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US3526976A - Interchangeable sports shoe - Google Patents

Interchangeable sports shoe Download PDF

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US3526976A
US3526976A US3526976DA US3526976A US 3526976 A US3526976 A US 3526976A US 3526976D A US3526976D A US 3526976DA US 3526976 A US3526976 A US 3526976A
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shoe
portion
surface
sport
sole
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Charles E Jacobs
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Charles E Jacobs
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43CFASTENINGS OR ATTACHMENTS OF FOOTWEAR; LACES IN GENERAL
    • A43C15/00Non-skid devices or attachments
    • A43C15/16Studs or cleats for football or like boots
    • A43C15/162Studs or cleats for football or like boots characterised by the shape
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B5/00Footwear for sporting purposes
    • A43B5/16Skating boots
    • A43B5/1633Multipurpose skate boots

Description

P 3, 0 v c. E. JACOBS INTERCHANGEABLE SPORTS SHOE 2 Sheets-Sneet 1 Filed May 20, 1968 IN\ 'ENTOR. Char/es 5 dircos TZKW Sept. 8, 1970 I c. E. JAcoBs 3,526,976

' INTERCHANGEABLE SPORTS SHOE Filed May 20, 1968 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

ATTORNEYS Charles EJ510065 BY United States Patent Office 3,526,976 Patented Sept. 8, 1970 12 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE In a preferred form, the present invention relates to athletic shoes that are adaptable for use in a plurality of sports by inserting different types of playing surface engaging apparatus peculiar to different sports into recesses formed in a sole of the shoes so that these different types of playing surface engaging devices can be interchanged when the wearer of the athletic shoe utilizes the same shoe to participate in these various sports. In a specific form, a plastic insert has different types of playing surface engaging elements formed thereon, peculiar to these different sports, and therefore the same shoe can be convertible for use in these different sports.

This invention generally relates to athletic shoes, and more particularly to a type of athletic shoe that is adaptable for use in a plurality of sports.

A participant in various athletic sports normally requires footwear that is peculiarly adaptable for use in that particular sport. Normally, the difference in the type of athletic shoe is in the playing surface to be engaged by the shoe, that is, an ice surface in the case of an ice skater, a relatively smooth hard surface in the case of a roller skater, a cinder surface in the case of a track participant, and a sodded field in the case of a golfer or football player. For one person to actively participate in these various sports, of the type above listed, a particular kind of footwear is required for each sport. The expense of providing the specific footwear adapted for use in the particular sport can be very great. Therefore, many sports participants, for example children, utilize footwear that is not particularly adapted for the sport in which they are participating, and in some cases this can bring about a dangerous condition in that their footing is not maintained in the best possible way. In the case of children this problem is particularly significant because their foot size is constantly changing, and it is indeed an expense to provide even a single type of footwar for a child without providing a multitude of types that would enable that child to be properly supported on a playing surface when engaged in various sports.

Another problem associated with the participation of children in various sports is that some of these sports, for example ice skating, are played on a surface that is not normally accessible to a persons residence and, therefore, some travel must ensue between the place of residence and the place of participating in the sport. Ordinarily, this means that a special type of footwear must be carried to the place where the person is participating in the sport while a different type of footwear is worn during transit. It is, therefore, very desirable, for children especially, to have a type of athletic shoe which can be worn to and from the place of participation in the sport as well as being used during the participation in the sport.

Finally, another desirable feature of an athletic shoe that is particularly adapted to be worn to and from a place of sport participation is that the particular shoe be usable when the athletic shoe is not oriented toward participation in any sport. In other words, athletic shoes are, by the very terminology athletic shoes, oriented to participation in athletics and are not normally oriented toward simply walking from one place to another.

The problem of adapting a particular shoe design, for example, to be used in various athletic sports has been recognized in the art only to a very limited extent. For example, the prior art shows soles for shoes that have permanently affixed thereto various types of apparatus adaptable for use in a particular sport. However, the sole when affixed to the shoe represents a permanent installation, and the apparatus cannot be switched from one form to another to adapt that particular shoe for use in various sports. The real problem in this arrangement is that a manufacturer can design a single shoe and attach thereto various types of apparatus, but this apparatus is not interchangeable once mounted and so that particular shoe cannot be re-oriented toward a dilferent sport.

The prior art also teaches ordinary street shoes that are adaptable for use as golf shoes, for example, by the addition of clamp-on cleats or ice skate and roller skate arrangements that likewise are adapted to be clamped to the sides of the sole of the street shoe for use in that particular sport. It is obvious, however, that a street shoe is not an athletic shoe, and the required resilience and locally reinforced construction of an athletic shoe that protects portions of the feet of the user in certain sports, is not normally found in street shoes. Similarly, a basketball shoe may be suitable for use in going back and forth to the place where the sport of basketball is being played, but again the limitation is to basketball and possibly street use but does not include any other sports. This lack is due to the fact that a basketball shoe is not particularly adapted for use in any sports requiring peculiar surface engaging means such as football cleats.

The prior art has recognized the need for steel support structures in the soles of shoes when attaching various forms of playing surface engaging elements thereto, while recognizing the need for a certain amount of resiliency in the sole of the shoe. This dilemma has caused the shoe builders of the prior art to provide various flexing means between steel plates in the soles of the shoes so that the shoe is adaptable for use in sports even after the playing surface engaging elements are worn down. A typical example of this is a steel golf spike that is replaceable and can be threaded into a metallic insert in the sole of the shoe, in some cases the full sole being of metallic construction. Football shoes of common design, likewise allow for the replacement of cleats but are certainly not adapted for use in any other sport other than those involving the need for traction on a sodded surface such as lacrosse or soccer.

The present invention contemplates the solution of the problems in the pror art by providing a shoe adaptable for use in a plurality of sports wherein a sole structure is of a flexible construction and has recesses formed therein. Means are provided with portions which are adapted to be matingly received in the recesses and with other portions attached thereto or formed integrally therewith for engaging a playing surface. In a preferred form, these last mentioned means can be composed of a plastic material. The use of plastic in the form herein described allows for ordinary holding means, for example screws, to be anchored into the sole of the shoe at the base of the recess with sufficient force that the plastic material is deformed to resiliently retain the holding means in its operative position. This is a solution to the well known problem of cleats becoming loose and falling from their mounting in a sole of an athletic shoe. Plastic inserts adapted to be received in the recesses can be cast into a plurality of shapes so as to form cleats of rectangular cross section adapted for use in baseball, cleats of elongated frustoconical shape arranged to penetrate a cindered surface thereby adapting the shoe for use in track, and cleats of wider frusto-conical shape arranged to penetrate a sodded surface thereby adapting the shoe for use in football, soccer or lacrosse, etc.

By the incorporation of a simple adjusting means, the plastic member insertable into the recesses can be attached to an ice skating blade or a set of roller skates further adapting the same athletic shoe herein described for use in those sports. An ice skating blade, for example, which is normally of metal construction can be attached in any well known manner to the plastic insert with an adjustment provided therebetween so that the same blade and insert assembly can be used with various size shoes having the complementary shaped recesses formed in the sole thereof.

The present invention also contemplates a shoe adaptable for use in a plurality of sports, the shoe comprising a foot retaining portion and a sole portion attached to the foot retaining portion, the sole portion having an exposed surface defining a plane and having a peripheral ridge integrally formed therewith and extending perpendicularly with respect to said plane to provide the primary wearing surface for the sole portion while the shoe is not oriented for use in a particular sport. This shoe can be further modified so that the recesses used to receive the complementary formed plastic means, previously described, can also be adapted to receive complementary shaped inserts that extend out as far as the extension of the peripheral ridge but without any particular form of surface engaging apparatus formed thereon adapting the shoe to be used for ordinary street wear.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide an improved athletic shoe adaptable for use in a plurality of sports wherein a sole structure has recesses therein adapted to receive apparatus having portions of complementary shape to that of the recesses and a particular type of sport-oriented surface engaging means formed therewith.

It is another object of the present invention to provide an improved athletic shoe wherein the surface engaging portions of the shoe are composed of a plastic material.

It is still another object of the present invention to provide an improved athletic shoe wherein the surface engaging elements thereof are anchored to the shoe with sufficient force to deform the plastic material thereby resiliently retaining the anchoring means in its operative position.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide an improved athletic shoe wherein a plastic element is adapted to fit into the recesses in the sole thereof with integrally formed surface engaging means.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide an improved athletic shoe that is adapted to have ice skating apparatus removably attached thereto.

It is still a further object of the present invention to provide an improved athletic shoe that is adapted to have a roller skating apparatus removably attached thereto.

It is yet a further object of the present invention to provide an improved athletic shoe wherein the sole portion thereof has a peripheral ridge extending therearound adapted to provide the primary wearing surface for said sole portion on an operative surface.

Other objects and attendant advantages of the present invention will be readily appreciated as the same becomes better understood by reference to the following detailed description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is an exploded perspective view of the subject athletic shoe including surface engaging elements for baseball.

FIG. la is a perspective view of elements not oriented for use in a particular sport adapted for use with the shoe of FIG. 1.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a portion of the assembly of FIG. 1 in assembled disposition.

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along line 33 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of surface engaging elements of the present invention in the form of track or golf spikes.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the surface engaging elements of the subject invention in the form of football cleats.

FIG. 6 is an exploded perspective view of the subject invention wherein the surface engaging elements are roller skates.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a surface engaging element in the form of an ice skate.

Referring to FIG. 1, a shoe generally designated by the numeral 10 is illustrated as having a foot retaining portion 12 and a sole portion 14 attached to the foot retaining portion 12. Sole portion 14 has an exposed surface 16 defining a plane, and a peripheral ridge 18 is integrally formed therewith and extends perpendicularly with respect to the plane of the surface 16. In this manner the peripheral ridge 18 represents the primary wearing surface of the sole portion 14 when shoe 10 is not oriented for use in a particular sport.

Referring to FIG. la the sole portion 14 has a recess 20 and a recess 22 formed therein which are adapted to receive complementary shaped inserts 24 and 26 respectively. Inserts 24 and 26 are of a dimension that allows them to exactly fill recesses 20 and 22 respectively relative to their lateral dimensions, and they extend out from the exposed surface 16 of sole portion 14 an amount equal to the extension of the peripheral ridge 18 when shoe 10 is not oriented for use in a particular sport. The addition of inserts 24 and 26 is optional and merely provides an auxiliary wearing surface to peripheral ridge 18 so that the edges of recesses 20 and 22 are not worn while the shoe is being worn for street use and also prevents dirt from impacting therein for reasons to be hereinafter explained.

The sole portion 14 is preferably of a resilient material such as rubber, and the recesses 20 and 22 are adapted to receive various types of surface engaging elements to be hereinatfer described when shoe 10 is oriented for use in a particular sport. Referring to FIG. 1, means generally designated by numeral 28 is in two parts, both composed of any well known plastic material having a certain amount of rigidity with a first portion 30 adapted to be matingly received in recess 20, and a first portion 32 adapted to be matingly received in recess 22. Therefore, as herein described, means 28 comprises generally triangular first portion 30 and a generally oval shape first portion 32, collectively forming a surface engaging means. Second portion 34 of first portion 30 are cleats of generally rectangular cross section adapting shoe 10 to be used in the sport of baseball. correspondingly, first portion 32 has similarly shaped second portions 34 and is adapted to be inserted in recess 22 near the heel of shoe 10 to complete the surface engaging means adapting shoe 10 to be used for baseball.

Referring to FIG. 3, the method of attaching means 28 to shoe 10 is illustrated. Only one point of attachment is shown, but it is understood that three similar points of attachment can be included for first portion 30 and two similar types of attachment can be provided for first portion 32. The fastening means for anchoring the various inserts to the sole portion of the shoe within the respective recesses as shown in FIG. 3 and includes an anchor member 36 in the form of an internally threaded nut which is received in a cavity 36a formed in the material of the sole portion. A fastener receiving passage 3612 provides communication between cavity 36a and the respective recess 20 or 22, passage 36b receiving one of the hollow projections 36c extending from the upper surface of the respective inserts 28. A fastener in the form of a screw 38 extends through the hollow projection 36c into detachable threaded engagement with the anchor member 36. Anchor 3 6 and screw 38 cooperate to form a holding means with screw 38 passing through an aperture in first portion 32 engaging anchor 36 with sufficient force so that the plastic material of portion 32 is deformed slightly which serves to retain screw 38 against casual withdrawal. It is understood that screw 38 is shown herein in illustrative form, but other appropriate holding means can be provided to engage anchor 36 such as Allen type screws or simple slotted screws. Therefore, both portion 30 and portion 32 are resiliently held in recesses 20 and 22 respectively and can be readily removed as desired and a substitution made with other apparatus to be hereinafter described.

'Referring to FIG. 4, the plastic member or first portion 30 is identical to that shown in the embodiment of FIG. 1 but integrally formed therewith is shown a series of elongated frusto-conical shaped cleats 40 arranged to penetrate a cinder surface thereby adapting shoe 10, so modified, for use in track. The mode of attachment of the embodiment of FIG. 4 in recesses 20 and 22- is identical to that previously described for the embodiment of FIG. 1.

Referring to FIG. 5, again first portion 30 and first portion 32 are identical to the embodiment shown in FIG. 1 but integrally formed therewith are a plurality of frusto-couical shaped cleats 42 arranged to penetrate a sodded surface thereby adapting shoe 10 for use in sports such as football, soccer, lacrosse, etc. The mode of attachment of the embodiment of FIG. 5 is identical to that described for FIG. 4.

Referring to FIG. 6, shoe is similar to that shown in the embodiment of FIG. 1 but has an ankle support for use in a particular operative environment to be described. However, it should be understood that the form shoe 10 takes, whether low top or high top, is not important to the subject invention except that some sports require more ankle support than others, and it would be totally within the province of the designer of a particular shoe to choose the high or low top version as desired. In a description of the embodiments of FIGS. 6 and 7, the same reference numerals will be applied for similar parts to those set forth in the embodiment of FIG. 1. First portion 30 is again adapted to be matingly received in recess 20. Attached thereto is a member 44 adjustably mateable with member 46 in turn attached in any well known fashion to first portion 32. Formed as a portion of member 44 is a roller skate assembly generally designated by numeral 48 and similarly formed with member 46 is a roller skate assembly thereby designated by numeral Therefore, in much the same manner as described for the previous embodiments, portion 30 is adapted to fit into and be anchored in recess 20, and portion 32 is similarly adapted to fit into and mate in locking engagement with recess 22. Members 44 and 46 are slidably adjustably related so that the roller skate assemblies 48 and 50 can be readily aflixed to different size shoes.

Referring to FIG. 7, in a very similar fashion to the embodiment of FIG. 6, an ice skating blade is generally designated by numeral 52 and is attached to members 44 and 46 adapting portions 30 and 32 to mate with recesses 20 and 22 respectively to adapt shoe 10 to be used for ice skating. One difference in structure exists in that bolt 54, insertable through support member 56 and through slot 58 in ice skate blade 52, is designed to accommodate the subject mechanism to be fitted to various size shoes.

Therefore, it is seen how a typical athletic shoe, such as a childs sneaker, can be utilized as an athletic shoe adaptable for use in a plurality of sports. It is understood that various sports require different types of surface engaging elements both for safety of the wearer of the shoe as well as for maximum participation in the sport. The problem of children growing as well as participating in many sports is solved by the subject device in that a single shoe can be readily adapted to be worn both as a street shoe and a shoe that, with slight modifications, receives inserts that are oriented toward a particular sport. It is likewise obvious that the inserts can be of standard design and shape and can fit many shoes. Likewise, when the shoe wears out, a new shoe can be purchased having the same adaptations and can again accept the inserts previously used. In the case of the baseball spikes, track spikes and football cleats, the expense of providing a replacement may not be too great in view of the plastic construction. However, in the embodiments of FIGS. 6 and 7, namely a roller skate and an ice skate, expense could be much greater and, therefore, these forms are not only suitable for use in a different shoe but are also adjustable so that if a larger shoe is bought for a growing child, the adaptations can still be used.

Such versatility as demonstrated by the shoe of the subject invention is not seen in the prior art. In addition, it is obvious that the forms of sport-oriented devices such as golf spikes, field-polo spikes, and other sport-oriented surface engaging apparatus, not specifically described herein, are meant to be included in that it is completely within the spirit of the invention to make such an insert of plastic or of any material readily adaptable to being formed into required shapes and then be inserted into the sole of the shoe.

In addition, the subject shoe overcomes the short coming of the prior art that sets a requirement of a metallic insert within the sole of the shoe to support the surface engaging elements because the torque acting against the side of such elements while the sport is being played can distort the sole of the shoe. The subject invention provides enough area in recesses 20 and 22 so that there is no requirement for a metallic insert which "would unduly stiffen the sole of the shoe and seriously limit the utility of the shoe in various sports. It is obvious that a stiffer shoe can be tolerated in a golf shoe than could be tolerated in a track shoe, for example. Additionally, the feature of plastic or other resilient material in helping to retain the screws or holding means in position by a lock-washer type action generated there between is a feature that is important in that not only is the loss of the particular sport oriented surface engaging element prevented, but the integral nature of the spike arrangements prevents the loss of an individual spike thereby precluding chance of injury due to an imbalance in the surface engaging element. It should also be noted that the resilient nature of the baseball spike and track spike, for example, injects another level of safety in that while being sufficiently rigid to hold the wearer of the shoe in place on a playing surface, the resilience of the spike material allows a certain amount tof bending when a hard object is struck.

The invention has been described in an illustrative manner, and it is to be understood that the terminology which has been used is intended to be in the nature of words of description rather than of limitation.

Obviously, many modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in light of the above teachiugs. It is, therefore, to be understood that within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described.

I claim:

1. A sport shoe comprising: a foot retaining portion; a sole portion having an exposed bottom surface; a recess formed in said exposed bottom surface; an insert having a first portion received in said recess and having a shape complementary to said recess; fastening means detachably securing said first portion of said insert to said sole portion within said recess; said insert having a second portion depending therefrom for engaging. the walking surface during use by the wearer; and a peripheral ridge on said sole portion projecting outwardly from said exposed bottom surface.

2. A sport shoe as claimed in claim 1 wherein said fastening means comprises a plurality of fastener engaging anchor members embedded in the material of said sole portion; a passage for each of said anchor members providing communication between said anchor member and said recess; a hollow projection on the first portion of said insert received in each passage; and a fastener extending through each hollow projection into detachable engagement with the anchor member associated therewith.

3. A sport shoe as claimed in claim 2 wherein said second portion of said insert comprises a plurality of cleats depending from said first portion.

4. A sport shoe as claimed in claim 2 wherein said second portion comprises an ice skating blade.

5. A sport shoe as claimed in claim 2 wherein said second portion comprises roller skate rollers.

6. A sport shoe as claimed in claim 1 wherein said second portion of said insert comprises a plurality of cleats depending from said first portion.

7. A sport shoe as claimed in claim 1 wherein said second portion comprises an ice skating blade.

8. A sport shoe as claimed in claim 1 wherein said second portion comprises roller skate rollers.

9. A sport shoe comprising: a foot retaining portion; a sole portion of resilient material having an exposed bottom surface with a peripheral ridge projecting outwardly therefrom and a pair of recesses spaced fore and aft from each other formed in said bottom surface; an insert for each of said recesses, each of said inserts having a first portion of complementary size and shape to its respective recess which is received in and fills said recess; two groups of fastener engaging anchor members embedded in the material of said sole portion. each group being located in said sole portion within the area defined by one of said recesses; a fastener receiving opening formed in the material of the sole portion providing communication between each anchor member and its associated recess; a hollow projection received in each of said passages, said hollow projection extending from the first portion of the associated insert; a fastener extending through each hollow projection into detachable engagement with the associated anchor member to detachably secure the inserts to said sole portion with said first portions received in said recesses; and each of said inserts having second portions depending from said first portions comprising sport oriented surface engaging means for engaging the surface during sporting use by the wearer, said peripheral ridge being engageable with the surface during non-sporting use by the wearer when the inserts are detached from said sole portion.

10. A sport shoe as claimed in claim 9 wherein said second portions comprise a plurality or cleats on each of said inserts depending from said first portions.

11. A sport shoe as claimed in claim 9 wherein said second portions comprise a pair of roller skate rollers mounted on each of said inserts.

12. A sport shoe as claimed in claim 9 wherein said second portions comprise a supporting member depending from the first portion of each insert, and an ice skating blade attached to each of said support members, said ice skating blade being adjustably connected with at least one of said supporting members.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,442,033 5/1969 Hilburn 362.5 2,034,050 3/1936 Levy.

2,276,887 3/ 1942 Smith.

3,054,197 9/ 1962 Morgan et al.

3,410,005 11/1968 Szerenyi.

r PATRICK D. LAWSON, Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R. 3 6--67

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