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US3421241A - Protected stencil aperture card - Google Patents

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Publication number
US3421241A
US3421241A US3421241DA US3421241A US 3421241 A US3421241 A US 3421241A US 3421241D A US3421241D A US 3421241DA US 3421241 A US3421241 A US 3421241A
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Prior art keywords
stencil
sheet
card
aperture
plastic
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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David Louis Hochberg
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Pitney-Bowes Inc
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Pitney-Bowes Inc
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06KRECOGNITION OF DATA; PRESENTATION OF DATA; RECORD CARRIERS; HANDLING RECORD CARRIERS
    • G06K19/00Record carriers for use with machines and with at least a part designed to carry digital markings
    • G06K19/02Record carriers for use with machines and with at least a part designed to carry digital markings characterised by the selection of materials, e.g. to avoid wear during transport through the machine

Description

14, 1969 D. 1.. HOCHBERG 3,

P ROTECTED STENCIL APERTURE CARD Filed Jan. 18, 1966 Fly. 7

JgHN cos M14- 0 I00 MAIN ST VIIATTBUEQCONN zo 25 1 W45 47/ mv/ /m III/Ill],

INVENTOR. DAVID LOUIS HOCH BERG M a. yz

A TIOKNEY United States Patent 3,421,241 PROTECTED STENCIL APERTURE CARD David Louis Hochberg, New York, N.Y., asignor to Pitney-Bowes, Inc., 0rd, Comm, a corporation of Delaware I Pi] 1966, Ser. No. 521,270

ed Jan. 18,

Claims lnt. Cl. G09f 1/10, 19/12; B421! /00 US. Cl. 40-158 ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE stencil aperture card. It aperture card of the type and which has a reflectwith protection for the This invention relates to a more particularly relates to an processed in business machines ing stencil in the aperture area stencil area.

Business machines. such as data processing equipment, make use of tabulating cards of a standard type which may have visible information and coded information, the

coded information, as well known in the art, may be in the form of punched, or magnetic or optically recogniz-- able intelligence. Such cards may be processed in collating or sorting machines according to the coded intelligence on the cards.

Other types of business machines are used for addressing or imprinting, such as addressing envelopes, bills, invoices. checks and the like. Such machines make use of metal addressing plates which print by impact or they may use inking stencils, neither of which are capable of being processed or handled in data processing equipment, i.e., sorters, collators, tabulators and the like. In addition, metal addressing plates are relatively heavy and occupy a large amount of space due to their thickness. Moreover, the addresses must be made on the plate with special embossing equipment which is heavy and not readily available to the user of the plates. Such plates are also relatively expensive to manufacture.

Ink stencils, although being lighter in weight, require use of liquid ink and the. stencil retains a considerable part of the ink after use for imprinting. Thus use of these stencils involves much care and is quite messy.

An ideal business card for business machine use would be one having the lightweight and versatility of the common single ply statistical or tabulating card and a printing element not requiring embossing or inking which could be prepared in the typewriter both with visual indicia and stencil imprinting information.

It is disclosed in the copending, commonly assigned application Ser. No. S2l,322, filed Jan. 8, 1966 of Gilbert Zweig, entitled Stencil Aperture Card that such a business card may be produced by forming an aperture of rectangular or other desired shape in a tabulating card and covering said aperture with sheet material consisting of a transparent plastic, for example Mylar (du Pont polyethylene terephthalate) coated with a thin reflective layer, such as a metal layer, which is reflective to radiations of the type which are produced by an incandescent filament. The reflective sheet material is secured at the edges of the aperture by any suitable adhesive means. Such a card may be inserted in a typewriter with an ordi- 3,421,241 Patented Jan. 14, 1969 "ice nary sheet of paper behind it, where visual data can be entered on the card as desired.

The stencil aperture is prepared by typing on the sheet material in the aperture with the metallic layer in contact with the sheet of paper. The metallic'layer is transferred off by the impact of the type keys, leaving a transparent area corresponding to the type letter. Thus, an address or any other informational image may be typed on the sheet material in the aperture area leaving the background of reflecting material and an image which is transparent. I have now found that such a stercil aperture card may be made in such a way that the light reflecting material is protected from accidental removal in undesired areas which would mar the stencil by superimposing a layer of material which is transparent to the imaging radiation over the layer of reflecting material and in contact with the reflecting layer.

My stencil aperture card may be used for imaging by thermographic methods using a filament and a thermal transfer carbon sheet as disclosed in commonly assigned copending application Ser. No. 503,218 filed Oct. 23, 1965 entitled Thermographic Copying Process, of Gilbert Zweig.

It is therefore an object of this invention to prepare an aperture card having the form of a regular tabulating card and a reflecting stencil material in the aperture wherein the stencil material is protected.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a protected stencilaperture card which may be used for addressing by thermography, requiring no ink orimpact printing techniques.

It is another .object to provide a protected addressing stencil which may be processed in data processing machines.

Another object is to provide a composite stencil aperture card from which a stencil can be formed in a typewriter without the use of additional receptor sheets.

These and other objects of my invention will become apparent as the description thereof proceeds.

The invention may to the drawings, in which 'FIG. 1 shows a plan view of the stencil aperture card;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged cross sectional' side view of a fragment of the aperture card through the aperture and stencil sheet, showing the coated stencil material;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary view showing the same as FIG. 2 with the coated stencil material reversed in the aperture;

FIG. 4 shows the stencil of FIG. 1 after type impact and removing of receptor paper showing the transparent image areas created in the stencil material;

FIG. 5 shows an enlarged cross sectional view of the stencil aperture card with protective layer on the'stencil',

FIGS. 6 and 7 show an alternate form of the invention;

FIGS. 8 and 9 show another embodiment of the form of the invention shown in FIG. 5; and

FIG. 10 shows still another embodiment of the form of the invention shown in FIG. 5.

Referring to FIG. 1. which illustrates one preferred embodiment of the invention, the reference character 10 designates a standard business card known as a data card, statistical card, tabulating card or otherwise. It will be understood that the vertical dimension of all cross-sectional figures is exaggerated in order to more clearly show all details.

Card 10 may be indexed in any of numerous ways known in the art and may be punched, as well known by perforation with coded information which is analyzed in data processing machines by electrical or optical sensing means. Moreover, the card may contain instead or in addition information readable and/or coded in magnetic be better understood by reference characters which can be read by a magnetic character reading data processing machine. Card 10 may also have ordinary typed or printed visual information for visual identification.

An aperture 14 of any suitable size or configuration is cut in card 10 and has a shoulder 15 surrounding the entire aperture. Shoulder 15 may be formed simply by embossing with a suitable die and the aperture could be cut and the shoulder embossed by machine in one operation.

A stencil sheet material 16 is fitted in aperture 14 and secured to shoulder 15 by any suitable means such as a layer of adhesive on shoulder 15 (See FIG. 2). The stencil sheet material 20 consists of a commercially available vacuum deposited metallic foil on plastic sheet. As is well known, the plastic sheet 18 is first given a release coating. Then a thin film of the metal is vacuum deposited over the release coating. Finally a sizing coating is formed on the metallic coating to form the composite coating 20 on the plastic sheet 18. Such films are commercially available and well known in the art. The metals are, for example, gold, silver, aluminum, bronze and the like.

A suitable gold foil is manufactured by Hastings and Co., Philadelphia, -Pa., and sold as Goldmark. The greeting card hot transfer leafing foils, in various metals such as gold, silver and aluminum, manufactured by M. Swift and Sons, Inc., Hartford, Conn., are also suitable.

In FIG. 2, the stencil sheet material 16 is shown with the coating side away from shoulder 15. In FIG. 3, it is shown that sheet 16 could be mounted with the coated side adjacent to shoulder 15.

The standard single ply tabulating card has a thickness of about 0.007 inch. It is preferred that the stencil sheet 16 in aperture 14 be flush with or lower than the surface of card 10. The Mylar used here is generally about 0.001 inch thickness. The coating comprises in all not more than about 0.001 inch. The shoulder 15 should be compressed to such a depth that the stencil sheet 16 when mounted will be flush with or lower than the surface of card 10 taking into account the adhesive layer.

In FIG. 4, card 10 is seen in end cross section after typing with a receptor sheet in contact with the coated side of stencil sheet material 16. Impact of character keys in the typewritter against sheet 16 has transferred off a portion of the coating equivalent to the character. Transfer of the coating takes place at the interface of 'plastic layer 18 and theestrike releaselay'eriofthecoating 20, adhering the released portion 'tothe'r'eceptOr-"Sheet and leaving a transparent-stencil area 21when receptorpaper has been removed (as shown in'FIG. 4), with the back ground areas 22 being reflective to radiations. As shown in FIG. 1, a complete typed transparent stencil image 23 has been formed with reflecting background 24.

My improved stencil aperture card basically provides a stencil which is protected from accidental removal of the light reflecting layer by a layer of a transparent plastic material, such as Mylar. As seen in FIG. protection of the stencil can be obtained by the plastic sheet 25.

A protected stencil aperture card may be obtained in other ways for example by the use of a pressure spreadable laminate material in the aperture area as shown in FIGS. 6 and 7. Such a laminate material is disclosed in my copending application Ser. No. 503,339, filed Oct. 23, 1965, entitled Stencil Laminate Material. This stencil laminate consists oftwo sheets of material 18 and 26 transparent to the imaging radiation having a pressure spreadable layer 27 between. The pressure spreadable layer 27 comprises a waxy material mixed with a pigment which reflects or scatters the imaging radiation. Such waxes, as carnauba, spermaceti, stearic acid, paraflin, acrawax, and the like are used in combination with such pigments as titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, aluminum powder and the like. Softening agents may be incorporated 4 .such as petrolatum and oils, e.g. mineral oil, silicon oils and the like.

The pressure spreadable laminate is installed in the aperture on shoulder 15 in the same manner shown in FIG. 5. When the laminate is struck with a type key 28, as in FIG. 6, the reflective layer is spread and displaced in the struck'area, leaving an area 29, see FIG. 7, which has little or no reflective pigment. Area 29 of the stencil is therefore transparent to the imaging radiation whereas the area 30 still reflects the radiation. Thus a stencil has been formed which is transparent in the struck or image area and reflective in the background areas. The reflective layer is protected since there is a layer of plastic on both sides and nothing can scratch or abrade the reflective layer.

In FIGS. 8 and 9, an aperture card is shown having a composite assembly in the aperture for forming a stencil which is basically similar to the card of FIGS. 2 and 3. Aperture card 10 has a plastic sheet 18 coated with reflective coating 20 in aperture 14 against shoulder 15 in face A of card 10 and secured by any suitable adhesive 31. A receptor paper 32 is in contact with the reflective layer 20 in the aperture area. A second layer of plastic 33 is secured against a shoulder 34 on the opposite face B and card 10 and secured by a pressure sensitive adhesive 35. A stencil is produced by typing on the plastic in a typewriter. As shown in FIG. 9, the areas 36 of the reflective coating 20 struck by type keys is transferred off onto the receptor paper 32. A transparent area representative of the type character is formed at 36. Plastic sheet 33 is lifted at one edge and receptor sheet 32 is removed, after which plastic sheet 33 is returned to position on the shoulder 34 and held by pressure sensitive adhesive 35. Plastic sheet 33 may be notched at its edge in any suitable manner to facilitate lifting. Thus a protected stencil is formed which is transparent to imaging radiation in areas 36 and reflective in the non-struck areas 37.

FIG. 10 shows a different embodiment of the assembly in FIGS. 8 and 9. Aperture card 10 has a single shoulder 15 with adhesive 31 to which is secured Mylar sheet 18 having reflective coating 20. A receptor sheet 32 coated with a release coating 38, for example a silicone, is laid on top of reflective layer 20. Receptor sheet 32 is slightly smaller in areas than plastic sheet 18. A plastic sheet 39 with a pressure sensitive layer 40 is aflixed to the top of receptor sheet 32 and to the area of the reflective layer 20 which is not covered by the receptor sheet. To lforrngastencil, the stencil area is typed on in a typewriter, an explained above for the stencil of FIGS. 8 and 9. The receptor paper 32 is removed by lifting plastic sheet 39 at either side and stripping of the receptor paper from the plastic. Separation is readily achieved between the silicone release coat and presure sensitive layer. After the receptor paper is removed, plastic layer 39 is affixed to reflective layer 20 by pressure sensitive adhesive 40 to form the stencil similar to FIGS. 8 and 9.

It will be recognized that any suitable sheet material may be used in place of Mylar, for example polyethylene, polypropylene, polyvinylidene chloride, cellulose acetate and the like.

The finished stencil card may be used in a thermographic imaging method as shown in previously mentioned commonly assigned, copending application Ser. No. 503,218.

Briefly, the stencil aperture card is placed upon a thermal transfer carbon sheet having a heat absorbing medium and a waxy heat fusible layer, with the waxy side away from the card. Then a sheet of regular stationary copy paper is placed in contact with the Waxy layer. This copy composite is then irradiated from the stencil side with a source of radiation rich in infra-red. The infrared rays pass through the transparent stencil image areas and are reflected from the stencil background areas. The rays passing through the stencil image areas are absorbed in the wax layer and heat it up, fusing it and transferring off the layer to the copy paper thereby creating an image corresponding to image areas of the stencil.

It is thus possible to take the aperture card of the invention and form an address or other informational stencil in a typewriter and at the same time put other typed information on the card. The card can then be coded in a punch card machine as desired, or coded in any other known way. Alternatively, the card can be punched before the stencil is formed.

It is thus simple to produce address stencils in any office with the aid of an ordinary typewriter. Such cards are easy to handle and to store, taking relatively little space. A large stack of filed cards may be machined sorted then used in an addressing machine. Addition of new cards to the files for changes of address is greatly facilitated since the cards are so inexpensive and the old cards may be discarded and a new one prepared immediately in the typewriter. The cards are always neat for reuse since they do not require ink as with ink stencils.

It will be apparent, moreover, that the coating may be arranged on the stencil so that the card may be typed with visible indicia and a right reading stencil which is positioned right reading on top of an exposure composite to obtain a right reading image. It is possible also to reverse visible and stencil information so that the stencil is not right reading when the visible indicia can be read if this should be desirable for any purpose.

The inventive aperture card therefor has all the advantages of a tabulating card and an addressing stencil without the disadvantages of metal addressing plates, since plates must be prepared with special machines and cannot be machine sorted, or of ink stencils requiring liquid ink.

While I have described some specific structures and preferred embodiments of my invention, this is only for the purpose of illustration. It will be apparent that various changes and modifications may be made in the invention without departing from the spirit of the disclosure and the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A stencil aperture card adapted for conversion into a printing stencil for use in a radiation sensitive printing process, said card comprising a thin flexible card having an aperture therein;

a shoulder around the periphery of said aperture; and

a sheet of stencil material across said aperture and secured to said shoulder;

said stencil material comprising a transparent plastic backing sheet having a radiation reflective coating thereon which is selectively removable to form a printing stencil and a transparent plastic sheet to protect said reflective coating, said transparent plastic sheet being removable from said reflective coating to permit the latter to be selectively removed from said transparent plastic backing sheet and replaceable over said reflective coating to thereafter protect the latter.

2. A stencil aperture card adapted for conversion into a printing stencil for use in a radiation sensitive printing process, said card comprising:

a thin flexible card having an aperture therein;

a shoulder around the periphery of said aperture; and

a sheet of stencil material across said aperture and secured to said shoulder;

said stencil material comprising a transparent plastic backing sheet having an infra-red radiation reflective coating thereon and secured thereto by means permitting said coating to be removed therefrom in selected areas by the application of pressure between said coating and a receptor surface in said selected areas, and an infra-red radiation transparent plastic sheet disposed over said reflective coating and secured thereover by means permitting said plastic sheet to be removed from said reflective coating to permit the latter to be selectively removed from said transparent plastic backing sheet, and to be replaced Over said reflective coating to thereafter protect the latter.

3. A stencil aperture card adapted for conversion into a printing stencil for use in a radiation sensitive printing process, said card comprising:

a thin flexible card having an aperture therein;

a shoulder around the periphery of said aperture; and

a sheet of stencil material across said aperture and secured to said shoulder;

said stencil material comprising a transparent plastic backing sheet having an infra-red radiation reflective coating thereon and secured thereto by means permitting said coating to be removed therefrom in selected areas by the application of pressure between said coating and a receptor surface in said selected areas, a receptor sheet disposed over said reflective coating and providing said receptor surface, said receptor sheet being removable from said reflective coating, and an infra-red radiation transparent plastic sheet disposed over said receptor sheet and secured to said shoulder by means permitting said plastic sheet to be removed from said shoulder in order to permit the removal of said receptor sheet With selected areas of said reflective coating adhered thereto, and to be resecured to said shoulder to thereafter protect the remaining areas of said reflective coating.

4. A stencil aperture card as set forth in claim 3 wherein said transparent plastic backing sheet with said reflective coating thereon is secured to one face of said shoulder and said radiation transparent plastic sheet is secured to the other face of said shoulder, said receptor sheet being disposed between said reflective coating and said radiation transparent plastic sheet.

5. A stencil aperture card as set forth in claim 3 wherein said transparent plastic backing sheet With said reflective coating thereon and said radiation transparent plastic sheet are secured to one face of said shoulder, said receptor sheet being disposed between said reflective coating and said transparent plastic sheet.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,179,081 4/1916 Denne 40-135 1,498,895 6/ 1924 Theriault. 2,557,402 6/ 1951 Altheimer 40-135 2,648,924 8/ 1953 Brewster. 2,984,921 5/1961 Herzig 40-158 EUGENE R. CAPOZIO, Primary Examiner.

W. J. CONTRERAS, Assistant Examiner.

US3421241A 1966-01-18 1966-01-18 Protected stencil aperture card Expired - Lifetime US3421241A (en)

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE3843061A1 (en) * 1987-12-30 1989-07-27 Schweinsberg Datox Org Microfilm aperture card, with stuck-in aperture film image
DE4431445A1 (en) * 1994-09-03 1996-03-07 Microbox Dr Welp Gmbh & Co Film data card for microfilm storage
US20120279100A1 (en) * 2011-05-06 2012-11-08 Avery Dennison Corporation Fastener Assembly and System for Manufacturing the Same

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1179081A (en) * 1915-05-28 1916-04-11 George F Denne Sign.
US1498895A (en) * 1921-02-16 1924-06-24 Elliott Addressing Machine Co Stencil
US2557402A (en) * 1946-07-22 1951-06-19 Milprint Inc Display sign
US2648924A (en) * 1949-12-16 1953-08-18 Brewster Ernest Billings Label structure
US2984921A (en) * 1959-04-24 1961-05-23 P C I Inc Microfilm record card

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1179081A (en) * 1915-05-28 1916-04-11 George F Denne Sign.
US1498895A (en) * 1921-02-16 1924-06-24 Elliott Addressing Machine Co Stencil
US2557402A (en) * 1946-07-22 1951-06-19 Milprint Inc Display sign
US2648924A (en) * 1949-12-16 1953-08-18 Brewster Ernest Billings Label structure
US2984921A (en) * 1959-04-24 1961-05-23 P C I Inc Microfilm record card

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE3843061A1 (en) * 1987-12-30 1989-07-27 Schweinsberg Datox Org Microfilm aperture card, with stuck-in aperture film image
DE4431445A1 (en) * 1994-09-03 1996-03-07 Microbox Dr Welp Gmbh & Co Film data card for microfilm storage
DE4431445B4 (en) * 1994-09-03 2007-10-04 Microbox Gmbh Movie data card
US20120279100A1 (en) * 2011-05-06 2012-11-08 Avery Dennison Corporation Fastener Assembly and System for Manufacturing the Same
US9842519B2 (en) * 2011-05-06 2017-12-12 Avery Dennison Corporation Fastener assembly and system for manufacturing the same

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