US3481675A - Pen - Google Patents

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US3481675A
US3481675A US3481675DA US3481675A US 3481675 A US3481675 A US 3481675A US 3481675D A US3481675D A US 3481675DA US 3481675 A US3481675 A US 3481675A
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pen
tube
stylus
reservoir
liquid
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Seymour Greenberg
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Seymour Greenberg
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B43WRITING OR DRAWING IMPLEMENTS; BUREAU ACCESSORIES
    • B43KIMPLEMENTS FOR WRITING OR DRAWING
    • B43K8/00Pens with writing-points other than nibs or balls

Description

Dec. 2, 1969 s. GREENBr-:RG 3,481,675
PEN
Filed Jan. 22, 1968 4 Sheets-Sheet l v/Enron. 5.SYEYMOUR GREENBERG &
ATTORNEYS.
Dec. 2, 1969 s, enr-:masas PEN 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 22, 1968 INVENTOR. SEYMOUR GREENBERG ATT OHNE YS.
Dec. 2, 1969 s. GRENBERG PEN 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Jan. 22, 1968 A TTOR/VEYS.
Den4 2, 1969 s. GREENBERG 3,481,675
PEN
Filed Jan. 22, 1968 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 ATTORNEYS.
United States Patent O 3,481,675 PEN Seymour Greenberg, 2131 Spruce St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19103 Filed Jan. 22, 1968, Ser. No. 699,712
Int. Cl. B43k 5/02, 8/00 U.S. Cl. 401--35 12 Claims ABSTRACT F THE DISCLOSURE A pen having an elongated body 4which houses a reservoir of liquid and means for dispensing said liquid. The means for dispensing the liquid comprises at least one elongated tube and an elongated stylus. The rst end of the tube extends into the reservoir and has a iirst opening which communicates with the liquid. The other end of the tube extends out of the body. The stylus extends through the tube and is anchored at one end relative to the body of the pen. The other end of the stylus projects beyond the other end of the tube. The stylus is thus adapted to be used as a marking surface of the pen and enables breaking up of the clogging in the reservoir and tube when the stylus is urged against a writing surface and pressure is then quickly released to cause a snapping action.
This invention relates generally to pens and more particularly to a pen ywhich is specifically adapted to be a tool for an artist.
Conventional pens are inadequate insofar as artistic uses are concerned. The conventional pen is unable to accept the highly viscous liquids which are used by an artist and conventional pens are capable of drawing only a single thickness of line. Moreover, where viscous fluids are used, the reservoir in the pen rapidly clogs up and causes caking which prevents further use of the artists pen without extensive cleaning.
It is therefore an object of the invention to overcome the aforementioned disadvantages.
Another object of the invention is to provide a new and improved pen which dispenses viscous liquids and which includes means for breaking up clogging and caking of said liquids in the pen.
Anther object of the invention is to provide a new and improved pen which can dispense a plurality of liquids.
Another object of the invention is to provide a new and improved pen which includes a plurality of reservoirs for a plurality of liquids and means for dispensing and cornbining said liquids.
Anther object of the invention is to provide a new and improved pen for regulating the rate of the liquid dispensed.
Another object of the invention is to provide a new and improved pen which dispenses a plurality of liquids selectively and in proportion to the pressure applied.
Another object of the invention is to provide a new and improved pen which combines capillary action with pressure feed action for dispensing a plurality of liquids.
Another object of the invention is to provide a new and improved stylus for a reservoir type pen Iwhich enables dispensing and guiding the liquid on a writing surface and prevents caking and clogging in the flow line between the reservoir and the stylus.
Another object of the invention is to provide a new and improved pen which is inexpensive to manufacture yet which provides the artist with great flexibility in use.
These and other objects of the invention are achieved by providing a pen having an elongated body which houses a reservoir of liquid and means for dispensing the liquid. The means for dispensing the liquid comprises at "ice least one elongated tube and an elongated stylus. The first end of the tube extends into the reservoir and has an opening which communicates with the liquid. The other end of the tube extends out of the body. The stylus extends through the tube and is anchored at one end relative to the body of the pen. The other end of the stylus projects beyond the other end of the tube. The stylus is adapted to be used as a marking surface for the pen and enables breaking up of clogging in the reservoir and the tube by urging the stylus against a surface and releasing quickly.
Other objects and many of the attendant advantages of this invention will be readily appreciated as the same becomes better understood by reference to the following detailed description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein:
FIG. l is a side elevational view of a preferred embodiment of the pen embodying the invention with the casing and end caps shown in vertical section;
FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary side elevational view of the pen embodying the invention with portions shown in vertical section;
FIG. 3 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the pen embodying the invention with the casing shown in section and the tip removed for enabling reloading of a compartment in the pen;
FIG. 4 is a fragmentary side elevational view of an alternate stylus embodying the invention;
FIG. 5 is a fragmentary side elevational view of a second alternate stylus embodying the invention;
FIG. 6 is a diagrammatic side elevational view of the operation of the pen embodying the invention ywith the casing shown in vertical section showing liquid being emitted from a first compartment of the reservoir to the tip of the pen;
FIG. 7 is a diagrammatic side elevational view of the operation of the pen embodying the invention with the casing shown in vertical section showing the liquid in a second compartment of the reservoir being emitted to the tip of the pen;
FIG. 8 is an enlarged vertical fragmentary cross-sectional view of an alternate tip assembly embodying the invention;
FIG. 9 is an exploded side elevational view of a pen embodying the alternate tip assembly with the stylus removed;
FIG. 10 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional view of an alternative pen embodying the invention which is preferably adapted for dispensing an epoxy glue;
FIG. 11 is an exploded side elevational view shown partially in section illustrating the tip of the pen for epoxy glue being removed for purposes of refilling the compartment;
FIG. l2 is a vertical sectional view of a second alternate pen embodying the invention having a combination capillary action and pressure feed action for dispensing the liquid in the reservoirs;
FIG. 13 is a sectional view taken along the line 13--13 in FIG. 12;
FIG. 14 is an enlarged perspective view of an alternate tip embodying the invention;
FIG. l5 is a fragmentary side elevational View of the tip shown in IFIG. 14; and
FIG. 16 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional view of a pen embodying the invention having a single liquid reservoir.
Referring now in greater detail to the various figures of the drawing wherein similar reference characters refer to similar parts, a pen embodying the invention is shown generally at 20 in FIG. 1.
Pen 20 is suitable for artistic purposes and basically comprises an elongated hollow cylindrical casing 22, a
tip assembly 24, an end cap 26 and a tip assembly cap 28. The casing is preferably comprised of a somewhat exible thermoplastic resin.
`Casing 22 includes a circular planar transversely extending wall 30 which is provided centrally of the bore which forms a reservoir comprised of a pair of reservoir compartments 32 and 34. Reservoir 32 is enclosed at its uppermost end by end cap 26 which is threadedly secured at 38 to the cylindrical casing 22. End cap 26 is removed by rotation thereof to enable refilling of the reseroir 32.
The tip assembly 24 is best seen in FIGS. l and 3 and basically comprises a body portion 48 which is preferably comprised of a soft elastomer, a rst rigid cylindrical tube 42 which extends longitudinally through the body 40 and a second rigid cylindrical tube 44 which extends parallel to tube 42 through the body 40 of the tip assembly 24. Tubes 42 and 44 are substantially rigid. Tube 42 is connected via a flexible tube 46 which extends from the end of tube 42 to the compartment 32 of pen 20 through wall 30. Tube 44 includes an elongated longitudinally extending opening or slot 48 which is provided by removal of a portion of the wall of tube 44. The slot 48 is located adjacent the lowermost end of compartment 34 of the reservoir. The end of the tube 44 is closed ofr at 49. As will hereinafter be seen, the slot 48 enables liquid in compartment `34 to enter tube 44.
The tip assembly 24 further includes a stylus 50 which is preferably comprised of stranded steel wire and which includes a first longitudinally extending leg 52, a second longitudinally extending leg 54 and a transversely extending bridging section 56. Leg 52 is substantially straight and extends into the tube 42. Leg 54 is elongated and includes a straight portion S8, a slightly arcuate portion 60 and an end portion 62. The end of the leg 54 of the stylus is secured to the end of tube 44 by crimping the end of tube 44 to end portion 62. Portion 60 of the leg 54 is projected arcuately out of opening 48 by a bead 64 which is telescoped over leg 54 about section 60` thereof. The bead maintains the arcuate deformation of portion of the leg and, as will hereinafter be seen, when bridging section 56 of the tip assembly is moved upwardly to the position shown in phantom at 56', the portion 60 is moved to the position shown at 60 in phantom. The bead 64, of course, moves wtih the portion 60" and is shown at 64.
As best seen in FIG. 3, body portion 40 of the tip includes a generally cylindrically shaped insert portion 66 having an annular bead 68 about the periphery thereof which portion is inserted into the mouth 70* of reservoir 34 of the pen 20. Annular bead 68 enables the body 40 of the tip to be snapped into the mouth 70 of the reservoir 34. Mouth 70 includes an enlarged portion or annular recess 72 which receives the annular bead 68. The forwardmost portion 73 of the body portion 40 of the tip assembly is somewhat conically formed to provide a tapered end piece. At the base of the portion 73 is an integral cylindrical Central section 71. Section 71 is larger than insert portion 66 of body 40 and thereby acts as a shoulder when the body portion of 40 is inserted in the mouth 70' of compartment 54.
The lowermost portion of the casing 22 is threaded at 74. Cap 28 is best seen in FIG. l and includes a bore 76 which is substantially complementary to the outer dimensions of body portion 40 of the tip assembly. At the mouth of bore 76 threads are provided for threadedly securing the cap to the casing at 74. To use the pen 20, cap 28 is removed by suitable rotation thereof. The body portion of tip 40 is removed from the mouth 70 of reservoir 34 to enable placement of a rst liquid in reservoir 34. After a suitable amount of liquid is placed into compartment 34, the body portion 40 is inserted back into the mouth 70 of the compartment as shown in FIG. 2. Cap 26 is removed to fill reservoir 32 with a second liquid. It should be noted that both compartments are atmospherically sealed about tubes 42 and 44. The only opening into each compartment is through tubes 42 and 44, respectively.
Referring now to FIG. 6, which is a diagrammatic illustration of the use of the pen 20, where it is desired to dispense liquid 87 which is located in reservoir 32, the cylindrical walls of casing 22 about the reservoir 32 are pressed at 80 and 82 preferably by urging the walls in the direction of arrows 84 and 86 and liquid 78 is thereby urged through `flexible tube 46 into the inexible tube 42 in the direction of arrow 88 and onto stylus S0. Thus, pen 20 is used to write with liquid 78 by pressing the side walls of reservoir 32 of the pen. The bridging section 56 of the stylus is then used to apply the liquid to a writing surface.
Referring now to FIG. 7, it can be seen that to enable pen 20 to write with liquid 90` in reservoir 34 of the pen, it is necessary only to press together the side walls of reservoir 34 at 92 and 94 in the directions of arrows 98 and 100, respectively. Liquid 90 is expressed into opening 48 of tube 44 and out of the end of tube 44 in the direction of arrow 102. Thus, by pressing only the walls about reservoir 34, liquid is expressed only out of reservoir 34 onto stylus 50 and thereby enables pen 20 to write only with the liquid 90.
It should be understood that the rate at which liquids 78 and 90 are used is controllable by the pressure applied to reservoirs 32 and 34, respectively. Thus, if a dry line is required, it is necessary only to hold the pen about the liquid to be used and the warmth of the hand is enough to urge a trickle of the liquid onto stylus 50 for writing therewith. If a large quantity of liquid is to be dispensed in a short stroke, the pressure may be manually added to the walls about the liquid to be dispensed.
Where it is desired that a combination of the liquids be applied to a writing surface, it is necessary only to press the walls about both of the reservoirs. In this manner, liquids 78 and 90 are dispensed simultaneously and thereby enable a mixing of the two liquids.
Although a transversely extending bridging section 56 is preferable, the bridging section of stylus 50 may also be V-shaped as shown in FIG. 4. Thus, stylus 50 includes a V-shaped bridging section 104 in place of the bridging section 56. The stylus is otherwise similar.
A stylus with an arcuately shaped bridging section 106 is shown in FIG. 5. The remainder of the stylus 50 is otherwise unchanged. Bridging sections 104 and 106 of the alternate styluses shown in FIGS. 4 and 5 enable the artist to use a narrower tip or a broader tip where desired. The bridging sections 104 and 106 enable both a thin line and wide line depending on the angle at which the pen is held with respect to the writing surface.
After pen 20 has been used, the cap 28 is screwed onto the top of the pen and the pen is put in storage until used again.
The next time the pen is used, to clear tubes 42 and 44, it is necessary only to press the stylus 50 against a firm surface thereby causing the bridging section or web 56 to be moved to the position shown at 56 in FIG. 2. By releasing pressure quickly from the pen, the stylus 50 snaps out so that web 56 assumes its former position. The particles formed in the tubes 42 and 44 by drying and caking of the liquids 78 and 90 are cleared out of the tubes and the liquids 78 and 90` are thus able to flow again therethrough when pressure is applied to either of compartments 32 or 34.
It can be seen that the pen is inexpensive to manufacture and enables the artist to have a great deal of flexibility. A pen is provided which includes a reservoir for two different types of liquid. Thus, different colored inks may be stored in the pen and may be used individually or in combination. The stylus 50 enables the user to write with either a thin line or a thick line. The line may be dry or wet depending on the pressure applied to the individual compartments or reservoirs.
Bead 64, which is provided around arcuate portion 60 of leg 54 of stylus 50, enables the spring action to be provided when the stylus 50 is pressed against a firm surface. Thus, a viscous liquid such as an oil or -water based paint may be used as well as various inks. The pen 20 can therefore be seen to be a versatile tool to the artist.
A pen embodying the invention having an alternate tip assembly is shown generally at 120 in FIGS. 8 and 9. Casing 122 of pen 120 is similar to casing 22 of pen 20 and includes a first reservoir 132 and a second reservoir 134 which are both compressible by pressing the walls thereof. The reservoirs 132 and 134 are separated by a transversely extending integral circular wall 130. The pen 120 also includes a tip assembly 124 which basically comprises a body 140 which is similar to body 40 of pen 20.
The tip assembly 120 also includes a pair of longitudinally extending tubes 142 and 144 which are parallel to each other and extend through body 140. Tube 142 terminates adjacent the rear surface 145 of body portion 140 of the tip assembly 120. A U-shaped supporting member 146 is connected to the end 148 of tube 142. Supporting member 146 includes a pair of transversely extending legs 150 and 152 and a longitudinally extending elongated web 154. A pair of integral annular collars 151 and 153 are provided at the end of legs 150 and 152, respectively. The member 146 is connected to the end 148 of tube 142 preferably by welding collar 151 about tube 142. Leg 152 is connected to a conically shaped receptacle 156 preferably by welding collar 153 about receptacle 156. The base of the conically shaped receptacle 156 faces the end 148 of tube 142. Tube 144 extends through the body 140 and projects beyond the rear surface 145 to and through wall 130 into compartment 132. The tube 144 is permanently aixed to wall 130. The bore of the tube 144 thus extends from the compartment 132 through body 140 out of the pen. The tube 144 is tightly tted into the body 140 of the tip assembly, however, the body 140 may be slid off the tube 144 for loading compartment 134. When the body 140 is replaced, the tube is inserted in the opening provided therefor and the seal between the body and the tube 144 is restored and compartment 134 is again closed.
A U-shaped stylus 160 is provided at the tip assembly 120. The stylus 160 includes a pair of straight elongated legs 162 and 164 which are parallel to each other. An integral bridging section 166 which extends transversely is integral therebetween. The stylus 160 is placed into operation with the tip assembly by inserting legs 162 and 164 into tubes 142 and 144, respectively.
The stylus is pressed inwardly of the pen 120 until leg 162 is pressed into and secured in the apex of conically shaped member 156. Pen 120 is operated similarly to pen 20 in all respects. However, it is not necessary to pull out body member 140 and the tip assembly in order to change styluses. Thus, for example, a stylus similar to stylus 160 but having tips 104 and 106 such as those shown in FIGS. 4 and 5 may be interchangeably replaced with stylus 160 in the pen shown i-n FIGS. 8 and 9.
As best seen in FIG. 8, by urging the pen against the surface, the bridge section 164 is urged in the direction of arrow 170 which thereby causes the bridging section 164 to be moved upwardly as shown in phantom at 164. The leg 162 is caused to deform and become an arcuately shaped section as show-n at 162' in phantom. The quick release of pressure causes the bottom bridging section 164 to snap back into place thereby causing any clogging in the tubes 142 and 144 to be broken up and thereby clearing the way for the liquids in the reservoirs 132 and 134 to be dispensed.
Refering now to FIGS. and l1, a pen embodying the invention for use with epoxy glue is shown generally at 220. Pen 220 basically comprises a casing 222 which is similar to casing 22 having a first reservoir 224 and a second reservoir 226. The reservoirs are separated by a transversely extending circular wall 228. The pen 220 further includes a tip assembly 230 which includes a body portion 232, a pair of tubes 234 and 236 and a stylus 238. The tubes 234 and 236 are preferably made of T eon or polyethylene plastic which are epoxy glue resistant. Tube 234 extends through body 232 and through reservoir 226 through wall 228 and into reservoir 224. The tube 234 is xedly secured to wall 228. The tube 236 extends through body 232 into reservoir 226. The stylus 238 basically comprises a pair of legs 240 and 242 and a bridging section 244.
As best seen in FIG. 11, leg 242 includes at the end thereof a loop 246 which is preferably secured by crimping to the end of leg 244 at 248.
As best seen in FIG. 11, to assemble the tip assembly on the pen, loop 246 is placed over tube 234 and tube 234 is then telescoped over leg 240 of stylus 238. Tube 234 is then inserted in the opening in body member 232 of the tip assembly 230. A seal is formed between the outer surface of tube 234 and the opening in body 232. A tip assembly cap 254 which is threadedly secured to the casing 222 is placed over the tip assembly when pen 220 is not in use. A removable end cap 255 is removed for filling compartment 224.
As best seen in FIG. 10, when the body 232 is placed in the mouth of reservoir 236, the loop 246 is flush against the wall 228. By urging the pen 220 against a rm surface, the leg 242 is bent thereby providing a spring action urging the bridging section 244 out of the pen. Thus, when pressure is released, the spring action breaks up any clogging that has been caused in the epoxy glue resistant tubes 234 and 236.
The two components of the epoxy glue are placed in the separate reservoirs. Thus, a resin 250 is preferably placed in the reservoir 224 and a hardener 252 is placed in reservoir 226. It should be understood that the placement may be interchanged. So long as the epoxy glue does not have its components mixed, there is no harden- The reservoirs 224 and 226 are similar to those in the pen 20 and are therefore deformable so that the cornponents of the epoxy may be pressed out of the reservoirs through the respective tubes 234 and 236 and yare guided accordingly via the stylus onto the paper. The hardener and the resin can then be mixed by the stylus 238 thereby enabling the application of the epoxy glue in a neat manner and thereby obviating any mixture of the hardener with the resin that is not used.
If, by chance, any resin and hardener should become mixed within either of tubes 234 or 236, the spring action of stylus 238 is suicient to overcome the clogging caused as a result thereof. The epoxy glue resistant surface of the material used to form tubes 234 and 236 further facilitates the removal of clogging when the spring action is put into elect by pressing the bridging section 244 against a firm surface and releasing pressure quickly.
Referring now to FIG. 12, a combination capillary action and pressure feed pen embodying the invention is shown generally at 320. Pen 320 basically comprises a cylindrical casing 322 which includes a pair of longitudinally extending compartments 324 and 326 which both extend longitudinally along the length of the casing 322 and are separated by a diametrically extending wall 328. Compartment 324 is adapted to have inserted therein a self-contained reservoir 340 which has rigid walls to prevent pressure thereon from deforming the same.
Compartment 326 acts as a reservoir and the compartment thereof is deformable by pressing the walls of the casing 332. The tip assembly 342 basically comprises a capillary tip assembly 344 and a pressure tip assembly 346. The capillary tip assembly includes an insert 348 which is threadedly secured within the barrel of compartment 324 and which communicates with reservoir 340. The tip assembly 342 includes a rigid tube 350 which extends into the insert 348 of the capillary tube `assembly which communicates with the reservoir 340. An opening is provided at 352 which enables atmospheric pressure to be inserted into the capillary tip assembly in order to allow automatic feed of the liquid in reservoir 340 through tube 350.
The pressure feed tip assembly 346 comprises a plug 354 which is inserted into the mouth of reservoir 326 and a tube 356. Tube 356 extends through plug 354 into the reservoir 326. The tube is substantially straight and includes an elongated opening 358 which is adjacent the bottom of reservoir 326 and which is similar to opening 48 in pen 20. A stylus 360 is provided having a pair of legs 362 and 364 and a bridging section 366. The leg 362 extends into insert 348 of the capillary tip assembly. The leg 364 extends through the tube 356 and is terminated at the end 368 of the tube by crimping. A bead 370 is provided about leg 364 in order to form an arcuate section to provide a spring action when the stylus 360 is pressed against a firm surface.
In operation, when stylus 360 is against a writing surface, there is a continuous feed of liquid in reservoir 340 through tube 350 to the stylus 360. However, in order to provide liquid through tube 356 to the stylus 360 it is necessary to press the wall adjacent the reservoir 326.
Thus, pen 320 acts as both a capillary pen and a com- -bination art pen. In addition, the stylus enables the selection of thickness of line which is desired to be yused by the artist thereby maintaining the fiexibility of the pens described hereinabove and also enabling the writing in a capillary pen fashion.
To refill reservoirs 326 and 340, the tip assemblies of each reservoir are removed together. The insert 348 is uuscrewed and then the plug 354 is pulled avially out of the mouth of the reservoir 326. The entire tip assemblies are thus removed prior to refilling.
Referring now to FIG. 14, an alternate tip assembly embodying the invention which tmay be substituted for tip assembly 24 in pen 20 is shown generally at 420. The tip assembly 420 basically comprises a body member 422 which is similar to body member 40. The tip assembly further includes a pair of tubes 442 and 444 which are similar to tubes 42 and 44, respectively. Finally, the tip assembly includes a stylus 450 which is similar to stylus 50.
A roller 452, which is rotatably mounted about the bridging section of the stylus, is also provided. The stylus 450 is connected to tube 444 in a similar manner to that of stylus 50 and includes a bead 464 which enables the spring action when the stylus is pressed against a firm surface. The roller 452 includes a knurled or embossed surface 454 which enables a pattern to be embossed on a writing surface by urging ink through either tube 442 or 444 to the roller as illustrated in FIG. 15 and rolling roller 452 along the surface.
The tip assembly 420 maintains the advantages of r tip assembly 28 in that different liquids may be used interchangeably with roller tip 454. Moreover, roller 454 enables the quick application of the pattern provided on the roller.
Referring now to HG. 16, a capillary pen embodying the invention is shown generally at 500. Pen 500 basically comprises a cylindrical casing 522 which has -a longitudinally extending bore 524 whic'h acts as a reservoir for a supply of liquid. The bore 524 includes an enlarged mouth which is threaded at 526 in order to receive a capillary tip assembly 528. The capillary tip assembly includes a bore 530 which communicates with the reservoir 524. The forwardmost portion of the capillary tip assembly 528 includes a pair of tubes 532 and 534. Tube 532 and tube 534 are parallel to each other and extend through the lowermost portion 536 of the capillary tip assembly.
Tube 534 is similar to tube 44 of pen 20 and includes an opening 548. A stylus 550 is provided having a pair of legs 552 and 554. Leg 552 extends into the tube 534 and is secured by crimping at end 558 of the tube 534. A bead 560 is telescoped over the portion of the leg 552 within opening 548. Bead 560 acts similarly to bea-d 64 to enable a spring action when the V-shaped ti-p 556 of the stylus is urged against a firm surface.
An opening 562 is provided which enables atmospheric pressure to be provided to the reservoir of liquid. Thus, a capillary action enables the liquid in reservoir 524 to be emitted through tubes 532 and 534 to the stylus 550 for application to a Writing surface. The stylus 550 enables cleaning of the bores of tubes 532 and 534 by pressing the stylus against a firm surface thereby enabling the spring action to release any clogging within the bores thereof.
It should also be understood that opening 562 need not be provided if the pen 500 should be operated on a pressure feed basis. To work on the pressure feed basis, the walls of casing 522 are comprised of a deformable material thereby enabling the liquid to be expressed through tubes 532 and 534.
It can therefore be seen that a new and improved pen has been provided. The pen enables an artist to Write for long periods without refilling. The only paint necessary to the artist is neatly stored in the reservoirs of the pen. The stylus enables cleaning of the tubes as well as guiding liquid to the surface and providing a choice of a variety of thicknesses of lines. Various artistic techniques are enabled by providing the reservoirs with a pressure feed tip assembly. Moreover, various points are useable on the stylus to enable a single pen to be used for a variety of types of line drawings. Moreover, an embossing Wheel may be used with the stylus to provide various patterns in Vvarious forms of linking and painting arrangements.
Without further elaboration, the foregoing, will so fully illustrate my invention that others may, by applying current or future knowledge, readily adapt the same for use under various conditions of service.
What is claimed as the invention is:
1. A pen having an elongated body which houses a reservoir of liquid and means for dispensing said liquid, said means for dispensing said liquid comprising a first and second elongated tube and an elongated stylus, the first end of each of said tubes extending into said reservoir and having a first opening communicating with said liquid, the other end of said tubes extending out of said body, a first leg of said stylus extending through said first tube and being anchored at one end relative to said body of said pen, the other end of said first leg of said stylus projecting beyond said other end of said tube, a second leg of said stylus extending through said second tube, said stylus adapted to guide said liquid to a writing surface and to enable removal of hardened materials in said reservoir and tubes by being urged against a firm surface and releasing quickly.
2. The invention of claim 1 wherein said reservoir of said pen is separated into two compartments, each of said compartments having a different liquid, said first tube communicating with a first `of said compartments and said second tube communicating with the other of said compartments.
3. The invention of claim 2 wherein at least one of said compartments is completely sealed so that pressure against the outer wall of said compartment urges liquid through said tube communicating with said compartment.
4. The invention of claim 2 wherein both said first and said second compartments are atmospherically sealed so that pressure on the walls of said compartments is required to emit fluid through the tube associated with said compartment.
5. The invention of claim 2 wherein a first compartment is atmospherically sealed and the other of said compartments includes an opening to the atmosphere, said liquid in said first compartment being emitted through said tube associated with said first compartment only when pressure is applied to the wall of said compartment, said second compartment emitting liquid when said stylus is placed on a writing surface.
6. The invention of claim 1 wherein said stylus includes a transversely extending bridging section.
7. The invention of claim 1 wherein said stylus includes a V-shaped bridging section.
8. The invention of claim 1 wherein said stylus includes an arcuately shaped bridging section.
9. The invention of claim 1 wherein said tubes are comprised of an epoxy glue resistant material, the first compartment of said reservoir having an epoxy resin and the second compartment of said reservoir having an epoxy hardener.
10. A pen having an elongated body which houses a reservoir of liquid and means for dispensing said liquid, said means for dispensing said liquid comprising at least one elongated tube and an elongated stylus, the first end of said tube extending into said reservoir and having a first opening communicating with said liquid, the other end of said tube extending out of said body, a leg of said stylus extending through said tube, said tube including an elongated slot, said stylus being secured to said tube by crimping said end of said tube, a bead telescoped over said stylus adjacent said slot whereby pressing said stylus against a firm surface causes said stylus to be arcuately deformed at said bead to cause a springing action, the other end of said stylus projecting beyond said other end of said tube, said stylus adapted to guide said liquid to a writing surface and to enable removal of hardened materials in said reservoir and tube by being urged against a rm surface and releasing quickly.
11. A pen having an elongated body which houses a reservoir of liquid and means for dispensing said liquid, said means for dispensing said liquid comprising at least one elongated stylus, the rst end of said tube extending into said reservoir and having a rst opening communicating with said liquid, the other end of said tube extending out of said body, a leg of said stylus extending through said tube, a supporting bracket connected to said rst end of said tube, said supporting bracket securing a conically-shaped member having its base facing said irst end of said tube so that said stylus is secured by urging said rst end into the apex of said conical member and said stylus is removed by withdrawing said lirst end from said apex of said conical member, the other end of said stylus projecting beyond said other end of said tube, said stylus adapted to guide said liquid to a writing surface and to enable removal of hardened materials in said reservoir and tube by being urged against a firm surface and releasing quickly.
12. A pen having an elongated body which houses a reservoir of liquid and means for dispensing said liquid, said means for dispensing said liquid comprising at least one elongated tube and an elongated stylus, the `rst end of said tube extending into said reservoir and having a rst opening communicating with said liquid, the other end of said tube extending out of said body, a leg of said stylus extending through said tube and being anchored at one end relative to said body of said pen, the other end of said stylus projecting beyond said other `end of said tube, said stylus adapted to guide said liquid to a writing surface and to enable removal of hardened materials in said reservoir and tube by being urged against a iirm surface and releasing quickly, said body of said pen being exible about said reservoir, said reservoir being atmospherically sealed continuously so that pressure applied to said body about said reservoir is required to emit fluid through the tube to said other end of said stylus.
References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 226,925 4/ 1880 Nimmo 401-260 1,875,553 9/1932 Beardsley 401-186 2,136,967 11/1938 Donner et al 401-258 2,627,844 2/ 1953 Johnson 401--259 FOREIGN PATENTS 55,140 12/ 1950 France.
LAWRENCE CHARLES, Primary Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R. 40l--36, 183, 260
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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5006004A (en) * 1987-11-25 1991-04-09 The Proctor & Gamble Company Topical applicator for liquid
US5306092A (en) * 1993-05-05 1994-04-26 Jenq Li Chen Marking pen with gradual-layer color effect
US5435245A (en) * 1992-09-03 1995-07-25 Radix Limited Self-inking roller stamp
US7001091B1 (en) 2003-10-31 2006-02-21 Knight Andrew F Ink pen for dispensing ink having time-dependent characteristics

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US226925A (en) * 1880-04-27 Edward b
US1875553A (en) * 1931-04-10 1932-09-06 Alfred S Beardsley Multicolor fountain pen
US2136967A (en) * 1936-02-28 1938-11-15 Donner Julius Stylograph
FR55140E (en) * 1951-06-06
US2627844A (en) * 1948-07-22 1953-02-10 Ibm Fountain pen for viscous ink

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US226925A (en) * 1880-04-27 Edward b
FR55140E (en) * 1951-06-06
US1875553A (en) * 1931-04-10 1932-09-06 Alfred S Beardsley Multicolor fountain pen
US2136967A (en) * 1936-02-28 1938-11-15 Donner Julius Stylograph
US2627844A (en) * 1948-07-22 1953-02-10 Ibm Fountain pen for viscous ink

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5006004A (en) * 1987-11-25 1991-04-09 The Proctor & Gamble Company Topical applicator for liquid
US5435245A (en) * 1992-09-03 1995-07-25 Radix Limited Self-inking roller stamp
US5306092A (en) * 1993-05-05 1994-04-26 Jenq Li Chen Marking pen with gradual-layer color effect
US7001091B1 (en) 2003-10-31 2006-02-21 Knight Andrew F Ink pen for dispensing ink having time-dependent characteristics

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