US3528115A - Bleaching fabrics with peracetic acid formed in situ thereon - Google Patents

Bleaching fabrics with peracetic acid formed in situ thereon Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3528115A
US3528115A US692691A US3528115DA US3528115A US 3528115 A US3528115 A US 3528115A US 692691 A US692691 A US 692691A US 3528115D A US3528115D A US 3528115DA US 3528115 A US3528115 A US 3528115A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
fabric
peracetic acid
solution
bleaching
hydrogen peroxide
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US692691A
Inventor
Bernard C Lawes
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
EI Du Pont de Nemours and Co
Original Assignee
EI Du Pont de Nemours and Co
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by EI Du Pont de Nemours and Co filed Critical EI Du Pont de Nemours and Co
Priority to US69269167A priority Critical
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3528115A publication Critical patent/US3528115A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Classifications

    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06LDRY-CLEANING, WASHING OR BLEACHING FIBRES, FILAMENTS, THREADS, YARNS, FABRICS, FEATHERS OR MADE-UP FIBROUS GOODS; BLEACHING LEATHER OR FURS
    • D06L4/00Bleaching fibres, filaments, threads, yarns, fabrics, feathers or made-up fibrous goods; Bleaching leather or furs
    • D06L4/10Bleaching fibres, filaments, threads, yarns, fabrics, feathers or made-up fibrous goods; Bleaching leather or furs using agents which develop oxygen
    • D06L4/15Bleaching fibres, filaments, threads, yarns, fabrics, feathers or made-up fibrous goods; Bleaching leather or furs using agents which develop oxygen using organic agents
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06LDRY-CLEANING, WASHING OR BLEACHING FIBRES, FILAMENTS, THREADS, YARNS, FABRICS, FEATHERS OR MADE-UP FIBROUS GOODS; BLEACHING LEATHER OR FURS
    • D06L4/00Bleaching fibres, filaments, threads, yarns, fabrics, feathers or made-up fibrous goods; Bleaching leather or furs
    • D06L4/10Bleaching fibres, filaments, threads, yarns, fabrics, feathers or made-up fibrous goods; Bleaching leather or furs using agents which develop oxygen
    • D06L4/12Bleaching fibres, filaments, threads, yarns, fabrics, feathers or made-up fibrous goods; Bleaching leather or furs using agents which develop oxygen combined with specific additives
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06LDRY-CLEANING, WASHING OR BLEACHING FIBRES, FILAMENTS, THREADS, YARNS, FABRICS, FEATHERS OR MADE-UP FIBROUS GOODS; BLEACHING LEATHER OR FURS
    • D06L4/00Bleaching fibres, filaments, threads, yarns, fabrics, feathers or made-up fibrous goods; Bleaching leather or furs
    • D06L4/10Bleaching fibres, filaments, threads, yarns, fabrics, feathers or made-up fibrous goods; Bleaching leather or furs using agents which develop oxygen
    • D06L4/18Bleaching fibres, filaments, threads, yarns, fabrics, feathers or made-up fibrous goods; Bleaching leather or furs using agents which develop oxygen in a gaseous environment

Description

United States Patent 3,528,115 BLEACHING FABRICS WITH PERACETIC ACID FORMED IN SITU THEREON Bernard C. Lawes, Wilmington, Del., assignor to E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, Wilmington, Del., a corporation of Delaware N0 Drawing. Filed Dec. 22, 1967, Ser. No. 692,691 Int. Cl. D06l 3/02 U.S. Cl. 8-111 7 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Textile fabrics which are amenable to bleaching with peracetic acid are saturated with an alkaline solution of hydrogen peroxide, the saturated fabric is contacted with acetic anhydride vapor, whereby peracetic acid is formed in situ on the fabric, and the fabric is then bleached with the peracetic acid.

The bleaching of textile fabrics with alkaline hydrogen peroxide solutions is widely practiced. Most commonly, relatively concentrated and highly alkaline peroxide solutions are employed at about atmospheric steam temperatures in order to achieve bleaching in short times. Under such rather severe conditions, efiicient use of the peroxide is not realized and some of the more sensitive fabrics are damaged. Peracetic bleach solutions are known to effectively bleach most fabrics even under much milder bleaching conditions. However, peracetic acid bleach solutions heretofore proposed have been solutions formulated prior to their use. Thus, such peracetic acid bleach solutions have been made from more concentrated purchased peracetic acid solutions, or they can be made as proposed in Reichert et a1. U.S. Pat. 2,377,038 by the addition of acetic anhydride to an alkaline solution of hydrogen peroxide. Preformed solutions of peracetic acid have noxious odors and are potentially hazardous to prepare and handle because of their explosive tendencies.

The present invention is based upon the discovery of a very practical way of forming peracetic acid solutions in situ upon the fabric that is to be bleached, thus overcoming the hazards and inconvenience of preparing and handling preformed peracetic acid solutions.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Textile fabrics which are amenable to bleaching with peracetic acid are saturated with an alkaline hydrogen peroxide bleaching solution, the saturated fabric is contacted with acetic anhydride vapor to effect absorption of said vapor on the fabric and reaction of the absorbed acetic anhydride with the hydrogen peroxide thereby producing peracetic acid in situ on the fabric, and the fabric is bleached with the peracetic acid so produced.

Alternatively, the fabric can be partially bleached with the alkaline hydrogen peroxide solution with which it is initially saturated, following which, peracetic acid is formed in situ on the fabric as indicated above and bleaching is completed with the peracetic acid so formed.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION AND PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The alkaline hydrogen peroxide solution with which the fabric to be bleached is saturated and which serves as the precursor of the peracetic acid solution formed in situ in accordance with the invention, will generally contain from around 0.1 to 5%, preferably 0.4 to 2%, H 0 by weight and an alkali which will be present in an amount sufficient to render the solution distinctly alkaline, e.g., have a pH of at least 9.0. Preferably, the solution will have a pH of at least 10.5 e.g., 10.5 to 13, and will contain sufficient alkali so that when it is reacted on the fabric with the acetic anhydride vapor to produce the peracetic acid, the alkalinity of the solution will be reduced to a pH not lower than 4.5, most preferably not lower than pH 5.5.

The alkaline hydrogen peroxide solution most generally will be formulated using commercial aqueous hydrogen peroxide products as the source of the hydrogen peroxide, although other products which yield hydrogen peroxide in solution can be used, examples of such products being sodium peroxide, sodium perborate, sodium percarbonate, urea peroxide, sodium phosphate perhydrates, and the like. The alkalinity of the peroxide solutions will generally be derived mainly from caustic soda or caustic potash although other alkaline-reacting materials such as sodium silicate, sodium carbonate, borax, and the like, may also be used. Most generally, the alkaline peroxide solution will contain caustic soda in combination with buffer materials such as sodium silicate and tetrasodiumv pyrophosphate. Other materials commonly employed in peroxide bleach solutions may also be present, examples of which are heavy metal ion sequestering agents, such as the polycarboxyamine compounds, e.g., ethylenediarnintetraacetic acid, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid, nitrilotriacetic and the hydroxyalkylethylenediamine triacetic acids, and the sodium salts of such acids. Wetting agents may also be present in the solution, examples of which are the conventional anionic and non-ionic detergents such as the common soluble soaps and the sodium and potassium alkyl sulfates and alkyl benzene sulfonates, the alkoxylated aryl polyether alcohols, and the like.

The fabric to be bleached will generally be dampened, impregnated, or saturated with an amount of the alkaline hydrogen peroxide solution equal to about 50 to 150%, preferably, to of the dry weight of the fabric. Following saturation of the fabric with such an amount of the solution, the saturated fabric can then be contacted directly with acetic anhydride vapors. Alternatively, the saturated fabric can be partially bleached with the alkaline peroxide solution by storing it for a sufficient time at ordinary or elevated temperatures to effect a partial bleaching of the fabric. At that point, the partially bleached fabric, which will contain a substantial amount of unused peroxide, can be contacted with acetic anhydride vapor to effect absorption of the anhydride on the fabric. The reaction of the absorbed anhydride with the residual peroxide will form peracetic acid in situ on the partially bleached fabric. Thereafter, bleaching is permitted to continue with the peracetic acid as the bleaching agent. The partial bleaching with the peroxide solution can, of course, be omitted and the fabric initially saturated with the peroxide solution can be immediately contacted with the acetic anhydride vapor and then bleached with the peracetic acid formed in situ as indicated above.

The contacting of the fabric saturated with the alkaline peroxide solution wtih the acetic anhydride vapor can be carried out at various temperatures for periods of time sufficient to provide absorption on the fabric of at least b ut 9.2% ace ic anhydride, basednp nthe dry Wei h of'the fabric. Any desirable temperature can be employed providing it is not sufficiently high to adversely affect the fabric. Temperatures from room temperature up to about the boiling temperature of water are generally satisfactory. Absorption of from about 0.2 to 3%, preferably 0.8 to 1.5%, acetic anhydride basedupon the fabric weight will generally be adequate and give good performance.

Reaction of the alkaline peroxide solution upon the fabric with the absorbed acetic, anhydride vapor toproduce peracetic acid proceeds quite readily even at room temperatures and, of course, the reaction proceeds more rapidly the higher the temperature. Temperatures from around room temperature, or even lower, up to around 300' F. may be employed, although in general, temperatures of around 100 to 200 F. will most generally be preferred. Following absorption of the anhydride, bleaching with the peracetic acid formed may be effected at any desired temperature, e.g., from room temperature up to 300 F., the lower temperatures requiring longer times than the higher temperatures. In most instances, temperatures from room temperature to about 212 P. will be used and those from about 150 to 212 F. will be preferred.

. The method of the invention is illustrated by the following examples in which all composition percentages are by weight.

In the experiments of Example 1, the results of which are reported in Table 1, 6" x 16" fabric samples of heavy all-cotton twill (1 yd./lb.) were bleached. All of the fabric samples had been freshly scoured by saturating them with a scouring solution and steaming the saturated fabric at 212 F. for 2 minutes. The scouring solution contained 10% caustic soda, 0.5 tetrasodium pyrophosphate decahydrate and 0.2% of a commercial sodium dodecylated oxydibenzene disulfonate surfactant.

In the experiments of Example 2, the results of which are reported in Table 2, 6" x 16" fabric samples of a nylon/ cotton twill (15.85, nylomcotton) having a weight of 1 yd./ 1b., which had been freshly scoured as indicated above, were bleached.

The bleaching procedure for the experiments of both Example 1 and 2 was as follows: the freshly scoured fabric sample for a given experiment was saturated with an equal weight of the alkaline hydrogen peroxide bleach solution, following which the fabric was either bleached directly (in the controls) by steaming the fabric at a desired temperature or by allowing it to stand at a temperature lower than the normal steaming temperature, or by first suspending the saturated fabric for a short period of time in an agitated acetic anhydride vapor bath maintained over liquid acetic anhydride at 212 F., to effect absorption of from about 1 to 1.5% acetic anhydride on the fabric. Bleaching was thencarried out as indicated above. In all cases, the bleached fabric was rinsed well with 500 ml. of warm water and the pH of the total rinse water was determined as well as its hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid contents.

The compositions of the various hydrogen peroxide I 4 bleach solutions employed in the experiments of Examples 1 and 2 were as follows:

Solution A 1.4% H 0 2.0% sodium silicate 0.05% epsom salt 0.1% sodium salt of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid 0.1% sodium dodecylated oxydibenzene disulfonate 0.5% TSPP Solution B 1.4% H 0 1.0% caustic soda 2.0% sodium silicate 0.05 epsom salt I Solution C 14% H 0 1.5% caustic soda Solution D 0.7% H 0 1.0% caustic soda 2.0% sodium silicate 0.5 TSPP 0.05 epsom salt Solution E 0.7% H 0 2.0% Na CO 0.5 TSPP Solution F 0.5 H 0 1.0% caustic soda 0.5 TSPP 0.05% epsom salt Solution G 0.5 H 0 4.0% TSPP 0.05 epsom salt 0.1% sodium dodecylated oxydibenzene disulfonate In the above compositions, the abbreviation TSPP stands for tetrasodium pyrophosphate decahydrate, and the designation sodium silicate stands for a commercial 40 B. sodium silicate solution whose approximate composition was 10% Na O, 25% SiO and H O.

In 'Tables 1 and 2, which report the results of the bleaching experiments, the initial pH reportedis that of the starting hydrogen peroxide bleach solution while the final pH is that of the rinse water following bleaching. The whiteness values reported are percent whitenesses representing the percent light reflected from the samples as measured using a Hunter Refiectometer with a blue filter for which magnesium oxide gives a reflectance of 100%. Under the heading MOTES in Table 2, a designation means the bleached fabric was free or virtually free of motes; and designation means that motes were barely visible; and a designation means that motes were distinctly visible. In the column heading SECONDS IN Ac O VAPOR, Ac O designates acetic anhydride.

EXAMPLE 1 [TABLE I.Bleaching heavy Cotton Twill] Percent residual A. 0

Seconds Steaming Percent I in time at pH Percent white- A020 0., As As whiteness Experiment Bleach solution vapor min. Intial Final H20 peracid ness gain a (control) A 2 l0. 1 9. 8 80. 2

b (control) A 2 10.1 5.4 83 83.1 '23 0 (control) A plus O,5% NaOH 2 10. 9 10. 4 81 81. 0

d do 2 10.9 6.0 65 84.4 3.4.

A plus 0.9% NaOI-I 2 11.3 10. 8 73 83. 8

f d 10 2 l1. 3 8. 3 52 87. 0 3. 2

g. 10 1 v 11. 3 7. 7 51 as. s

'lhe fabric saturated with the bleach solution was steamed for. 1 minute, then suspended in the acetic anhydride vapor bath then steamed for an additional minute.

EXAMPLE 2 [Table II.Bleacl1ing N ylon/Cotton Twill] Percent residual A. 0. Percent Seconds pH Percent white- Bleaeh in A020 4 As As white uess Experiment solution vapor Initial Final Bleach conditions H201 peraeid Motes ness gain 11.4 10.9 212 F./2minutes 64 :1; 81.4

1O 11. 4 9. 75 do 47 0.6 85.3 3. 9 10 11. 4 5. 2 212 F./2 minutes, 18 1 82. 8 l. 4

then A020 treatment, then 150 F715 min. l 11.4 170 F./2 minutes 70.5

10 11.4 8.0 do 79.0 8.5 11. 9 11. 2 212 F./2 minutes- =1; 76. 10 11.9 6.0 ..do =1; 78.8 2.3 12.4 10.8 .do 80.5

10 12. 4 5. 9 212 F./ minutes- 83. 7 3. 2 10.6 10.6 212 F./2 minutes. 72.8 5 10.6 6.9 do 79.8 7.0 10 10. 6 6.4 .do 82.0 9.2

The experiments of Examples 1 and 2 involving the use of peracetic acid formed in situ illustrate application of the method of the invention to the bleaching of cotton and cotton/nylon fabrics. The method of the invention is also applicable in similar manner to the bleaching of other textile fabrics which are amenable to bleaching with peracetic acid. Such other textile fabrics include: cottonpolyester blends, rayon, and cellulose acetates and triacetates.

I claim:

1. In a method for bleaching a textile fabric which is amenable to bleaching with an aqueous peracetic acid solution, the improvement comprising forming said per acetic acid solution in situ on said fabric by saturating said fabric with an aqueous alkaline solution of hydrogen peroxide and thereafter contacting the fabric saturated with said hydrogen peroxide solution with acetic anhydride vapor whereby acetic anhydride is absorbed by the fabric and the absorbed acetic anhydride reacts with said alkaline hydrogen peroxide solution to produce peracetic acid in situ.

2. The method of claim 1 wherein the alkaline hydrogen peroxide solution contains 0.1 to 5% H 0 by weight and has a pH of at least 9.0.

3. The method of claim 1 wherein the alkaline hydrogen peroxide solution contains 0.1 to 5% H 0 by weight and has a pH of 10.5 to 13, and wherein the fabric saturated with said hydrogen peroxide solution is contacted with acetic anhydride vapor to effect absorption on the fabric of from 0.2 to 3% of said acetic anhydride, based upon the dry weight of the fabric.

4. The method of claim 3 wherein bleaching with the peracetic acid formed in situ is effected at a temperature from room temperature to about 300 F.

5. The method of claim 3 wherein bleaching with the peracetic acid formed in situ is effected at a temperature from room temperature to 212 F.

6. The method of claim 3 wherein bleaching with the peracetic acid formed in situ is effected at a temperature from to 212 F.

7. The method of claim 3 wherein the fabric saturated with the alkaline hydrogen peroxide solution is partially bleached with said hydrogen peroxide solution with only partial utilization of the hydrogen peroxide, and the fabric is thereafter contacted with acetic anhydride vapor to effect absorption of acetic anhydride thereon and the formation of peracetic acid in situ by reaction of the acetic anhydride with the residual hydrogen peroxide present on the fabric, and bleaching of the fabric is completed with said in situ formed peracetic acid.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,362,401 11/1944 Reichert et al. 252--99 X 2,377,038 5/1945 Reichert et al. 260-502 2,955,905 10/1960 Davies et al. 8--111 3,227,655 1/1966 Prett et al. 252-486 3,298,775 1/1967 Malafosse et al. 8-111 X 3,338,839 8/1967 MacKellar et al. 8-111 X 3,404,943 10/ 1968 Morris 8-137 3,457,023 7/ 1969 Peloquin 81 11 FOREIGN PATENTS 968,806 9/1964 Great Britain.

MAYER WEINBLATT, Primary Examiner A. RADY, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

US692691A 1967-12-22 1967-12-22 Bleaching fabrics with peracetic acid formed in situ thereon Expired - Lifetime US3528115A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US69269167A true 1967-12-22 1967-12-22

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3528115A true US3528115A (en) 1970-09-15

Family

ID=24781610

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US692691A Expired - Lifetime US3528115A (en) 1967-12-22 1967-12-22 Bleaching fabrics with peracetic acid formed in situ thereon

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3528115A (en)

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3634020A (en) * 1969-12-19 1972-01-11 Ppg Industries Inc Peracid treatment of keratinous fibers
US3918898A (en) * 1972-12-06 1975-11-11 Jerome Katz Hydrogen peroxide bleaching solution and method
US4026798A (en) * 1975-11-28 1977-05-31 Fmc Corporation Peracid treatment of dry cleaning baths
WO1991003590A1 (en) * 1989-09-04 1991-03-21 Henkel Kommanditgesellschaft Auf Aktien Process for disinfecting textiles in washing systems
US5122538A (en) * 1990-07-23 1992-06-16 Ecolab Inc. Peroxy acid generator
US5389278A (en) * 1988-06-14 1995-02-14 Basf Corporation Method for removing coffee stains from carpet
US5522580A (en) * 1988-06-14 1996-06-04 Basf Corporation Removing stains from fixed items
US5608051A (en) * 1993-10-28 1997-03-04 Bp Chemicals Limited Acetylation of lignocellulosic materials
US5681805A (en) * 1995-05-25 1997-10-28 The Clorox Company Liquid peracid precursor colloidal dispersions: microemulsions
US5776877A (en) * 1995-05-25 1998-07-07 The Clorox Company Liquid peracid precursor colloidal dispersions: macroemulsions

Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2362401A (en) * 1944-11-07 Detergent compositions
US2377038A (en) * 1941-09-15 1945-05-29 Du Pont Manufacture of peracids
US2955905A (en) * 1955-07-27 1960-10-11 Lever Brothers Ltd Peroxide-ester bleaching process and compositions
GB968806A (en) * 1962-04-14 1964-09-02 Air Liquide Improvements in or relating to the bleaching of textile fibres
US3227655A (en) * 1957-11-25 1966-01-04 Fmc Corp Process for preparation of a bleaching agent
US3338839A (en) * 1964-12-28 1967-08-29 Fmc Corp Activating of peroxygen compounds
US3404943A (en) * 1964-09-18 1968-10-08 Ici Ltd Process for cleaning textile materials
US3457023A (en) * 1965-07-07 1969-07-22 Union Carbide Corp Room-temperature bleaching of textiles with peracetic acid

Patent Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2362401A (en) * 1944-11-07 Detergent compositions
US2377038A (en) * 1941-09-15 1945-05-29 Du Pont Manufacture of peracids
US2955905A (en) * 1955-07-27 1960-10-11 Lever Brothers Ltd Peroxide-ester bleaching process and compositions
US3227655A (en) * 1957-11-25 1966-01-04 Fmc Corp Process for preparation of a bleaching agent
GB968806A (en) * 1962-04-14 1964-09-02 Air Liquide Improvements in or relating to the bleaching of textile fibres
US3298775A (en) * 1962-04-14 1967-01-17 Air Liquide Process for bleaching textile fibres and new bleaching compositions
US3404943A (en) * 1964-09-18 1968-10-08 Ici Ltd Process for cleaning textile materials
US3338839A (en) * 1964-12-28 1967-08-29 Fmc Corp Activating of peroxygen compounds
US3457023A (en) * 1965-07-07 1969-07-22 Union Carbide Corp Room-temperature bleaching of textiles with peracetic acid

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3634020A (en) * 1969-12-19 1972-01-11 Ppg Industries Inc Peracid treatment of keratinous fibers
US3918898A (en) * 1972-12-06 1975-11-11 Jerome Katz Hydrogen peroxide bleaching solution and method
US4026798A (en) * 1975-11-28 1977-05-31 Fmc Corporation Peracid treatment of dry cleaning baths
US5389278A (en) * 1988-06-14 1995-02-14 Basf Corporation Method for removing coffee stains from carpet
US5522580A (en) * 1988-06-14 1996-06-04 Basf Corporation Removing stains from fixed items
WO1991003590A1 (en) * 1989-09-04 1991-03-21 Henkel Kommanditgesellschaft Auf Aktien Process for disinfecting textiles in washing systems
US5122538A (en) * 1990-07-23 1992-06-16 Ecolab Inc. Peroxy acid generator
US5608051A (en) * 1993-10-28 1997-03-04 Bp Chemicals Limited Acetylation of lignocellulosic materials
US5681805A (en) * 1995-05-25 1997-10-28 The Clorox Company Liquid peracid precursor colloidal dispersions: microemulsions
US5776877A (en) * 1995-05-25 1998-07-07 The Clorox Company Liquid peracid precursor colloidal dispersions: macroemulsions
US5977044A (en) * 1995-05-25 1999-11-02 Peterson; David Liquid peracid precursor colloidal dispersions: macroemulsions

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
EP1255888B1 (en) Method for the one step preparation of textiles
US4130392A (en) Bleaching process
EP0119920B1 (en) Process for the simultaneous desizing and bleaching of textiles
CA1101614A (en) Peroxyacid bleach composition
US3956159A (en) Stable concentrated liquid peroxygen bleach composition
US3234140A (en) Stabilization of peroxy solutions
US3256198A (en) Compositions containing an oxygen releasing compound and an organic carbonate
US5344581A (en) Process for increasing the bleaching efficiency of an inorganic persalt using an acetylated mixture of sorbital and mammitol
US4013575A (en) Dry cleaning with peracids
US2955905A (en) Peroxide-ester bleaching process and compositions
US3740187A (en) Processes for bleaching textiles
US2081327A (en) Process for bleaching
US4115061A (en) Combination method for cleaning greatly soiled textiles
GB1368400A (en) Bleaching process and compositions therefor
US2141189A (en) Bleaching and cleansing compositions
US4013581A (en) Bleach tablet composition
US4643736A (en) Desizing and bleaching woven fabrics in a single operation in a bath based on sodium chlorite
US4025453A (en) Activated bleaching process and compositions therefor
EP0210952B1 (en) Aqueous, alkaline, silicate-containing composition for the bleaching of cellulosic fibres in the presence of percompounds
US3338839A (en) Activating of peroxygen compounds
GB542413A (en) Treatment of textile materials
US2165270A (en) Cotton bleaching
JP2578135B2 (en) Partially esterified block polymer and methods of making and using same
US3318657A (en) Method of bleaching cellulose fibres
US4426203A (en) Stable anhydrous textile assistant