61L15/16Bandages, dressings or absorbent pads for physiological fluids such as urine or blood, e.g. sanitary towels, tampons
    • A61L15/22Bandages, dressings or absorbent pads for physiological fluids such as urine or blood, e.g. sanitary towels, tampons containing macromolecular materials
    • A61L15/225Mixtures of macromolecular compounds
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/608Including strand or fiber material which is of specific structural definition

Abstract

A bonded nonwoven fabric suitable for use as a flushable cover for a disposable diaper or a sanitary napkin is produced by bonding a thin web of textile-length fibers with a fugitive binder comprising a mixture of a soft acrylic binder and a polyvinyl alcohol. Such a fabric has sufficient tensile strength to function usefully as a cover whether dry or damp, but then, after use, may be readily disposed of by flushing since it disintegrates into a thin fibrous slurry when agitated in water.

Description

United States Patent lnventor Robert R. Alexander Sudbury, Mass.

Appl. No. 807,055

Filed Mar. 13,1969

Patented Feb. 9, 1971 Assignee The Kendall Company Boston, Mass.

a corporation of Massachusetts FLUSHABLE SANITARY NAPKIN 7 Claims, 1 Drawing Fig.

US. Cl 128/290, 117/140; 156/328; 161/146 lnt.Cl A6lf 13/16 Field of Search 117/140,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,081,197 3/1963 Adelman 117/140 3,106,207 10/1963 Dudley Y 128/290 3,370,590 2/ 1968 Hokanson et al. 128/284UX 3,371,666 3/1968 Lewing 128/296 3,480,016 1 H1969 Constanza et 128/284 Primary Examiner-Charles F. Rosenbaum Attorney-John F. Ryan ABSTRACT: A bonded nonwoven fabric suitable for use as a flushable cover for a disposable diaper or a sanitary napkin is produced by bonding a thin web of textile-length fibers with a fugitive binder comprising a mixture of a soft acrylic binder and a polyvinyl alcohol. Such a fabric has sufficient tensile strength to function usefully as a cover whether dry or damp, but then, after use, may be readily disposed of by flushing since it disintegrates into a thin fibrous slurry when agitated in water.

PATENTEU man man FLUSHABLE SANITARY NAPKIN *The present'invention relates to nonwoven fabrics in which textile-length fibers'are bonded by abinding agent whose adherence to the fibers imparts to the fabric a substantial degree of fabric strength when dry. or damp, but which allows the disposable diapers, sanitary napkins, incontinent pads, surgical dressings, and the like, has created a disposal problem. Especially when such products are soiled or stained from usage, incineration is a cumbersome and offensive expedient. Recourse is frequently had to flushing the nonwoven covers in a water closet, but this introduces the hazard of clogged plumbing. Moreover, most bonded nonwoven fabrics are only slowly attacked by bacterial decomposition in a cesspool, septic tank, or sewerage system. Decomposition by bacterial attach is much more rapid if the fibers comprising the fabric are more or less individually separated from each other.

It is with improvements in the art of producing what will be termed herein flushable nonwoven fabrics that the present invention is concerned. Byflushable is meant not simply that the fabric can be bodily deposited in and flushed through a water closet, but that soaking the fabric in an excess of water, with even mild agitation, will cause the cover to release the bonding and so disintegrate into its component fibers. The use of such a cover as a wrapper around an absorbent core of unbonded flushable fibers results in an article which can be totally disposed of in a water closet with minimal danger of clogging the plumbing.

It is the primary object of this invention to provide a soft, conformable,and flushable nonwoven fabric for such use.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a nonwoven fabric which whether dry or damp has sufficient strength and toughness to serve as a covering for a diaper or sanitary napkin, but which when agitated in an excess of water by reason of its fugitive, bonding will disintegrate into a suspension of unbonded fibers.

lt is another object of the invention to provide a sanitary napkin which disintegrates completely into a fibrous slurry when agitated in water.

Other objects of the invention will appear from the following description thereof and the drawing, in which:

The FIGURE is a perspective view, partially cut away, of a sanitary napkin of this invention.

ln the FIGURE there is shown a sanitary napkin l comprising an absorbent core 12 and an external nonwoven covering 14 in intimate contact with said core. The shape and thickness, as well as the composition of the core, are conventional, as are the degree of overlap of the covering nonwoven fabric, and the method of sealing or securing the overlap if such an operation is desired.

Advantage is taken in this invention that a polymeric bonding agent such a polyvinylalcohol is known to swell strongly and eventually dissolve in water at room temperature. Polyvinyl alcohol is prepared by the saponification of polyvinyl acetate, and is considered to be principally a polymerized 1-3 glycol, (-CH,CHOH-CH,-CHOH),,. The saponification of the polyvinyl acetate is not complete, but in the polyvinyl alcohols of commerce, between 76 percent and 98 percent of the acetyl groups are replaced by hydroxyl groups. Polyvinyl alcohols saponified to between 76 percent and 98 percent are generally soluble in cold water.

The fact that the polyvinyl alcohol is too soluble in water renders it unsuitable for use alone as a binder for a nonwoven napkin or diaper cover, since it loses its bonding power rather readily when merely damp, and the fabric becomes incapable of retaining and enclosing the absorbent filler element. For example, a carded fleece of textile-length rayon fibers, bonded with polyvinyl alcohol alone, has adequate dry strength but has no measurable strength in either the machine or cross direction when damp.

By damp is not meant that the nonwoven cover is completely saturated and dripping wet, since it rarely if ever reaches that condition in actual use, being in intimate contact with a large mass of other absorbent material. Damp strength is therefore measured by wetting a nonwoven fabric with excess water and then quickly blotting it between absorbent paper towels or blotting paper until it has substantially ceased to transmit water to the blotting medium. The moisture content of the fabric will be found to be somewhere between percent and percent of the fabric weight when it is in the damp condition.

There are many methods available for cross-linking polyvinyl alcohol to insolubilize it, including reacting the alcohol with formaldehyde, phenol-formaldehyde, or melamine-formaldehyde, or cross-linking with metallic salts such as those of chromium, iron, copper, titanium, aluminum, and others. Unfortunately, they are not useful in the process of this invention. since the insolubilization is irreversible, and the cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol binder would remain water insoluble. Furthermore, the cross-linking reaction embrittles the binder and renders it stiff and harsh.

in contrast to the behavior of polyvinyl alcohol, aqueous dispersions of acrylic resins are used as bonding agents for nonwoven fabrics where wet strength is a desirable property of the fabric. Such binders are typified by the polymerized or copolymerized esters of acrylic and methacrylic acids wherein the ester group contains up to eight carbon atoms; acrylonitrile; and mixtures and modifications thereof. Such binders may be selected to yield soft, conformable nonwoven fabrics, but unfortunately their high wet strength renders the fabrics nonflushable: that is, nonwoven fabrics prepared from acrylic binders remain bonded when agitated in water, and do not disintegrate into a suspension of individual fibers or clumps of fibers.

. It has not been found that if a soft acrylic polymeric bonding agent and a portion of water-soluble polyvinyl alcohol are deposited together and substantially uniformly on a web of unspun and unwoven textile-length fibers and dried thereon, the

resulting product has sufficient strength when damp to serve as a cover for a disposable diaper or a sanitary napkin, but will disintegrate into individual fibers or clumps of fibers when gently agitated in an excess of water.

binder formulation comprising between 35 percent and 65 percent of a soft acrylic polymer and between 65 percent and 35 percent polyvinyl alcohol, used to bond a lightweight web of textile-length fibers, will yield a napkin or diaper cover which when damp (80 percent-B0 percent water content) will have a tensile strength of at least 0L3 pounds per inch-wide strip, but which will disintegrate into a thin slurry of small clumps of fibers within 20 seconds when mildly agitated in excess water. By contrast, the use of polyvinyl alcohol alone results in nonwoven fabrics with no measurable damp tensile strength, and the use of acrylics alone results in products which do not disintegrate in water and are therefore not flushable.

As a starting base material for the fabrics of this invention there may be used carded, garnetted, or air-laid webs of cotton, rayon, acetate, nylon, polyester, or others of the wellknown textile fibers of such length that they may be dry-assembled into a fleece or web, in distinction to the web processing of shorter papermaking fibers. For reasons of hydrophilicity, ease of separation when agitated in water, and cost, viscose rayon fibers are the material of choice. It has been found that rayon fibers of about 1 inch in staple length will yield, on disintegration, a thinner slurry than longer rayon fibers, 1.5 inches or more: about 1 inch staple length is therefore preferred. For diaper or napkin covers, a weight range of 10 to 20 grams per square yard is suitable.

Polyvinyl alcohol tends to form a film which is rather stiff and brittle, and its nature is not substantially changed by the presence of an acrylic binder. To enhance the softness of products designed for use as napkin covers, therefore, it is preferred that the polyvinyl alcohol be plasticized by, for example, a glycol such as glycerine, ethylene glycol, diethylene glycol, or other recommended glycol plasticizers for polyvinyl alcohol. The softness and esthetic appeal of the products of this invention preferable may be further enhanced by distributing the binder not uniformly throughout the web, but in a set of discrete and spaced-apart lines extending transversely across the web, in the manner known in the art as line bonding. Alternatively, the cover may be bonded by so-called spot bonding, by a set of broken transverse or oblique lines; by an overall diamond of lozenge print pattern; or by any of the other well-known and widely practiced patterns of discontinuous bonding. in this connection, therefore, it is understood that when reference is made to the binder being distributed substantially uniformly on the web, it is not meant that the whole extent of the web must be bonded, but that the binder is substantially uniform in composition in those areas where it is applied.

The invention will be illustrated by the following preferred example.

A carded web of 1.5 denier viscose rayon fibers, 1 inch long,

wrighing 12.6 grams per square yard, was bonded with an aqueous binder mixture consisting of:

Cellosize isa Union Carbide trademark for hydroxyl ethyl cellulose, and was used to thicken the binder mixture: Vinol is an Air-Reduction trademarked brand of polyvinyl alcohol: Triton is a trademarked wetting agent from Rohm and Haas; Poly M B225 is an acrylic ester-acrylonitrile polymer from Polymerics lnc.: Antiform AF is a Dow silicone antifoam.

Bonding was effected by printing the viscous binder onto the web by means of a print roll engraved with a series of shallow transverse grooves, one thirty-second inch wide, spaced 8 to the inch. Due to the aqueous nature of the binder mixture and the hydrophilicity of the rayon fibers, there is a certain amount of capillary spread in the width of the line of bonding agent, but for maximum enhancement of softness, it is preferred that at least 50 percent of the total area of the product should be substantially free of bonding agent.

The weight of the nonwoven fabric thus produced was 14.1 grams per square yard, indicating about 12 percent binder pickup. It has a machine direction tensile strength of 4.0 pounds when dampened to 130 percent water content. When gently agitated in water, a 4 inch square of the material was observed to disintegrate into a fibrous slurry or suspension in 18 seconds.

The products of this invention, though flushable, are marked by satisfactory resistance to damp abrasion, as well as by sufficient damp strength to serve satisfactorily as a cover for a disposable diaper or sanitary napkin. Such products combine an inner core of absorbent material, usually of inexpensive bulk material such as fluffed wood pulp, cellulose wadding, or the like, with a nonwoven cover wrapped or folded thereabout, said cover frequently being heat-sealed to itself to prevent displacement. In such structures, the absorbent core has many times the absorbent capacity of the cover, and performs the primary absorbing function. In this manner, a covering material in contact with such an absorbent core is generally found in a damp, rather than in a saturated, state.

Since the contents of the absorbent core are generally flushable, in that they disintegrate into a fibrous slurry in water, the use of the cover of this invention in such a structure leads to a sanitary napkin in which both cover and core are flushable, instead of different disposable techniques being required as in conventional.

claim:

1. A nonwoven fabric suitable for use as a covering for a disposable diaper or sanitary napkin:

having sufficient strength when damp to maintain its integri ty as a fabric; L

but capable of disintegrating into substantially individual nonunified fibers when gently agitated with an excess of water;

which comprises a web of textile-length fibers unified by a bonding medium which comprises between 35 percent and 65 percent of asoft acrylic polymeric binder; and between 65 percent and 35 percent of polyvinyl alcohol.

2. The product according to claim 1 in which the polyvinyl alcohol is plasticized by a water-soluble aliphatic glycol.

3. The product according to claim 1 in which the bonding agent is applied in the form of discrete, spaced-apart areas extending transversely across the fibrous web.

4. The product according to claim 3 in which the areas of bonding agent cover not more than 50 percent of the surface area of the fabric.

5. The product according to claim 1 in which the textilelength fibers are predominately of the order of approximately 1 inch in length.

6. The product according to claim I in which the soft acrylic bonding agent is a polymer copolymer of acrylonitrile and an acrylic ester of no more than eight carbon atoms in the ester group.

7. A wholly-flushable sanitary napkin comprising a flushable absorbent core and a nonwoven cover in intimate contact therewith:

said cover having sufficient strength when damp to maintain its integrity as a fabric and to contain the contents of the absorbent core;

but capable of disintegrating into substantially individual nonunified fibers when gently agitated with an excess of water;

said cover comprising a web of textile-length fibers unified by a bonding medium which comprises between 35 percent and 65 percent of a soft acrylic polymeric binder; and between 65 percent and 35 percent of polyvinyl alcohol.

Claims (7)

1. A nonwoven fabric suitable for use as a covering for a disposable diaper or sanitary napkin: having sufficient strength when damp to maintain its integrity as a fabric; but capable of disintegrating into substantially individual nonunified fibers when gently agitated with an excess of water; which comprises a web of textile-length fibers unified by a bonding medium which comprises between 35 percent and 65 percent of a soft acrylic polymeric binder; and between 65 percent and 35 percent of polyvinyl alcohol.
2. The product according to claim 1 in which the polyvinyl alcohol is plasticized by a water-soluble aliphatic glycol.
3. The product according to claim 1 in which the bonding agent is applied in the form of discrete, spaced-apart areas extending transversely across the fibrous web.
4. The product according to claim 3 in which the areas of bonding agent cover not more than 50 percent of the surface area of the fabric.
5. The product according to claim 1 in which the textile-length fibers are predominately of the order of approximately 1 inch in length.
6. The product according to claim 1 in which the soft acrylic bonding agent is a polymer copolymer of acrylonitrile and an acrylic ester of no more than eight carbon atoms in the ester group.
7. A wholly-flushable sanitary napkin comprising a flushable absorbent core and a nonwoven cover in intimate contact therewith: said cover having sufficient strength when damp to maintain its integrity as a fabric and to contain the contents of the absorbent core; but capable of disintegrating into substantially individual nonunified fibers when gently agitated with an excess of water; said cover comprising a web of textile-length fibers unified by a bonding medium which comprises between 35 percent and 65 percent of a soft acrylic polymeric binder; and between 65 percent and 35 percent of polyvinyl alcohol.
US3561447A 1969-03-13 1969-03-13 Flushable sanitary napkin Expired - Lifetime US3561447A (en)

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Cited By (46)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3654928A (en) * 1970-02-24 1972-04-11 Kimberly Clark Co Flushable wrapper for absorbent pads
US4063995A (en) * 1975-10-28 1977-12-20 Scott Paper Company Fibrous webs with improved bonder and creping adhesive
US4117187A (en) * 1976-12-29 1978-09-26 American Can Company Premoistened flushable wiper
DK152563B (en) * 1978-04-28 1988-03-21 James River Norwalk Inc Premoisturized, flushable aftoerringsserviet and procedure for their manufacture
US4762738A (en) * 1986-12-22 1988-08-09 E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc. Means for disposal of articles by flushing and ostomy pouches particularly suited for such disposal
US4830187A (en) * 1986-12-22 1989-05-16 E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc. Means for disposal of articles by flushing and ostomy pouches particularly suited for such disposal
US4930942A (en) * 1986-12-22 1990-06-05 E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc. Method of disposal of articles by flushing
US5041104A (en) * 1987-07-27 1991-08-20 Bonar Carelle Limited Nonwoven materials
US5397625A (en) * 1990-12-20 1995-03-14 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Duo-functional nonwoven material
US5405342A (en) * 1991-12-31 1995-04-11 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Disposable absorbent article with flushable insert
US5578344A (en) * 1995-11-22 1996-11-26 The Procter & Gable Company Process for producing a liquid impermeable and flushable web
US5658268A (en) * 1995-10-31 1997-08-19 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Enhanced wet signal response in absorbent articles
US5684068A (en) * 1995-07-31 1997-11-04 International Cellulose Corp. Spray-on insulation
US5702377A (en) * 1994-09-01 1997-12-30 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Wet liner for child toilet training aid
US5722966A (en) * 1995-11-22 1998-03-03 The Procter & Gamble Company Water dispersible and flushable absorbent article
US5763044A (en) * 1995-11-22 1998-06-09 The Procter & Gamble Company Fluid pervious, dispersible, and flushable webs having improved functional surface
US5885265A (en) * 1995-11-22 1999-03-23 The Procter & Gamble Company Water dispersible and flushable interlabial absorbent structure
US6251476B1 (en) 2000-03-27 2001-06-26 International Cellulose Corp. Methods for spray-on insulation for walls and floor
US6384297B1 (en) 1999-04-03 2002-05-07 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Water dispersible pantiliner
US6429261B1 (en) 2000-05-04 2002-08-06 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Ion-sensitive, water-dispersible polymers, a method of making same and items using same
US6433245B1 (en) 1997-11-25 2002-08-13 The Procter & Gamble Company Flushable fibrous structures
US6444214B1 (en) 2000-05-04 2002-09-03 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Ion-sensitive, water-dispersible polymers, a method of making same and items using same
US20020155281A1 (en) * 2000-05-04 2002-10-24 Lang Frederick J. Pre-moistened wipe product
US20020193774A1 (en) * 1996-09-30 2002-12-19 Toshifumi Otsubo Disposable diaper
US6514602B1 (en) 2000-03-07 2003-02-04 The Procter & Gamble Company Water-flushable and biodegradable film useful as backsheets for disposable absorbent articles
US6548592B1 (en) 2000-05-04 2003-04-15 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Ion-sensitive, water-dispersible polymers, a method of making same and items using same
US6579570B1 (en) 2000-05-04 2003-06-17 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Ion-sensitive, water-dispersible polymers, a method of making same and items using same
US6586529B2 (en) 2001-02-01 2003-07-01 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Water-dispersible polymers, a method of making same and items using same
US6599848B1 (en) 2000-05-04 2003-07-29 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Ion-sensitive, water-dispersible polymers, a method of making same and items using same
US6630558B2 (en) 1998-12-31 2003-10-07 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Ion-sensitive hard water dispersible polymers and applications therefor
US6653406B1 (en) 2000-05-04 2003-11-25 Kimberly Clark Worldwide, Inc. Ion-sensitive, water-dispersible polymers, a method of making same and items using same
US6669878B2 (en) * 1998-01-16 2003-12-30 Uni-Charm Corporation Method of making a water disintegratable non-woven fabric
US6683143B1 (en) 2000-05-04 2004-01-27 Kimberly Clark Worldwide, Inc. Ion-sensitive, water-dispersible polymers, a method of making same and items using same
US20040030080A1 (en) * 2001-03-22 2004-02-12 Yihua Chang Water-dispersible, cationic polymers, a method of making same and items using same
US6713414B1 (en) 2000-05-04 2004-03-30 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Ion-sensitive, water-dispersible polymers, a method of making same and items using same
US6828014B2 (en) 2001-03-22 2004-12-07 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Water-dispersible, cationic polymers, a method of making same and items using same
US6835678B2 (en) 2000-05-04 2004-12-28 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Ion sensitive, water-dispersible fabrics, a method of making same and items using same
US6897168B2 (en) 2001-03-22 2005-05-24 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Water-dispersible, cationic polymers, a method of making same and items using same
US6908966B2 (en) 2001-03-22 2005-06-21 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Water-dispersible, cationic polymers, a method of making same and items using same
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US7070854B2 (en) 2001-03-22 2006-07-04 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Water-dispersible, cationic polymers, a method of making same and items using same
US20060154054A1 (en) * 2005-01-13 2006-07-13 John Banks A flushable body fluid absorbent composite
US7276459B1 (en) 2000-05-04 2007-10-02 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Ion-sensitive, water-dispersible polymers, a method of making same and items using same
US20090018517A1 (en) * 2007-07-11 2009-01-15 Riccardo Cecconi Composite absorbent material with water-soluble bonding agents, products made of said material nad method for its manufacture
US9005738B2 (en) 2010-12-08 2015-04-14 Buckeye Technologies Inc. Dispersible nonwoven wipe material
US9439549B2 (en) 2010-12-08 2016-09-13 Georgia-Pacific Nonwovens LLC Dispersible nonwoven wipe material

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US3371666A (en) * 1965-01-26 1968-03-05 Tampax Inc Absorbent device
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US3081197A (en) * 1959-09-10 1963-03-12 Du Pont Nonwoven fabrics bonded with interpolymer and process of preparing same
US3106207A (en) * 1961-01-03 1963-10-08 Scott Paper Co Sanitary napkin and method of manufacture
US3371666A (en) * 1965-01-26 1968-03-05 Tampax Inc Absorbent device
US3370590A (en) * 1966-08-17 1968-02-27 Riegel Textile Corp Process of preventing undesirable loosening or matting in paper for use in sanitary products and the products thereof
US3480016A (en) * 1968-02-02 1969-11-25 Celanese Corp Sanitary products

Cited By (59)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3654928A (en) * 1970-02-24 1972-04-11 Kimberly Clark Co Flushable wrapper for absorbent pads
US4063995A (en) * 1975-10-28 1977-12-20 Scott Paper Company Fibrous webs with improved bonder and creping adhesive
US4117187A (en) * 1976-12-29 1978-09-26 American Can Company Premoistened flushable wiper
DE2817604A1 (en) * 1976-12-29 1979-10-31 American Can Co A pre-moistened wipe cloth fortspuelbares
DK152563B (en) * 1978-04-28 1988-03-21 James River Norwalk Inc Premoisturized, flushable aftoerringsserviet and procedure for their manufacture
US4930942A (en) * 1986-12-22 1990-06-05 E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc. Method of disposal of articles by flushing
US4762738A (en) * 1986-12-22 1988-08-09 E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc. Means for disposal of articles by flushing and ostomy pouches particularly suited for such disposal
US4830187A (en) * 1986-12-22 1989-05-16 E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc. Means for disposal of articles by flushing and ostomy pouches particularly suited for such disposal
US5041104A (en) * 1987-07-27 1991-08-20 Bonar Carelle Limited Nonwoven materials
US5397625A (en) * 1990-12-20 1995-03-14 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Duo-functional nonwoven material
US5613959A (en) * 1991-09-03 1997-03-25 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Disposable absorbent article with flushable insert
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