US3542433A - Apparatus for removing roofing - Google Patents

Apparatus for removing roofing Download PDF

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Publication number
US3542433A
US3542433A US3542433DA US3542433A US 3542433 A US3542433 A US 3542433A US 3542433D A US3542433D A US 3542433DA US 3542433 A US3542433 A US 3542433A
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Prior art keywords
roofing
roof
blade
removing
apparatus
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John F Probst
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P A L DEV CORP
PAL DEV CORP
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PAL DEV CORP
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04DROOF COVERINGS; SKY-LIGHTS; GUTTERS; ROOF-WORKING TOOLS
    • E04D15/00Apparatus or tools for roof working
    • E04D15/003Apparatus or tools for roof working for removing roof material

Description

United States Patent Inventor John F. Probst Hartland, Wisconsin Appl. No. 840,100

Filed June 11, 1969 Patented Nov. 24, 1970 Assignee P.A.L. Development Corp.,

' Butler, Wisconsin a corporation of Wisconsin v Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 710,018, March 4, 1968, abandoned.

APPARATUS FOR REMOVING ROOFING 11 Claims, 2 Drawing Figs.

US. Cl 299/37;

15/93: 173/24 Int. Cl 825d 17/00 Field ofSearch.... 299/36, 37;

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,565,841 8/1951 Conforto 299/3-7X 2,663,555 12/1953 Milliken l 299/36X 2,777,680 l/l957 RObb 299/37 3,074,090 l/1963 Thompson... 299/37X 3,219,388 11/1965 Haynes 299/37 3,251,629 5/1966 Cawley 299/37 Primary Examiner-Ernest R. Purser Attorney-Andrus, Sceales, Starke and Sawall ABSTRACT: The invention relates to a self-propelled apparatus for removing roofing, including a small tractor and a roof removing attachment extends forwardly of the tractor. The roof removing attachment comprises a frame member which terminates in a sharpened head adapted to wedge under the roofing and pry the roofing up as the tractor moves across the roof. The dislodged roofing is progressively moved up an inclined shield, which extends upwardly and to the rear from the head, and the dislodged roofing can be readily removed by workmen from the shield Patented N0v.24,197fl 3,542,433

Sheet 1 of 2 Patented Nov. 24, 1970 3,542,433

y @mb "/5 APPARATUS REMOVING ROOFING This application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Pat. tpplication Ser. No. 7l0,0l8, filed Mar. 4, 1968, now abandoned and entitled Apparatus .for Removing Roofing".

This invention rel-ates to a device for removing roofing and more particularly to a self-propelled roof removing apparatus.

One common type of built-up roofing for commercial and industrial buildings consists of a layer of insulation board covered by a number oflayers of roofing paper. The insulation board, in the form of 2 X 4 sections, is nailed to the roof deck and the roofing paper is then tar-mopped to the insulation board.

In another common form of built-up roofing, the insulation board is eliminated and the first ply of roofing paper is nailed directly to the roof decking and additional plies or layers of paper are tar-mopped over the first ply.

During a period of years, additional layers of roofing paper may be applied over the original roof. Eventually the thickness of the roofing may increase to a point where additional layers cannot be applied due to the added weight on the roof, and the roofing must then be'removed. In some cases, depending on its condition, the insulation board must be removed as well, and new layers ofinsulatio'n board and roofing paper applied.

In the conventional procedure for removing roofing, the roofing is cut into squares and workmen using hand-operated scrapers then pry beneath the cut roofing to loosen the squares to a position where they can be manually removed. This operation is very time-consuming and the cost of a new roof depends largely on the cost of the removal of the old roofmg.

The present invention is directed to a self-propelled apparatus which can be utilized for removing roofing prior to the application of a new roof. The apparatus includes a small garden-type tractor, and a roof removing attachment is attached to the front connecting bar of the tractor. In one form of the invention, the attachment includes a series of rods which extend downwardly and forwardly from the connecting bar and terminate in wedge-shaped heads. The sharpened tips of the heads are adapted to pry beneath the roofing as the tractor moves across the roof to thereby loosen and dislodge the roofing.

As the tractor moves across the roof, the dislodged roofing is progressively moved up an inclined platform or frame formed ofa series of diagonal rods which extend upwardly and to the rear from the wedge-shaped heads. Workmen can then readily lift the roofing sections from the inclined platform and carry it to the disposal site.

In a second form of the invention, the head or blade is power-driven and is provided with a reciprocating, fore-andaft motion. To provide this reciprocating motion, the blade is carried by a pair of horizontal rods mounted for sliding movement on the frame of the machine and the inner ends of the rods are connected to a crank shaft that is driven by the tractor engine.

With the power driven blade, a ram-type action is provided which aids in dislodging the roofing and shearing the roofing nails. Moreover, the reciprocating action of the blade prevents the blade from sticking and stalling under load.

The apparatus of the invention enables the layers of roofing paper, or both the insulation board and the roofing paper, to be removed from the roof in a substantially reduced period of time over that required by the conventional hand-scraping methods. This results in a considerable labor saving which reduces the overall cost ofthe roofing operation.

The apparatus not only pries the roofing loose, but the loosened roofing is moved up the inclined frame to a position where it can be readily removed by the workmenv As an added feature, a nail removing blade can be attached across the wedge-shaped heads and utilized to remove nails, if necessary, from heavily nailed areas of the roof deck after the roofing paper has been removed.

Other objects and advantages will appear in the course of the following description.

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the roof removing apparatus of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary side elevation of the roof removing attachment;

FIG. 3 is a front view ofthe roof removing attachment;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary enlarged front view showing the nail removing attachment connected to the wedge-shaped heads;

a FIG. 5 is a section taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a plan view of a modified form of the invention utilizing a power driven, reciprocating blade;

FIG. 7 is a side elevation with parts broken away of the machine shown in FIG. 6; and

FIG. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical section showing the spring mounted handle of the machine of FIG. 6.

The FIGS. IS illustrate a self-propelled apparatus to be used for removing roofing which includes a tractor I, and a roof removing attachment 2 is attached to the front connecting bar 3 of the tractor. The tractor 1 can be a conventional garden-type tractor including a frame 4 which is mounted on a pair of wheels 5. The tractor is driven by a gasoline engine 6 supported on the frame 4 and enclosed within a housing 7. To direct the tractor 1, a handle 8 extends to the rear ofthe frame 3 and is adapted to be grasped by the operator as the tractor is moved over the roof.-

The roof removing attachment 2 includes a transverse connecting bar 9 which is connected to the front connecting bar 3 of the tractor I. Extending downwardly and forwardly from the connecting bar 9 are a series of generally parallel spaced rods 10 and the forward end of each rod carries a wedgeshaped head 11. Each head 11 has a generally flat bottom 12 adapted to ride on the roof, and the forward end of each head terminates in a pointed tip 13 which is adapted to pry beneath the roofing 14 and loosen or dislodge the roofing as the tractor moves across the roof. i

The heads 11 are connected together by a cross rod 15 which extends transversely between the heads.

As the tractor moves across the roof, the loosened roofing 14 is moved up an inclined platform 1.6 or frame formed of a series of generally parallel rods 17 which extend upwardly and rearwardly from the heads 11. The rear ends of the rods 17 are connected together by a cross rod 18, and, in addition, the rods 17 are secured to the inner ends ofthe rods 10 by vertical supports 19. The diagonal rods 17 function as an inclined platform and the dislodged roofing sections 14 are progressively moved up the platform 16 as the tractor moves across the roof. As the roofing 14 is supported on the platform 16 defined by the rods 17, it is in a position where it can easily be lifted by workmen and transported to the disposal site.

In the removal of the old roofing, a cutting unit is initially moved across the roof and acts to cut the layers of roofing paper into sections 14 having a size generally in the range of 4' X 6'. After the cutting has been completed, the pointed tips 13 of the heads 11 are inserted beneath the roofing sections by lifting up on the handle 8, causing the front end of the tractor to pivot downwardly and digging the tips 13 into the roofing. The'tractor l is then moved across the roof and the heads 11 pry up the roofing and the dislodged roofing sections 14 are moved upwardly on the rods 17 to a location where they can be readily removed by the workmen.

In the event that the insulation board has deteriorated and must also be removed it is usually removed in a separate operation after removal of the roofing paper. The removal operation for the insulation board is similar to that employed to remove the roofing paper except that the insulation board does not have to be cut, due to the fact that it is applied in 2 X 4 sections. Thus the heads 11 are inserted beneath the insulation board and as the tractor moves across the roof, the heads 11 will act to wedge or .pry up the insulation board and move it upwardly on the rods 17 where it can be removed. In some situations, it is possible to remove the roofing paper, as well as the insulation board, in a single operation.

In some roofing installations the insulation board is not used, and the inner layer or ply of roofing paper is nailed directly to the roof deck. With a roof of this type, there may be areas which are heavily nailed and the removal of the roofing paper will not necessarily remove all of the nails from the deck. To remove the nails, a nail removing attachment can be attached to the heads 11 as shown in FIGS, 4 and 5. The nailremoving attachment 20 comprises a generally flat blade 21 having a pair of flanges 22 which are secured to flanges 23 on the cross rod 15The forward edge of the blade 21 is tapered or sharpened and is provided with a series of generally V-shaped teeth 24. As the tractor moves across the roof, the remaining nails are engaged with the V-shaped teeth and are removed.

The present invention substantially reduces the overall time required for removing the old roofing and therefore provides a substantial cost savings to the roofer. The unit is adapted to be moved continuously across the roof and the wedgeshapcd heads I I serve to pry up the roofing and the dislodged roofing is progressively moved up the inclined platform I6 where it can be removed by the workmen.

FIGS. 68 illustrate a modified form ofthe invention utilizing a power driven reciprocating blade. The embodiment shown in FIGS. 6-8 includes a frame 25 and a pair ofaxlcs 26 are journaled on the frame and carry wheels 27. A conven tional gasoline engine 28 is mounted on a platform 29 carried on frame 25, and the drive shaft 30 of engine 28 extends laterally and carries a sprocket 31 which is connected by chain 32 to sprocket 33 mounted on the end of transverse shaft 34. The ends of the shaft 34 are journaled within bearings 35 mounted on the diagonal frame members 36.

In addition to the sprocket 33, the opposite end of transverse shaft 34 carries sprocket 37 that is connected by chain 38 to sprocket 39 on the input shaft 40 of transmission 41. The transmission 41 is a conventional forward-reverse variable speed type and the output of the transmission is operably connected to the axles 26 to drive the unit over the roof,

It is contemplated that a conventional clutch, as indicated by 42, can be associated with the engine drive shaft 30. The clutch serves to selectively engage and disengage the drive and is normally operated by a lever on the handle of the machine.

As the machine moves across the roof, the roofing is dislodged or pried up by a blade 43 having a series of sharpened teeth 4 similar to blade 21 of the first embodiment. The blade 43 is provided with a fore-and-aft reciprocating motion which aids in dislodging the roofing as well as shearing the roofing nails. To provide this reciprocating motion, a pair of rods 45 are threaded within openings in the enlargement 46 formed in the underside of blade 43, and rods 45 are slidably mounted within bushings 47 carried by sleeves 48 attached to the two central horizontal frame members 49 of frame 25. As best shown in FIG. 6, a pair of transverse frame members 50 connect the two central frame members 49 and also aid in supporting the sleeves 48.

Attached to the inner end ofeach rod 45 is a connecting rod 51 and the opposite end of each connecting rod is connected to crank shaft 52 which extends transversely ofthe frame. The ends of the crankshaft are journaled within bearings 53 mounted on the frame members 49. To drive the crankshaft one end of the crankshaft carries a sprocket 54 which is connected by chain 55 to a sprocket 56 mounted on transverse shaft 34. With this drive, rotation of the shaft 34 is transmitted through the chain drive 55 to crankshaft 52 which acts to move the blade in a reciprocating stroke oftravel.

A platform or shield 57, which corresponds generally in function to the rods 17 of the first embodiment, extends rearwardly and upwardly from the blade 43. The inclined platform 57 functions as a ramp and the dislodged roofing sections are progressively moved up the platform as the tractor moves across the roof. The dislodged roofing sections can be readily removed by workmen from the platform 57. While the platform can be formed of a series of parallel rods as in the first embodiment, it is preferred to form the platform of sheet metal or screening which serves the added function of preventing pieces of roofing from contacting the drive mechanism.

The platform 57 is supported by a pair of rear vertical supports 58 and a pair of shorter front vertical supports 59 which extend upwardly from frame members 49. In addition, diagonal braces 60 connect the upper ends of the supports 58 and 59. The lower edge of the shield 57 is provided with a generally vertical bend as indicated by 61, and terminates in spaced relation to the upper surface of the blade 43, thereby permitting the blade to reciprocate in close proximity to the edge 61.

Extending rearwardly from the unit is a handle assembly 62, including a pair of parallel, upwardly inclined arms 63, and the outer ends of the arms are bent laterally and define hand grips 64. The inner end of each arm is pivotally connected to one of a series of holes in a mounting plate 66 extending downwardly from the platform 29 by a stud which extends through the hole 65 and through an opening in the inner end ofthe arm. By changing the position of pivotal attachment of the arm 63 to the mounting plate 66. the nngularity ofthe handle assembly can be varied as desired.

To minimize the vibration transmitted through the handle to the operator, a resilient mounting is provided for the handle assembly. As illustrated in FIG. 3, a pair of rubber or resilient pads 67 are located on either side of each of the arms 63 and coil springs 68 extend between each pad 67 and a pad 69. The upper pad 69 bears against the lower surface of platform 29, while the lower pad 69 bears against a plate 70 that is connected to the lower edge of mounting plate 66. Rod 71 extends through the springs 68, as well as through alined openings in the platform 29, pads 67 and 69 and arms 63, and the ends of the rods 71 are engaged with nuts 72. The resilient pads 67 and 69 in combination with the coil springs 68 serve to dampen the vibratory motion provided by the reciprocating blade so that the operator is not subjected to the intense vibratron.

The unit shown in FIGS. 6--8 operates in a manner similar to that described with respect to the first embodiment except that the blade is provided with a reciprocating action which aids in dislodging theroofing, as well as shearing off the roofing nails. Due to the reciprocating action, the unit is self-freeing, meaning that if the blade sticks beneath the roofing or roofing paper, the reciprocating stroke will automatically free the blade.

The power driven unit of FIGS. 6-8 can be used to remove roofing either on flat roof decks or on sloping roofs. With a sloping roof, the unit is generally operated in a manner so that it travels down the slope during the removing pass and is backed uphill in preparation for the next removing pass.

While the drawings illustrate the head in the form of a blade, it is contemplated that various types of blades or heads can be employed, such as a straight blade without teeth, or a series of wedge-shaped heads as illustrated in the first embodiment.

Iclaim:

1. A self-propelled apparatus for removing roofing, comprising a tractor including a support member, a cross bar connected to said support member, a series of spaced, generally parallel rods extending downwardly and forwardly from said cross bar, a generally wedge-shaped head secured to the forward end of each rod, each head having a generally flat bottom adapted to ride on the roof and each head terminating in a sharpened forward tip adapted to pry beneath the roofing to dislodge the roofing as the tractor moves over the roof, means located to the rear ofsaid sharpened tips for connecting the heads together, and an inclined frame extending upwardly and rcarwardly from said heads and located above said rods, said frame being disposed to receive the dislodged roofing as the tractor moves over the roof.

2. An apparatus for removing roofing, comprising a frame having a power source mounted thereon, a pair of wheels journaled on the frame, the forward portion of the frame extending a substantial distance forwardly of said wheels, a blade mounted on the forward portion of said frame and including a sharpened edge adapted to pry beneath the roofing to dislodge the same and having a generally flat bottom surface adapted to ride on the roof, said wheels and said bottom surface providing a three point support for said apparatus, drive means interconnecting the power source and wheels to drive the apparatus over the roof, and a generally flat inclined platform mounted on the forward portion of the frame behind the blade, said platform having a low end spaced above the blade and having a high end extending to the level of the power source, said platform having a width substantially equal to the width of the blade whereby the dislodged roofing is moved up the platform as the vehicle moves over the roof and the platform shields the power source from the roofing fragments.

3. The apparatus of claim 2, and including means driving the roof removing member in a reciprocating path of travel normal to said edge.

4. The apparatus of claim 3, wherein the lower edge of the platform is spaced a slight distance above the blade whereby the blade is reciprocated in close proximity to said lower edge.

5. An apparatus for removing roofing, comprising a vehicle, roof removing means disposed forwardly of the vehicle and comprising a series of generally parallel spaced wedge-shaped heads, each head having a bottom surface adapted to ride on the roofand terminating in a sharpened edge adapted to pry beneath the roofing and dislodge the same, connecting means for connecting the roof removing means to the vehicle and including a series of generally parallel spaced rods with one end of each rod connected to one of said heads, said connecting means also including a transverse connecting member attached to the opposite ends of said rods and connected to said vehicle, and an inclined frame extending upwardly and rearwardly from said member and disposed to receive the dislodged roofing as the vehicle moves over the roof.

6. The apparatus of claim 5, wherein said rods extend downwardly at an acute angle from said transverse connecting member to said heads.

7. The apparatus of claim 6, and including means extending transversely of said rods for connecting said heads together.

8. The apparatus of claim 5, wherein said frame comprises a series of generally parallel supports with the forward end of each support connected to one of said heads and the rear ends of the supports being connected together.

9. The apparatus of claim 5. and including means for pivoting said vehicle about a horizontal transverse axis, pivoting said vehicle in one direction causing said tips to engage and penetrate said roofing and pivoting said vehicle in the opposite direction causing said tips to move out ofengagement with the roofing. l

10. The apparatus of claim 5, and including a transverse blade removably secured to said heads and having a generally sharp forward edge projecting forwardly beyond the tips of said heads, said forward edge having a series of notches disposed to engage and remove nails protruding from the roof as the vehicle moves across the roof.

11. The apparatus of claim 10, wherein said notches face forwardly and have a generally V-shape.

US3542433A 1969-06-11 1969-06-11 Apparatus for removing roofing Expired - Lifetime US3542433A (en)

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Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3695713A (en) * 1970-03-02 1972-10-03 Outboard Marine Corp Roofing removal process and machine
US3779605A (en) * 1972-07-28 1973-12-18 J Nieman Roofing removal apparatus
US4277104A (en) * 1978-10-23 1981-07-07 Sanchez Edward J Reciprocating shingle remover with upward thrust blade
DE3245808A1 (en) * 1981-12-10 1983-06-23 Palmer Grasse Blade holder in an oscillating head for floor tearing-up machines
DE3219927A1 (en) * 1982-05-27 1983-12-08 Dieter Dipl Ing Wolff Wheel gear for floor-working machines
US4880491A (en) * 1988-08-01 1989-11-14 Jacobs James L Guided roofing materials removal apparatus
US5098165A (en) * 1988-08-01 1992-03-24 Jacobs James L Guided roofing materials removal apparatus
US5800021A (en) * 1996-06-19 1998-09-01 J. Best Company Shingle remover and method of removing
US5830313A (en) * 1994-12-12 1998-11-03 Marcor Management, Inc. Self-propelled floor covering scraper machine
US6711971B1 (en) 2002-02-08 2004-03-30 Guil B. Morin Roofing removal apparatus
US20060179790A1 (en) * 2005-02-17 2006-08-17 Bremer Karl W Jr Roof membrane and insulation removing device
US20060191378A1 (en) * 2004-06-03 2006-08-31 Linscott Herbert G Roof shingle and nail remover
US20070000354A1 (en) * 2005-06-30 2007-01-04 Tyler Robert C Shingle removing machine
US7252021B1 (en) 2004-06-03 2007-08-07 Herbert Garfield Linscott Roof shingle and nail remover
US20070245684A1 (en) * 2005-02-17 2007-10-25 Bremer Karl W Jr Roof membrane and insulation removing device
US7802854B1 (en) 2006-03-10 2010-09-28 Advanced Roofing Technologies, Inc. System for removing shingles from a roof
US20110030511A1 (en) * 2009-08-07 2011-02-10 Keith Schmidt Roofing Material Removing Apparatus

Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3695713A (en) * 1970-03-02 1972-10-03 Outboard Marine Corp Roofing removal process and machine
US3779605A (en) * 1972-07-28 1973-12-18 J Nieman Roofing removal apparatus
US4277104A (en) * 1978-10-23 1981-07-07 Sanchez Edward J Reciprocating shingle remover with upward thrust blade
DE3245808A1 (en) * 1981-12-10 1983-06-23 Palmer Grasse Blade holder in an oscillating head for floor tearing-up machines
DE3219927A1 (en) * 1982-05-27 1983-12-08 Dieter Dipl Ing Wolff Wheel gear for floor-working machines
US5098165A (en) * 1988-08-01 1992-03-24 Jacobs James L Guided roofing materials removal apparatus
US4880491A (en) * 1988-08-01 1989-11-14 Jacobs James L Guided roofing materials removal apparatus
US5830313A (en) * 1994-12-12 1998-11-03 Marcor Management, Inc. Self-propelled floor covering scraper machine
US6003401A (en) * 1994-12-12 1999-12-21 Marcor Management, Inc. Self-propelled floor covering scraper machine
US5800021A (en) * 1996-06-19 1998-09-01 J. Best Company Shingle remover and method of removing
US6711971B1 (en) 2002-02-08 2004-03-30 Guil B. Morin Roofing removal apparatus
US20060191378A1 (en) * 2004-06-03 2006-08-31 Linscott Herbert G Roof shingle and nail remover
US7252021B1 (en) 2004-06-03 2007-08-07 Herbert Garfield Linscott Roof shingle and nail remover
US20060179790A1 (en) * 2005-02-17 2006-08-17 Bremer Karl W Jr Roof membrane and insulation removing device
US20070245684A1 (en) * 2005-02-17 2007-10-25 Bremer Karl W Jr Roof membrane and insulation removing device
US20070000354A1 (en) * 2005-06-30 2007-01-04 Tyler Robert C Shingle removing machine
US7222556B2 (en) * 2005-06-30 2007-05-29 Tyler Robert C Shingle removing machine
US7802854B1 (en) 2006-03-10 2010-09-28 Advanced Roofing Technologies, Inc. System for removing shingles from a roof
US20110030511A1 (en) * 2009-08-07 2011-02-10 Keith Schmidt Roofing Material Removing Apparatus

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