US3478399A - Apparatus for coiling a textile product - Google Patents

Apparatus for coiling a textile product Download PDF

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US3478399A
US3478399A US3478399DA US3478399A US 3478399 A US3478399 A US 3478399A US 3478399D A US3478399D A US 3478399DA US 3478399 A US3478399 A US 3478399A
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Prior art keywords
yarn
package
plate
means
apparatus
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William Kirk Wyatt
Edward G Mueller
William H Hebrank
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Turbo Machine Co
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Turbo Machine Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H54/00Winding, coiling, or depositing filamentary material
    • B65H54/76Depositing materials in cans or receptacles
    • B65H54/80Apparatus in which the depositing device or the receptacle is rotated
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H2403/00Power transmission; Driving means
    • B65H2403/40Toothed gearings
    • B65H2403/48Other
    • B65H2403/481Planetary
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H2515/00Physical entities not provided for in groups B65H2511/00 or B65H2513/00
    • B65H2515/12Density
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H2701/00Handled material; Storage means
    • B65H2701/30Handled filamentary material
    • B65H2701/31Textiles threads or artificial strands of filaments

Description

Nov. 18, 1969 w. K. WYATT ETAL 3,478,399

APPARATUS FOR COILING A TEXTILE PRODUCT 9 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 29, 1967 I N VEN TORS.

WILLIAM KIRK WYATT EDWARD G. MUELLER BY WILLIAM H. HEBRANK ATTORNEYS.

Nov. 18, 1969 w, wY T E 3,478,399

APPARATUS FOR COILING A TEXTILE PRODUCT Filed June 29, 1967 9 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS. WILLIAM KIRK WYATT EDWARD e. MUELLER BY WILLIAM H. HEBRANK MAW ATTORNEYS.

Nov. 18, 1969 w, wY -r ETAL 3,478,399

APPARATUS FOR COILING A TEXTILE PRODUCT 9 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed June 29, 1967 WRK VMW 0 EB s K U ND n N W p m mM M m m L. A

I-Dl

WEW W Nov. 18, 1969 w. K. WYATT ETAL 3,478,

APPARATUS FOR COILING A TEXTILE PRODUCT 9 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed June 29, 1967 INVENTORS.

\ WILLIAM KIRK WYATT v EDWARD G. MUELLER BY WILLIAM H. HEBRANK ATTORNEYS.

Nov. 18, 1969 w. K. WYATT ETAL 3,473,399

APPARATUS FOR COILING A TEXTILE PRODUCT 9 Sheets-Sheet 5 I73 I72 I74 Filed June 29, 196'? INVENTORS. WILLIAM KlRK WYATT EDWARD e. MUELLER BY WILLIAM H. HEBRANK WY W ATTORNEYS.

Nov. 18, 1969 w. K. WYATT ETAL 3,473,399

APPARATUS FOR COILING A TEXTILE PRODUCT 9 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed June 29, 1967 INVENTORS. WILLIAM KIRK WYATT EDWARD G. MUELLER WILLIAM H. HEBRANK MLM ATTORNEYS.

Nov. 18, 1969 w. K. WYATT ETAL 3,478,399

APPARATUS FOR COILING A TEXTILE PRODUCT 9 Sheets-Sheet '7 Filed June 29, 1967 IOO INVENTORS. \Vl LLIAM Kl RK WYATT DWARD G. MUELLER BY WILLIAM H. HEBRANK ATTORNEYS.

Nov. 18, 1969 w. K. WYATT ETAL 3,478,399

APPARATUS FOR COILING A TEXTILE PRODUCT 9 Sheets-Sheet 8 Filed June 29, 1967 INVENTORS. WILLIAM KIRK WYATT EDWARD G. MUELLER WILLIAM H. HEBRANK WWAM ATTORNEYS.

w. K. WYATT ETAL 3,478,399

9 Sheets-Sheet 9 ATTORNEYS.

Nov. 18, 1969 APPARATUS FOR COILING A TEXTILE PRODUCT Filed June 29, 1967 T K m h wmm R 4 4 Z wm ap MDM mmm H MW M WEWW k 4 Y B m w .\l 4 4 h m. 3 M 4 2 .M. O 4 f +v M I n O L 9 4 a 4 4 5 4 United States Patent O."

3,478,399 APPARATUS FOR COILING A TEXTILE PRODUCT William Kirk Wyatt, Lansdale, Edward G. Mueller, Huntingdon Valley, and William H. Hebrank, Wallingford, Pa., assignors to Turbo Machine Company, Lansdale,

Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Filed June 29, 1967, Ser. No. 650,094 Int. Cl. B65h 51/02, 55/00 U.S. C]. 2821 15 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Yarn is laid continuously in loops progressively in a path along an annulus to form an annular layer as part of a coiled yarn package. Various means are used to vary the size of the loops, the number of loops laid over one revolution around the annulus, and the radial position of the loops in the annulus. The loops are laid along the annulus by feeding the yarn upwardly through a rotating nozzle in the annulus. A second annular layer of loops is formed beneath, and as a continuation of, the preceding one, and this step is repeated so that a stack of annular layers of looped yarn is formed into a coiled yarn package.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to the coiling of yarn, tow, staple, sliver, rope, or any other substantially continuous length of textile material, hereinafter referred to generically as yarn, to form a package. More particularly, this invention relates to apparatus for producing a coiled yarn package by feeding loops of yarn through a rotating base in such a manner that the loops progress along a substantially annular path while being varied in position both radially and circumferentially.

Prior art devices have formed yarn packages in coils having loops of a uniform diameter disposed at a uniform distance from the center of the annulus. The product formed by these devices builds up yarn at the inner and outer diameters of the coiled package. This type of package has proved undesirable, particularly in connection with dyeing the yarn package, because the high yarn density at the inner and outer walls of the yarn package annulus results in a non-uniform penetration of the dye. When the non-uniformly dyed yarn is formed into a fabric, the fabric exhibits localized dye spots or streaks which seriously affect its appearance and quality.

We have discovered new means for producing yarn packages of desirable yarn densities. By changing the feeds, speeds, and positions of the parts of the yarn handling apparatus, we have been able to produce new and useful coiled yarn packages having a significantly increased yarn density.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention covers an apparatus for producing a product, said product being a continuously wound package constructed of yarn disposed in substantially annular layers forming a coil, each layer being constructed of a series of yarn loops which progress along their annular layers in various radial and circumferential positions, and additionally, the loops may be varied in size and configuration, so that a yarn package of substantially uniform density is produced.

Accordingly, an object of this invention is to provide new apparatus for the production of coiled textile packages comprising coiled yarn packages wherein there is a higher density of yarn loops more uniformly distributed 3,478,399 Patented Nov. 18, 1969 throughout the packages than has heretofore been known in the industry.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken as indicated by the lines and arrows VV which appears in FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a diagrammatic elevation of a central sectional view of a typical annular yarn package for purposes of illustrating various yarn distributions by means of density curves;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view taken as indicated by the lines and arrows VIIVII which appear in FIG. 1, showing a portion of the apparatus in phantom alternate position;

FIG. 8 is a partial plan view showing, in alternate position, a portion of the apparatus shown in FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a sectional view taken as indicated by the lines and arrows IXIX which appear in FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a motion diagram of a portion of the rotating apparatus shown in FIG. 5;

FIG. 11 is a diagrammatic fragmentary view showing a typical disposition of the yarn as a result of the motion shown in FIG. 10, and a regulated yarn feed in accordance with one embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 12 is a partial vertical sectional view similar to FIG. 5 showing an alternate embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 13 is a partial plan view taken as indicated by the lines and arrows XIIIXIII which appear in FIG. 12;

FIG. 14 is a partial vertical sectional view similar to the upper portion of FIG. 12, but showing an alternate embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 15 is a partial plan view taken as indicated by the lines and arrows XV-XV which appear in FIG. 14;

FIG. 16 is a diagrammatic plan view of a pattern of yarn laid down by an alternate embodiment of our invention;

FIG. 17 is a partial sectional view of a modified form of apparatus according to the invention similar to a portion of FIG. 5.

FIG. 18 is a diagrammatic view indicating motions of the rotating elements and taken as indicated by the lines and arrows XVIIIXVIII which appear in FIG. 17;

FIG. 19 is a partial view taken along the line XIX- XIX of FIG. 17;

FIG. 20 is a vertical sectional view similar to a portion of FIG. 5 showing a further alternate embodiment of the invention; a

FIG. 21 is a partial plan view taken as indicated by the lines and arrows XXI-XXI which appear in FIG. 20;

FIG. 22 is a diagrammatic representation of a typical disposition of yarn achieved by the apparatus shown in FIG. 20 and 21;

FIG. 23 is a schematic diagram of an alternate embodiment of apparatus for producing a yarn package in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 24 is a schematic plan view of an alternate form of dofiing apparatus;

FIG. 25 is a full section, partially broken away, of an alternate yarn package container and means of driving same; and

FIG. 26 is a sectional view taken as indicated by the lines and arrows XXVI-XXVI which appear in FIG. 25.

3 DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT In the figures, similar numbers have been used throughout to designate similar parts.

Referring to the drawings, FIG. 1 shows in perspective the basic apparatus which can be adapted in accordance with this invention for producing desirable yarn packages. This apparatus comprises a stand having a base portion 31 and a vertical supporting column 32. A yarn package 33 in the form of a cone of yarn is mounted on the base 31. The yarn may be natural or synthetic, crimped or uncrimped, or even rope, tow, staple or sliver, for example. Yarn is withdrawn from the package 33 and passes through a guide means 34, which is attached to the vertical column 32, and after passing through the coil depositing apparatus (generally designated 36) the yarn is deposited on a plate 37 (more clearly shown in FIG. 2). The plate 37 rotates (as will be more fully discussed hereinafter), so that as the yarn is deposited in loops on one portion of the plate 37 it is progressively laid out substantially in the form of an annulus to form a ring-like mass or substantially annular layer, a portion of which is shown in FIG. 2. Each successive annular layer is formed as a continuation of the preceding layer and passes over the original point of disposition of the yarn (designated as point A on the plate 37, FIG. 2), so that the layers build up continuously with the newest layer laid on the plate 37 under the preceding layer. As the layers continue to build up, they form a coiled yarn package. Such a package is shown being formed in FIG. 1 at B.

To retain the package, a cylindrical container 41 is desirably (but not always necessarily) disposed on the table 42. A plunger 43 is disposed within the container 41 and rests initially on the plate 37. In operation, the plunger 43 rests on top of the first layer of the newly formed package, and maintains a suitable pressure so that the friction provided by the plunger and the stack of yarn forming in the package aids in the disposition of the yarn on the plate 37. The automatic operation of this plunger 43 and the removal or doifing of the yarn packages will be described more fully hereinafter.

Referring now generally to FIGS. 1-9, we will describe the apparatus and method for producing one type of product in accordance with our invention. These figures represent a preferred embodiment of our invention wherein the resulting product is a coiled yard package composed of yarn laid continuously in annular layers, each layer being composed of loops of yarn of approximately the same size, which loop size is smaller than the width of the annular path, and wherein each successive annular layer in the coil is eccentric to the overall coiled package and out of phase with the previous layer. In this manner a high density yarn package is produced. (See FIG. 3.)

As shown in the cross section in FIG. 5, the periphery of the plate 37 has gear teeth 44 thereon. The plate 37 is mounted for rotation within the table 42, about a central axis. The gear teeth 44 engage the teeth 45 of the driving gear 46 which is mounted for rotation with the shaft 47. The shaft 47 is *journaled at its outer end in a bearing plate and is suitably coupled to a drive motor 51 which is mounted on the column 32.

Attached to the underside of the plate 37 is a hollow cylindrical bearing housing 52 at the lower end of which there is affixed a gear housing 53. The underside of the table housing 50 carries an internal ring gear 54. The gear housing 53 has a driven pinion mounted in engagement with the (driving) ring gear 54. In operation, the motor 51 rotates the gear 46 which in turn rotates the plate 37. As the plate 37 rotates, the cylindrical bearing housing 52 and the gear housing 53 likewise rotate. The pinion 55 being in engagement with the ring gear 54 on the housing 50 is likewise rotated about its shaft 56. Mounted on the shaft 56 is a gear 57 which is part of a gear train, designated generally 58, The other end of the gear train 58 terminates in a pulley 61 of suitable design for use in a belt drive.

Mounted for rotation within and relative to the hollow cylindrical bearing housing 52, is a flyer assembly, designated generally 65. The flyer assembly 65 passes through the gear. housing 53 and has attached to the end thereof a pulley 66 for driving engagement with the belt 67. The flyer assembly 65 comprises a hollow cylindrical member 68 which is mounted for rotation in the bearings 69 and 70 at either end thereof; said bearings being suitably mounted in the bearing housing 52. Disposed on the end of the member 68 is a fiyer 73 having a concave upper surface preferably formed of a smooth and slippery material such as polished chrome, nylon or polytetrafiuoroethylene, for example. The concavity is about of an inch from the upper edge of the fiyer 73 which is on the same level as the surface of the plate 37, for a fiyer 73 approximately 1% inches in diameter. As shown more clearly in FIG. 4, within the fiyer 73 there is a sleeve 74 forming a passageway disposed at an angle to the axis of the fiyer assembly. The sleeve 74 is likewise preferably made of a slippery bearing material and is rounded to prevent burrs at its inlet end 75 and at its outlet end 76. In particular, at the outlet end 76 it is countersunk in a generally flared manner. Mounted within the fiyer assembly 65 and held in place by the flyer 73 is a bearing guide 77 for the yarn passing through the fiyer assembly to the inlet end 75 of the sleeve 74.

In operation, as the plate 37 is rotated counterclockwise when viewed from the top, the gear train 58 controls the rotation of the flyer assembly 65, so that it is rotated in a clockwise direction when viewed from the top.

Before actuating the motor 51, yarn is fed through the flyer assembly 65 and across the plate 37 under the plunger 43. As rotation begins, the plunger 43 provides a frictional force on the yarn which tends to restrain the yarn and withdraw it from the yarn package 33 through the flyer assembly 65. As the flyer 73 rotates and the plate 37 rotates, a trail of loops is left behind the fiyer on the plate 37, which trail of loops is generated substantially along an annulus, as shown in FIG. 2. When one complete rotation of the plate 37 has been made the loops deposited are substantially in the form of an annular layer. The apparatus continues to lay loops 0n the plate 37, so that a second layer of loops is formed adjacent to the first layer as a continuation thereof, thereby separating the first layer from the surface of the plate 37. The frictional force on the yarn is now between the previously formed annular layer of loops and the yarn being fed across the slippery surface of the fiyer. As successive annular layers of loops are formed, a yarn package begins to form adjacent to the surface of the plate 37. If this process is continued, a yarn package is formed wherein all the loops are of approximately the same size, i.e. each loop has approximately the same generating radius, and each annular layer is disposed essentially concentric with the other layers in the coiled package, so that the inner and outer diameter of the annular layers of loops lie substantially adjacent to one another. In the course of building up a package approximately 8 to 10 inches long, there is a high density of yarn at the inner and outer diameters of the package and a substantially lower density in the area of the mean diameter. This occurrence is shown in FIG. 6, wherein the yarn package is shown diagrammatically in elevation and the density curve C is plotted across one cross-sectioned side of the package. The mean diameter is dm, the outer diameter is do, and the inner diameter is di. As previously stated, it is an object of this invention to provide a high density yarn package wherein the yarn is distributed more uniformly from the inner radius to the outer radius of the annular package.

In dyeing processes wherein the velocity of the fluid is proportional to the dye rate, the more yarn per height of package the more uniform the dyeing. It is desirable, therefore, in certain dye processes to have a density curve which is almost fiat, as shown by the illustrated curve C In certain other types of processes it is desirable to control the density, so that a higher density exists at either the inner radius or the outer radius. Various density curves are desirable depending on the particular use for which the package is intended, and it is an object of this invention to provide methods and means for achieving these various density patterns.

One such method is to control the depositing of the individual annular layers of yarn so that each succeeding annular layer is eccentrically deposited with respect to the previous annular layer within the package. A typical arrangement is shown in FIG. 3.

The apparatus shown in FIGS. 1, 5 and 7 may be adapted to produce a yarn package of substantially the same configuration as that shown in FIG. 3 by the means as shown by way of example in FIGS. 8 and 9.

Referring to FIG. 7, the table 42 comprises a bed 80 and a pair of guides 81a and 81b. The guides are adjustable transversely of the table, as by the slots 83 and bolts 84, so that one guide may be moved closer to the center of the plate 37 than the other. In FIGS. 8 and 9, the member 82 retaining the container 41 laterally on the table is slightly 01f center from the plate 37, so that the container 41 is eccentric thereto. The container 41 is preferably hollow and cylindrical and made of plastic or other suitable material. It rests on the table 80 and is free to turn thereon. Supporting rollers 40, 48 and 49 are disposed about its sides spaced above the table to maintain the container 41 in its axial position and allow it to rotate.

In the operation of the basic apparatus as shown in FIGS. 1 and 7, it is preferable to have the plate 37 and the fiyer 73 driven in opposite directions, i.e. one clockwise and the other counterclockwise. Where the plunger 43 is also driven, the plunger and the fiyer preferably should be driven in the same direction, while the plate is rotating in the opposite direction. In this embodiment of the apparatus it'is necessary to rotate the plunger about its axis.

Accordingly, drive means designated 85, FIG. 5 is rigidly attached to frame 38 and is coupled to the shaft 86 of the plunger 43 to rotate the plunger; said drive means being connected by conventional electrical means (designated M) to the controls of the motor 51, to be actuated thereby. The plunger 43 is disposed within the retainer member 82 on the table 42 and is also eccentric to the plate 37 (FIG. 8). 'When the motor 51 is started, the plunger rotates and the frictional force between the plunger and the plate 37 draws yarn through the nozzle 74. As the table rotates the yarn is laid in loops along an annulus, as previously described. However, the rotation of the plunger 43, which is disposed eccentrically to the plate 37 within the container 41, produces an orbital movement of the layer of yarn being formed relative to the plate 37.

In the FIG. 3, according to a typical example, the outside diameter of the package is approximately 5 inches and the inside diameter is approximately 1 /2 inches. The wall thickness of this package is therefore 1% inches. However, the loops of yarn that comprise a layer are only about 1 /8 inches in width, as seen from the top. The loops forming the layer are laid continuously and progressively one partially beneath the other along an annulus, which is generated at substantially a fixed radial distance from the center of the plate 37 Since the loops are of a smaller diameter than the width of an annular portion of the package, and since the layers are deposited in an eccentric orbital path with respect to the previous layer within the package, the resulting coiled yarn package is similar to that shown in FIG. 3. By predetermining the speed of rotation of the various rotating members, just described, control is achieved wherein the loops in succeeding layers will not lay directly upon one another. This results in a softening of the inner and outer peripheries of the yarn package. Thus, a more uniform density is produced in the yarn package than would be the case when the loops lie substantially above one another in repetitive pattern, as previously described.

A variety of yarn packages can be produced by varying the geometric arrangements of the patterns in which the loops are laid along the substantially annular shape. One such pattern is that shown in FIG. 11, wherein the center of each loop is substantially equidistant from the center of the package. However, some of the loops are smaller than others and the loops are varied continuously in size along the path of the variable thickness annulus.

This pattern of loops can be produced in an apparatus similar to that described with reference to FIGS. 1-7, wherein a single fiyer rotates in a single rotating plate, as shown in the motion diagram FIG. 10. There are several methods of producing this type of yarn package, among which are varying the fiyer speed, varying the plate speed, varying the pressure on the plunger, and varying the tension on the yarn passing into the coiler apparatus by controlling the input feed. One preferred method is to vary the speed of the feed of the yarn relative to the speed of rotation of the flyer. Reducing the yarn feed must necessarily reduce the generated radius of the loops in the product. If, however, the feed is increased without changing the speed of the fiyer, a maximum feed is approached beyond which the yarn would merely build up before the flyer. A constant take-up speed is desirable, and an appropriate change in the fiyer speed provides this important result.

To control the input speed, feed rollers designated 35 (FIGS. 1 and 5) are mounted on the gear housing 53 which rotates with the plate 37 so that the rollers 35 remain in the same relative position with respect to the rotating fiyer. Suitable guide means 78 are disposed on the gear housing 53 ahead of the feed rollers 35 to guide the yarn into the bight of the rollers. The feed rollers 35 take up inequalities of yarn tension as the yarn comes ofi the package 33 on the base 31 and take the load ofi the coiler feeding which is due to friction at the interface between the fiyer and plate on the one hand and the plunger or yarn package on the other hand. The rollers 35 may be driven by any conventional drive means 39, FIG. 5 The drive may be constant or variable as desired.

A fragmentary view of one annular layer showing diagrammatically the disposition of yarn has been shown in FIG. 11. By varying the plate speed while maintaining the feed at a constant rate, the phasing of the large to small loop disposition can be changed, that is, the phasing can be adjusted so that each succeeding annular layer of loops is out of phase with the preceding layer. Thus, once again a yarn package of more uniform crosssectional density is produced.

The apparatus shown in the FIGS. 1, 2 and 5 can be utilized with certain modifications in achieving this result, by having a variable-speed drive on the feed rollers 35 and/or on the fiyer assembly 65. Likewise, fixed drives having cams can be used to lay a constant pattern of loops of varying size per annular layer, which pattern is out of phase from one annular layer to the next, thereby producing a similar yarn package.

Another means of producing a similar yarn loop pattern, i.e. one in which the loops vary in size but are all disposed approximately the same distance from the center of the package and wherein similar size loops do not lie in the same angular position on successive revolutions, is shown in FIGS. 12 and 13. The modified flyer 173 contains a slot 179 wherein a sleeve 174 is mounted for sliding engagement, and is spring biased outwardly by the spring 172. A cable 180 is attached to the sleeve 174 in the slot 179. The cable 180 passes over a guide roller 181, through the hollow portion of the fiyer assembly 65, and around a second guide roller 182, and is fixedly connected to a drive assembly 183. The drive assembly 183 is mounted to the fiyer assembly 65, so as to rotate therewith. The drive assembly may be variable or fixed as desired. For example, if the drive assembly is to run in a variable pattern so that the position of the sleeve 174 within the flyer 173 may be varied while the flyer is rotating, the rod 183a which is connected to the cable 180, is a part of a spring biased electro-magnetic device, such as a solenoid 183b, which solenoid is responsive to a variable voltage impressed across the circuit Z. The position of the rod 183a within the solenoid 18317 is a function of the magnetic flux which is a function of the variable voltage in the circuit Z. Thus by changing the voltage, the rod 183a is moved back and forth in the solenoid, so that the sleeve 174 is withdrawn and let out within the slot according to variations in the voltage in the circuit Z. If the drive assembly is to run in a fixed pattern, a cam means (not shown) is incorporated into the drive assembly 183 to contact the rod 183a to retract and let out the cable over a fixed time interval. Thus, as the flyer rotates at a constant speed, the sleeve 174 is withdrawn and let out within the slot in the direction of the arrows FIG. 13, thereby varying the generating radius of the loops. Note, however, that the center of each loop remains equidistant from the center of the package.

An alternate means for oscillating the sleeve 174a within the flyer is shown in FIGS. 14 and 15. Herein a slot 179a is again provided in a further modification of the fiyer 175. The sleeve 174a is disposed in sliding engagement in the slot and is spring biased outwardly by the spring 172a. A cammed surface 184 is provided on the plate 137. The sleeve has a rotating cam follower 186 attached thereto, which follows the cammed surface 184 in the plate 137, thereby adjusting the radial position of the sleeve 174a within the flyer 175 over a fixed pattern.

Referring now to FIG. 18 of the drawings, a further variation in the pattern of loops can be achieved by having the flyer 173a rotate within a rotating member 101, which in turn rotates in the plate 137a. The pattern laid down by this device is that shown in the diagrammatic plan view, FIG. 16. The flyer 173a rotating within the intermediate rotating member 101, produces a series of loops along a small annulus. The intermediate rotating member 101 rotating within the plate 137a lays these loops along the generated annulus. The pattern produced, as shown in FIG. 16, is composed of a series of loops forming a larger loop and similar series of larger loops forming the annular layer.

The mechanism for producing the pattern of FIG. 16 is shown in FIGS. 17 and 19, wherein drive means 100 drives intermediate rotating member 101 through pulleys 161 and 166 and belt 167. The shaft 90 of the drive means 100 extends through pulley 161 and has a pulley 91 attached thereto. The flyer assembly 168 is mounted off center in the intermediate member 101 for rotation in the bearings. The flyer assembly 168 is driven by pulleys 91 and 92 through a belt 98 being driven about a spring loaded idler 103 to make up for the eccentricity caused by the off center disposition of the flyer assembly in the intermediate member.

A still further variation of the type of product which can be produced is shown in FIG. 22, wherein the loops are of substantially the same generating radius, however, the center of the loops is moved approximately sinusoidally with respect to a circle extending about the center of the package. Disposition of loops in this fashion may be accomplished in several ways. For example, in FIGS. and 21, a device is shown for rocking the flyer. The flyer assembly is mounted for rotation in a hollow cylindrical member 139, which in turn is mounted in an arcuate bearing 140. The opening in plate 237 for the flyer is enlarged, as shown at R in FIG. 21, so that the flyer itself may be moved in a radial direction toward and away from the center of the plate. In order to move the flyer, it is rocked or pivoted about the bearing 140 (FIG. 20).

To provide a constant drive for the flyer, a spring-type expandable belt 141 is affixed to the flyer assembly in close proximity to the bearing 140, so that the mount of off-set or take-up necessary by the spring on the pulleys 261 and 266 will be as small as possible. This alternative drive works well, particularly when the dimension of the eccentricity is small in relation to the plate or package diameter. The take-up required in the expandable belt 141 is, therefore, well within the limits of known materials.

A cam drive 142 is mounted to the gear housing 53 for rotation therewith. The cam drive comprises a driving wheel 96 having a substantially annular cam groove 96a in the upper surface thereof. The wheel 96 is afiixed to the shaft a for rotation therewith. Disposed within the cam groove 96a is a follower 94a which is attached to a rod 94. The rod 94 is disposed within a bearing 93a which is aflixed to a flange 93 mounted to the gear housing 53. Rotation of the wheel 96 produces a straight line movement of the rod 94 which is in sliding engagement in the bearing 93a. The other end of the rod 94 is mounted about the hollow cylindrical member 68 which forms a part of the flyer assembly 65. An arcuate bearing a is mounted on the hollow cylindrical member 68 to engage a mating bearing portion on the rod 94 for rotation therein. Thus, while the flyer assembly 65 is rotating, the straight line movement of the rod 94 is transmitted to the hollow cylindrical member 68 producing a rocking of the flyer assembly 65 about the bearing 140.

An alternate form of apparatus for achieving the same type of yarn package is shown in the FIG. 23, wherein the flyer assembly 65 is moved along an arcuate path toward and away from the center of the plate 337. In this apparatus the upper surface of the flyer remains in fixed planar relationship to the upper surface of the plate 337. A suitable type cam drive mechanism designated 300 (shown schematically in FIG. 23) is attached to the flyer assembly to move the assembly toward and away from the center of the plate. Both types of apparatus provide the same type of yarn configuration in the finished package, i.e. that shown in FIG. 22.

Referring once again to FIG. 1, reference is now made to a means for dofiing or removing a finished package and starting another package without interrupting the continuous coiling, which means is particularly suited for the coiling apparatus previously described. Plunger 43 has a shaft 86 extending vertically upwardly therefrom. As the yarn package accumulates (as shown at B in FIG 1), the plunger 43 rises vertically. Eventually the package fil-ls the container 41 up to a predetermined level.

An automatic doffing means is shown in FIGS. 1 and 5. When the plunger 43 reaches the top of the container 41, a pressure actuated limit switch designated S in FIG. 5) is closed, thereby actuating circuit J (FIG. 5). Circuit 1 controls electrically actuated pneumatic positioning means designated (FIG. 1), whereby the frame 38 is shifted to the left in FIG. 1 to the position shown in phantom in FIG. 7. A second container automatically comes into position on the table 42 above the plate 37 together with a second plunger, and a second package begins to form immediately. The first package can now be removed from the table and in so doing the yarn may be cut at any convenient place.

As can readily be seen, it is a great advantage in this invention to feed the yarn through the plate 37 from the bottom, since this permits easy and automatic doffing.

An alternate method and means for dofling is shown in the FIG. 24, wherein the containers 41a, 41b, and 41c are disposed on an indexed table. The same principles of actuation apply except that the table 42a is automatically indexed to rotate the next container into position. This gives the operator more time to remove the package. As in the previously discussed arrangement, the shifting of the table automatically sets the next plunger on the pressure plate.

FIGS. 25 and 26 show an alternate form of yarn package container, which is particularly suited for use with packages produced in accordance with our invention. The container designated 441 consists of a number of vertically extending equally spaced rods 442 aflixed in rings 443, 444 at either end. A perforated pressure plate 445 is disposed in the container 441 with ears 446 to interlock the plate with the rods. The ears contact the upper ring 444 when the container is filled with yarn, so that doffing of the package and container is achieved by slipping a perforated cover plate over the lower end of the container; it is then ready for further processing. Because of the open construction at both the sides and ends, the container can be used immediately in a dye process. There is no need to transfer the yarn package to another suitably configured container, as would be the case if the container were a hollow plastic cylinder.

FIG. 25 shows an alternate embodiment of a drive means for the plunger to produce the type of package shown in FIG. 3. This means is particularly suited for use with the alternate container 441, when it is desired to rotate the yarn package in order to achieve orbital movement of the yarn package eccentric to the yarn depositing plate (as was previously described in connection with FIGS. 3, 8 and 9). FIG. 25 shows an elevation of the alternate drive means and container arrangement in apparatus similar to that shown in FIGS. 1-7. A fixed bracket 450 retains a bearing housing 451 wherein sleeve bearings 452 and 453 are fixed to support tubular shaft 454 and permit it to rotate therein. Within the tubular shaft 454, bearing members 455 and 456 support shaft 86 for rotation therein. Shaft 86 is similar to that previously described and is connected to plunger 43. A pulley 460 is fixedly connected to the tubular shaft 454 as by means of set screw 461. A belt 462 connects the pulley 460 with a suitable drive means (not shown) for driving the pulley 460 and rotating the tubular member 454. The lower end of the tubular member 460 is in threaded engagement with a cover plate 470. The cover plate 470 is disposed on top of the container 441 and is held in engagement therewith by the spring 471 and the pin 472, which passes through the hole 473 in the ring 444 and is fixed-1y connected to the cover plate 470. The configuration of the ring on the cover plate, together with the coaction of the spring and the pin, provide a means whereby the container 441 may be rotated upon rotation of the shaft 454. The tabs 446 of the perforated plate 445 engage the rotating rods 442 of the container 441 so as to rotate therewith.

In operation, yarn is fed through the plate 480 in a similar fashion as previously described in connection with FIGS. l-9. The package container 441 is disposed off center or eccentric to the plate. The perforated plate 445 coacts with the yarn and the plate 480 in the same manner as the plunger 43 coacted with the plate 37 and the yarn to withdraw the yarn in loops along an annulus. The plunger 43 and the shaft 86 maintain the perforated plate 445 in engagement with the plate 480* or the newly formed yarn package (as appropriate). As the yarn package is formed, the plate 445 rises vertically in the container 441 and the plunger likewise rises vertically; the shaft 86 being in sliding engagement with the bearings 455 and 456. The plunger 43 and the shaft 86 may be weighted as at 490, or spring loaded, as desired, to maintain a suitable pressure on the yarn package. As previously mentioned, the yarn package is similar to that described in connection with FIG. 3, so that it has a desirable density for further processing, as for instance, dyeing. Likewise, the axial load provided by the weighted plunger may be adjusted easily to provide the desirable axial compression in the yarn package, thereby eliminating any additional steps necessary to compress the package further axially. Thus, the finished package of coiled yarn of suitable density and axial compression and disposed in a container designed for maintenance of the package integrity, while permitting relatively free fluid flow therethrough, presents a very desirable product.

It will be understood that various changes in the details, materials and arrangement of parts which have been herein described and illustrated in order to explain the nature of this invention, may be made by those skilled in the art within the principle and scope of the invention.

More particularly, it is to be noted that gravity has no effect on the operation of the apparatus described. Thus While the apparatus has been shown mounted in an up right position, it could be mounted on an angle or even inverted. To appreciate the applicability of this statement, notice in connection with FIG. 5 that while the feed rollers 35 may be said to be feeding the yarn upwardly through the flyer assembly 65, the term upwardly is only a relative term designating the relationship of the parts in a particular embodiment shown.

Further, just as the Word yarn has been used broadly to denote many types of continuous textile products, many other specific terms used in this application are capable of having equivalents substituted therefor. It is to be understood then that only the preferred. embodiments have been described, rather than all posible embodiments of the apparatus. In line with this, the apparatus has been described to function in a certain defined manner with respect to which variations could be made within the scope of the invention. For example, in FIG. 18 the rotation of the parts with respect to one another could be changed to produce a variety of yarn patterns. This being the case, it is apparent that when we use the term annulus We are not introducing a limitation to the actual shape of the ring. While some patterns have been shown which are other than an exact ring, still other forms could be shown which would be useful within the scope of our invention.

When we refer to layers these are formed one adjacent to the other and essentially helical; but this also could be otherwise, for example, by adjusting the speed and feeds of the various parts. Likewise, where the layers are laid helically, a helical separator could be introduced between the layers and it will be understood that in accordance with our invention the layers would still be adjacent, as the term is used herein.

As previously noted, the pattern of the loops may be varied by changing the speed and feeds of the parts. Likewise, the loops themselves may be varied. While the word loop has been used generically throughout the application and has been shown as being substantially circular in shape, it could be oval or of another shape. Similarly the loop has been shown as a closed loop, it

. being understood that the loop could be either opened or closed and, in fact, the yarn could be laid in a sinusoidal pattern or a series of V-shaped repeating figures.

What is claimed is:

1. An apparatus for producing a coiled yarn package comprrsmg:

(a) a plate having a yarn depositing surface thereon;

(b) a drive means connected to said plate for rotating said plate about its axis;

(0) a second plate having a yarn depositing surface thereon mounted for rotation about its axis and disposed eccentrically within said first mentioned plate, said second plate having a yarn depositing surface thereon contiguous with the yarn depositing surface of said first plate;

(d) means connected to said second plate for rotating said second plate about its axis;

(e) a flyer mounted for rotation about its axis and disposed eccentrically within said second plate, said flyer having a surface contiguous with said yarn depositing surface on said second plate;

(f) means connected to said flyer for rotating said flyer about its axis;

(g) passage means for said yarn disposed through said flyer and terminating in an opening in said surface of said fiyer at a point spaced from the axis thereof; and

(h) friction means contacting said plates and disposed to cover said opening in said fiyer whereby yarn passing through said opening and across said plates is withdrawn through said passage means and deposited upon said yarn depositing surfaces upon rotation of said plates and said fiyer.

2. An apparatus for producing a coiled textile package comprising:

(a) a rotatable member having a yarn depositing surface thereon;

(b) drive means connected to rotate said member about its axis; a

(c) a fiyer mounted for rotation about its axis an disposed eccentrically with respect to said member, said fiyer having a surface communicating with said yarn depositing surface;

(d) means connected to said fiyer for rotating said fiyer about its axis;

(e) means forming a passage for said textile disposed through said flyer, said passage being open at both ends thereof and extending to said surface of said fiyer at a point spaced from the axis thereof; and

(f) friction means disposed to contact the textile depositing surface of said rotatable member and to cover the end of said passage in said surface of said fiyer, whereby textile material passing through said end and across said rotatable member is withdrawn and deposited upon said textile depositing surface upon rotation of said member and of said fiyer, said textile material being deposited in the form of loops, said loops being formed against the package and loops previously formed.

3. An apparatus as in claim 2 wherein means are connected to said friction means to vary the pressure of said friction means against said member.

4. An apparatus as in claim 2 wherein container means are mounted about said friction means having an open end in communication with said member for containing the package as it is formed.

5. An apparatus as in claim 4 wherein said container means comprises:

(a) a first annular member;

(b) a second annular member;

(c) a plurality of rods fixedly connected to and extending betwen said first and said second annular members; and

(d) a perforated plate disposed within said container means, said plate having tabs thereon extending between said rods.

6. An apparatus as in claim 5 wherein:

(a) said friction means comprises a plunger and a shaft extending from said plunger;

(b) said perforated plate is disposed on said first mentioned plate in frictional contact therewith, said plunger rests upon said perforated plate to maintain said frictional contact; and

(c) means are connected to said container means to rotate said container means, said container means being disposed eccentric to said rotatable member.

7. An apparatus as in claim 6 wherein:

(a) said means connected to said container means to rotate said container means, comprises:

(1) a housing disposed on said apparatus;

(2) a hollow tubular shaft disposed to rotate within said housing, said shaft being disposed about said shaft of said plunger and having bearing means therein engaging said shaft of said plunger for rotational and sliding contact therewith;

(3) means connected to said tubular shaft to rotate said shaft;

(4) a plate fixedly connected to said hollow tubular shaft and disposed in engagement with the end of said container remote from said first mentioned plate; and

(b) means are disposed on the shaft extending from said plunger to maintain a predetermined force against said depositing surface.

8. An apparatus for producing a coiled textile package comprising:

(a) a rotatable member;

(b) drive means connected to rotate said member about its axis;

(c) a flyer mounted for rotation about its axis and disposed eccentrically with respect to said member;

(d) means connected to said fiyer for rotating said fiyer about its axis;

(e) means forming a passage for said textile disposed through said fiyer, said passage being open at both ends thereof, at least one open end being spaced from the axis of said fiyer;

(f) means mounting said flyer for pivotal movement transverse to its axis; and

(g) means connected to said fiyer to pivot said fiyer about said last mentioned means While said fiyer is rotating.

9. An apparatus for producing a coiled textile package comprising:

(a) a rotatable member;

(b) drive means connected to rotate said member about its axis;

(c) a fiyer mounted for rotation about its axis and disposed eccentrically with respect to said member;

((1) means connected to said fiyer for rotating said fiyer about its axis;

(e) means forming a passage for said textile disposed through said fiyer, said passage being open at both ends thereof, at least one open end being spaced from the axis of said fiyer;

(f) said fiyer having a slot therein;

(g) means disposed in said slot in sliding engagement therewith forming a part of said passage means and terminating in said end of said passage spaced from said axis of said fiyer; and i (h) means connected to said last mentioned means for oscillating said means in said slot While said fiyer is rotating.

10. apparatus for producing a coiled textile package compnsmg:

(a) a rotatable member;

(b) drive means connected to rotate said member about its axis;

(c) a fiyer mounted for rotation about its axis and disposed eccentrically with respect to said member;

((1) means connected to said fiyer for rotating said fiyer about its axis;

(e) means forming a passage for said textile disposed through said fiyer, said passage being open at both ends thereof, at least one open end being spaced from the axis of said fiyer;

(f) a hollow container having an open end arranged in communication with said rotatable member for receiving and containing said textile package;

(g) means disposed in said apparatus for positioning said container;

(h) means for shifting said positioning means on said apparatus;

(i) a second container disposed on said apparatus;

and

(j) said positioning means having means for positioning said second container about said rotatable member when said positioning means has been shifted, whereby said first container can be removed from its position realtive to said member and replaced by said second container.

11. An apparatus for producing a coiled textile package comprising:

(a) a rotatable member having a yarn depositing surface thereon;

(b) drive means connected to rotate said member about its axis;

(c) a flyer mounted for rotation about its axis and disposed eccentrically within said member, said fiyer having a yarn depositing surface contiguous with said yarn depositing surface on said member;

(d) means connected to said flyer for rotating said flyer about its axis;

(e) means forming a passage for said textile disposed through said flyer, said passage being open at both ends thereof and extending to said surface of said flyer at a point spaced from the axis thereof, whereby textile material passing through said passage means is deposited upon rotation of said member and of said flyer, thereby forming a coiled textile package.

12. An apparatus as in claim 11, wherein:

(a) a hollow container having an open end is arranged in communication with said member, said container being eccentric to said member; and

(1)) drive means are connected to said container to rotate it about its axis.

13. An apparatus as in claim 11 wherein:

(a) a hollow container having an open end is arranged in communication with said rotatable member for receiving and containing said textile package;

(b) means are disposed on said apparatus for positioning said container; and

(0) means are provided for shifting said positioning means on said apparatus.

14. An apparatus as in claim 11 wherein:

(a) feed means are disposed on said apparatus for feeding textile material into the end of the passage means in said flyer remote from said surface.

15. An appartus as in claim 14 wherein:

(a) said feed means comprises a pair of feed rolls;

(b) means are provided for guiding said textile material into said feed rolls; and

(c) means are provided for varying the speed of said feed rolls.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 334,453 1/1886 Morgan 24283 X 2,936,509 5/ 1960 Martin 28-21 3,052,010 9/1962 Martin 28-21 3,226,794 1/1966 Erb 28-21 3,234,627 2/ 1966 Russo et al 28-21 3,316,609 5/1967 Russo 28-21 3,332,126 7/1967 Cabello 28-21 3,369,280 2/1968 Shattuck et a1. 2821 US. Cl. X.R.

US3478399D 1967-06-29 1967-06-29 Apparatus for coiling a textile product Expired - Lifetime US3478399A (en)

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Cited By (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3638278A (en) * 1968-06-07 1972-02-01 Iws Nominee Co Ltd Coiling textile strands
US3640112A (en) * 1969-05-12 1972-02-08 Republic Steel Corp Coiling method and apparatus
US3667092A (en) * 1970-06-22 1972-06-06 Deering Milliken Res Corp Yarn package winder
US3816889A (en) * 1971-12-20 1974-06-18 Eddybel Sa Apparatus for producing a coiled thread package
US3909892A (en) * 1973-04-12 1975-10-07 Renato Crotti Apparatus for producing a coiled thread package
US3981055A (en) * 1974-06-17 1976-09-21 Eakes James H Apparatus for forming a yarn package
FR2453813A1 (en) * 1979-04-11 1980-11-07 Superba Sa Device for packaging continuous yarn
US4376517A (en) * 1980-04-16 1983-03-15 Barmag Barmer Maschinenfabrik Ag Method and apparatus for depositing yarn
US4546935A (en) * 1982-06-29 1985-10-15 Yoshida Kogyo K. K. Method of and apparatus for piling up tapes
US4785510A (en) * 1986-05-13 1988-11-22 G & W Maschinen Ag Method and apparatus for the continuous looping of yarn
US4863029A (en) * 1987-11-16 1989-09-05 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Apparatus and process for packaging yarn and product therefrom
US4869059A (en) * 1988-04-29 1989-09-26 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Yarn consolidation by wrapping for hollow fiber membranes
US4936001A (en) * 1987-11-16 1990-06-26 Koskol Joseph E Apparatus and process for packaging continuously connected lengths of compacted yarn
US4956901A (en) * 1987-11-16 1990-09-18 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Apparatus and process for forming a wad of yarn
US4991261A (en) * 1989-03-14 1991-02-12 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Apparatus and process for pneumatic segmenting of compacted fiber wads for continuous package layer formation
US5269115A (en) * 1991-09-23 1993-12-14 Rosink Gmbh + Co. Kg Device for placing a fiber ribbon into a can
US6145278A (en) * 1997-12-25 2000-11-14 Idemitsu Petrochemical Co., Ltd. Tape packing method
EP1764333A3 (en) * 2005-09-14 2007-09-19 Sergio Zamattio Method and device for spooling a yarn and wound body thus achieved

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US3052010A (en) * 1958-06-11 1962-09-04 Western Electric Co Apparatus for distributing a strand into a rotatable open-topped receiver
US2936509A (en) * 1958-10-07 1960-05-17 Western Electric Co Apparatus for collecting strands
US3226794A (en) * 1962-04-11 1966-01-04 Erb Ernst Device for forming and depositing continuous rings of threads about a center for the purpose of forming a package of thread material
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Cited By (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3638278A (en) * 1968-06-07 1972-02-01 Iws Nominee Co Ltd Coiling textile strands
US3640112A (en) * 1969-05-12 1972-02-08 Republic Steel Corp Coiling method and apparatus
US3667092A (en) * 1970-06-22 1972-06-06 Deering Milliken Res Corp Yarn package winder
US3816889A (en) * 1971-12-20 1974-06-18 Eddybel Sa Apparatus for producing a coiled thread package
US3909892A (en) * 1973-04-12 1975-10-07 Renato Crotti Apparatus for producing a coiled thread package
US3981055A (en) * 1974-06-17 1976-09-21 Eakes James H Apparatus for forming a yarn package
FR2453813A1 (en) * 1979-04-11 1980-11-07 Superba Sa Device for packaging continuous yarn
US4376517A (en) * 1980-04-16 1983-03-15 Barmag Barmer Maschinenfabrik Ag Method and apparatus for depositing yarn
US4546935A (en) * 1982-06-29 1985-10-15 Yoshida Kogyo K. K. Method of and apparatus for piling up tapes
US4785510A (en) * 1986-05-13 1988-11-22 G & W Maschinen Ag Method and apparatus for the continuous looping of yarn
US4863029A (en) * 1987-11-16 1989-09-05 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Apparatus and process for packaging yarn and product therefrom
US4936001A (en) * 1987-11-16 1990-06-26 Koskol Joseph E Apparatus and process for packaging continuously connected lengths of compacted yarn
US4956901A (en) * 1987-11-16 1990-09-18 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Apparatus and process for forming a wad of yarn
US4869059A (en) * 1988-04-29 1989-09-26 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Yarn consolidation by wrapping for hollow fiber membranes
US4991261A (en) * 1989-03-14 1991-02-12 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Apparatus and process for pneumatic segmenting of compacted fiber wads for continuous package layer formation
US5269115A (en) * 1991-09-23 1993-12-14 Rosink Gmbh + Co. Kg Device for placing a fiber ribbon into a can
US6145278A (en) * 1997-12-25 2000-11-14 Idemitsu Petrochemical Co., Ltd. Tape packing method
EP1764333A3 (en) * 2005-09-14 2007-09-19 Sergio Zamattio Method and device for spooling a yarn and wound body thus achieved

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