US3411505A - Device for interrupting arterial flow - Google Patents

Device for interrupting arterial flow Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3411505A
US3411505A US51404065A US3411505A US 3411505 A US3411505 A US 3411505A US 51404065 A US51404065 A US 51404065A US 3411505 A US3411505 A US 3411505A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
artery
link
device
handle
legs
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Paul D Nobis
Original Assignee
Paul D. Nobis
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Paul D. Nobis filed Critical Paul D. Nobis
Priority to US51404065 priority Critical patent/US3411505A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3411505A publication Critical patent/US3411505A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/12Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for ligaturing or otherwise compressing tubular parts of the body, e.g. blood vessels, umbilical cord
    • A61B17/132Tourniquets
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/12Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for ligaturing or otherwise compressing tubular parts of the body, e.g. blood vessels, umbilical cord
    • A61B2017/12004Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for ligaturing or otherwise compressing tubular parts of the body, e.g. blood vessels, umbilical cord for haemostasis, for prevention of bleeding

Description

Nov. 19, 1968 P. D. NOBIS 3,411,505

DEVICE FOR INTERRUPTING ARTERIAL FLOW Filed Dec. 15, 1965 INVENTOR.

' PAUL D. NOBIS BY $2M a/W ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,411,505 DEVICE FOR INTERRUPTING ARTERIAL FLOW Paul D. Nobis, 490 Post St., SanFrancisco, Calif.

Filed Dec. 15, 1965, Ser. No. 514,040 8 Claims. (Cl. 128-325) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE holding member facilitates the application of hand pressure to the link.

This invention relates to a surgical instrument adapted for stopping blood flow through an artery of a human or other animal. More particularly, it relates to a handactuated instrument which can' be applied quickly to the exterior surfaces of an artery and the blood flowing past the point of application stopped by pinching the interior walls of the artery into sealing engagement through the application of pressure to the instrument.

During cardio-vascular surgery, it frequently becomes necessary 'to stop blood flow through a particular artery so that repair, removal of clots, and similar manipulations can be accomplished downstream from the point of closure of the artery. Closing of the artery at a given point by compressing or pinching the walls thereof into a sealed relationship requires considerable pressure because of the forces which build up at the constriction by blood being pumped from the heart.

When closure of the artery must be maintained for some period of time to permit completion of surgical manipulations, the pressure must be applied over a long and sustained period'of time. Intermittent opening and closure can not be tolerated or profuse bleeding and loss of blood quickly results through the portion of the artery undergoing surgery. For this reason, closure of an artery by .simply pinching it between the fingers is not feasible. The muscles in the fingers soo'n fatigue under the pressures and forces encountered, if a complete closure can be accomplished at all.

Consequently, it has been the practice to utilize several aids along the lines of a rigid member with fabric, or the like, at one end which is placed in contact with the artery at the desired point of constriction and pressure .applied. Another type of unit is a rigid member which hasa configuration analagous to a shufile board paddle. It is used byplacing the artery in the curved end of the paddle and forces are then applied with the elongate handle. Unfortunately, these types of devices are not completely efficient in that the user tends to become fatigued because of a lack of a comfortable surface upon which to apply the considerable hand pressure required over a prolonged period of time. In addition, the devices are not designed for adaption to the varying physiological characteristics of the arteries and parts of the body in which the artery is located. For example, the arteries are not uniformly compressible due to deposits within the arteries and/or non-uniformities of the surrounding body tissues against which the artery is pressed.

The present invention provides a device that has overcome all of these deficiencies of prior techniques and instruments. The new device provides a convenient surface for receiving hand pressure that is comfortable and which provides a maximum maneuverability for the user, en-

abling the application of large amounts of pressure for sustained periods of time with a minimum of fatigue. Of even more importance, the new instrument provides a portion for engaging the artery that adapts to the condition of the artery and its environment so that a total and complete closure is readily accomplished with a minimum of mechanical damage to the tissues.

In a preferred embodiment, the new device is formed with a main body member having an X configuration. A substantially straight beam which serves as a handle is attached across two adjacent ends of the X. At the other end of the X, opposed to the handle, a link is connected between the other two legs of the X. The link is formed from a-material sufiiciently resilient to conform to the surface of an artery during application of pressure to the handle while being sufficiently rigid to compress the walls of the artery and close arterial flow therebetween.

In the accompanying drawing:

FIG. 1 shows in side elevation a surgical device in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 2 shows in perspective the manner of using the device of FIG. 1 to constrict an artery for purposes of closing flow therethrough.

FIG. 3 shows in side elevation an alternate embodinientof the device of the present invention.

More particularly, with respect to FIG. 1, the preferred device is formed with a furcated member 10 which may be viewed as the main 'body. Member 10 is preferably in the form of an X. Onepair of adjacent ends 11 and 12 of member '10 are joined to a handle 13 which may take the form of a substantially straight beam. Handle 13 is most advantageously selected so that the palm of a human hand can conveniently rest upon it in comfort so that substantial downward pressure can be applied over a long period of time with a minimum of fatigue.

The X configuration of member 10, together with the straight beam handle 13 offer an optimum configuration for this purpose. Thus, a hand can conveniently rest upon the top of beam 13 with the fingers extending therearound, underneath, and between ends 11 and 12 of member 10. In this way, there is no interfering parts of member 10 which must fit between the fingers and which could lead to early fatigue.

The bifurcated configuration of member 10 in which ends 11 and 12 are attached to handle 13 at spaced apart locations near the ends of handle 13 contributes to a high degree of control during use of the instrument. With this configuration, it is possible to exert more pressure on one side or the other as required by the characteristics of the artery and itslocation without losing a grip on the unit and without opening the artery to undesired flow.

Member 10, due to its X configuration, also includes an opposite pair of spaced apart legs 14 and 15. A link 16 is connected between legs 14 and 15 to form a loop therewith. Connection between link 16 and the ends of legs 14 and 15 may be accomplished in any suitable manner. It is convenient to accomplish the connection by forming ling 16 with at least its ends being hollow so that the ends of legs 14 and 15 can be inserted within the hollow ends of link 16. In this way, link 16 can be quickly replaced in the event it has lost its necessary physical properties to be described or has otherwise been rendered not suitable for further use.

Where this preferred manner of connection between link 16 and legs 14 and 15 is used, it is advantageous to form the ends of legs 14 and 15 with some type of protuberance or other irregularity so that when inserted within the hollow portions of link 16 and pressure applied, link 16 will not slip off legs 14 and 15. In the drawing, the ends of legs 14 and 15 are enlarged and can be seen in 3 dotted lines as a bulge at 17 and 18 interiorly of link 16.

The character of link 16 is most important. It must be sufficiently resilient to conform to the surface of the artery, such as artery 19 shown in FIG. 2. When pressures are applied downwardly on handle 13, link 16 conforms to the exterior surface of artery 19, as well as to the body tissues and adjacent parts such as bone segment 20, which may be present in the vicinity of the particular artery under treatment.

The resiliency will allow for hardening or deposits which may be present within artery 19 which will cause one portion of the artery to yield differently than another adjacent portion of the artery. Also, where the surrounding bone, for example, is irregular, and the artery is compressed against it, the resilient character of link 16 will adapt to and conform with such an environment. A uniform total closure of the artery results, which can be held as long as necessary without leakage.

While being resilient, link 16 must be sufficiently rigid so that the forces applied to handle 13 will result in a collapse and closure of the artery worked upon. This combination of resiliency with the proper amount of rigidity is found in a variety of tubing commonly found in hospital operating rooms. Suitable tubing for use as link 16 which has the requisite physical properties has been found to exist in typical rubber or plastic tubing of an overall outside diameter of about /2 inch and an internal diameter of about inch. Such material has been found to have the proper resiliency, and is rigid enough to cause closure of arterial walls under application of hand pressure. Selection of a proper material for link 16 will be readily accomplished by those skilled in this art who have a knowledge of the physical properties of arteries.

The X configuration of the preferred embodiment is compatible with the practical requirements of the surgeon. Thus, where the operation is performed through a relatively small incision such as at 21, the furcated body member of the present device can be constructed so that the cross-over area 22 lies at a point which will coincide with the location of the incision and will fit through incision 21 as a key through a keyhole. In this regard, it may be desirable to have a plurality of devices of differing sizes on hand during the operation to insure that this relationship will be obtainable.

Preferably, legs 14 and of the device are formed from a material that permits a pro-selected degre of flexing during use. For example, legs formed from stainless steel have been shown to demonstrate this desirable attribute. A relatively small amount of flexing contributes better adaptation to the peculiarities of the artery and its environment and aids in applying a more uniform pressure which will positively close flow through the blood vessel at the time desired.

In the embodiment in FIG. 3, a furcated body member 23 takes the form of an inverted Y with a handle 24 attached to the unitary end of the Y and a resilient link 25 attached to the bifurcated end of the Y. All comments applicable to the embodiment of FIGS. 1 and 2 apply here, except for the fact that the same degree of control over application of pressure to one side or the other is not as readily achieved with the unitary end 26 of member 23 attached centrally to handle 24. In addition, end 26 of member 23 may tend to interfere with the grip of the user about handle 24.

Although the foregoing invention has been described in some detail by way of illustration and example for purposes of clarity of understanding, it is understood that certain changes and modifications may be practiced within the spirit of the invention as limited only by the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed:

1. A device for interrupting arterial flow comprising: a handle including a surface adapted for receiving pressure applied by the human hand, a furcated member joined in opposition with said handle having first and second spaced apart legs, and a curved link connected at its ends to said first and second legs to form a loop therewith and formed from material sufiiciently resilient to conform to the surface of an artery during application of pressure to said handle while being sufiiciently rigid to compress the walls of an artery and close arterial flow therebetween.

2. A device in accordance with claim 1 wherein said furcated member has the configuration of an X.

3. A device in accordance with claim 1 wherein said furcated member has the configuration of a Y, the handle is attached at the unitary end of the Y, and the link is joined across the bifurcated end of the Y.

4. A device in accordance with claim 1 wherein said link is hollow at least at its ends and is connected with said first and second legs by insertion of the legs within the hollow ends of the link.

5. A device in accordance with claim 4 wherein said first and second legs are formed with protuberances at their ends to secure non-slipping engagement with the interior of the hollow ends of said link.

6. A device in accordance with claim 5 wherein said first and second legs are formed from a material that permits a pre-selected degree of flexing when pressure is applied to compress the walls of an artery.

7. A device for interrupting arterial flow comprising: a handle including a surface adapted for receiving pressure applied by the human hand, a furcated member having the configuration of an X, and provided with first and second spaced apart legs and a link connected between said first and second legs and formed from material sufficiently resilient to conform to the surface of an artery during application of pressure to said handle while being sufficiently rigid to compress the walls of an artery and close arterial flow therebetween, said handle being joined across two ends of the X and said link being joined across the opposite two ends of the X.

8. A device in accordance with claim 7 wherein said handle is a substantially straight beam.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 788,947 5/1905 Roth 132-91 1,299,860 4/ 1919' Pl-ummer 128-327 2,612,176 9/1952 Sam 13291 2,796,065 6/ 1957 Kapp 128-346 3,126,005 3/ 1964 Smialowski 128--325 FOREIGN PATENTS 15,446 1913 Great Britain.

RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examiner.

M. F. MAJESTIC, Assistant Examiner.

US51404065 1965-12-15 1965-12-15 Device for interrupting arterial flow Expired - Lifetime US3411505A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US51404065 US3411505A (en) 1965-12-15 1965-12-15 Device for interrupting arterial flow

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US51404065 US3411505A (en) 1965-12-15 1965-12-15 Device for interrupting arterial flow

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3411505A true US3411505A (en) 1968-11-19

Family

ID=24045570

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US51404065 Expired - Lifetime US3411505A (en) 1965-12-15 1965-12-15 Device for interrupting arterial flow

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3411505A (en)

Cited By (40)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4610248A (en) * 1984-09-18 1986-09-09 University Of Medicine And Dentistry Of New Jersey Surgical finger assembly
US4744363A (en) * 1986-07-07 1988-05-17 Hasson Harrith M Intra-abdominal organ stabilizer, retractor and tissue manipulator
US5342388A (en) * 1993-03-25 1994-08-30 Sonia Toller Method and apparatus for sealing luminal tissue
US5645566A (en) * 1995-09-15 1997-07-08 Sub Q Inc. Apparatus and method for percutaneous sealing of blood vessel punctures
US5976069A (en) * 1996-07-25 1999-11-02 Guidant Corporation Epicardial immobilization device
US6071300A (en) * 1995-09-15 2000-06-06 Sub-Q Inc. Apparatus and method for percutaneous sealing of blood vessel punctures
US20020124853A1 (en) * 2000-04-21 2002-09-12 Fred Burbank Methods for minimally-invasive, non-permanent occlusion of a uterine artery
US20020165579A1 (en) * 2001-03-28 2002-11-07 Burbank Fred H. Multi-axial uterine artery identification, characterization, and occlusion devices and methods
US20030088269A1 (en) * 2001-11-08 2003-05-08 Sub-Q, Inc. System and method for delivering hemostasis promoting material to a blood vessel puncture site by fluid pressure
US20030191391A1 (en) * 2002-04-04 2003-10-09 Burbank Fred H. Doppler directed suturing and compression device and method
US6635065B2 (en) 2000-11-16 2003-10-21 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Doppler directed suture ligation device and method
US6638286B1 (en) 2000-11-16 2003-10-28 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Doppler directed suture ligation device and method
US20040019328A1 (en) * 2001-11-08 2004-01-29 Sing Eduardo Chi System and method for delivering hemostasis promoting material to a blood vessel puncture site by fluid pressure
WO2004012601A3 (en) * 2002-08-01 2004-04-15 Abbott Lab Vascular Entpr Ltd Apparatus for sealing punctures in blood vessels
US20040097962A1 (en) * 2002-11-19 2004-05-20 Vascular Control System Deployable constrictor for uterine artery occlusion
US20040097961A1 (en) * 2002-11-19 2004-05-20 Vascular Control System Tenaculum for use with occlusion devices
US20040202694A1 (en) * 2003-04-11 2004-10-14 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Embolic occlusion of uterine arteries
US6846320B2 (en) 1998-05-01 2005-01-25 Sub-Q, Inc. Device and method for facilitating hemostasis of a biopsy tract
US6849232B2 (en) 2001-03-12 2005-02-01 Sub-Q, Inc. Methods for sterilizing cross-linked gelatin compositions
US20050113852A1 (en) * 2003-11-20 2005-05-26 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Uterine artery occlusion device with cervical receptacle
US6964658B2 (en) 2000-05-12 2005-11-15 Sub-Q, Inc. System and method for facilitating hemostasis of blood vessel punctures with absorbable sponge
US6984219B2 (en) 1999-09-23 2006-01-10 Mark Ashby Depth and puncture control for blood vessel hemostasis system
US7025748B2 (en) 2001-11-08 2006-04-11 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Sheath based blood vessel puncture locator and depth indicator
US7037323B2 (en) 2001-11-08 2006-05-02 Sub-Q, Inc. Pledget-handling system and method for delivering hemostasis promoting material to a blood vessel puncture site by fluid pressure
US7048710B1 (en) 1998-05-01 2006-05-23 Sub-Q, Inc. System and method for facilitating hemostasis of blood vessel punctures with absorbable sponge
US20060229664A1 (en) * 2005-03-29 2006-10-12 Marine Polymer Technologies Methods and apparatus for a manual vascular compression device
US7192436B2 (en) 2001-11-08 2007-03-20 Sub-Q, Inc. Pledget-handling system and method for delivering hemostasis promoting material to a blood vessel puncture site by fluid pressure
WO2005053546A3 (en) * 2003-11-25 2007-08-16 Vascular Control Systems Inc Occlusion device for asymmetrical uterine artery anatomy
US7329265B2 (en) 2003-01-30 2008-02-12 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Uterine artery occlusion clamp
US7333844B2 (en) 2003-03-28 2008-02-19 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Uterine tissue monitoring device and method
US7354444B2 (en) 2001-03-28 2008-04-08 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Occlusion device with deployable paddles for detection and occlusion of blood vessels
US7455680B1 (en) 2002-11-04 2008-11-25 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Apparatus and method for inhibiting blood loss
US7611479B2 (en) 1998-05-01 2009-11-03 Sub-Q, Inc. System and method for facilitating hemostasis of blood vessel punctures with absorbable sponge
US7618567B2 (en) 1998-05-01 2009-11-17 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Absorbable sponge with contrasting agent
US7625352B1 (en) 1998-05-01 2009-12-01 Sub-Q, Inc. Depth and puncture control for system for hemostasis of blood vessel
US7651511B2 (en) 2003-02-05 2010-01-26 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Vascular clamp for caesarian section
US7771357B2 (en) 1998-12-08 2010-08-10 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Devices and methods for occlusion of the uterine arteries
US7875036B2 (en) 2004-10-27 2011-01-25 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Short term treatment for uterine disorder
US7875043B1 (en) 2003-12-09 2011-01-25 Sub-Q, Inc. Cinching loop
US8187625B2 (en) 2001-03-12 2012-05-29 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Cross-linked gelatin composition comprising a wetting agent

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US788947A (en) * 1904-12-14 1905-05-02 Charles F Roth Device for removing obstructions from between the teeth.
GB191315446A (en) * 1913-07-04 1913-12-11 Robert Morse Withycombe Improved Teeth Cleansing and Polishing Appliance.
US1299860A (en) * 1918-03-13 1919-04-08 Henry W Plummer Tourniquet.
US2612176A (en) * 1951-10-30 1952-09-30 Sam Sam Women Tooth cleaner
US2796065A (en) * 1955-05-12 1957-06-18 Karl A Kapp Surgical clamping means
US3126005A (en) * 1964-03-24 haemostatic clamp

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3126005A (en) * 1964-03-24 haemostatic clamp
US788947A (en) * 1904-12-14 1905-05-02 Charles F Roth Device for removing obstructions from between the teeth.
GB191315446A (en) * 1913-07-04 1913-12-11 Robert Morse Withycombe Improved Teeth Cleansing and Polishing Appliance.
US1299860A (en) * 1918-03-13 1919-04-08 Henry W Plummer Tourniquet.
US2612176A (en) * 1951-10-30 1952-09-30 Sam Sam Women Tooth cleaner
US2796065A (en) * 1955-05-12 1957-06-18 Karl A Kapp Surgical clamping means

Cited By (73)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4610248A (en) * 1984-09-18 1986-09-09 University Of Medicine And Dentistry Of New Jersey Surgical finger assembly
US4744363A (en) * 1986-07-07 1988-05-17 Hasson Harrith M Intra-abdominal organ stabilizer, retractor and tissue manipulator
US5342388A (en) * 1993-03-25 1994-08-30 Sonia Toller Method and apparatus for sealing luminal tissue
US5645566A (en) * 1995-09-15 1997-07-08 Sub Q Inc. Apparatus and method for percutaneous sealing of blood vessel punctures
US6071300A (en) * 1995-09-15 2000-06-06 Sub-Q Inc. Apparatus and method for percutaneous sealing of blood vessel punctures
US6371974B1 (en) 1995-09-15 2002-04-16 Sub Q, Inc. Apparatus and method for percutaneous sealing of blood vessel punctures
US7175646B2 (en) 1995-09-15 2007-02-13 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Apparatus and method for percutaneous sealing of blood vessel punctures
US5976069A (en) * 1996-07-25 1999-11-02 Guidant Corporation Epicardial immobilization device
US8050741B2 (en) 1998-05-01 2011-11-01 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Device and method for facilitating hemostasis of a biopsy tract
US7611479B2 (en) 1998-05-01 2009-11-03 Sub-Q, Inc. System and method for facilitating hemostasis of blood vessel punctures with absorbable sponge
US6846320B2 (en) 1998-05-01 2005-01-25 Sub-Q, Inc. Device and method for facilitating hemostasis of a biopsy tract
US7618567B2 (en) 1998-05-01 2009-11-17 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Absorbable sponge with contrasting agent
US7625352B1 (en) 1998-05-01 2009-12-01 Sub-Q, Inc. Depth and puncture control for system for hemostasis of blood vessel
US20100029908A1 (en) * 1998-05-01 2010-02-04 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Absorbable sponge with contrasting agent
US7048710B1 (en) 1998-05-01 2006-05-23 Sub-Q, Inc. System and method for facilitating hemostasis of blood vessel punctures with absorbable sponge
US7771357B2 (en) 1998-12-08 2010-08-10 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Devices and methods for occlusion of the uterine arteries
US6984219B2 (en) 1999-09-23 2006-01-10 Mark Ashby Depth and puncture control for blood vessel hemostasis system
US20060000479A9 (en) * 2000-04-21 2006-01-05 Fred Burbank Methods for minimally-invasive, non-permanent occlusion of a uterine artery
US20020124853A1 (en) * 2000-04-21 2002-09-12 Fred Burbank Methods for minimally-invasive, non-permanent occlusion of a uterine artery
US7223279B2 (en) 2000-04-21 2007-05-29 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Methods for minimally-invasive, non-permanent occlusion of a uterine artery
US6964658B2 (en) 2000-05-12 2005-11-15 Sub-Q, Inc. System and method for facilitating hemostasis of blood vessel punctures with absorbable sponge
US6635065B2 (en) 2000-11-16 2003-10-21 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Doppler directed suture ligation device and method
US20040059352A1 (en) * 2000-11-16 2004-03-25 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Doppler directed suture ligation device and method
US6638286B1 (en) 2000-11-16 2003-10-28 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Doppler directed suture ligation device and method
US7141057B2 (en) 2000-11-16 2006-11-28 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Doppler directed suture ligation device and method
US8524270B2 (en) 2001-03-12 2013-09-03 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Cross-linked gelatin composition coated with a wetting agent
US8187625B2 (en) 2001-03-12 2012-05-29 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Cross-linked gelatin composition comprising a wetting agent
US6849232B2 (en) 2001-03-12 2005-02-01 Sub-Q, Inc. Methods for sterilizing cross-linked gelatin compositions
US8821918B2 (en) 2001-03-12 2014-09-02 Boston Scientific Scimed Inc. Cross-linked gelatin composition comprising a wetting agent
US7264772B2 (en) 2001-03-12 2007-09-04 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Methods for sterilizing cross-linked gelatin compositions
US7229465B2 (en) 2001-03-28 2007-06-12 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Method and apparatus for the detection and ligation of uterine arteries
US7354444B2 (en) 2001-03-28 2008-04-08 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Occlusion device with deployable paddles for detection and occlusion of blood vessels
US20020165579A1 (en) * 2001-03-28 2002-11-07 Burbank Fred H. Multi-axial uterine artery identification, characterization, and occlusion devices and methods
US20050228416A1 (en) * 2001-03-28 2005-10-13 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Multi-axial uterine artery identification, characterization, and occlusion pivoting devices and methods
US20020183771A1 (en) * 2001-03-28 2002-12-05 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Method and apparatus for the detection and ligation of uterine arteries
US7594890B2 (en) 2001-03-28 2009-09-29 Vascular Control System, Inc. Multi-axial uterine artery identification, characterization, and occlusion devices
WO2003007827A1 (en) * 2001-07-20 2003-01-30 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Methods for minimally-invasive, non-permanent occlusion of a uterine artery
US20030088269A1 (en) * 2001-11-08 2003-05-08 Sub-Q, Inc. System and method for delivering hemostasis promoting material to a blood vessel puncture site by fluid pressure
US6863680B2 (en) 2001-11-08 2005-03-08 Sub-Q, Inc. System and method for delivering hemostasis promoting material to a blood vessel puncture site by fluid pressure
US7192436B2 (en) 2001-11-08 2007-03-20 Sub-Q, Inc. Pledget-handling system and method for delivering hemostasis promoting material to a blood vessel puncture site by fluid pressure
US7037323B2 (en) 2001-11-08 2006-05-02 Sub-Q, Inc. Pledget-handling system and method for delivering hemostasis promoting material to a blood vessel puncture site by fluid pressure
US7025748B2 (en) 2001-11-08 2006-04-11 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Sheath based blood vessel puncture locator and depth indicator
US20040019328A1 (en) * 2001-11-08 2004-01-29 Sing Eduardo Chi System and method for delivering hemostasis promoting material to a blood vessel puncture site by fluid pressure
US7008440B2 (en) 2001-11-08 2006-03-07 Sub-Q, Inc. System and method for delivering hemostasis promoting material to a blood vessel puncture site by fluid pressure
US7207996B2 (en) 2002-04-04 2007-04-24 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Doppler directed suturing and compression device and method
US7645284B2 (en) 2002-04-04 2010-01-12 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Doppler directed suturing and compression device and method
US20030191391A1 (en) * 2002-04-04 2003-10-09 Burbank Fred H. Doppler directed suturing and compression device and method
US20060100665A1 (en) * 2002-08-01 2006-05-11 Abbott Laboratories Vascular Enterprises, Limited Apparatus for sealing punctures in blood vessels
WO2004012601A3 (en) * 2002-08-01 2004-04-15 Abbott Lab Vascular Entpr Ltd Apparatus for sealing punctures in blood vessels
US7455680B1 (en) 2002-11-04 2008-11-25 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Apparatus and method for inhibiting blood loss
US20070173863A1 (en) * 2002-11-19 2007-07-26 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Deployable constrictor for uterine artery occlusion
US20040097961A1 (en) * 2002-11-19 2004-05-20 Vascular Control System Tenaculum for use with occlusion devices
US20040097962A1 (en) * 2002-11-19 2004-05-20 Vascular Control System Deployable constrictor for uterine artery occlusion
US7479145B2 (en) 2002-11-19 2009-01-20 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Tenaculum-like device for intravaginal instrument delivery
US7172603B2 (en) 2002-11-19 2007-02-06 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Deployable constrictor for uterine artery occlusion
US7404821B2 (en) 2003-01-30 2008-07-29 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Treatment for post partum hemorrhage
US7329265B2 (en) 2003-01-30 2008-02-12 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Uterine artery occlusion clamp
US7651511B2 (en) 2003-02-05 2010-01-26 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Vascular clamp for caesarian section
US7333844B2 (en) 2003-03-28 2008-02-19 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Uterine tissue monitoring device and method
US7616979B2 (en) 2003-03-28 2009-11-10 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Uterine tissue monitoring device and method
US20040202694A1 (en) * 2003-04-11 2004-10-14 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Embolic occlusion of uterine arteries
US20050113852A1 (en) * 2003-11-20 2005-05-26 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Uterine artery occlusion device with cervical receptacle
US7325546B2 (en) 2003-11-20 2008-02-05 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Uterine artery occlusion device with cervical receptacle
WO2005053546A3 (en) * 2003-11-25 2007-08-16 Vascular Control Systems Inc Occlusion device for asymmetrical uterine artery anatomy
US7686817B2 (en) 2003-11-25 2010-03-30 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Occlusion device for asymmetrical uterine artery anatomy
US7875043B1 (en) 2003-12-09 2011-01-25 Sub-Q, Inc. Cinching loop
US7875036B2 (en) 2004-10-27 2011-01-25 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Short term treatment for uterine disorder
US10206683B2 (en) * 2005-03-29 2019-02-19 Marine Polymer Technologies, Inc. Methods and apparatus for a manual vascular compression device
AU2006230231B2 (en) * 2005-03-29 2012-08-02 Marine Polymer Technologies, Inc. Methods and apparatus for a manual vascular compression device
WO2006105153A3 (en) * 2005-03-29 2007-12-06 Marinepolymer Tech Inc Methods and apparatus for a manual vascular compression device
US20060229664A1 (en) * 2005-03-29 2006-10-12 Marine Polymer Technologies Methods and apparatus for a manual vascular compression device
US8834516B2 (en) 2005-03-29 2014-09-16 Marine Polymer Technologies Methods and apparatus for a manual vascular compression device
US20060229662A1 (en) * 2005-03-29 2006-10-12 Marine Polymer Technologies, Inc. Methods and apparatus for a manual vascular compression device

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3349771A (en) Nasal clamp
US3482571A (en) Surgical pillow having oxygen tube supporting means
US3503398A (en) Atraumatic clamp for vascular surgery
US3032039A (en) Arterial and veinous clamp and clamp applicator
US4590926A (en) Hand-held massager
AU761693B2 (en) A surgical forceps
US6447467B1 (en) Device for pressurizing limbs
US2897820A (en) Surgical needle guiding instrument
US5571121A (en) Atraumatic clamp for temporary occlusion of blood vessels
US6478757B1 (en) Device for pressurizing limbs
US3091237A (en) Facial muscle and tissue conditioning device
CA1054892A (en) Suction-irrigator
US6217602B1 (en) Method of performing illuminated subcutaneous surgery
US5000164A (en) Circulation enhancing apparatus
US5231977A (en) Tools and method for performing soft tissue massage
US6254555B1 (en) Instrument for diagnosing and treating soft tissue abnormalities through augmented soft tissue mobilization
US4373709A (en) Surgical limb holder
US3034501A (en) Inflatable heart massager
JP3068178B2 (en) Everting forceps
US5152302A (en) Forearm transaxial compression band
US5697942A (en) Internal vascular clamp
US2694397A (en) Mouth prop
US5666964A (en) Muscle treatment devices
US5458562A (en) Circulation enhancing apparatus
US2760488A (en) Internal bone fixation apparatus