US3446200A - Natural archery assist device - Google Patents

Natural archery assist device Download PDF

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US3446200A
US3446200A US3446200DA US3446200A US 3446200 A US3446200 A US 3446200A US 3446200D A US3446200D A US 3446200DA US 3446200 A US3446200 A US 3446200A
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bow
arrow
archer
bow string
string
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Norton M Gross
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Norton M Gross
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41BWEAPONS FOR PROJECTING MISSILES WITHOUT USE OF EXPLOSIVE OR COMBUSTIBLE PROPELLANT CHARGE; WEAPONS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F41B5/00Bows; Crossbows
    • F41B5/14Details of bows; Accessories for arc shooting
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41BWEAPONS FOR PROJECTING MISSILES WITHOUT USE OF EXPLOSIVE OR COMBUSTIBLE PROPELLANT CHARGE; WEAPONS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F41B5/00Bows; Crossbows
    • F41B5/14Details of bows; Accessories for arc shooting
    • F41B5/1442Accessories for arc or bow shooting
    • F41B5/1469Bow-string drawing or releasing devices

Description

y- 1969 N. M. GROSS 3,446,200

NATURAL ARCHERY ASSIST DEVICE Filed Aug. 11, 1966 Sheet of s INVEN'JOR. NOQTON M. Geoss BY@MI 771m y 7, 1969 N. M. GROSS 3,446,200

NATURAL ARCHERY ASSIST DEVICE Filed Aug. 11, 1966 Sheet 2 of 3 y 7, 1969 N. M. GROSS 3,446,200

7 NATURAL ARCHERY ASSIST DEVICE Filed Aug. 11, 1966 Sheet 3 0f 3 wa za'a l I I NOQ TON M 62055 IN VENTOR.

United States Patent 3,446,200 NATURAL ARCHERY ASSIST DEVICE Norton M. Gross, Los Angeles County, Calif. (16510 San Jose St., Granada Hills, Calif. 91344) Filed Aug. 11, 1966, Ser. No. 571,917 Int. Cl. F4111 5/00 U.S. Cl. 124-24 11 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This invention relates to archery and, more particularly, to a novel archery shooting aid incorporating means for permitting the bow string of a long bow to be drawn to its shooting position with a nocked arrow and to be retained in its taut shooting position during the archers aiming procedure and further including a mechanism for manually releasing the taut bow string from its shooting position at the will of the archer.

One of the problems and difliculties encountered by an archer, particularly a novice, resides in his ability to draw a bow st-ring taut preparatory to loosening an arrow for flight and to maintain the bow string taut while the archer takes aim at an intended target. Normally, the archer will draw the bow string to a position where the neck of the arrow is anchored adjacent a selected portion of the archers head such as the corner of the mouth or perhaps immediately under the chin. In such an anchored position, the bow has a tendency to skewer or cant due to high torque forces generated by the taut bow string so that the archer encounters great difiiculty in sighting accurately with respect to a given target.

To overcome this tendency of the bow to skewer or cant, modern archery procedures have been evolved that take into account the natural muscles and natural finger grip of the archer so that the bow can be held as stable and balanced as possible under adverse torque conditions. Also, a variety of arrow shooting devices, commonly referred to as cross-bows, have been employed for purposes of providing greater stability and balance during shooting than can be achieved by employing a long bow. Cross bows are characterized by the incorporation of a shoulder stock fixed to the bow perpendicular thereto so that the load produced by withdrawing the bow string is transmitted via the stock to the bow limbs. Generally, cross bows provide for some form of a pistol type grip and a trigger mechanism for selectively releasing the drawn or taut bow string. However, such an arrangement does not permit the long bow archer to use the same fingers and the same body muscles that are used in shooting a long bow.

Another attempt to overcome the difiiculties of shooting a long bow resides in an arrow shooter similar to a cross bow in that a rigid side bar fixed to the bow is employed in a fashion similar to the shoulder stock of a cross bow so that the natural stance, finger grip and muscles of the archer cannot be used and requires the long bow archer to retrain himself to effectively use the device. Also, it is to be particularly noted that arrow shooters of the cross bow type are highly awkward for hunting purposes or for general target shooting in rugged terrain since the fixed stock or bar having a slidable release mechanism projects rearwardly and coupled with a nocked arrow that projects forwardly when the bow string is not taut provides an overall combined length that greatly encumbers the archer while travelling on foot through high density brush, over hilly terrain, rocky ground conditions or through heavily wooded areas. Even when the bow string is maintained tau-t while the, bow

ice

is being carried, the arrow is pointed to ground and the bow must be held either by the arrow-bow string release mechanism with the bow adjacent the ground or held 'by the bow with the rearwardly projecting rigid stock extended under the archers arm.

Accordingly, the problems and dilficult-ies encountered by conventional bow shooting devices are obviated by the present invention which provides a slidable draw tube or member detachably mounted to a hand grip portion of a long how that readily mounts a fixed bow string retainer and release mechanism on one end of the draw tube. The draw tube projects rearwardly from the hand grip portion of the bow when the bow string is drawn taut and when fully drawn, means are provided for latching the slide tube in fixed relationship with the bow while the nocked arrow is held ready for a shot. A bow string release mechanism is employed to release the drawn bow string to initiate arrow flight. A feature of the invention resides in slidably mounting the draw tube or member to the how so that a nocked arrow can be carried in position before the bow string is drawn with the draw tube and arrow projecting forward of the how. This arrangement permits the archer to carry the bow in a normal, ready for shooting position without being unduly cumbersome and awkward. Furthermore, the arrangement pro vides for the drawing of the bow string and release thereof employing the natural archerrs stance, finger grip and muscles.

Therefore, it is a primary object of the present invention to provide a novel archery shooting aid having a slidable draw tube which projects perpendicular to a long bow about its mid-section adapted to he slid to between an arrow shooting position re-arwardly of the bow and a carrying position projecting forwardly of the bow.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a novel archery shooting aid adapted to duplicate the natural procedures and archers holding grip employed in shooting a conventional long bow while employing a mechanical assist to the archer that provides for improved stability and bow balance conditions.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a novel archery assistor capable of being detachably mounted on a long bow in such a manner that the same fingers and the same body muscles as are used in natural archery in conjunction with shooting a long bow are employed whereby the archer may be readily trained and prepared physically for natural long bow archery.

Still a further object of the present invention is to provide a novel archery apparatus that eliminates the problem of holding the bow string taut with a nocked arrow ready for shooting While the archer takes aim in such a manner that the mechanism retains the bow string taut while the archer may concentrate on the proper sighting picture.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a novel archers assist device that employs a sliding draw tube detachably mounted on a long bow that incorporates a bow string latching and release mechanism for holding the bow string taut with a nocked arrow in its shooting position and further including latch means from the opposite end of the draw tube for detachably connecting with the long bow in a perpendicular relationship so that the draw tube becomes rigid. Also, means are provided for unlatching the draw tube from the bow so that the tautness of the bow string can be released without causing the nocked arrow to be shot.

Yet a further object of the present invention is to provide a novel archers assist device which is readily attached to a conventional long bow Without materially altering the physical size and weight of the long bow on which the apparatus or device is mounted either when the bow string is drawn taut or loose with an arrow nocked and ready to be drawn.

The features of the present invention which are believed to be novel are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. The present invention, both as to its organization and manner of operation, together with further objects and advantages thereof, may best be understood by reference to the following description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is an exploded side elevational view of the archery aid of the present invention showing a bow, a detachable mount, and a draw tube;

FIGURE 2 is a side elevational view of the archery aid of FIGURE 1 as employed in use by an archer;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged side elevational view of the draw tube and a portion of the bow as illustrated in the position indicated by solid lines in FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 4 is a top elevational view of the draw tube as taken in the direction of arrows 41 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 5 is an enlarged side elevational view of the draw tube and a portion of the bow as illustrated in the position indicated by broken lines in FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 6 is an enlarged fragmentary view of one end of the draw tube and shown as being partially broken away to illustrate the arrow release mechanism in its locked condition;

FIGURE 7 is a cross sectional view of the release mechanism as taken in the direction of arrows 77 of FIGURE 6;

FIGURE 8 is a view similar to the view of FIGURE 6 showing the arrow release mechanism in its unlocked condition to effect flight of the arrow;

FIGURE 9 is a perspective view of the bow string retaining block employed in the release mechanism;

FIGURE 10 is a side elevational view of the arrow release mechanism illustrating the natural bow string grip employed by a long bow archer;

FIGURE 11 is a rear elevational view of the bow and draw tube of FIGURE 3 as taken in the direction of arrows 1111 thereof and illustrating the draw tube in its releasable locked condition with respect to the bow;

FIGURE 12 is a side elevational view of the bow and the detachable mount as taken in the direction of arrows 12-12 of FIGURE 11;

FIGURE 13 is a rear view similar to FIGURE 11 illustrating the draw tube in its released and unlocked condition so as to permit the draw tube to slide on the detachable mount; and

detachable mount as taken in the direction of arrows 1414 of FIGURE 12.

Referring to FIGURE 1 of the drawings, a long bow is illustrated in the general direction of arrow 10 that includes a bow stock or middle portion 11 disposed between upper and lower limbs 12 and 13 wherein the bow limbs have terminating ends 14 and 15 respectively, adapted to hold opposite ends of a bow string 16 in either an at rest position as shown in FIGURE 1 or for holding the bow string taut for shooting an arrow as shown in FIGURE 2. The middle portion 11 of the how 10 serves to suitably mount a receiver 17 for detachably receiving a mount 18 thereon. Mount 18 is employed for slidably receiving a draw tube 19 having a latch receptacle 20 provided on one end thereof and a bow string catch means 21 carried on the opposite end thereof. As illustrated, the receptacle 17 is mounted on the bow for use with a right handed archer so that the left hand of the archer can be employed to grip the mid-section 11 as shown in FIGURE 2, while the right hand of the archer can be employed for drawing the bow string taut. The bow shown may be made of any suitable material such as wood, for example, but it is to be understood that the bow may be made of other suitable materials, if desired, such as metal, synthetic resin or suitable plastic.

Referring in detail to FIGURE 2, the bow string 16 4 is drawn taut by the archer after the string has been secured within the catch 21 of the draw tube. The draw tube is slid rearwardly of the bow to the position shown in solid lines through a pair of parallel spaced apart apertured brackets 22 and 23 carried on the mount 18 and projecting laterally therefrom. In the draw tube position shown in solid lines in FIGURE 2, the load of the taut bow string is transmitted via the draw tube 19 tothe how when the latch 20 is fixedly coupled to the mount 18. However, when the bow string is loose as illustrated in broken lines, the draw tube 19 slides through the apertured brackets 22 and 23 forwardly of the bow to the position of the slide tube 19 illustrated in broken lines.

Slide tube 19, shown in more detail 'in FIGURES 3 and 4, is preferably tubular in cross-section and has a front end portion 24 carrying the latch slot 20 illustrated as being engaged by a locking detent 25 so that the slide tube can be temporarily attached rigidly with the middle portion of the bow. Preferably, the slide tube is composed of metal but the tube can be made of any suitable wood materials, suitable plastic or the like. When the slot 20 of the slide tube is engaged by the detent 25, the major length of the slide tube projects rearwardly to the draw back position of the bow string. In this position, the bow string catch mechanism 21 is in a substantially rearward position so that the bow string is fully taut per the load rating of the bow. The draw tube 19 is provided with a stop collar 26 that is adapted so that its forward face engages with the outer surface of the bracket 22 to prevent further sliding of the draw tube through the brackets of the mount 18. The catch mechanism 21 is carried on an extension 27 via an angular bracket 28 wherein the extension 27 is arranged in telescopic relationship with the major length of the draw tube 19 so that the overall length of the draw tube can be conveniently adjusted such as by inserting pins 30 through mating holes 31 provided in the extension 27 and the draw tube 19.

The detent 25 is maintained within the slot 20 by means of the forcible urging of a spring clip 32 to be described more fully later. The catch mechanism 21 located on the opposite end of the slide tube is enclosed within a housing suitable to be received within the palm of an archers hand so that the natural and desired position of the fingers and stance of the archer can be maintained which is identical to the natural stance and finger grip of a long bow archer on the draw string 16. Furthermore, a push-button type plunger 33 is employed for releasing the catch mechanism so as to loosen the taut bow string 16 to initiate flight of an arrow 34. It is to be particularly noted in FIGURE 4 that the arrow 34 is arranged at the side of the slide tube 19 in spaced parallel relationship therewith with the arrow nock seated within the catch mechanism 21 at one end and the shaft of the arrow at its opposite end resting on an arrow guide 35 formed in the mid-portion of the bow 10. Therefore, it can be seen that the position of the arrow 34 is identical to the position of an arrow normally used in shooting a long bow. The slide tube mechanism is substantially located on the opposite side of the bow from that of the arrow and by means of the amount 18 and the angle bracket 28, the slide tube and associated mechanism is maintained out of the way of the arrow, released bow string and the arrow guide 35.

Referring now to FIGURE 5, the slide tube 19 is illustrated in its forwardmost position ahead of the bow midp ortion 11 so that the stop collar 26 abuts against the bracket 22. The bow string 16 is loose and when in this condition, an arrow can either be nocked with the bow string preparatory for shooting or a nocked arrow can be carried by the bow. It is to be particularly noted that the detent 25 rests against the external surface of the tube 19 and that the tube is not retained nor secured to the bow and that the slide tube 19 is free to slide within the laterally extending brackets 22 and 23.

Referring now to FIGURE 6, it can be seen that the angular bracket 28 projects laterally behind the bow in such a fashion to offset the slide tube 19 and its extension 27 from interfering therewith. The extreme terminating end of the angular bracket 28 is formed to carry a housing 36 for rotatably enclosing a catch block 37 forming a part of the release mechanism. The catch block 37 includes a longitudinal groove 38 opening through one side of the block and extending its entire length that is adapted to receive the bow string 16. As illustrated in FIGURE 6, the block is oriented in such a fashion that the bow string 16 is held within the groove 38 so that when the slide tube is moved rearwardly through brackets 22 and 23, the bow string is pulled taut. The catch block 37 is arranged for rotation about a vertical axis by means of a mounting shaft 40 projecting from the opposite ends of the block.

As illustrated more clearly in FIGURE 7, the catch block is held within a chamber 41 formed in the housing 36 so that the catch block will have sufiicient clearance to rotate and function. Furthermore, it is to be noted that a tensioned coil spring 42 is provided which has its opposite ends secured to the housing 36 and the catch block respectively, so that the catch block is normally biased to the position shown in FIGURE 8. The catch block 37 also includes a slot 43 formed about its midsection normal to and passing through the groove 38. The slot '43 is employed for suitably receiving the nocked arrow so that the extreme rear end of the arrow resides within the slot in engagement with the bow string 16. A spring clip 44 is attached at one end of the housing 36 and includes a cantilevered clip portion 45 that is adapted to engage the arrow 34 when the arrow is seated within the slot 43. The tension of the spring clip 44 is light but is of sufiicient compression to maintain the arrow within the slot and in nocked engagement with the bow string 16.

FIGURES 6 and 7 illustrate that the catch block 37 includes an elongated recess 46 that extends from one end of the block to its opposite end and opening to the periphery of the block at a location substantially opposite to the groove 38. The elongated recess 46 is employed to receive a latch 47 that is carried by a plunger 48 having the push-button head 33. When the latch 47 is extended into the recess 46, the catch block is maintained in the position as shown in FIGURES 6 and 7 and the block is held against the tension of the taut bow string 16.

In more detail, FIGURE 7 shows that the plunger 48 is slidably mounted in an angular bore 50. The plunger 48 is resiliently biased in an upward direction by means of a coil spring 51 seated at the bottom of the bore 50 and engaging with one end of the plunger 48. It is to be particularly noted that the housing 36 includes a cutout portion 52 into which the latch 47 projects and moves vertically in accordance with movement of the plunger 48. Cut-out 52 communicates with bore 50 and with chamber 41 so that the terminating end of the latch 47 projects into the elongated recess 46 when the plunger is biased upwardly in the bow string nonrelease position.

Referring now to FIGURE 9, a perspective view of the catch block 37 is shown which more clearly illustrates the relationship of the elongated recess 46, groove 38 for receiving the bow string and slot 43 for seating the nocked arrow. Inasmuch as the block 37 is intended to rotate upon the release thereof by the release mechanism, the slot 43 continues around the opposite side of the block and gradually tapers toward its peripheral edge so that when the block rotates, the full thickness or diameter of the block does not inhibit or impair the launching of the arrow.

In FIGURE 8, a launched arrow is indicated travelling in the general direction indicated by numeral 53 immediately after the bow string 16 has been released from the catch block. The catch block is illustrated as having rotated approxiately 50 which is sufiicient to permit the tensioned bow string to move out of the groove 38. Rotation of the block is initiated by downward pressure on button 33 which depresses the plunger and removes the latch 47 f-rom the recess 46 so that the catch block is free to rotate. The tension of the bow string 16 initiates movement of the block. In this view, it can be seen that the slot 43, because of its rearwardly tapering condition, does not interfere with the launching of the arrow 34 upon rotation of the catchblock.

With respect to FIGURE 10, it can be seen that the release mechanism is readily grasped by the three fingers of the archers hand so that the identictal finger grip employed in natural archery is used with the device of the present invention. The plunger button 33 is critically located so that the release mechanism can be readily operated by the a-rchers thumb while employing the natural grip of a long bow archer. Angular bracket 28 is constructed by means of a pair of arms 56 and 57 which are arranged in fixed spaced relationship so as to provide an opening therebetween to accommodate the second finger of the a-rchers hand.

Referring now to FIGURES l1 and 12, the arrow 34 is illustrated as being within the guide 35 and may be seated against brushes 60 and 61. The mount 18 is detachably carried on the mid-section 11 of the bow by means of the wedge receptacle 17 on the side of the bow opposite to the guide 35. The slide tube is shaped and sized to fit within the coaxial bores of the brackets 22 and 23 so that only a little play is permitted to allow free sliding movement of the slide tube within the bores. It is to be particularly noted that the end 24 of the slide tube is provided with slot 20 into which the detent 25 is inserted. The detent 25 is biased into the slot by means of the leaf spring 32 and more specifically by means of an integral member 62 that immediately presses the detent into the slot 20. The slide tube may be slightly cocked or rotated by the right hand of the archer so that the detent .25 may be readily removed from the slot at the control of the archer. Such a circumstance is shown in FIGURE 13 wherein the slide tube is shown in a cocked position so that the detent 25 merely drops from within the slot 20 by means of gravity. When the detent is removed from the slot, the archer may readily ease the slide tube through the brackets 22 and 23 to the position shown in FIGURE 5 in the event that the archer decides not to shoot after the arrow has been nocked and the bow string drawn taut.

FIGURE 14 illustrates the wedge type connection between the mount 18 and its receptacle 17 whereby the mount may be readily removed when it is desired to disassemble or detach the mechanism of the present invention from the bow.

In actual operation, the slide tube 19 is moved forwa-rdly through the brackets 22 and 23 to the position shown in FIGURE 5. Movement of the slide tube is restricted by engagement of the collar 26 with the bracket 22. The bow string 16 is placed into the groove 38 and the mock of an arrow 34 is engaged with the bow string so that the end of the arrow resides within slot 43 of the catch block 37. The spring clip 44 will retain the arrow in the slot and in nocked engagement with the bow string. The catch block is prevented from rotation by means of the latch 47 being in engagement with the recess 46 due to the upwardly urging action of the plunger 48 by the spring 51.

The archer grips the housing 36 in the manner shown in FIGURE 10 and slowly draws the bow string 16 taut by sliding the slide tube rearwardly. When the slide tube has moved to its bow string draw position, detent 25 engages with slot 20 due to the urging of the leaf spring 32 so that the slide tube is maintained in a releasably fixed condition with the bow. At this time, the archer may engage in whatever aiming procedures he feels are necessary to align the arrow with an intended target. Dur

ing the aiming procedures, the archer need not be cOncerned with maintaining the bow string taut inasmuch as the slide tube achieves this purpose by operating as a rigid extension between the bow and the drawn bow string.

Once the archer has determined to free the arrow for flight, the archer employs his thumb to depress button 33 which causes plunger 48 to move towards the bottom of the bore 50 against the tension of spring 51. The movement of the plunger in this manner causes the latch 47 to be removed from its mating recess 46- in the catch block so that the catch block is free to rotate in accordance with the tension placed thereon by the drawn bow string. The direction of catch block rotation is clockwise so that the bow string will be released after approximately 50 of rotation. Once the bow srting has been released, the tension of spring 42 urges the catch block to its position as shown in FIGURE 8 so that the mechanism is ready to receive the bow string for another shot. By releasing plunger 48, latch 47 enters the recess 46 to maintain the catch block in its start poistion.

Therefore, it can be seen that the apparatus of the present invention provides a new and novel mechanism that may be readily employed by novice or professional alike which offers greater stability and balance for a long bow during aiming and shooting procedures. Furthermore, it can be seen that by permitting the slide tube to extend forwardly of the bow per se, the bow may be carried with a nocked arrow in a manner usual for carrying low bows during cross country travelling conditions. In the event that an arrow has been pulled to the drawn position, and the archer decides not to shoot, detent 25 is readily removed by sliding the leaf spring 32 downwardly with the thumb so that gravity will cause the detent to drop out from the slot. If the archer decides to shoot, the detent is removed after the arrow has been shot by slightly cocking the slide tube so that the detent cams out of the slot to permit the slide tube to slide forward. A feature of the present invention resides in the fact that the mid-section of the bow can also be employed to mount a suitable sighting device if desired by the archer, and the sighting device will in no way interfere with the mechanism of the present invention. Also, the same muscles, stance and finger grip employed by long bow archers are employed in using the device of the present invention so that an archer can become conditioned to using a long bow without necessitating any changes in position or finger grip.

While particular embodiments of the present invention have been shown and described, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that changes and modifications may be made without departing from this in its broader aspects, and, therefore, the aim in the appended claims is to cover all such changes and modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of this invention.

I claim:

1. In an arrow shooting apparatus adapted to employ natural shooting techniques including a bow having a mid-portion disposed between two limbs for holding a bow string comprising:

a bracket means detachably secured to the mid-portion of the bow along one side thereof;

only a single elongated slide member movably carried on said bracket means between a first position substantially projecting forward of the bow and a second position projecting to the rear of the bow;

a bow string catch means carried on one end of said member and being adapted to releasably engage with the bow string when said member is in its second position;

an angular bracket having a transverse open-ended passageway therethrough and finger-engaging means on its side next to the bowstring, said bracket connecting said catch means to said elongated member and being arranged to ofiset said member out of alignment with the rear of the bow mid-portion so as not to interfere with the positioning of the bow string or arrow;

release mechanism carried on said bracket and having an exposed portion projecting from the top of said bracket perpendicular to said passageway and operably coupled to said catch means to selectively release the bow string to shoot an arrow;

said exposed portion adapted to be pressed by the thumb of the bowman and said transverse passageway adapted to insertably receive a selected finger of the bowmans hand; and said finger-engaging means adapted to receive two other fingers of the hand wherein the bowman employs the same three finger bow string grip normally used in natural long bow archery.

2. The invention as defined in claim 1 including detent means carried on said bracket means and operably connected with a slot formed in the end of said member opposite to its end carrying saidcatch means for releasably coupling said member to said bracket means in said second position whereby said member provides a rigid load bearing transmission path between the how string and the bow, said detent means operable to release said member from said bracket means by rotation of said member relative to said bracket means by the hand of the bowman so as to remove said detent means from said slot.

3. The invention as defined in claim 2 including a housing carried on said angular bracket for mounting said catch means and said release mechanism and adapted to be held by the archer employing the same finger bow string grip normally used in natural long bow archery.

4. The invention as defined in claim 3 wherein:

said catch means includes a block rotatably mounted on said housing having a vertical axis of rotation substantially lying in a plane in alignment with the rear of the bow mid-portion; and

said block including a groove extending between its opposite ends adapted to releasably receive the bow string and having a slot formed normal to said groove and communicating therewith so as to releasably receive the nock of the arrow.

5. The invention as defined in claim 4 wherein:

said block further includes a recess substantially disposed on the opposite side thereof from said groove; and

wherein said release mechanism includes latch means for releasably coupling with said recess for holding said block against rotation.

6. The invention as defined in claim 5 wherein said bracket means includes:

a mount;

a pair of parallel spaced apart brackets projecting outwardly from the side of said mount; and

said pair of spaced apart brackets having aligned coaxial bores formed therein adapted to slidably mount said member.

7. The invention as defined in claim 6 including a spring clip mounted on said housing adjacent said block slot and cantilevered thereover and being adapted to releasably engage a nocked arrow to urge the arrow into a seated position within said slot.

8. The invention as defined in claim 1 including an extension secured at one end to said angular bracket and arranged at its other end in sliding telescoping relationship with said elongated member whereby the eifective length of said member can be readily adjusted.

9. The invention as defined in claim 5 wherein said latch means includes an angular bore formed in said housing;.

a plunger slidably carried in said angular bore for reciprocal movement therein;

9 10 biasing means located in said bore urging a portion References Cited of said plunger to project beyond said housing; and UNITED STATES PATENTS a latch secured to said plunger and adapted to move therewith for selective engagement with said block 1,133,189 3/1915 Shannon 124-25 recess r 2,815,016 12/1957 Kellogg 124-23 X 10. The invention as defined in claim 9 including spring 2,982,276 5/1961 Pursley 12423 X means coupled between said housing and said block for 2,637,311 5/1953 Rose 124 35 n l gg gf g fig z i b a and RICHARD c. PINKHAM, Primary Examiner.

11. The invention as defined in claim 10 including a re- 10 W, R, BROWNE, Assistant E i ceptacle secured to the mid-portion of the bow for detachably receiving a wedge shaped element carried on said US. Cl. X.R. bracket means. 124-35, 41

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Cited By (20)

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US3557769A (en) * 1968-10-08 1971-01-26 Herter Inc S Bow handrest
US3561418A (en) * 1969-05-02 1971-02-09 Bert E Fredrickson Archery bow with bowstring stressing device
US4041926A (en) * 1976-02-18 1977-08-16 Troncoso Fernando Jr Bowstring release device
US4041925A (en) * 1975-04-07 1977-08-16 John F. Cowen Bowstring release device
US4061125A (en) * 1975-11-28 1977-12-06 Trotter George H Bowstring positioning device
US4062339A (en) * 1976-02-17 1977-12-13 Wilson Hugh R Bowstring draw and release mechanism
US4066051A (en) * 1971-06-25 1978-01-03 Alban John M Training aid for archery
US4105011A (en) * 1977-09-23 1978-08-08 Chism Van B Archery bowstring release
DE2813484A1 (en) * 1978-03-29 1979-10-11 United Carr Gmbh cable band
US4466418A (en) * 1982-07-26 1984-08-21 Jones Bobby L Bowstring trigger release mechanism
US4612907A (en) * 1983-11-28 1986-09-23 Gatomba, Inc. Archery release aid
US4791908A (en) * 1987-09-17 1988-12-20 Pro Line Company Bowstring release mechanism
US5002035A (en) * 1989-11-30 1991-03-26 Brooks Scott T Archery bow cocking apparatus
US5146908A (en) * 1990-03-21 1992-09-15 Browning Hold-back system for bowstring
US5156138A (en) * 1990-09-19 1992-10-20 Roger Grover Apparatus for drawing, holding and releasing bowstring
US5671723A (en) * 1997-01-03 1997-09-30 Jerry A. Goff Archery drawlock
US6012440A (en) * 1995-05-25 2000-01-11 Grindle; Joseph Gary Brace for an archery bow
US6161532A (en) * 1997-01-03 2000-12-19 Goff; Jerry Alan Archery drawlock
US20090071458A1 (en) * 2007-09-14 2009-03-19 Sean Gordon Bowstring dampener
US20090071457A1 (en) * 2007-09-14 2009-03-19 Sean Gordon Bowstring vibration dampener and mounting

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US2637311A (en) * 1950-08-03 1953-05-05 Make All Tool & Die Co Arrow releasing device
US2815016A (en) * 1955-03-04 1957-12-03 Warren H Kellogg Long bow attachment
US2982276A (en) * 1957-08-28 1961-05-02 Bosch Gmbh Robert Pulse generating system for electronic fuel injection control devices and the like

Cited By (24)

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US3557769A (en) * 1968-10-08 1971-01-26 Herter Inc S Bow handrest
US3561418A (en) * 1969-05-02 1971-02-09 Bert E Fredrickson Archery bow with bowstring stressing device
US4066051A (en) * 1971-06-25 1978-01-03 Alban John M Training aid for archery
US4041925A (en) * 1975-04-07 1977-08-16 John F. Cowen Bowstring release device
US4061125A (en) * 1975-11-28 1977-12-06 Trotter George H Bowstring positioning device
US4062339A (en) * 1976-02-17 1977-12-13 Wilson Hugh R Bowstring draw and release mechanism
US4041926A (en) * 1976-02-18 1977-08-16 Troncoso Fernando Jr Bowstring release device
US4105011A (en) * 1977-09-23 1978-08-08 Chism Van B Archery bowstring release
DE2813484A1 (en) * 1978-03-29 1979-10-11 United Carr Gmbh cable band
US4466418A (en) * 1982-07-26 1984-08-21 Jones Bobby L Bowstring trigger release mechanism
US4612907A (en) * 1983-11-28 1986-09-23 Gatomba, Inc. Archery release aid
US4791908A (en) * 1987-09-17 1988-12-20 Pro Line Company Bowstring release mechanism
US5002035A (en) * 1989-11-30 1991-03-26 Brooks Scott T Archery bow cocking apparatus
US5146908A (en) * 1990-03-21 1992-09-15 Browning Hold-back system for bowstring
US5156138A (en) * 1990-09-19 1992-10-20 Roger Grover Apparatus for drawing, holding and releasing bowstring
US6012440A (en) * 1995-05-25 2000-01-11 Grindle; Joseph Gary Brace for an archery bow
US5671723A (en) * 1997-01-03 1997-09-30 Jerry A. Goff Archery drawlock
US5944004A (en) * 1997-01-03 1999-08-31 Goff; Jerry Alan Archery stabilizer and drawlock
US6161532A (en) * 1997-01-03 2000-12-19 Goff; Jerry Alan Archery drawlock
US20090071458A1 (en) * 2007-09-14 2009-03-19 Sean Gordon Bowstring dampener
US20090071457A1 (en) * 2007-09-14 2009-03-19 Sean Gordon Bowstring vibration dampener and mounting
US8011356B2 (en) * 2007-09-14 2011-09-06 Bear Archery, Inc. Bowstring dampener
US8033277B2 (en) 2007-09-14 2011-10-11 Bear Archery, Inc. Bowstring vibration dampener and mounting
US8453636B2 (en) 2007-09-14 2013-06-04 Bear Archery, Inc. Bowstring vibration dampener and mounting

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