US3415010A - Toy parachute apparatus - Google Patents

Toy parachute apparatus Download PDF

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Publication number
US3415010A
US3415010A US59520066A US3415010A US 3415010 A US3415010 A US 3415010A US 59520066 A US59520066 A US 59520066A US 3415010 A US3415010 A US 3415010A
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Prior art keywords
parachute
trigger
movable magnet
magnet
container
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Franklin D Belz
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FRANKLIN D BELZ
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Franklin D. Belz
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS OR BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H33/00Other toys
    • A63H33/20Toys with parachutes; Toy parachutes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS OR BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H27/00Toy aircraft; Other flying toys ; Starting or launching devices therefor
    • A63H27/005Rockets; Missiles

Description

Dec. 10, 1968 F. D. BELZ 3,415,010
TOY PARACHUTE APPARATUS Filed NOV. 17, 1966 INVENTOR United States Patent 3,415,010 TOY PARACHUTE APPARATUS Franklin D. Belz, 2102 Ave. E, Brownwood, Tex. 76801 Filed Nov. 17, 1966, Ser. No. 595,200 4 Claims. (Cl. 46-241) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Disclosed herein is a toy parachute apparatus having parachute expulsion means that includes a trigger mechanism that utilizes a movable magnet which is drawn toward a stationary magnet when the apparatus reaches its maximum height. While the apparatus is traveling upward, the force of gravity, acting on the movable magnet, prevents it from moving relative the stationary magnet. Further, a wind resistor may be combined with the movable magnet to prevent movement thereof toward the stationary magnet is disclosed. The force of the wind acting against this resistor helps keep the movable magnet in a fixed position until the maximum height of the trajectory is reached, at which time the velocity of the apparatus and the force against the resistor decrease. Also disclosed is a form of trigger mechanism that utilizes a trigger arm control bar to hold a trigger arm in place until the movable magnet is drawn toward the stationary magnet.
My invention relates to amusement devices of the type generally referred to as toy parachute apparatus and in particular to improvements in the means used to automatically release the parachute when such apparatus reaches the maximum height of its trajectory.
Previously, toy parachute apparatus having a missile which may be fired into the air has been developed. Such apparatus commonly includes a parachute which automatically releases to bring the missile safely back to ground. It is beneficial that the parachute be released at the maximum height of the trajectory of the missile to .prolong the in-flight time. It is difiicult, however, to
develop parachute release means which operates with essential fail safe reliability precisely at the maximum height of trajectory without relying on complex and expensive mechanisms. If an essentially fail safe system is not provided and the parachute release means fails to function properly, the missile may strike the ground at terminal ,velocity with damaging results.
It is accordingly the general object of my invention to provide toy parachute apparatus with improved automatic parachute release means.
Another object of my invention is to provide automatic parachute release means that utilizes an essentially fail safe combination magnetic and gravity operated system that consistently discharges the parachute at the maximum height of trajectory.
Another object of my invention is to provide in an automatic parachute release means for toy parachutes a wind responsive device which further adds to its reliability by lessening chances for a premature release of the parachute.
Another object of my invention is to provide an improved form of trigger mechanism in automatic toy parachute release means.
These and other objects are effected by my invention as will be apparent from the following description taken in accordance with the accompanying drawing, forming a part of this application, in which:
FIG. 1 is a perspective view of toy parachute apparatus embodying the principles of my invention along with the propulsion means used to launch the apparatus;
FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view as seen looking along the lines IIII of FIG. 2;
FIG. 3 is a side elevational view, partially in the section, showing the apparatus of FIG. 1 as positioned when it reaches the maximum height of its trajectory and during the initial stages of the automatic actuation of the parachute release means; and
FIG. 4 is a side elevational view, partially in section, of the apparatus of FIG. 1 during its descent after the parachute has been released.
Referring initially to FIG. 1, the numeral 11 designates the body of an apparatus having a parachute expulsion portion 13 (see FIG. 3) which is reciprocable with respect to a parachute container member 15. A parachute 17, when suitably folded may be inserted inside the parachute container member 15 if the parachute expulsion member 13 is moved forward as shown in FIG. 3. In this particular instance a parachute 17 is carried by the body 11 by securing the shrouds 19 (see FIG. 4) to the extremity of the parachute expulsion portion 13.
Biasing means 21, here in the form of an elastic (preferably rubber) bank interconnect the body and the parachute container member to urge the parachute expulsion portion 13 against components of a trigger mechanism 23 and in a direction to expel the parachute 17. The elastic band is inserted through an aperture 25 in an upper portion of the body 11 so that its approximate midregion is confined thereby, and the free end portions are looped over two identical and oppositely positioned shoulders 27 which protrude from the parachute container member 17.
A preferred form of trigger mechanism 23 comprises a pair of trigger arms 29 (see especially FIG. 3) which are pivotally secured at 31 to a longitudinally divided and raised portion 33 of the parachute container member 15. Each of the trigger arms 29 has an car 35 which engages a radial shoulder 37 formed on the body 11 when the trigger arms are rotated to a position such that they lie inside the raised and slotted portion 33 of the parachute container member 15. When positioned in this manner, the body 11 and the parachute container member 15 are locked in a position such thta. the expulsion portion 33 is withdrawn into the parachute container member 15 to receive the folded parachute. The reaction of the radially extending shoulder 37 against the ears 35 tends to urge the trigger arms 29 radially outward. The trigger arms 29 are retained within the raised portion 33 by utilization of trigger arm control bars 39 which are pivotally secured as indicated by the numeral 41 to the raised portion 33 of the parachute container member 15.
The tendency of the trigger arms 29 to move radially outward has sufiicient force to also move the trigger arm control bars 39 radially outward. However, a locking cap 43 carried by said body is adapted to extend over the free end portions of the trigger arm control bars to confine them against radial movement as shown in FIG. 1. A positioning head 45 for the trigger arm control bars 39 may be provided to insure their proper alignment.
A stationary magnet 47 is secured to an upper portion of the body 11 and a movable magnet 49 is also carried by said body inside the locking cap 43 below the stationary magnet. It should be understood that the terms upper and lower refer to locations on the apparatus when positioned to travel upward, as shown in FIG. 1. When the apparatus is positioned to travel upward, the movable magnet 49 is maintained in what I refer to as a trigger retaining position by the force of gravity. The locking cap 43 and the movable magnet 49 are secured to each other by suitable means such as an epoxy resin such that when gravity pulls the movable magnet down ward, the locking cap confines the free ends of the trigger arm control bars as shown in FIG. 1. But when the maximum height of the trajectory of the missile is reached and the apparatus tilts from an upward to a downward position, the force of gravity no longer urges the movable magnet downward and the magnets, being positioned with opposite poles facing one another, are urged together to remove the locking cap from engagement with the free ends of the trigger arm control bars 39.
To further insure that the movable magnet stays downward in the trigger retaining position while the apparatus travels upwardly, a wind resistor 51 is secured to the movable magnet to extend radially outward therefrom to engage the airstream formed around the moving missile, The resulting drag thus helps retain the movable magnet 49 in its trigger retaining position While the missile is traveling through the atmosphere when vibrations are otherwise likely to prematurely release the trigger mechanism.
Since the movable magnet 49 must overcome a certain amount of inertia before the trigger mechanism can be actuated, I have provided an impact arrangement which facilitates actuation. The preferred arrangement shown in the drawing includes apertures (not shown) in a radially extending surface on the locking cap 43 through which extend one or more actuation pins 53 having one end secured to the movable magnet and another end supporting a radially extending surface or ball 55. When the apparatus tlits from the upward position, the force between the fixed and movable magnets causes an accelerated movement of the movable magnet. After achieving a relatively high velocity, the radial surfaces 55 collide with the radially extending surface of the locking cap to forcefully withdraw the cap from engagement with the end portions of the trigger arm control bar 39.
As may be seen in FIG. 2, the body may have a plurality of splines 57 which are received in elongated apertures 59 in the parachute container member to maintain a selected radial alignment of the various components of the apparatus. A plurality of fins 60 are provided on the parachute container member 15 to provide stability in flight in the usual manner. The very upper extremity of the apparatus has a propulsion head 61 with a slot 63 therein to receive an elastic element 65 of suitable propulsion means 67.
A number of significant advantages fiow from the utilization of apparatus of the type previously described. The utilization of magnet means to control the trigger mechanism enables the use of gravity to keep the magnets apart when the missile is moving in upward direction. When the missile reaches the maximum height of its trajectory and first begins to move downward, the force of gravity no longer prevents the movable magnet from moving toward the fixed magnet, The movable magnet therefore actuates the trigger mechanism in an advantagoeus manner. This system enables the utilization of impact means to overcome the inertia of a locking member such as the locking cap previously described. Consequently, it is unnecessary for the force between the magnets to overcome any appreciable amount of the friction inherent in a mechanical trigger mechanism. The utilization of the specific trigger mechanism previously described is beneficial in that the trigger arm control bars, due to their exceptional length, are easier to control when arming the trigger mechanism. The utilization of a wind resistor in combination with a movable magnet further insures fail safe reliability of the trigger mechanism since the resistance of the wind tends to keep the magnet separated while in flight and during that period of time when vibrations are maximum. This further insures against premature actuation of the trigger mechanism.
While I have shown my invention in only one of its forms, it should be apparent to those skilled in the art that it is not so limited but is susceptible of various changes and modifications without departing from the spirit thereof.
1 claim:
1. A toy parachute apparatus having automatic parachute release means, said apparatus comprising: a parachute; a parachute container member; a body adapted to carry said parachute and having a reciprocable parachute expulsion portion extending into said parachute container member, a trigger mechanism supported by said body to hold said reciprocable parachute expulsion portion in a position relative to said container member to receive the parachute when suitably folded; biasing means interconnecting said body and said parachute container member to urge said expulsion portion against said trigger mechanism and in a direction to expel said parachute; a stationary magnet secured to said body; a movable magnet carried by said body below said stationary magnet when the apparatus is positioned to travel upward, with said movable magnet being maintained in a trigger retaining position by the force of gravity when the apparatus is positioned to travel upward but which moves toward the stationary magnet and a trigger release position when the apparatus moves from its upward position as when the maximum height of its trajectory is reached.
2. The apparatus defined by claim 1 wherein a wind resistor is supported by said movable magnet and extends radially outward to further help retain the movable magnet in its trigger retaining position while the apparatus moves upwardly through the atmosphere.
3. The apparatus defined by claim 1 which further includes a locking cap having at least one aperture in a radially extending surface; at least one actuation pin secured by said movable magnet to extend through the aperture of said cap and having a radially extending surface that engages said cap by impact when said movable magnet moves toward said stationary magnet to overcome the inertia of said cap.
4. The invention defined by claim 1 wherein said trigger mechanism comprises at least one trigger arm pivotally secured to said parachute container member and having an car which engages a radial shoulder on said body to lock the body and the parachute container member against the force of said biasing means; a trigger arm control bar pivotally secured to said parachute container member to engage and confine said trigger arm; and a locking cap carried by said body and being movable by said movable magnet to confine or release a free end portion of said trigger control bar and thus said trigger arm.
References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS LOUIS G. MANCENE, Primary Examiner.
ROBERT F. CUTTING. Assistant Examiner.
U.S. Cl. X.R. 4686
US59520066 1966-11-17 1966-11-17 Toy parachute apparatus Expired - Lifetime US3415010A (en)

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Cited By (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3822502A (en) * 1973-09-04 1974-07-09 F Belz Toy parachute apparatus
US4687455A (en) * 1985-10-22 1987-08-18 Ron Sculatti Flying model rocket and method of recovery
US4840598A (en) * 1987-11-16 1989-06-20 Schuetz Robert W Amusement projectile device
US5407375A (en) * 1993-12-08 1995-04-18 Johnson; Lonnie Toy rocket with velocity dependent chute release
US5549497A (en) * 1993-12-08 1996-08-27 Johnson Research Development Company, Inc. Toy rocket with velocity dependent chute release
US5785278A (en) * 1997-05-29 1998-07-28 Bejtlich, Iii; Chester Louis Pressure dependent parachute release device for air/water rockets
US5878735A (en) * 1997-02-11 1999-03-09 Johnson Research & Development Company, Inc. Compressed air toy gun
US5878734A (en) * 1995-05-15 1999-03-09 Johnson Research & Development Company, Inc. Multiple barrel compressed air gun
US5951354A (en) * 1993-12-08 1999-09-14 Johnson Research & Development Co., Inc. Toy rocket
US6000386A (en) * 1997-03-24 1999-12-14 Johnson Research & Development Company, Inc. Toy gun with fluid pulsator
US6003503A (en) * 1997-03-24 1999-12-21 Johnson Research & Development Company, Inc. Toy gun with fluid pulsator
US6203397B1 (en) 1999-11-19 2001-03-20 Johnson Research & Development & Company, Inc. convertible air and water toy gun
US6220237B1 (en) 1999-07-30 2001-04-24 Johnson Research & Development Company, Inc. Compressed air toy gun
US6321737B1 (en) 1999-11-24 2001-11-27 Johnson Research & Development Co., Inc. Toy rocket launcher
US6364162B1 (en) 2000-01-06 2002-04-02 Johnson Research & Development Co. Automatic pressurized fluid gun
US6408837B1 (en) 1999-09-13 2002-06-25 Johnson Research & Development Co. Toy gun with magazine
US6478648B1 (en) 2000-05-15 2002-11-12 Johnson Research & Development Company Toy rocket with parachute hatch release
US6679155B1 (en) 2002-10-24 2004-01-20 Johnson Research & Development Co., Inc. Projectile launcher
US20040266310A1 (en) * 2003-04-14 2004-12-30 Kouhei Ogino Hand-thrown toy parachute and method of manufacturing the same
US20110244756A1 (en) * 2010-12-27 2011-10-06 Funsource Partners d/b/a Funtastic USA Toy Projectile and Launch Device

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3014308A (en) * 1959-05-25 1961-12-26 Parris Mfg Co Rocket and launcher therefor
US3172231A (en) * 1962-11-05 1965-03-09 Raymond M Arland Parachute toy

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3014308A (en) * 1959-05-25 1961-12-26 Parris Mfg Co Rocket and launcher therefor
US3172231A (en) * 1962-11-05 1965-03-09 Raymond M Arland Parachute toy

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3822502A (en) * 1973-09-04 1974-07-09 F Belz Toy parachute apparatus
US4687455A (en) * 1985-10-22 1987-08-18 Ron Sculatti Flying model rocket and method of recovery
US4840598A (en) * 1987-11-16 1989-06-20 Schuetz Robert W Amusement projectile device
US5407375A (en) * 1993-12-08 1995-04-18 Johnson; Lonnie Toy rocket with velocity dependent chute release
US5549497A (en) * 1993-12-08 1996-08-27 Johnson Research Development Company, Inc. Toy rocket with velocity dependent chute release
US5951354A (en) * 1993-12-08 1999-09-14 Johnson Research & Development Co., Inc. Toy rocket
US5878734A (en) * 1995-05-15 1999-03-09 Johnson Research & Development Company, Inc. Multiple barrel compressed air gun
US5878735A (en) * 1997-02-11 1999-03-09 Johnson Research & Development Company, Inc. Compressed air toy gun
US6000386A (en) * 1997-03-24 1999-12-14 Johnson Research & Development Company, Inc. Toy gun with fluid pulsator
US6003503A (en) * 1997-03-24 1999-12-21 Johnson Research & Development Company, Inc. Toy gun with fluid pulsator
US5785278A (en) * 1997-05-29 1998-07-28 Bejtlich, Iii; Chester Louis Pressure dependent parachute release device for air/water rockets
US6220237B1 (en) 1999-07-30 2001-04-24 Johnson Research & Development Company, Inc. Compressed air toy gun
US6408837B1 (en) 1999-09-13 2002-06-25 Johnson Research & Development Co. Toy gun with magazine
US6203397B1 (en) 1999-11-19 2001-03-20 Johnson Research & Development & Company, Inc. convertible air and water toy gun
US6321737B1 (en) 1999-11-24 2001-11-27 Johnson Research & Development Co., Inc. Toy rocket launcher
US6364162B1 (en) 2000-01-06 2002-04-02 Johnson Research & Development Co. Automatic pressurized fluid gun
US6478648B1 (en) 2000-05-15 2002-11-12 Johnson Research & Development Company Toy rocket with parachute hatch release
US6679155B1 (en) 2002-10-24 2004-01-20 Johnson Research & Development Co., Inc. Projectile launcher
US20040266310A1 (en) * 2003-04-14 2004-12-30 Kouhei Ogino Hand-thrown toy parachute and method of manufacturing the same
US6902460B2 (en) * 2003-04-14 2005-06-07 Kouhei Ogino Hand-thrown toy parachute and method of manufacturing the same
US20110244756A1 (en) * 2010-12-27 2011-10-06 Funsource Partners d/b/a Funtastic USA Toy Projectile and Launch Device

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