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Ball valves

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Publication number
US3437106A
US3437106A US3437106DA US3437106A US 3437106 A US3437106 A US 3437106A US 3437106D A US3437106D A US 3437106DA US 3437106 A US3437106 A US 3437106A
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Grant
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Prior art keywords
valve
ball
key
housing
annular
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Frank H Mueller
Wilbur R Leopold Jr
John J Smith
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Mueller Co
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Mueller Co
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16KVALVES; TAPS; COCKS; ACTUATING-FLOATS; DEVICES FOR VENTING OR AERATING
    • F16K35/00Means to prevent accidental or unauthorised actuation
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16KVALVES; TAPS; COCKS; ACTUATING-FLOATS; DEVICES FOR VENTING OR AERATING
    • F16K5/00Plug valves; Taps or cocks comprising only cut-off apparatus having at least one of the sealing faces shaped as a more or less complete surface of a solid of revolution, the opening and closing movement being predominantly rotary
    • F16K5/06Plug valves; Taps or cocks comprising only cut-off apparatus having at least one of the sealing faces shaped as a more or less complete surface of a solid of revolution, the opening and closing movement being predominantly rotary with plugs having spherical surfaces; Packings therefor
    • F16K5/0626Easy mounting or dismounting means
    • F16K5/0636Easy mounting or dismounting means the spherical plug being insertable from the top of the housing
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T137/00Fluid handling
    • Y10T137/6851With casing, support, protector or static constructional installations
    • Y10T137/7043Guards and shields
    • Y10T137/7062Valve guards
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T137/00Fluid handling
    • Y10T137/7069With lock or seal
    • Y10T137/7256Locks against rotary motion
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T137/00Fluid handling
    • Y10T137/8593Systems
    • Y10T137/86493Multi-way valve unit
    • Y10T137/86574Supply and exhaust
    • Y10T137/86638Rotary valve
    • Y10T137/86646Plug type

Description

April 8, 1969 F. H. MUELLER ETAL 3,437,106

BALL VALVES Filed Dec. 1o, 1964 sheet L of s ATTOR NEYS MMV April 8, 1969 F. H. MUELLER ETAL 3,437,106

BALL VALVES Filed Dec. 1o, 1964 sheet 2 of s 447 INVENTORS sku-Lav, rw

ATTORNEYS April 8, 1969 F. H. MUELLER ETAL 3,437,106

BALL vALvEs Filed Dec. 1o, 1964 sheet 5 of s BY 19d/Kif ATTORNEYS April 8, 1969 F. H. MUELLER ETAL 3,437,106

BALL VALVES Filed Dec. 1o, 1964 sheet 4 of s y A /04 A241. l /agfe INVENTORS ATTORNEYS April 8, 1969 F. H. MuELLr-:R ETAL. 3,437,106

BALL VALVES' Filed Dec. 1o, 1964 sheet 5 of 8 GE t INVENTORS BY fof/xv JSM/r# Wwfaw ATTOR NEYS April 8, 1969 F. H. MUELLER E'rAL BALL. VALVES Sheet Filed Dec. l0, 1964 INVENTORS M2 aw? Elf-anu 0, Jg. Jeff/v JSM dnoqga/ ik ATTORNEYS April 8, 1969 F. H. MUELLER ETAL 3,437,106

BALL VALVES v Filed Dec. 1o, v1954 sheetA 7 of a I NVENT OR S ETNA/.e vf/Varas: M4 we Elfe/au o, Je.

BY .GA//v M /rf/ @beauf/w ATroRNEYS April 8, 1969 F. H. MuELLl-:R ETAL 3,437,106

BALL VALVES Filed Dec. 1o, 1964 sheet 9 or 8 INVENTORS ATTORNEYS United States Patent Office 3,437,106 Patented Apr. 8, 1969 3,437,106 BALL VALVES Frank H. Mueller, Wilbur R. Leopold, Jr., and `lohn J. Smith, Decatur, Ill., assignors to Mueller Co., Decatur,

Ill., a corporation of Illinois Filed Dec. 10, 1964, Ser. No. 417,435

Int. Cl. F16k 35/00; F161 35/00 U.S. Cl. 137-382 14 Claims The present invention relates to valves and more particularly to improvements in valves having a rotatable valve body and resilient means to increase the seating pressure between the body and the valve seats when the valve is in its closed position.

Various prior art proposed rotatable valve body valves have come into increasingly wide usage, particularly in high fluid pressure environments. However, this usage has shown that the prior art valves of this type are not without serious shortcomings and disadvantages.

In particular, in order to provide valves in which the Valve seats were replaceable many constructions have been proposed which include intricate procedures for disassembly of the valve housing to a greater or lesser extent in order to remove the old seats and replace them with new ones. In the art which includes rotatable body valves wherein continual rotation of the valve body with respect to the seats results in more rapid seat wear due to the abrasive action of particles carried in the uid being controlled by the valve, a considerable amount of effort has been expended in seeking to provide a satisfactorily acceptable, widely useable arrangement for replacing such valve seats.

However, these efforts have not been entirely successful in the past inasmuch as the resulting valve structure required an unsatsfactorily expensive amount of precision machinery, was constituted by a large number of intricate interengaging parts having widely varying service lives, or required a considerable amount of down time and skill in the seat replacement procedure.

For instance a sizable percentage of such valves require such complete disassembly of the valve housing in order to get at the Valve rotor and seats that the housing must be uncoupled from the conduit in which it is interposed, or alternatively, axial or lateral movement of the two conduit sections adjacent the valve is required in order to satisfactorily separate the valve housing portions from one another.

It is not diflicult to appreciate that in many instances, not only is it imperative that the valve down time for inspection and parts replacement be very short, but also such preventive maintenance and repair must be accomplishable with the valve in line in View of the diiculties and hazards involved in disrupting a high pressure line and also in view of the cramped working area that may be involved.

Also in attempting to solve the seat replacement problem, many prior art valves of this nature have unwittingly unsatisfactorily worsened other desirable characteristics of the valves involved with respect to those of more conventional valves.

For example, efforts concentrated in the area of improving .assembly and disassembly procedures have in the past produced valves wherein the rotor was subjected to such an axial thrust that these valves are quite susceptible to failure of the rotor retaining means and expulsion of the rotor and seats from the valve housing.

Additionaly many of these valves have not been providable with means for rendering them tamperproof, for instance for use by gas utility companies in distribution of gas products to residential users.

Valves which .are tamperproof can be installed in the supply lines for domestic gas immediately prior to the gas meter so that the utility can determine when gas will be supplied to the user. Such valves are commonly referred to as meter stops, and insofar as stops can be made tamperproof and discourage unauthorized prospective tamperers from attempting their disassembly, the utility is able to be confident that they Vare exercising effective -control of the gas they supply so that will be remunerated for all of the gas being used. Additionally, it is desirable in this type of valve to assure that attempts at unauthorized disassembly or tampering with the valves will not render them dangerous, for instance by causing them to leak gas to the atmosphere.

Most usually, unauthorized tamperers are those seeking to withdraw gas from a supply line surreptitiously by removing the valve rotor retaining means and the rotor,

and collecting the gas escaping from the rotor receiving chamber. Such tampering is only effectively accomplishable where the procedure just set forth can be effected without visibly damaging the valve or rendering it thereafter inoperable.

Agcordingly, in order to render such valves effectively tamperproof and safe it is necessary to construct them so ,they are not disassembled by unauthorized persons with conventional tools or without being rendered thereafter inoperable. It is also an important consideration that the tamperproof arrangement not unduly restrict or hinder authorized repair and preventive maintenance work on the valves by representatives of the utility company.

Essentially, the subject valves are intended to be used as water curb stops, although they can be used for other purposes. When used as curb stops, however, they normally are buried in the earth, and so it is desirable for such valves to have a one-piece body or housng to facilitate sealing the same against the entry of grit-carrying ground water, dirt, and the like. Additionally, itis most desirable for such valves to have a completey enclosed check arrangement, i.e. the arrangement which limits the rotation of the valve plug between open and closed positions of the valve.

In the preferred embodiment to be described hereinafter, it is noted that the body is of one-piece construction having what may be called a closed bottom and an open top. In the art, this arrangement for ball valves is known as a top entry arrangement, because the valve ball is inserted from the top. The lower end of the body is provided with a cylindrical journal bearing for the lower trunnion on the ball, while the inner ends of the body flow ports are provided with the cylindrical recesses in which annular cylindrical seats are slidably mounted. The outer end of each valve seat is exteriorly reduced to provide an annular space for the reception of an O-ring between the seat and the seat recess. It will be noted that the outer end of each seat is received within the flow passage so as to more effectively isolate the O-rings.

The seats, which preferably are made of a material such as nylon, the O-rings, and the valve ball are so proportioned that the latter can be inserted through the open upper end of the valve body, with the ball in an open position, between the two seat rings. When the O- rings are relaxed, the space between the two seat rings is somewhat less than the corresponding dimension of the Valve ball in its open position. Hence, when the valve ball is inserted between the seat rings as aforesaid, the latter are forced back into their seat recesses against the spring action of the O-rings, so that the two seat rings are maintained constantly in yieldable engagement with the valve ball.

As the valve ball is rotated from its open to its closed position, the spherical configuration of the valve ball forces the seat rings even further back into their recesses against the action of the O-rings. When the valve is closed, upstream liuid pressure essentially acts on the annular area of the O-ring to constantly force the upstream seat ring against the valve ball to maintain a tight seal. In this respect, a trunnion-supported valve ball depends for its sealing effect upon upstream pressure holding the upstream seat tightly against the valve ball. In other valve ball arrangements, wherein the valve ball is not trunnion supported, upstream line pressure holds the valve ball, when closed, tightly against the ldownstream seat to effect the seal.

The opening in the top of the valve body, at its inner end, is of a configuration corresponding to the outline of the valve ball when the latter is in its open position, so that the inner end of the opening is shaped so that it will just admit the entrance of the valve ball between the seat rings. It will be noted that this configuration of the opening provides, at its inner end, two opposed transverse, fiat surfaces, and very practical use is made of these surfaces as described hereinafter.

Above its inner end, the top opening in the body is interiorly enlarged to a cylindrical or circular configuration for the snug rotatable reception of a corresponding cylindrical portion of a cap which, in a sense, acts as a valve stem. The cylindrical portion of the cap is provided with a circumferential groove for the reception of an O-ring which effectively makes a seal between the bottom of the' groove in the cap and the opposed cylindrical surface in the body. Thus, the open upper end of the valve housing is effectively sealed.

The rim of the inner end of the cap is provided with a pair of diametrically opposed notches that are. elongated longitudinally of the cap and which receive the opposite ends of a drive pin received with a friction fit in a transverse opening through the upper trunnion of the valve ball. It will be noted that by reason of this construction the valve ball can move somewhat axially to thereby accommodate itself precisely to the inner ends of the seat rings to more effectively seal therewith when the valve ball is in its closed position. It further will be noted that by reason of the driving arrangement bef tween the cap and the valve ball, line pressure, whenthe valve is open, can be exerted on the upper end of the valve ball, as well as on the lower end thereof. Thus, the valve ball is pressure balanced, which makes for Ieasier turning.

Above its inner cylindrical section which is engaged by the O-ring in the cap, the top opening in the valve body or housing is provided with an outwardly inclined conical surface which merges with the inner edge of a snap ring groove. Above its cylindrical portion the cap is exteriorly reduced to forman outwardly facing shoulder against which is seated an anti-friction washer preferably made of nylon or a similar material. The washer snugly surrounds the reduced portion of the cap, and the outer edge of the washer is beveled for snug engagement with the conical surface in the top opening in the valve body. A snap ring is disposed in the snap ring groove in the body top opening and overlies the anti-friction washer to thereby retain the cap in place. It will be noted that the aforementioned outwardly facing conical surface in the top opening in the valve housing facilitates assembly of the cap in that the O-ring can be moved into the cylindrical portion of the top opening without danger of damaging or pinching the same in moving past the inner edge of the snap ring groove. In other words, if the top opening were of a constant diameter throughout its length, such damage could occur.

As a result of the foregoing construction, it will be noted that line pressure probably will be exerted against the underside of the cap to hold the same tightly against the anti-friction washer which distributes this thrust load better over the inner side of the snap ring.

The inner end of the cap is provided with opposed projections that are designed as abutment surfaces to engage against the opposed fiat, transverse surfaces at the inner end of the body top opening and in the open 4 and in the closed positions of the valve to serve as checks.

Thus, a practical use is made of the aforementioned opposed flat surfaces. It also will be noted that the abutment stop or check surfaces are integral with the cap and the valve body, so that the valve ball itself is not subject to forces exerted by the check arrangement. It further will be noted that the check arrangement is completely enclosed within the valve body and sealed off from the exterior thereof by the O-ring on the cap.

Inasmuch as line pressure tends to hold the cap snugly against the anti-friction washer, the latter forms a seal to minimize entrance of grit-carrying ground water, dirt, and so forth, past the anti-friction washer into contact with the O-ring. While the O-ring will seal against entrance of such material into the valve, contact of such material with the O-ring might cause damage to the latter, and it is desirable to minimize contact of such material with the O-ring.

The aforedescribed construction provides a cylindrical configuration on top of the valve which is conveniently used for the provision of a Minneapolis thread. In other words, the exterior of the cylindrical configuration is threaded. Many curb stops are provided with what is known in the art as a Minneapolis thread which is used for engagement by complementary interior thread on the inner end of a curb box, in order to maintain proper alignment between the box and the operating stem or cap of the curb stop. In the present instance, the upper end of the valve does not have to be enlarged or specially formed for this purpose, because the basic construction makes for the cylindrical upper end of the valve. In other words, the present design is very practical.

The present valves as shown in the attached drawings are designed for use with pressures of the order of to 200 p.s.i., but the valves can work effectively with 500 p.s.i. if the top thrust bearing, i.e. the anti-friction washer and snap ring, are reinforced to resist such a pressure load.

It also will ibe noted that the construction of the preferred embodiment involves a drain which includes a transverse drain port in the housing at the lower end of the valve chamber, i.e. the chamber in the housing wherein the valve ball is located. This location is immediately above the bottom bearing for the lower trunnion on the valve ball.

A lower side of the valve ball is provided with a fiat surface designed to overlie the lower portion of the downstream seat ring when the valve is in its closed position. In this position of the port, clearance will be provided between the valve ball and the downstream seat ring, so that water in the downstream line can drain back into the valve chamber and out through the housing drain port. It will lbe noted that the housing drain port is at the lower end of the valve chamber, i.e. the housing cavity wherein the valve ball is located. Accordingly, after the downstream line drains, air will be trapped in the valve chamber and tend to prevent entry of ground water through the housing drain port.

It further will be noted that since the valve cavity is vented to the atmosphere by the housing drain port, there will be an increase in the pressure difference across the seal between the valve ball and each seat ring when the valve is open, so that both seat rings will be urged by pressure more tightly against the valve ball.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide valves susceptible of rotor removal and seat replacement while the valve remains in line, and which can be rendered effectively and safely tamperproof.

It is a further object of the invention to provide valves of the type described having resilient means urging the valve seats into contact with the rotor.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of ball valves having trunnion mounted rotors the rotors being axially movable to a limited extent to effecting a better seal between the valve rotor and the seats.

A further object of the invention is the provision, in valves of the type described, of means for facilitating insertion and removal of the trunnion-supported ball type rotor laterally through the valve housing with the valve in its open position without necessitating the provision of complicated and expensive seat arrangements that are removed with the rotor.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide valves of the type described that are usable as water works water curb stops having the valve housing bottom closed around the bottom trunnion of the rotor and which may alternatively have an open bottom with an O-ring seal provided to seal the bottom trunnion to the housing.

It is a further object of this invention to provide valves of the type described wherein the operating means is pinned to the top trunnion so that any desired form of operator, such as a lever handle, T-head, plain head, lock wing or the like may be provided thereon, thus effectively broadening the scope of usefulness of the valves according to the invention.

It is an object according to an embodiment of the invention to provide a valve of the type described wherein the check is a compact integral part of the valve operating head or cap arranged so that any overload on the check does not affect the ball or the seating arrangement, and wherein the check is concealed so that sand and gravel or the like are effectively prevented from disturbing proper operation of the check.

It is a further object according to further embodiments of the invention especially usable as water curb stops, to provide means on the ball and in the valve housing to accomplish automatic draining of the downstream side of the valve when the Valve is in its closed position.

These and further objects of the present invention will be more fully set forth in the following detailed explanation of several preferred embodiments of the invention having reference to the attached drawings wherein the several embodiments illustrating the principles of the present invention are depicted.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a longitudinal sectional view of a valve embodiment of the invention;

FIGURE 2 is a sectional view taken substantially along line 2-2 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a sectional View taken substantially along line 3--3 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is a longitudinal sectional view of another embodiment of the invention having housing drain means incorporated therein;

FIGURE 5 is a longitudinal sectional View of a preferred embodiment of the ball valve of the invention;

FIGURE 6 is a sectional view taken substantially along line 6-6 of FIGURE 5;

FIGURE 7 is an end elevation view of the modified valve as shown in FIGURES 5 and 6, partly sectioned to expose the drain feature of the valve;

FIGURE 8 is a top plan view of an embodiment of a valve according to principles of the invention;

FIGURE 9 is a longitudinal sectional View taken along line 9-9 of FIGURE 8;

FIGURE 10 is an end elevation view of the embodiment of FIGURES 8 and 9;

FIGURE 11 is a top plan view of another embodiment of a valve according to the principles of the invention;

FIGURE 12 is a longitudinal sectional view taken along line 12-12 of FIGURE 1l;

FIGURE 13 is an end elevation view of the valve ernbodiment shown in FIGURES l1 and 12;

FIGURE 14 is a top plan view of another embodiment of a valve according to the principles of the invention;

FIGURE l5 is a longitudinal sectional view taken along line 15-15 of FIGURE 14;

FIGURE 16 is an end elevation view of the valve embodiment of FIGURES 14 and l5;

FIGURE 17 is a horizontal longitudinal sectional view taken along the line 1,7--17 of FIGURE 16;

FIGURE 18 is an exploded perspective view of the valve embodiment of FIGURES 14 through 17 with some portions broken away to expose elements otherwise hidden from View;

FIGURE 19 is a top plan view of a further embodiment of a valve according to the principles of the invention;

FIGURE 20 is a longitudinal sectional view taken along line 20-20 of FIGURE 19;

FIGURE 21 is an end elevation view of the valve embodiment of FIGURES 19 and 20;

FIGURE 22 is a top plan view of yet another embodiment of a valve according to the principles of the invention;

FIGURE 23 is a longitudinal sectional view taken along line 23-23 of FIGURE 22 and FIGURE 24 is an end elevation view of the valve embodiment of FIGURES 22 and 23.

The embodiment of the ball valve 350 shown in FIG- URES l through 3 as noted hereinbefore is particularly advantageously used in subterranean applications where gritty soil could easily cause the check means to become inoperable and where the valve might be subjected to temperatures below the freezing -point of the fluid carried therein.

As illustrated the valve 350 includes a housing 352 having a flow passageway 354 extending axially therethrough. Centrally of the passageway 354, an opening 356 is formed through the housing 352 surrounded by an upstanding annular wall 358 defining a cylindrical key or rotor receiving chamber 360 laterally intersecting the passageway 354 at the top of the axially extending portion of the housing.

A t the bottom of the central area of the lpassageway 354, and axially aligned with the chamber 360, a welllike bearing 362 is formed in the housing 352, the bearing 362 including a downwardly conical bottom 364 and a generally annular sidewall 366 communicating with the passageway 354 through an opening 368 therethrough.

The 'base of the upstanding annular `Wall 358 is preferably yspaced radially outwardly from the periphery of the opening 356, thereby defining an annular, upwardly facing, preferably flat surface 370.

The housing 352 may be threaded as at 372 for a short distance interiorly of the ends 374 of the passageway 354 or have other equivalent coupling provisions such as bolt flanges or the like formed thereon. Additionally, means such as lugs 376 may be provided on the exterior of the housing 352 to facilitate the making up of pipe joints including the threaded housing ends.

The passageway 354 is enlarged centrally thereof adjacent each side of the chamber 360 by any convenient method such as coring the housing casting or counterboring thereby defining two valve seat ring receiving` portions 378 each including a longitudinally extending annular surface 380 and a radially extending annular surface 382. For simplicity, these central enlargements are hereinafter referred to as counterbores though alternative methods of forming them are not intended to be foreclosed.

A resilient annular rollable seal in the form of an O-ring 384 of -polytetrauorethylene or the like is received in each counterbore 378 adjacent each surface 382. An annular resilient valve seat ring 386 is slidingly received in eac-h counterbore 37-8 adjacent each O-ring 384.

The rings 386, which may be formed from any suitable corrosion resisting material including fiber reinforced or non-reinforced thermoplastic resin compositions such as those essentially comprising nylon, are preferably configured so as to have a radially inner, smooth annular surface 388 coaxial with the passageway 354, and a radially outer, smooth annular sur-face 389 slidingly engaging the surface 380 of the associated counterbore 378.

The end of each sealing ring 386 facing away from the chamber 360 includes an annular recess 390 extending therearound and opening endwardly and radially outwardly of the ring.

Accordingly each O-ring 384 is confined between the opposed smooth radially extending surfaces 382 and 392 on the ring 386 and valve housing 352 respectively and also sealingly confined between the opposed smooth longitudinally extending surfaces 394 and 380.

The valve seat rings 386 are preferably freely axially slidable to a limited extent in their respective counterbores 378, the surface 394 on each ring 386 being relatively long with respect to the diameter of the associated O-ring 384 so that within the range of limited axial movement of the seat rings 386, the O-rings 384 will provide sealing between the rings 386 and the housing passageway 354.

Each valve seat ring 386 includes a smooth annular end face 396 presented toward the chamber 3601 and arranged to sealingly engage the valve key peripherally of its through passage.

As best shown in FIGURE 1, the valve key 398 of the valve 350 comprises a spherical ball portion 400 having a generally horizontal fluid passageway 402 formed therethrough which is axially alignable with the housing passageway 354 and seat ring surface 388. The Iball 400 is preferably integrally mounted on upper and lower trunnions 404 and 406 which are arranged to extend generally coaxially with the chamber 360 and perpendicularly to the passageway 402.

The lower trunnion 406 is supported for rotation in the well-like bearing 362. As best seen in FIGURES 1 and 3 the lower trunnion 406 has a pair of generally parallel, diametrically opposed, longitudinally extending flats 407 thereon and the lower end 409 of the lower trunnion is spaced upwardly from the bottom of the well 362. The flats 407 are shown lying in planes penpendicular to the ball through passage 402.

Accordingly, should the valve 350 be subjected to a mild freeze, water or other fluid which has condensed or Seeped into the trunnion well 362 and expands as it freezes, can move upwardly through the spaces 411 defined between the trunnion well sidewall and the flats 407. Should additional expansion occur the freezing material can move upwardly into the space 413 between the ball 400 and the kbottom of the central portion of the housing.

The support for the upper trunnion of the key 398 is provided by means including an annular collar 408 integrally radially projecting from the upper trunnion a short distance above the ball 400. An annular spacer 410 is received between the inner surface of the annular housing wall 358 and the trunnion immediately superadjacent the collar 408. The spacer 410 at the radially outer and lower extent thereof has means defining an annular recess 412 therein. A resilient O-ring 414 is received in the chamber 360 engaging the surface 370 and the interior surface of the wall 358 at the base thereof.

When the spacer 410 is inserted downwardly into the valve as shown in FIGURE 1, the surfaces thereof defining the annular recess 412 engage the O-ring 414. Accordingly the O-ring 414 provides a seal between the spacer and the valve housing.

The spacer 410 is sealed with respect to the trunnion 404 by a resilient `O-ring 416 received in an annular groove 418 formed circumferentially in the trunnion radially inwardly from the spacer.

The lower surface of the spacer 410 is configurated to engage both the flat annular surface 370 radially inwardly from the O-ring 414 and the upper surface of the collar 418.

The novel key arrangement just discussed is retained in the valve by an annular split retaining ring 420` composed of elastic hard metal or the like. The retainer 420` is seated in an annular groove 422 formed in the wall 358 and bears against the upper surface of the spacer.

The improved combined key cap and check 424 has a socket 426 arranged centrally in the bottom thereof in which the upper trunnion 404 is received. The cap 424 also includes a depending annular flange 425 adapted to abut the upper surface of the spacer immediately radially inwardly of the retainer 420. Inasmuch as the flange 425 as shown engages the radially inner extent of the retainer and additionally abuts the upper surface thereof, the retainer is effectively prevented from being forced inwardly and upwardly a sufficient amount to snap out of the groove 422. Thus the problem of effectively guarding against valve key blow-out when the pressure within the valve is great or an unusually great upward thrust occurs therein is effectively solved by the key cap 424.

The key cap is made tamperproof by the inclusion of a skirt 428 which projects outwardly from the flange 425 immediately above the upper end of the wall 358 and terminates in a downwardly directed flange 427 which effectively precludes unauthorized access to the retainer 420 by those having ordinary tools.

A pin 430 preferably composed of hardened metal is inserted in a socket 432 in the cap 424 and the lateral opening 433 of the trunnion 404. In order to make this arrangement tamperproof, the socket 432 may be formed as a blind socket and the pin 430 and socket have an interference fit.

In order to restrict the possible angular movement of the key to that necessary for use, an arcuate slot 435 defined between the flange 425 and skirt 428 bridged at two angularly spaced points 437, 439 is provided. A lug check 441 integrally projecting upwardly from the housing wall 358 is slidably received in the slot 435 and arranged so that when the valve is brought to its full open position the lug check 441 will contact the slot end 437 and when the valve is brought to its fully closed position the lug check 441 will contact the slot end 439.

The advantages provided by the valve check just disclosed are firstly that, if an unauthorized person attempts to turn the key cap beyond either of its intended positions he will no damage the valve key or adversely affect its sealing arrangements. This is an especially important advantage where the valve is being used to conduct gas or other fluids which could be dangerous if allowed to leak to the atmosphere.

Secondly because the valve check just described is effectively concealed, the action of the check will not be hampered by dirt or foreign objects and valves can be made quite compact.

FIGURE 4 illustrates a modification of the valve just described relative to FIGURES l-3 and accordingly the common elements are numbered the same in each.

The valve 450 is especially provided with means to drain the downstream or outlet side of the valve and any standpipe conduit or similar arrangement with which this Valve can advantageously be associated.

A single flat 407 is provided on the lower trunnion and an opening 452 is formed through the Well 362 at the lowermost point of the downwardly conical bottom thereof. Additionally a flat 454 is formed on the ball 400 below the horizontal center line thereof.

The flat is formed sufficiently deeply that when the valve is brought to the closed position shown there is a space 456 between the ball 400' and the seat ring 386 adjacent the bottom thereof.

Accordingly fluid trapped on the side 458 of the ball when the valve is closed can flow through the space 456, down into the well past the flat 407 and out of the system through the opening 452.

The feature just discussed is of considerable importance in applications where the valve 450 is in a water works system. The valve itself is placed below the frost line, but the outlet conduit leading therefrom may carry water to a zone where freezing could occur. Accordingly, utilizing the valve 450, the downstream conduit will drain when the valve is turned off thus precluding ice damage to the downstream conduit.

Another modification of the valve is illustrated at 475, in FIGURES -7. The elements of the valve 475 common with those of the valves of FIGURES l-4 are indicated by like numerals for ease in understading.

The valve 457 differs from the valve embodiments discussed hereinbefore principally `by the elimination of the spacer and the provision of increasing the axial mobility of the ykey to improve the seating of the ball with respect to the resilient seat rings. A modified check and a modified downstream conduit and housing drain means are also included.

As best seen in FIGURES 5 and 7, an opening 447 is provided through the valve housing communicating the area 413 between the ball 400 and the bottom of the key receiving chamber with the exterior of the housing. A flat surface 454 is formed on the ball 400 as in the FIG- URE 4 embodiment. Accordingly, when the valve key is in its closed position fluid downstream from the valve can drain back through the passageway 354 past the flat 454 into the area 413 and out of the system through the opening 447.

The key cap 479 has a centrally disposed downwardly facing socket 481 therein which the relatively short upper trunnion 483 of the valve key is received. A pin 485 is received generally horizontally through a bore 487 in the key cap 479 and trunnion 483. A shown the pin 485 is located well down Within the housing chamber 489 to effectively preclude tampering therewith.

The check arrangment for the valve 475 is also preferably located within the chamber 489 so as to preclude the interference of dirt therewith. The check 491 best seen in FIGURE 6 is provided by forming a portion of the chamber 489 with an interior vertical surface 493 having an elongated, non-circular shape as viewed from above, and including surface engaging means such as a pair of diametrically opposed radi-ally extending ears 495 adjacent the lower end of the key cap 479.

As shown in FIGURE 6, two at angular sides 497 of the ears 495 abut the surface 493 in the open position of the valve. Upon rotation of the key 90 degrees to the closed position of the valve, the other fiat angular sides 499 of the ears 495 abut the surface 493 preventing further rotation of the valve past the closed position thereof.

In the valve 475 the key cap is sealed with respect to the housing upstanding chamber defining wall 501 by a resilient O-ring 503 received between vertically spaced, radially extending flanges 505 on the key cap and sealingly engaging the radially inner surface 507 of the wall 501. Alternately the O-ring 503 could be positioned on the flat annular surface 509 similarly to the rings in FIG- URES l, 4 and 20.

The cap 479 is supported on the surface 509 and the cap and key assembly is retained in the valve by a split annular retainer ring 511 mounted in a groove 513 in the chamber inner surfa-ce near the upper extent thereof. As an important improvement feature, a somewhat resilient anti-friction washer 515 is interposed between the snap ring 511 and the cap 479 and the lower trunnion of the key terminated somewhat short of the bottom of the bearing well therefor. The anti-friction washer 515 radially outer wall 515a is conically tapered and is received against a beveled seat 5070. Accordingly, during insertion of the key cap 479, the bevel 507a facilitates passage of the O-ring 503 to the position shown in FIGURE 5 without pinching.

The friction washer 515 provides a secondary dirt seal and reduced friction characteristics to keep dirt and muddy water from entering the valve, and facilitate turning of the key. Additionally, upward thrust is distributed toward the outer edge of the retaining ring to lessen the possibility of the snap ring being dislodged due to a concentration of forces at its smaller diameter.

The valve 475 could be made tamperproof to a greater extent by the addition of a flange radially outwardly from the cap and over the retainer ring similar to the arrangement shown in FIGURE 4.

As shown in FIGURES 8-10 the valve 10 includes a housing 12 having a flow pasageway 14 extending axially therethrough. Centrally of the passageway 14 an opening 16 is formed through the housing 12 surrounded by an annular wall 18 defining a cylindrical key 0r rotor receiving chamber 20 laterally intersecting the passageway 14 at the top thereof.

At the bottom of the central area of the passageway 14, and axially aligned with the chamber 20 a well-like bearing 22 is formed in the housing 12, the bearing 2.2 including a bottom 24 and a generally annular sidewall 26 communicating with said passageway through an opening 28 therethrough.

The base of the laterally extending annular wall 18 is preferably spaced radially outwardly from the periphery of the opening 16, thereby defining an annular, upwardly facing, preferably flat surface 30.

The housing 12 may be threaded as at 32 for a short distance interiorly of the ends 34 passageway 14 or have other equivalent coupling provisions such as bolt flanges or the like formed thereon. Additionally threaded connecting means 36 may be provided exteriorly of -the annular wall 18, for instance to receive a conventional curb box or the like.

In each of the valve embodiments shown the passageway 14 is counterbored centrally thereof adjacent each side of the chamber 20 forming two valve seat ring receiving portions 38 each defined by a longitudinally extending annular surface 40 and a radially extending annular surface 42.

A resilient annular rollable seal in the form of an O- ring `44 of polytetrafluoroethylene or the like is received in each counterbore 38 adjacent each surface 42. An annular resilient valve seat 46 is slidingly received in each counterbore 38 adjacent each O-ring 44. The rings 46, which may be formed from any suitable corrosion resisting material including fiber reinforced or non-reinforced thermoplastic resin compositions such as those essentially comprising nylon are preferably configured so as to have a radially inner, smooth annular surface 48 coaxial with the passageway 14 and a radially outer, smooth annular surface 39 slidingly engaging the surface 40 of the associated counterbore 38.

The end of each sealing ring 46 facing away from the chamber 20 includes an annular recess 50 therearound opening radially outwardly and also endwardly of the ring 46.

Accordingly each O-ring 44 is confined between the opposed smooth radially extending surfaces 52 and 42 on the ring 46 and valve housing 12 respectively and also sealingly conned between the opposed smooth longitudinally extending surfaces 54 and 40.

The valve seat rings 46 are preferably freely longitudinally slidable in their respective counterbores 38, the surface 54 on each ring 46 being relatively long with respect to the diameter of the `associated O-ring 44 to that the O-rings 44 will provide sealing between the rings 46 and the housing passageway at all times during the operation of the valves as will be explained hereinafter.

Each valve seat ring 46 includes a smooth end face 56 presented toward the chamber 20 and arranged to sealingly engage the valve key or rotor as next described.

As shown in FIGURE 9 the valve key or rotor 58 comprises a spherical ball portion 60 having a fluid passageway `62 formed therethrough which is alignable with the housing passageway 14. The lball 60 is preferably integrally mounted on upper and lower trunnions 64 and 66 which extend from the ball generally perpendicularly of the passageway 62. In the embodiment of FIGURES 8-10 the lower trunnion 66 is supported for rotation in the welllike bearing 22.

An annular collar 68 forming an integral part of the key projects radially outwardly from the upper trunnion 64 a short distance above the ball 60. The bearing for the upper trunnion 64 includes an annular spacer 70 received between the inner surface of the annular housing wall 18 and the trunnion 64. The spacer 70 radially outer surface 72 has an annular recess 74 therein extending circumferentially of the spacer and a resilient O-ring 73 received therein sealingly engages the wall 18. The spacer 70 is sealed with respect to the trunnion 64 by a resilient O-ring 76 received in an annular groove 78 formed circumferentially in the trunnion 64 radially inwardly of the spacer.

The bottom of the spacer 70 is configured to engage the flat annular surface 30 and the upper surface of the collar 68. The key arrangement just discussed is retained in valve by an annular split retaining ring 80 composed of elastic hard metal or the like. The retainer 80 is seated in an annular groove 82 formed in the wall 18 and bears against the upper surface of the spacer 70.

The key cap 84 shown as the valve operator in FIG- URES 8-10 which could alternately be a lever handle, a flat head, a lock wing or the like, has a socket 86 therein in which the upper trunnion 64 is received. The cap 84 can be employed to make the valve tamperproof by including a radially extending skirt 88 thereon which extends outwardly immediately above the upper end of the wall 18 so as to make the reainer ring 80 inaccessible to those having ordinary tools. A blind pin 90 composed of hardened metal can be inserted in a socket 92 in the cap 84 and a lateral opening formed through the trunnion 64 to secure the cap to the trunnion. In the tamperproof embodiment just described, the pin 90 and the socket 92 are preferably interference lit to prevent removal of the pin with ordinary tools.

However, if the valve is to be used in an industrial application where rapid teardown and reassembly are desii-able, the skirt 88 can be eliminated and the pin socket 92 extended to open through both sides of the cap 84. Accordingly, the retainer 80 would be accessible and the pin 90 could easily be driven out using a punch and a mallet or similar tools.

Once the retainer 80 and pin 90 have been removed, an upward tug on the key 58 with the key in its open position as shown in full lines in FIGURE 9, cause the ball 60 acting on the sealing surfaces 56 to move the rings 46 and compress the resilient O-rings 44 sufficiently that the key can be withdrawn from the valve. The valve seat rings 46 and other elements of the valve can then be replaced and the valve quickly reassembled by orienting the key in its open position with respect to the housing passageway and inserting it downwardly into place as shown in FIGURE 9. The resilient O-rings 44 again are compressed by the action of the ball as the ball is moved into place. With the key in position as shown in FIGURE 9, each O-ring 44 is preferably still somewhat compressed in order to resiliently bias the valve seat ring sealing surfaces 56 into sealing engagement with the ball 60.

The spacer 70 retainer 80, cap 84 and pin 90 are reassembled as shown in FIGURES 8-10 completing the repair.

The valve embodiment 100 shown in FIGURES 11-13 is similar in all respects in structure and operation to that depicted in FIGURES 8-10 and is similarly numeraled but for the omission of the exterior threading surrounding the housing wall 18 and the addition of a check arrangement by the substitution of a key cap 102 which includes a lock wing 104. A similar lock wing 106 is provided on housing wall 18 projecting radially outwardly therefrom adjacent the upper extent of said wall.

The lock wings 104, 106 each have an opening 108 formed therethrough and are arranged on their respective members so that the openings 108 are in vertical registry when the key is in its closed position so that suitable locking means such as a padlock, lead seal or the like can be fastened therethrough.

As best seen in FIGURE 13, an upstanding arcuate stop element 110 is defined at the upper extent of the housing wall 18 and a check stud 112 is arranged on the cap 102, arcuately spaced from the lock wing opening 108, in position to abut one end 114 of the stop 110 when the lock wings 104, 106 vertically coincide and the valve is in its closed position as aforementioned.

The arcuately opposite end 116 of the stop 110 is arranged to be abutted by a side 118 of the key cap lock wing 104 when the valve has been rotated to its open position, as illustrated in FIGURES 11-13.

It should be noted that in order to avoid interfering with the check arrangement just described, the key cap skirt 120 of the valve 100 rather than extending over the wall 18, extends to a point so radially adjacent the inner surface of the wall 18 that the interposition of any conventional tool by an unauthorized person attempting valve disassembly is effectively precluded.

Although it can be seen that the valve shown in FIG- URES 11-13 is `balanced so that either side thereof may be used at the pressure or upstream side of the valve, it should be apparent that if valves including the lock wing and check carrying key cap as illustrated are installed in a standard manner, for instance so that the lock wing 104 points downstream when the valve is in its open position, that maintenance work on the system in which such standards are employed will be greatly facilitated.

The valve embodiment 200 shown in FIGURES 14-18 differs from valve 100 only by its having an open bottom and lacking an upper trunnion collar.

In some installations, for instance where valves as described herein are to be used as water curb stops rather than in domestic gas distribution facilities, it is considered preferable to have an open bottom, for instance because such valves may be less susceptible to housing failure when subjected to mild freezing in a subterranean environmeut.

Accordingly it can be seen that the improvements according to the present invention areI providable in open bottomed as well as closed housing valves.

'Ihe key 214 of the valve 200 has a lower trunnion bearing which engages a smooth interior surfaced downwardly extending annular wall 202. A resilient O-ring 204 recessed in an annular groove 206 circumferentially formed in the lower trunnion 66 forms an effective seal between the lower trunnion 66 and the valve housing.

The upper trunnion bearing collar having been eliminated in the valve embodiment 200 now being described the spacer 208, which in other respects is similar to the spacer 70, includes an annularly downwardly extending leg 210 which is arranged to engage a relatively narrow generally flat annular shoulder 212 at the top of the ball. The spacer 208 extends between the ball shoulder 212 and the retainer 80.

A further modification of the valve is designated 250 in FIGURES 19-21. It is an open bottomed housing type valve quite similar to theI valve 200 shown in FIGURES 14-18 but for being adapted for more rapid assembly and disassembly. Elements of the valve 250 common in structure with those shown in previously discussed embodiments are numbered accordingly.

The radially inner surface 252 of the upstanding annular wall 254 is shown threaded to receive an exteriorly threaded annular spacer 256. The spacer just mentioned extends between the key cap 266 and the ball shoulder 212 similarly to the spacer 208. However, the spacer 256 is preferably terminated flush with the upper extent of the annular wall 254, the function of a retainer being provided by the threading arrangement 260 and by vertically projecting stop pins 262.

As best seen in FIGURE 19, tlie two Stop pins 262 are slidingly or alternatively threadably received in two generally vertically directed angularly spaced sockets 264 located intermediate the annular wall 254 and the spacer 256 comprising Complementary arcuate recesses in each f these elements. Accordingly, the pins 262, when in place as shown prevent rotation of the spacer 256 with respect to the valve housing.

The key cap 266 is similar to the ones shown in the valves in FIGURES 11-16 but for the elimination of a radially extending snap ring covering skirt adjacent the lower extent thereof so that the cap retaining pin 268 is accessible from both sides of the cap.

It should be noted that the pins 262 additionally act as stops adapted when positioned as shown in FIGURE 19 to limit the rotation of the valve key to the 180 degree ar-c between full open with the lock wing of the key cap 66 pointing downstream and full open with the lock wing pointing upstream.

The spacer 256 may conveniently have a plurality of tool receiving sockets 270 in the upper surface for easeI of assembly and disassembly of the modified valve 250 as more fully described hereinafter.

The O-ring 272 which provides a seal between the housing of the Valve 250 and the spacer 256, rather than being received in an annular groove in the vertical surface of the spacer as in the embodiments already discussed, seals against a chamfer 274 formed at the lower radially outer edge of the spacer. This modification also facilitates the' assembly of the valve 250.

To assemble the valve 250, the resilient O-rings 44 and novel seat rings 46 are first inserted in their respective counterbores. The valve key 214 with theI O-rings 76 and 204 received thereon, is easily inserted in the chamber by orienting the key in its open position with respect to the valve passageway and pushing the key axially downwardly.

As discussed in relation to the first embodiment of the valve the O-rings 44 are suiiiciently resilient to be compressed enough by the ball of the entering key 214 to permit the ball to be brought to its proper orientation with respect to the seats 46. As the key is brought to the position shown the O-rings 44 recover and resiliently force the seat ring faces 56 into sealing engagement with the ball 60 peripherally of the passageway 62 therethrough.

It has Ibeen found to be an advantageous assembly technique to place the O-ring 272 at the base of the interior of the housing wall then insert the spacer 256 using the modification of the valve now being discussed than it is to first assemble an O-ring on a grooved side wall type spacer and then assemble the spacer to the valve housing inasmuch as in the former case, the problem of preventing the' radially protruding ring from at least partially rolling from its groove and pinching between the spacer and the upstanding housing wall is alleviated.

The spacer 256 is threaded downwardly into position and brought to the desired tightness using an appropriately pronged tool arranged to engage the sockets 270. The stop pins 262 are then placed in the sockets 264 and the key cap 266 placed over the upper trunnion. The valve assembly is completed by pinning the cap 266 to the trunnion with the retaining pin 268. Rapid disassembly of the valveI 250 proceeds in reverse of the steps just outlined.

Yet another modification of the open bottomed valve is illustrated at 300 in FIGURES 22-24. In this embodiment which is also susceptible of rapid assembly and disassembly the overall height of the chamber 20 and thus of the valve 300 has been reduced by the eliminaion of the upstanding annular wall 18 surrounding the opening 16. Instead thereof the L-sectioned spacer 302 horizontally extending portion 304 is radially enlarged compared to the diameters of the spacers in the previously discussed embodiments.

The spacer 302 is arranged to seat on the fiat surface 306 with a washer-like annular resilient gasket 308 interposed between the spacer and the surface 30. A plurality of screws 310 secure the spacer to the valve housing.

The key cap 312 of the valve 300 is shown in FIG- URE 22 having an angularly enlarged lock wing 314 so that a first edge 316 of the lock wing is engageable with one of the screws 310 and a second edge 318` thereof is engageable with a second screw 310` spaced degrees from the first. Due to the angular width of the lock wing 314, the possible movement of the key of the valve 300 is limited to the 9() degree interval between the fully open position shown in full lines in FIGURE 2.3 and the fully closed position indicated in dashed lines.

Preferably the screw 310 angularly intermediate the path of the lock wing movement has a fiat head 320 rather than one which would interfere with the movement of the lock wing.

It should now be readily apparent that the several embodiments of the novel ball valve shown efficiently accomplish all of the objects set forth hereinabove and well illustrate the principles of the present invention.

Inasmuch as the embodiments shown may be considerably modified without departing from these principles the invention should be understood to encompass modifications encompassed by the principles and be limited only by the spirit and scope of the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A valve assembly comprising an integral valve housing having a passage extending therethrough, the ends of said passage defining an inlet and an outlet, a lateral opening communicating with said passage intermediate the ends thereof, an annular member mounted within said passage adjacent said inlet for limited axial movement, annular resilient sealing means between said annular member and said valve housing providing a fluid tight seal between said annular member and said passage and a valve key received in said housing through said lateral opening, said valve key including a central ball portion and opposed trunnion portions extending from said ball portion, said ball portion including means defining a passage extending laterally therethrough; means defining an upstanding, generally cylindrical wall projecting from said valve housing peripherally adjacent said lateral opening, means defining a generally annular surface on said valve housing between said lateral opening and said upstanding wall, means dening an annular groove in the interior surface of said upstanding wall; a removable retainer received in said groove; means interposed between said retainer and said key to removably retain said key in said housing, the interposed retaining means comprising an annular spacer tiange means received on the upper of said opposed trunnions and urging against said generally annular surface; a key cap on said upper trunnion; a resilient washer interposed between the key cap and the removable retainer to provide for limited axial movement of the key to effect a sealing engagement between the key ball portion and the annular member mounted in said passage, said resilient washer having an upwardly diverging conically curved radially exterior surface, and said resilient Iwasher being mounted on means defining an upwardly diverging conically curved seat on said upstanding wall.

2. A valve assembly as set forth in claim 1 further including a second annular member mounted within said passage adjacent said outlet for limited axial movement, annular resilient sealing means between said second annular member and said valve housing providing a fluid tight seal between said second annular member and said passage.

3. A valve assembly as set forth in claim 2 wherein said annular resilient sealing means comprise O-rings, said O-rings resiliently biasing said annular members against said valve key ball portion.

4. A valve assembly as set forth in claim 1 further comprising: means defining a socket in said key cap,

said key upper trunnion being received in said socket; and means pinning said key cap to said key, said key cap protruding beyond said upstanding wall.

S. A valve assembly as set forth in claim 4 wherein said pinning means comprises a blind pin received in a lateral socket in said key cap and a lateral pin receiving opening in said upper trunnion.

6. A valve assembly as set forth in claim 4 wherein the key cap includes a laterally extending peripheral skirt arranged to project so closely to said upstanding wall as to prevent access to said removable retainer with ordinary tools.

7. A Valve assembly as set forth in claim 4 further including means on said key cap and means on said upstanding wall to check the rotation of said key to positions wherein the ball passage is aligned with the housing passage and wherein the housing passage is -fully blocked by the key ball portion.

8. A valve assembly as set forth in claim 1 wherein the lower of the opposed trunnions is received in means deining a well in said housing laterally opposite said lateral opening.

9. A valve assembly as set forth in claim 1 further comprising means defining a flat on said key ball portion centered below the center line of the ball portion and intermediate the junctures of said ballpassage with the exterior of said ball portion; means defining a relatively small lateral opening through the valve housing positioned for communication with said flat, whereby when said key ball portion is in a housing passage blocking position thereof the downstream side of the valve is communicated to the exterior of the 'valve housing through said relatively small lateral opening.

10. A valve assembly comprising an integral valve housing having a passage extending therethrough, the ends of said passage defining an inlet and an outlet, a lateral opening communicating with said passage intermediate the ends thereof, an annular member mounted within said passage adjacent said inlet for limited axial movement, annular resilient sealing means between said annular member and said valve housing providing a fluid tight seal between said annular member and said passage and a valve key received in said housing through said lateral opening, said valve key including a central ball portion and opposed trunnion portions extending from said ball portion, said ball portion including means defining a passage extending laterally therethrough; said lateral opening is of substantially the sa-me lateral noncircular cross-sectional shape and size as said key ball portion at the center line of the ball portion passage whereby said key is insertable in and withdrawable from said lateral opening only when the ball portion passage is aligned with the housing passage.

11. A valve assembly as set forth in claim 10 further including an upstanding wall peripherally adjacent said lateral opening; a key cap secured to the upper of said opposed trunnions and extending centrally of said upstanding wall; and removable retaining means on said upstanding wall and bearing upon said key cap to removably retain said key in said housing.

12. A valve assembly as set forth in claim 11 wherein said key cap extends into said lateral opening; means deining a lateral projection on said key cap at a point thereon within said lateral opening for engagement with said housing peripherally of lateral opening at two angularly spaced points therealong to check the rotation of said key between a rst position wherein the ball portion passage and the housing passage are aligned and a second position wherein said ball portion fully blocks said housing passage.

13. A valve assembly as set forth in claim 11 further including a resilient washer interposed between the key cap and the removable retaining means to facilitate limited axial movement of the key to effect a sealing engagement between the key ball portion and said annular member.

14. A valve assembly comprising an integral valve housing havin-g a passage extending therethrough, the ends of said passage defining an inlet and an outlet, a lateral opening communicating with said passage intermediate the ends thereof, an annular member mounted within said passage adjacent said inlet for limited axial movement, annular resilient sealing means between said annular member and said valve housing providing a fluid tight seal between said annular member and said passage and a valve key received in said housing through said lateral opening, said valve key including a central fball portion, said ball portion including means defining a passage extending laterally therethrough; said lateral opening is of substantially the same lateral cross-sectional shape and size as said key ball portion at the center line of the ball portion passage whereby said key is insertable in and withdrawable from said lateral opening only when the ball portion passage is aligned with the housing passage; an upstanding wall peripherally adjacent said lateral opening; a key cap secured to the upper of said opposed tr-unnions and extending centrally of said upstanding wall; and removable retaining means on said upstanding wall and bearing upon said key cap to removably retain said key is said housing; a resilient lwasher interposed between the key cap and the removable retaining means to facilitate limited axial movement of the key to effect a sealing engagement between the key ball portion and said annular member; the resilient washer has an upwardly diverging, conically curved radially exterior surface, and said resilient washer is mounted on means defining an upwardly diverging annular conically curved seat on said upstanding lwall.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,825,527 3/1958 Wendell 251-315 X 12,911,009 1l/l959 Parker 251-315 X 2,985,191 5/1961 Beckett et al. 251-315 X 3,082,992 3/1963 Vickery 251-315 X 3,118,649 l/l964 Allen et al 251--315 X 3,154,094 10/ 1964 Bredtschneider et al.

251-315 X 3,245,653 4/1966 Lavigueur 251-315 X 2,861,773 ll/ 19518 'Clade 251-317 3,134,396 5/1964 Bredtschneider 137-315 3,209,778 10/ 19615 Flohr 251-315 X 3,241,570 3/1966 Mueller 251-312 X HENRY T. KLINKSIEK, Primary Examiner.

Us. C1. xn.

Claims (1)

1. A VALVE ASSEMBLY COMPRISING AN INTEGRAL VALVE HOUSING HAVING A PASSAGE EXTENDING THERETHROUGH, THE ENDS OF SAID PASSAGE DEFINING AN INLET AND AN OUTLET, A LATERAL OPENING COMMUNICATIONG WITH SAID PASSAGE INTERMEDIATE THE ENDS THEREOF, AN ANNULAR MEMBER MOUNTED WITHIN SAID PASSAGE ADJACENT SAID INLET FOR LIMITED AXIAL MOVEMENT, ANNULAR RESILIENT SEALING MEANS BETWEEN SAID ANNULAR MEMBER AND SAID VALVE HOUSING PROVIDING A FLUID TIGHT SEAL BETWEEN SAID ANNULAR MEMBER AND SAID PASSAGE AND A VALVE KEY RECEIVED IN SAID HOUSING THROUGH SAID LATERAL OPENING, SAID VALVE KEY INCLUDING A CENTRAL BALL PORTION AND OPPOSED TRUNNION PORTIONS EXTENDING FROM SAID BALL PORTION, SAID BALL PORTION INCLUDING MEANS DEFINING A PASSAGE EXTENDING LATERALLY THERETHROUGH; MEANS DEFINING AN UPSTANDING, GENERALLY CYLINDRICAL WALL PROJECTING FROM SAID VALVE HOUSING PERIPHERALLY ADJACENT SAID LATERAL OPENING, MEANS DEFINING A GENERALLY ANNULAR SURFACE ON SAID VALVE HOUSING BETWEEN SAID LATERAL OPENING AND SAID UPSTANDING WALL, MEANS DEFINING AN ANNULAR GROOVE IN THE INTERIOR SUR-
US3437106A 1964-12-10 1964-12-10 Ball valves Expired - Lifetime US3437106A (en)

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US41743564 true 1964-12-10 1964-12-10

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US3437106A Expired - Lifetime US3437106A (en) 1964-12-10 1964-12-10 Ball valves

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US (1) US3437106A (en)
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DE (1) DE1500166A1 (en)
GB (1) GB1079577A (en)

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US3674052A (en) * 1970-01-12 1972-07-04 Stile Craft Mfg Inc Ball valve
US4411407A (en) * 1981-04-13 1983-10-25 Asahi Yukizai Kogyo Co., Ltd. Ball valve assembly
US4809949A (en) * 1988-01-26 1989-03-07 Dresser Industries, Inc. Plug valve
US4964614A (en) * 1989-10-02 1990-10-23 Mueller Co. Method for forming a ball valve connection and structure
US20060118184A1 (en) * 2002-06-28 2006-06-08 Toshio Mikiya Female coupling member of a pipe coupling
US20130014839A1 (en) * 2011-07-15 2013-01-17 Glen Calla Security Valve
US20150267851A1 (en) * 2012-09-28 2015-09-24 Nitto Kohki Co., Ltd. Female joint having safety function

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US2911009A (en) * 1956-11-20 1959-11-03 Stephen C Peplin Mixing valve
US2985191A (en) * 1957-06-19 1961-05-23 Beckett Harcum Co Ball valve
US3082992A (en) * 1961-05-12 1963-03-26 Fisher Governor Co Sealed ball valve
US3118649A (en) * 1961-06-15 1964-01-21 Cameron Iron Works Inc Ball valve with a reinforced and deformable valve seat
US3134396A (en) * 1961-05-01 1964-05-26 Crane Co Ball valve with adjustable seats
US3154094A (en) * 1961-10-25 1964-10-27 Crane Co Ball valve
US3209778A (en) * 1962-03-09 1965-10-05 Borsig Ag Valve with spherical plug
US3241570A (en) * 1962-09-17 1966-03-22 Mueller Co By-pass meter stop
US3245653A (en) * 1962-05-01 1966-04-12 Gen Dynamics Corp Trunnion mounted ball valve having lost motion and positive reduction actuating means

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2825527A (en) * 1954-12-13 1958-03-04 Hale Fire Pump Co Rotary valves
US2861773A (en) * 1954-12-15 1958-11-25 Acf Ind Inc Spherical plug valve
US2911009A (en) * 1956-11-20 1959-11-03 Stephen C Peplin Mixing valve
US2985191A (en) * 1957-06-19 1961-05-23 Beckett Harcum Co Ball valve
US3134396A (en) * 1961-05-01 1964-05-26 Crane Co Ball valve with adjustable seats
US3082992A (en) * 1961-05-12 1963-03-26 Fisher Governor Co Sealed ball valve
US3118649A (en) * 1961-06-15 1964-01-21 Cameron Iron Works Inc Ball valve with a reinforced and deformable valve seat
US3154094A (en) * 1961-10-25 1964-10-27 Crane Co Ball valve
US3209778A (en) * 1962-03-09 1965-10-05 Borsig Ag Valve with spherical plug
US3245653A (en) * 1962-05-01 1966-04-12 Gen Dynamics Corp Trunnion mounted ball valve having lost motion and positive reduction actuating means
US3241570A (en) * 1962-09-17 1966-03-22 Mueller Co By-pass meter stop

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3674052A (en) * 1970-01-12 1972-07-04 Stile Craft Mfg Inc Ball valve
US4411407A (en) * 1981-04-13 1983-10-25 Asahi Yukizai Kogyo Co., Ltd. Ball valve assembly
US4809949A (en) * 1988-01-26 1989-03-07 Dresser Industries, Inc. Plug valve
US4964614A (en) * 1989-10-02 1990-10-23 Mueller Co. Method for forming a ball valve connection and structure
US20060118184A1 (en) * 2002-06-28 2006-06-08 Toshio Mikiya Female coupling member of a pipe coupling
US7549445B2 (en) * 2002-06-28 2009-06-23 Nitto Kohki Co., Ltd. Female coupling member of a pipe coupling
US20130014839A1 (en) * 2011-07-15 2013-01-17 Glen Calla Security Valve
US8851445B2 (en) * 2011-07-15 2014-10-07 Glen Calla Security valve
US20150267851A1 (en) * 2012-09-28 2015-09-24 Nitto Kohki Co., Ltd. Female joint having safety function
US9528649B2 (en) * 2012-09-28 2016-12-27 Nitto Kohki Co., Ltd. Female joint having safety function

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
BE673535A (en) 1966-06-09 grant
GB1079577A (en) 1967-08-16 application
DE1500166A1 (en) 1969-07-10 application

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