US3433114A - Slide control arrangement - Google Patents

Slide control arrangement Download PDF

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US3433114A
US3433114A US579740A US3433114DA US3433114A US 3433114 A US3433114 A US 3433114A US 579740 A US579740 A US 579740A US 3433114D A US3433114D A US 3433114DA US 3433114 A US3433114 A US 3433114A
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slide
trigger
instrument
valve
tuning
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Frank J Seme
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Seeburg Corp
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Seeburg Corp
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Assigned to CONTINENTAL ILLINOIS NATIONAL BANK AND TRUST COMPANY OF CHICAGO, A NATIONAL BANKING ASSOC. reassignment CONTINENTAL ILLINOIS NATIONAL BANK AND TRUST COMPANY OF CHICAGO, A NATIONAL BANKING ASSOC. SECURITY INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: KING MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, INC., A DE CORP.
Assigned to GENERAL ELECTRIC CREDIT CORPORATION 880 JOHNSON FERRY ROAD, SUITE 555, ATLANTA, GA 30342 reassignment GENERAL ELECTRIC CREDIT CORPORATION 880 JOHNSON FERRY ROAD, SUITE 555, ATLANTA, GA 30342 SECURITY INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: KING MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, INC., A DE CORP
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; AEOLIAN HARPS; SINGING-FLAME MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D7/00General design of wind musical instruments
    • G10D7/10Lip-reed wind instruments, i.e. using the vibration of the musician's lips, e.g. cornets, trumpets, trombones or French horns
    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; AEOLIAN HARPS; SINGING-FLAME MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D9/00Details of, or accessories for, wind musical instruments
    • G10D9/01Tuning devices

Description

March 18, 1969 F. J. SEME 3,433,114

SLIDE CONTROL ARRANGEMENT Filed Sept. 15, 1966 lNVE/VTOR. FRANK J. 55 ME United States Patent 3,433,114 SLIDE CONTROL ARRANGEMENT Frank J. Seme, Euclid, Ohio, assignor to the Seeburg Corporation, Chicago, 111., a corporation of Delaware Filed Sept. 15, 1966, Ser. No. 579,740 US. Cl. 84-394 Int. Cl. G10d 9/04 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This invention relates generally to a slide control arrangement for a musical instrument and more particularly to a unique arrangement for controlling the positioning and removal of a tuning slide for a trumpet, cornet, or other like wind instrument.

Slide adjusting mechanisms heretofore known to the art have not been entirely satisfactory for various reasons. One of the disadvantages of some of the prior art mechanisms is that the position of the mechanism on the instrument does not readily allow the musician to grip the instrument consistently with handling techniques commonly practiced by musicians while playing the instrument. On the other hand, other prior art slide adjusting mechanisms that attempt to minimize this problem nonetheless require the musician to change his grip before the musician is able to actuate the mechanism. Yet other mechanisms heretofore known to the art are actuated with the right hand (for right-hand instruments, and vice-versa for lefthand instruments), which makes simultaneous actuation of the slide adjusting mechanism and the valves of the instrument extremely difficult, if not impossible. This awkward positioning of the prior art mechanisms also has the disadvantage of causing the mouthpiece of the instrument to shift when the musician shifts his grip on the instrument or when the musician actuates the slide mechanism, thereby raising the possibility of causing the musician to play distorted or slurred notes.

Moreover, an important operational characteristic of instruments of the type in question resides in the frequent necessity for the musician to remove accumulated m0isture from the tuning slide of the instrument several times during a long performance. Preferably, the musician should be able to remove accumulated moisture in as short a period of time as a rest pause in a musical score. However, slide adjusting mechanisms heretofore known to the art have been predicated upon attachment of the mechanism to the slide by relatively cumbersome and not readily detachable devices, such as machine screw and bolt assemblies. These methods of attaching the adjusting mechanism to the tuning slide makes it impossible for the musician to quickly and easily detach the slide for cleaning purposes. Often, special tools are necessary, which means that it is impossible for the musician to clean out moisture during a performance. As a result Otf the accumulated moisture, the musical quality of the instrument is decreased.

The present invention obviates these deficiencies of the prior art by a unique and inexpensive approach to slide tuning mechanisms that facilitates use thereof consistently with common handling techniques of the instrument and that nonetheless provides for an extremely rapid removal and replacement of the tuning mechanism for effecting moisture removal during play.

A preferred embodiment of the present invention can be best explained in the context of a standard trumpet or cornet. Generally, a standard trumpet or cornet consists of a series of hollow tubes of varying length with a set of valves which can be actuated to change the direction of the flow of air through any or all of these hollow tubes.

More specifically, the trumpet or cornet has a hollow mouthpipe into which the mouthpiece is inserted. The mouthpipe curves and enters the third valve housing of the instrument, which includes three valves with associated valve housings. The valves are actuated by depressing valve keys that are situated on valve shafts extending through the respective tops of the valve housings. Extending from each valve housing of the instrument are hollow generally U-shaped tubes or slides of varying lengths, the bifurcated ends of which are attached to the valve housing. Attached to and extending from the first valve housing is the outlet pipe which terminates at the bell of the instrument. The bell is a generally conical expansion of the outlet pipe which serves to amplify and direct the emitted tones of the instrument.

When the musician presses his closed lips against the mouthpiece of the instrument and then forces air between his lips, the musicians lips will vibrate. This vibration of the musicians lips produces a musical note as a result of a well known physical principle around which all wind instruments are designed. When vibrating air is passed through a tube, only the vibrations with wavelengths that are an integer factor of the length of the tube are emitted from the other end. A trumpet or cornet is really a tube which can be varied in length by actuating the valves. By actuating the valves, the vibrating air is directed through either the first, second, or third valve slides, or any co mbinations of these slides to vary the effective tulbe length of the instrument to produce the musical note desired. A cornet or trumpet is designed so that by properly actuating the valves, the length of the interior tube of the instrument can he varied proportionately so that 'a musical scale of notes can be achieved. The present invention provides an improved means for changing the effective length of the first valve slide so that the proportional length of internal tubing of the instrument and therefore the key of the instrument may be selectively changed.

Generally, the preferred embodiment of the present invention comprises a trigger mechanism mounted intermediate its ends by suitable means (such as a screw connection) on a supporting member attached to the first valve of a trumpet or a comet so that the trigger mechanism may be pivoted relative to the first valve. The trigger mechanism is provided with a digital pressing surface at one end and with an open bifurcated cam yoke at the other end. The cam yoke is generally U-shaped and has two legs of unequal length which fit over and mate with a suitable follower (such as a protruding pin) attached to the tuning slide. The tuning slide is conventionally mounted for sliding movement into and out of receiving guide tubes attached to the first valve. In order to adjust the slide to change the key of the musical instrument, pressure may be applied to the pressing surface so as to cause the trigger mechanism to rotate angularly. This angular motion causes one leg of the open yoke to press against the follower causing the slide to move laterally on the guide tubes away from the first valve. A spring bias means attached directly to the trigger mechanism biases the mechanism to a rest position and therefore serves to cause the trigger mechanism to return the slide to its original position when pressure is removed from the trigger mechanism pressing surface.

The primary object of the present invention is to provide a simple slide control arrangement that may be easily actuated to adjust the position of a tuning slide of a musical instrument while the instrument is being played.

An equally important object of the present invention is to provide such a slide control arrangement that is designed so as to permit the tuning slide of a musical instrument to be detached and replaced quickly enough so that accumulated moisture may be removed from the slide during such short intervals of time as a rest pause in a musical score.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a unique slide control arrangement that can be actuated without varying the musicians grip and without requiring the musician to grip the instrument in any other way than that which is commonly practiced by musicians.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a slide control arrangement that can be actuated by either one of the musicians hands, as desired.

A still further object of the present invention is to provide a slide control arrangement that can be actuated without causing the mouthpiece of the instrument to slip or shift position relative to the musicians lips.

These and other objects, advantages, and features of the present invention will hereinafter appear, and, for purposes of illustration, but not of limitation, an exemplary embodiment of the present invention is shown in the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a partially fragmentary side elevational view of a musical instrument equipped with a preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged view of a portion of the musicial instrument illustrated in FIGURE 1, partially broken away to fully show the structural details of the preferred embodiment; and

FIGURE 3 is a partially sectional view taken along the line 3-3 in FIGURE 2.

With reference to the drawing, FIGURES 1, 2, and 3 show a preferred embodiment of the present invention on a trumpet 4 with a trigger mechanism 5 attached to a first valve 6 f trumpet 4 by a supporting member 7 and a screw 8 received therein to provide a pivot axis for trigger mechanism 5. Supporting member 7 takes the form of a yoke-like extension of first valve 6 comprising extending arms 7R and 7L (FIGURES 2 and 3) through which screw 8 is threadably received.

Trigger mechanism comprises an upper end formed into a digital pressing surface 9 comprising a generally flattened spatula actuator and a lower end formed into an open ended bifurcated yoke 10 comprising a generally U-shaped member having legs 11 and 12 extending from an interconnecting base, with leg 11 being shorter than leg 12 for reasons that will hereinafter appear.

A conventional hollow tuning slide 13 is slidingly mated with conventional guide tubes 14U and 14L that are attached to first valve 6. Tuning slide 13 is a generally U-shaped hollow tube comprising a lower male leg 13L, an enlarged diameter stop collar portion 13C, an arcuate interconnecting portion 13A, and an enlarged diameter upper female sleeve 13U. Guide tubes 14U and 14L are generally parallel hollow tubes that extend from first valve 6 and that are pneumatically connected therewith. Tube 14U is provided with a reduced diameter male leg 14U over which female sleeve 13U matingly slides, and tube 14L is provided with an enlarged diameter female sleeve 14L within which male leg 13L matingly slides, as best shown in FIGURE 3.

A follower pin 15 is positioned in a socket cylinder 15B that is mounted on the underside of upper leg 13U of tuning slide 13 such that pin 15 extends between legs 11 and 12 of yoke 10. A coil spring 16 is also provided in trigger mechanism 5 and is coiled around screw 8 with one end thereof locked on supporting member 7 and the other end thereof locked on the base of yoke 10 such that spring 16 tends to resist clockwise angular rotation of trigger mechanism 5 and biases slide 13 to the normal fully retracted or 4 extreme right hand position (as viewed in FIGURES 1 and 2).

In use, the musician grips the trumpet 4 in a conventional manner with the left hand thumb placed behind first valve 6 in position for rapid shifting to press against digital pressing surface 9. The fingers of the left hand are wrapped around the third valve 17, the first two fingers above a conventional third valve tuning slide 18 shown in FIGURE 1 and the third and fourth fingers below third valve tuning slide 18. If the musician prefers, he may extend his ring finger straight along third valve tuning slide 18, and he may hook his middle finger through a conventional finger hook 19 to keep the instrument from slipping out of his grasp. The little finger of the right hand of the musician is hooked in a conventional open finger hook 20, leaving the first three fingers of the right hand in a position to depress conventional valve-keys 21, 22, and 23 of the trumpet in a well known manner. With the musicians hands in this position, which is the position commonly practiced by musicians playing a trumpet, the thumb of the left hand is in position to press against pressing surface 9 of trigger mechanism 5, if desired. Of course, the other thumb of the right hand may also be utilized, but the ability to utilize the normally dormant left thumb is especially significant since tuning slide adjustments may thereby be effected without disturbing the right hand grip during normal play. The thumb pressure against pressing surface 9 rotates trigger mechanism 5 clockwise around screw 8 causing relatively longer leg 12 of yoke 10 to cam press against follower pin 15 and thereby sliding first valve slide 13 horizontally on guide tubes 14U and 14L away from first valve 6 toward any desired degree of a fully extended or extreme left hand position (as viewed in FIGURES 1 and 2).

When the pressure is removed from pressing surface 9, trigger mechanism 5 is rotated by the bias of spring 16, causing relatively shorter leg 11 of yoke 10 to cam press against follower pin 15 and thereby sliding tuning slide 13 back to its normal starting position. To quickly and easily disengage slide 13 from trigger mechanism 5 so that slide 13 can be removed from guide tubes 14U and 14L for rapid removal of accumulated moisture (as by shaking disengaged slide 13) and subsequent rapid replacement or re-engagement of slide 13, sulficient pressure can be exerted against pressing surface 9 to rotate trigger mechanism 5 about screw 8 until the reverse side of pressing surface 9 is impeded by the stationary abutment of supporing member 7. With trigger mechanism 5 rotated to this extreme clockwise position (as viewed in FIGURES 1 and 2), follower pin 15 can be readily removed from between legs 11 and 12 of yoke 10 because leg 11 is short enough to allow follower pin 15 to clear the bottom edge of leg 11 when slide 13 is manually grasped and slid completely out of engagement with guide tubes 14U and 14L. After the accumulated moisture is removed from the slide 13 (as by appropriate shaking), slide 13 can be easily reengaged with guide tubes 14U and 14L. With trigger mechanism 5 held in the same fully rotated position as when slide 13 was fully extracted for removal, slide 13 can be guided back into engagement with guide tubes 14U and 14L until follower pin 15 is again positioned between legs 11 and 12 of yoke 10. By removing the pressure against pressing surface 9, the bias of spring 16 will cause rotation of trigger mechanism 5 such that leg 11 of yoke 10 presses against follower pin 15 to bring slide 13 back to its normal fully retracted position.

What is claimed is:

1. A slide control arrangement for selectively positioning a tuning slide engaged on guide tubes of a wind musical instrument comprising:

trigger means mounted intermediate oppositely disposed first and second ends thereof for pivotal movement on the musical instrument adjacent to the guide tubes thereof;

digital pressing surface means located at the first end of the trigger means;

cam means located at the second end of the trigger means and comprising a bifurcated open ended yoke having a pair of spaced extending legs;

follower means comprising a pin affixed to the tuning slide and normally disposed between the legs of the yoke for engagement with the cam means to produce sliding movement of the tuning slide in response to movement of the cam means, the cam means being adapted for selective disengagement from the follower means; and

spring bias means interconnecting the trigger means and the musical instrument to normally retain the trigger means and therefor the tuning slide as well in a fully retracted position and away from a fully extracted position adjacent the musical instrument,

whereby the tuning slide can be selectively located in relation to the guide tubes between its fully retracted and fully extracted positions by angular rotation of the trigger means induced by digital pressure applied ot the digital pressing surface means, and the tuning slide can be readily disengaged from the trigger means by digital rotation of the trigger means until the pin can be removed from between the legs of the yoke so as to facilitate disengagement of the tuning slide from the guide tubes.

2. A slide control arrangement, as claimed in claim 1, wherein the legs of the yoke are of unequal length, the relatively shorter leg being disposed closer to the fully extracted position of the tuning slide and the relatively longer leg being disposed closer to the fully retracted position of the tuning slide.

3. A slide control arrangement for selectively positioning a tuning slide engaged on guide tubes of a wind musical instrument comprising:

a trigger member mounted intermediate oppositely dis posed first and second ends thereof for pivotal movement on the musical instrument adjacent to the guide tubes thereof;

a digital pressing surface located at the first end of the trigger means and comprising a flattened spatula portion of the trigger member extending from the intermediate pivotal point thereof;

a follower pin connected to the tuning slide;

a cam member located at the second end of the trigger member and comprising a bifurcated open ended yoke having a pair of spaced extending legs, the cam member being normally adapted to engage the follower pin for sliding movement thereof and therefore of the tuning slide as well in response to movement of the cam member but adapted for selective disengagement from the follower pin; and a biasing spring interconnecting the trigger member and the musical instrument to normally retain the trigger member and therefore the tuning slide as Well in a fully retracted position and away from a fully extracted position adjacent the musical instrument,

whereby the tuning slide can be selectively located in relation to the guide tubes between its fully retracted and fully extended positions and, when located in its fully extracted position, can be completely removed from and replaced into engagement with the guide tubes upon disengagement of the cam member and the follower pin, the selective locating of the tuning slide being controlled by angular rotation of the trigger member induced by digital pressure applied to the digital pressing surface thereof.

4. A slide control arrangement, as claimed in claim 3, wherein the legs of the yoke are of unequal length, the relatively shorter leg being disposed closer to the fully extracted position of the tuning slide and the relatively longer leg being disposed closer to the fully retracted position of the tuning slide.

5. A slide control arrangement, as claimed in claim 3, wherein the biasing spring comprises a spring member coiled about the pivot axis of the trigger member and having a first end thereof in locking engagement with the trigger member and a second end thereof in locking engagement with the musical instrument.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,662,076 3/1928 Newman. 3,161,103 12/1964 Pascucci et a1. 84394 RICHARD B. WILKINSON, Primary Examiner. J. F. GONZALES, Assistant Examiner.

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Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4276804A (en) * 1979-06-11 1981-07-07 Holland Jack O Pitch adjuster for valved brass instruments
US4512233A (en) * 1983-11-18 1985-04-23 Holland Jack O Pitch adjuster
WO2000063876A1 (en) * 1999-04-20 2000-10-26 Top Music Sa Brass musical instrument with tuning slide and pitch adjuster
US10249270B2 (en) * 2016-11-18 2019-04-02 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for compromise tuning of musical instruments
US10535327B2 (en) * 2018-01-11 2020-01-14 Wichita State University Trumpet slide ring spacer
US10672369B2 (en) 2018-05-21 2020-06-02 Wichita State University Adapter for finger appendage of brass instrument

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1662076A (en) * 1927-06-10 1928-03-13 Joseph B Newman Trumpet
US3161103A (en) * 1962-08-02 1964-12-15 Leblanc Corp G Trigger mechanism for trumpet

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1662076A (en) * 1927-06-10 1928-03-13 Joseph B Newman Trumpet
US3161103A (en) * 1962-08-02 1964-12-15 Leblanc Corp G Trigger mechanism for trumpet

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4276804A (en) * 1979-06-11 1981-07-07 Holland Jack O Pitch adjuster for valved brass instruments
US4512233A (en) * 1983-11-18 1985-04-23 Holland Jack O Pitch adjuster
WO2000063876A1 (en) * 1999-04-20 2000-10-26 Top Music Sa Brass musical instrument with tuning slide and pitch adjuster
US10249270B2 (en) * 2016-11-18 2019-04-02 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for compromise tuning of musical instruments
US10535327B2 (en) * 2018-01-11 2020-01-14 Wichita State University Trumpet slide ring spacer
US10672369B2 (en) 2018-05-21 2020-06-02 Wichita State University Adapter for finger appendage of brass instrument

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Owner name: CONTINENTAL ILLINOIS NATIONAL BANK AND TRUST COMPA

Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:KING MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, INC., A DE CORP.;REEL/FRAME:003953/0477

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