US3405999A - Pilot burner means or the like - Google Patents

Pilot burner means or the like Download PDF

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US3405999A
US3405999A US61611467A US3405999A US 3405999 A US3405999 A US 3405999A US 61611467 A US61611467 A US 61611467A US 3405999 A US3405999 A US 3405999A
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flame
fuel
burner
pilot burner
pilot
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Riehl Fred
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Robertshaw Controls Co
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Robertshaw Controls Co
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Priority to US415410A priority Critical patent/US3308871A/en
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Priority to US61611467 priority patent/US3405999A/en
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23NREGULATING OR CONTROLLING COMBUSTION
    • F23N5/00Systems for controlling combustion
    • F23N5/02Systems for controlling combustion using devices responsive to thermal changes or to thermal expansion of a medium
    • F23N5/06Systems for controlling combustion using devices responsive to thermal changes or to thermal expansion of a medium using bellows; using diaphragms
    • F23N5/067Systems for controlling combustion using devices responsive to thermal changes or to thermal expansion of a medium using bellows; using diaphragms using mechanical means
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23QIGNITION; EXTINGUISHING-DEVICES
    • F23Q9/00Pilot flame igniters
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23QIGNITION; EXTINGUISHING-DEVICES
    • F23Q9/00Pilot flame igniters
    • F23Q9/08Pilot flame igniters with interlock with main fuel supply
    • F23Q9/12Pilot flame igniters with interlock with main fuel supply to permit the supply to the main burner in dependence upon existence of pilot flame

Abstract

1,115,999. Controlling gas burners. ROBERTSHAW CONTROLS CO. 1 Dec., 1965 [2 Dec., 1964], No. 51061/65. Headings F4F and F4T. An oven burner 51, Fig. 8 is ignited by a pilot burner 10, the flame of which is enlarged at ignition to provide both an igniting flame and a heating flame, the latter heating a temperature sensing bulb 47 adapted to open a safety valve 58 supplying the oven burner. A flame shield 13, Fig. 2, associated with the pilot burner comprises a first portion 28 having an opening 29 through which the igniting flame issues and a second slotted portion 32 which directs part of the enlarged flame downwardly towards a pair of spaced ears 40, 41 formed on the end of the second portion and adapted to support the sensing bulb 47. The pilot burner comprises a bent conduit 15 brazed to a hexagonal retainer 17 having a threaded inlet for connection to a fuel line and having a transverse opening 19 through which air is drawn. In a modification. Figs. 10-14 (not shown), the pilot burner directs the Mixture upwardly on to an inclined apertured first part of the shield and the second slotted part is disposed horizontally. The safety valve 58, Fig. 7 (not shown), comprises an expansible element (65) connected by a conduit (49) to the temperature sensing element 47 and to a valve member (63) through a snap action lever and spring device (64). The fuel supply to the oven and pilot burners is controlled by a device 52, Fig. 8, comprising a valve 57 opened by a knob 56 to connect a fuel manifold 54 to a chamber 55 and to a chamber 77. The pilot burner is supplied continuously by to passage 74 to provide small standby flame and the enlarged pilot flame is produced by an additional of fuel to the pilot burner by the opening of a ball valve 79 between the chamber 77, and a third chamber 76. The ball valve 79 is opened by a lever 81 fulcrumed on the end 83 of an axially movable pin 84 connected to the knob 56. The end of the lever remote from the ball valve is connected to an expansible element 87 connected to a second temperature sensing element 88 in the oven. When the oven temperature is below the temperature set by the knob 56, the ball valve opens and the enlarged pilot flame actuates the safety valve 58 and fuel flows from the chamber 55 to the oven burner.

Description

Oct. 15, 1968 F. RIEHL PILOT BURNER MEANS OR THE LIKE A Sheets-Sheet 1 Original Filed Dec. 2, 1964 INVEN'fOR. FRED RIEHL HIS ATTORNEYS Oct. 15, 1968 F. RIEHL 3,405,999

PILOT BURNER MEANS OR THE LIKE Original Filed Dec. 2, 1964 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR; FRED RIEHL HIS ATTORNEYS Oct. 15, 1968 F. RIEHL 3,405,999

PILOT BURNER MEANS OR THE LIKE Original Filed Dec. 2, 1964 i 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 g Q INVENTOR. 0 FRED RIEHL dmapdwq HIS ATTORNEYS Get. 15, 1968 F. RlEHL 3,405,999

PILOT BURNER MEANS OR THE LIKE Original Filed Dec. 2, 1964 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR. FRED RIEHL HIS ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,405,999 PILOT BURNER MEANS OR THE LIKE Fred Riehl, Greensburg, Pa., assignor to Robertshaw Controls Company, Richmond, Va., a corporation of Delaware Original application Dec. 2, 1964, Ser. No. 415,410, now Patent No. 3,308,871, dated Mar. 14, 1967. Divided and this application Feb. 14, 1967, Ser. No. 616,114

Claims. (Cl. 431-42) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This disclosure relates to a pilot burner means for a main burner wherein the pilot burner is continuously supplied a certain amount of fuel to maintain a small standby flame at one outlet means of the pilot burner means and wherein the pilot burner means is additionally supplied with another amount of fuel by a thermostat valve or the like to not only increase the size of the standby flame to a size sufficient to ignite fuel issuing from the main burner, but also to create a heater flame at another outlet means of the pilot burner so that a heater flame detector will open a safety valve means to direct fuel to the main burner to be ignited by the increased standby flame.

This application is a divisional patent application of its copending parent patent application, Ser. No, 415,410, filed Dec. 2, 1964, such parent patent application having been granted on Mar. 14, 1967, as Patent No. 3,308,871.

This invention relates to an improved pilot burner system or the like as well as to improved parts for such a pilot burner system or the like. It is well known that small pilot burners are provided for fuel burning apparatus or the like wherein the pilot burner means is mounted adjacent to the main burner means of the apparatus or the like so that the flame issuing from the pilot burner means will ignite the fuel issuing from the main burner means as the main burner means is cycled between its off and on positions.

Acording to the teachings of this invention, an improved pilot burner means is provided wherein the structure provides improved mixing between the fuel and the air supply for eflicient burning thereof at the outlet end of the burner means, the burner means additionally having a flame shield so constructed and arranged that the same will cause the flame to appropriately heat a temperature sensing bulb when the flame at the pilot burner means is projected outwardly therefrom in a manner hereinafter described.

However, the improved pilot burner means of this invention is adapted to have a standby flame thereof projected into main burner igniting position before the heater flame thereof is large enough to heat the temperature sensing bulb.

Further, the pilot burner means of this invention is so constructed and arranged that the same can be formed of a relatively few parts in a relatively inexpensive manner to provide an economical pilot burner means or the like.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide an improved pilot burner system having one or more of the novel features set forth above or hereinafter shown or described.

Another object of this invention is to provide improved parts for such a pilot burner system or the like.

Other objects, uses and advantages of this invention are apparent from a reading of this description, which proceeds with reference to the accompanying drawings forming a part thereof and wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a side view of the improved pilot burner means of this invention.

FIGURE 2 is a top view of the pilot burner means illustrated in FIGURE 1. I

FIGURE 3 is a cross-sectional view taken on line 33 of FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 4 is a view similar to FIGURE 1, with the flame shield thereof shown in cross section.

FIGURE 5 is a. view similar to FIGURE 4 and illustrates the pilot burner means in another operating position thereof.

FIGURE 6 is a view similar to FIGURE 4 and illustrates the pilot burner means in another operating position thereof. 4

FIGURE 7 is a schematic view illustrating the improved system of this invention.

FIGURE 8 is also a schematic view illustrating various parts of the system of this invention in cross section.

FIGURE 9 is a view similar to FIGURE 1, illustrating another pilot burner means of this invention.

FIGURE 10 is a top view of the structure ofFIG URE 9.

FIGURE 11 is a cross-sectional view taken on line 11- 11 of FIGURE 9.

FIGURES 12-14 are views similar to FIGURES 4-6 and illustrate the pilot burner means of FIGURE 9 in various operating positions thereof.

While the various features of this invention are hereinafter described and illustrated as being particularly adapted for providing a pilot burner means for a fuel burning main burner system means, it is to be understood that the various features of this invention can be utilized singly or in any combination thereof to provide burner means for other systems or the like.

Therefore, this invention is not to be limited to only the embodiments illustrated in the drawings, because the drawings are merely utilized to illustrate one of the wide variety of uses of this invention.

Referring now to FIGURE 1, the improved pilot burner means of this invention is generally indicated by the reference numeral 10 and comprises a conduit means 11, bracket means 12, flame shield 13 and temperature sensing bulb 47 interconnected together in a manner hereinafter described.

The conduit means 11 includes a tubular conduit 15 having one end 16 received in a hollow hexagonal retainer 17 and secured thereto by brazing or the like, the hexagonal retainer 17 having a threaded portion 18 to interconnect the interior thereof with a fuel supply line (not shown). The retainer 17 has a transverse opening 19 passing completely therethrough and being in communication with the axial bore therein which is aligned with the bore in the conduit 15 so that when fuel flows from the inlet end 18 of the conduit means 11'to the outlet end 20 thereof (FIGURE 4) the flow of fuel causes air to be drawn into the retainer 17 through the opening 19 to be mixed with the fuel for subsequent ignition thereof.

The conduit 15 is bent or angled at 21 between the ends 18 and 20 thereof to provide a tortuous path for the fuel and air passing therethrough so that a turbulence is created at the elbow 21 to thoroughly mix the fuel and air flowing through the conduit 15.

The hexagonal retainer 17 is received in a hexagonal opening 22 formed through a tang 23 of the mounting bracket 12 in the manner illustrated in FIGURES l and 2, the hexagonal retainer 17 being subsequently brazed in the opening 22 to securely fasten the conduit means 11 to the bracket 12. i

The bracket 12 can be provided with a plurality of openings or slots25, 26 and 27 for mounting the pilot burner means 10 to any desired structure, such as a main burner means or the like so that the pilot burner means can ignite fuel issuing from the main burner means in a manner hereinafter described.

The flame shield 13 is formed with a first portion 28 thereof extending over and beyond the outlet end 20 of the conduit means 11, the first portion 28 of the flame shield 13 having a suitable opening 29 formed therein and through which a small standby flame 30 of the pilot burner means can issue in the manner illustrated in FIGURE 4 when a minimum amount of fuel is flowing to the pilot burner means 10 in a manner hereinafter described.

When forming the opening 29 in the flame shield 13, a small substantially triangular tang 31 is carved therefrom and bent over in stacked relation against the outlet end 20 of the conduit means 11 in the manner illustrated in FIGURES 3 and 4, the tang 31 partially closing the end 20 of the conduit means 11 and extending from the upper portion thereof to a point substantially spaced from the lower portion of the outlet end 20 for a purpose now to be described.

Since the tang 31 provides an obstruction to the fuel issuing from the outlet end 20 of the conduit means 11, it can be seen that the fuel impinging thereagainst will have to flow around the tang 31 and, thus, will cause turbulence of the fuel issuing from the outlet end 20 of the conduit 11 to further mix the fuel and air flowing through the conduit for proper ignition thereof.

The flame shield 13 also includes a second portion 32 integrally interconnected to the first portion 28 and being disposed angularly relative thereto whereby the second portion 32 is directed across the outlet end in the manner illustrated in FIGURE 5, the portion 32 having a slit or slot 33 formed therein and terminating short of the free end 34 of the second portion 32 of the flame shield 13.

In this manner, when an additional supply of fuel is fed to the pilot burner means 10 in a manner hereinafter described, the increased force of the flow of fuel through the conduit means 11 will cause the standby flame to increase in size in the manner illustrated in FIGURE 5, while part of the flame impinges against the angularly disposed portion 32 of the flame shield 13 whereby a flame 35 can issue through the slit 33 and not be extinguished by the portion 32 even though the portion 32 is directing the flame 35 downwardly to produce a heater flame 36 in the manner illustrated in FIGURE 6 beyond the free end 34 of the portion 32 of the flame shield 13 for a purpose hereinafter described.

The flame shield 13 has a pair of opposed depending flanges 37 extending downwardly from the side edges of the portions 28 and 32 thereof in the manner illustrated in the drawings whereby the flame shield 13 has a substantially inverted U-shaped cross-sectional configuration as illustrated in FIGURE 3 throughout substantially the entire length of the flame shield 13. The flame shield 13 also has a front depending flange 38 provided with an opening 39 therein and through which the outlet end 20 of the conduit means 11 can project, the outlet end 20 of the conduit means 11 being suitably brazed in the opening 39 and the flame shield 13 having the flanges 37 and 38 suitably brazed to the bracket 12 to secure the burner means 10 together.

A pair of ears 40 and 41 extend outwardly from the depending flanges 37 of the flame shield 13 in the manner illustrated in the drawings, the ears 40 and 41 respectively having apertures 42 and 43 passing therethrough. When the aperture 43 in the ear 41 is formed, an L- shaped tang 44 is carved therefrom and aligned with the aperture 43 therein for a purpose hereinafter described.

A tang 45 extends from the free end of the ear 40 and is angularly disposed thereto, the tang 45 having a slit 46 formed therein for a purpose now to be described.

A temperature sensing bulb 47 is adapted to be received in the apertures 42 and 43 of the cars 40 and 41 in the manner illustrated in FIGURE 2 whereby the free end 48 of the temperature sensing bulb 47 will abut against the tang 44 to position the temperature sensing bulb 47 relative to the flame shield 13, the temperature sensing bulb 47 having its conduit 49 received in the slit 46 of the tang 45 whereby the temperature sensing bulb 47 can be simply assembled to the flame shield 13 and be positively located relative thereto between the tangs 44 and 45 in the manner illustrated in the drawings.

It can be seen that the temperature sensing bulb 47 is disposed spaced from the free end 34 of the flame shield 13 so as to be in the path of the heater flame 36 in the manner illustrated in FIGURE 6 whereby the heater flame 36 will completely surround the temperature sensing bulb 47 to heat the same for any desired purpose.

For example, the temperature sensing bulb 47 can control a valve means directing fuel to the main burner means so that when the temperature sensing bulb 47 senses the heater flame 36, the valve means will be opened to permit fuel to issue from the main burner means so that the fuel issuing from the main burner means can be ignited by the large standby flame 30. However, when the heater flame 36 ceases to exist at the pilot burner means 10 and only the small standby flame 30 is being produced, it can be seen that the temperature sensing bulb 47 is disposed a suflicient distance away from the flame 30 so that the temperature sensing bulb 47 will cause the safety valve to close to prevent fuel from issuing from the main burner means.

In particular, reference is made to FIGURES 7 and 8 wherein the improved system of this invention is generally indicated by the reference numeral 50 which utilizes the pilot burner means 10 previously described.

The pilot burner means 10 is mounted adjacent a main oven burner 51 which is adapted to have the fuel issuing therefrom ignited when the standby flame 30 of the pilot burner means 10 has increased in size in the manner illustrated in FIGURE 5 before the heater flame 36 has reached the temperature sensing bulb 47 for a purpose hereinafter described.

A control device 52 is provided in the system 50 and comprises a housing means 53 having suitable passages and cavities formed therein whereby a fuel manifold 54 is adapted to be interconnected to a chamber 55 when a control knob 56 is disposed in on position thereof to open a valve means 57 disposed between the fuel manifold 54 and the chamber 55. The chamber 55 is interconnected to a safety valve 58 by a conduit means 59.

The safety valve 58 comprises a housing means 60 having a valve seat 61 interconnecting the conduit 59 to a conduit 62 leading to the main burner means 51, the valve seat 61 being open and closed by a valve member 63 snapped between its open and closed position by lever and spring means 64.

An expansible element is carried by the safety valve 58 and has a movable wall 66 interconnected to the lever arrangement 64 and a fixed wall 67 fixed to the housing 60, the interior of the expansible element 65 being interconnected to the temperature sensing bulb 47 by the conduit 49 previously described.

Thus, as long as the temperature sensing bulb 47 does not sense a heater flame 36 at the pilot burner 10, the movable Wall 66 of the expansible element 65 is in such a position that the spring and lever arrangement 64 maintains the valve member 63 in its closed position against the valve seat 61 to prevent the flow of fuel to the burner means 51.

However, when the temperature sensing bulb 47 senses the heater flame 36 at the pilot burner means 10, the movable wall 66 of the expansible element 65 has moved in such a manner that it causes the spring and lever arrangement 64 to snap open the valve member 63 so that fuel can issue at the main burner means 51 and be ignited by the enlarged standby flame 30.

However, it can be seen that the pilot burner means 10 is so constructed and arranged in the manner previously described that the standby flame 30 has increased to a size in FIGURE 5 to ignite fuel which would issue from the burner means 51 well before the time that'the heater flame 36 is effective to actuate the safety valve 58 to direct fuel to the burner means 51 so that there is always an igniter flame 30 at the main burner means 51 before the safety valve 58 opens.

The pilot burner is fed fuel from a conduit means 68 interconnected to the threaded portion 18 of the pilot burner means 10 and to a passage means 69 formed in the housing 53. A pilot adjusting key 70 is disposed in the passage means 69'and has an axial bore 71 in alignment therewith and interconnected to transverse bores 72 and 73 respectively interconnected to passage means 74 and 75 in the housing means 53.

The passage means 74 is always interconnected to the fuel manifold 54 at a point downstream from the valve means 57 so that when the adjusting key 70 is disposed in the position illustrated in FIGURE 8, suflicient fuel is directed to the pilot burner means 10 to produce the small standby flame 30 in the manner illustrated in FIG- URE 4.

The passage means 75 in the housing 53 is interconnected to an outlet chamber 76 interconnected to a fuel inlet chamber 77 by a valve seat 78 opened and closed by a ball valve 79. The fuel inlet chamber 77 is interconnected to the fuel manifold 54 by a passage means 80 which is opened and closed by the valve member 57.

A lever 81 is disposed in the chamber 55 and has an intermediate portion 82 fulcrumed on the end 83 of an axial, removable adjusting pin 84 operatively interconnected to the control knob 56. One end 85 of the lever 81 is operative interconnected to a movable wall 86 of an expansible element 87 having the interior thereof interconnected to a temperature sensing bulb 88 by a conduit means 89, the temperature sensing bulb 88 being disposed in the oven so as to sense the temperature effect of the main burner means 51 for a purpose hereinafter described.

The other end 90 of the lever 81 carries a plunger 91 adapted to engage the ball valve 79 for a purpose now to be described.

When it is desired to operate the system 50 of this invention, it can be seen that the small standby flame 30 is always in existence at the pilot burner means 10 when the adjusting key 70 is disposed in the position illustrated in FIGURE 8, even though the control knob 56 is disposed in its off position to close the valve member 57 in a manner to prevent communication between the fuel manifold 54 and the passage means 80 and chamber 55.

When only the flame 30 is at the pilot burner means 10, the safety valve 58 is disposed in its closed position because the temperature sensing bulb 57 does not have the heater flame 36. I

The operator turns the control knob 56 to the desired on position thereof whereby the valve means 57 is open to interconnect the fuel manifold 54 to the chamber 55 of the control device as well as to the passage means 80 thereof.

The rotation of the control knob 56 causes axial adjustment of the fulcrum pin 84 in'such a manner that since the temperature sensing bulb 88 is sensing a temperature in the oven below the temperature selected by the control knob 56, the lever 81 is pivoted in such a manner on the end 83 of the fulcrum pin 84 by a compression spring 92 that the ball valve 79 is moved to an open position thereof whereby an increased flow of fuel is directed to the pilot burner means 10 by means of the adjusting key 70 so that the increased flow of fuel to the pilot burner means 10 causes the pilot burner means 10 to increase the standby flame 30 thereof in the manner illustrated in FIGURE 5 so that the increased standby flame 30 will be sufficiently large to ignite fuel subsequently issuing from the main burner means 51. In addition, this additional flow of fuel to the pilot burner means 10 forms the heater flame 36 in the manner illustrated in FIGURE 6 whereby the temperature sensing bulb 47 senses the heater flame 36 and causes opening of the safety valve'58 whereby fuel can now flow to the main burner means 51 and be ignited by the enlarged standby flame 30.

The safety valve 58 remains open so that fuel can issue from the main burner means 51 as long as the temperature of the oven is below the temperature selected by the control knob 56.

However, when the temperature sensing bulb 88 senses that the temperature of the oven is at or exceeds the temperature selected by the control knob 56, the expansible element 87 has moved the movable wall 86 to the right in FIGURE 8 a distance suflicient to cause the lever 81 to close the ball valve 79 against the valve seat 78 whereby the increased flow of fuel to the pilot burner means 10 is terminated so that the same will only have the small heater flame 30 in FIGURE 4 whereby the safety valve 58 will close and terminate the supply of fuel to the main burner means 51.

Thus, it can be seen that the main burner means 51 1s cycled on and off by means of the pilot burner means 10 under the control of the temperature sensing bulb' 88 whereby the temperature of the oven can be maintained at the temperature selected by the control knob 56.

When it is desired to turn off the system 50, the control knob 56 is moved to its off position whereby the same closes the valve means 57 in the manner previously de scribed.

Therefore, it can be seen that the system 50 of this invention is so constructed and arranged that the same causes a small standby flame 30 at the pilot burner means 10 to be increased in size to ignite fuel which will issue from the main burner means 51 before the heater flame 36 is produced to cause fuel to flow to the burner means 51.

While only one type of pilot burner means 10 has been described for the system 50 of this invention, it is to be understood that other types of burner means can be provided.

For example, reference is made to FIGURES 9-14 wherein another pilot burner means 93 of this invention is provided and includes a mounting bracket means 94 carrying an angularly bent conduit 95 having an outlet end 96 and an inlet end 97 interconnected to a hollow retainer 98 having a threaded portion 99 for interconnecting to a fuel supply conduit or the like. The retainer 98 has a transverse bore 100 provided therein so that air can be drawn in to the hollow interior of the retainer 98 when fuel flows therethrough so as to provide an air and fuel mixture at the outlet end 96 of the conduit 95.

A flame shield 101 is carried by the bracket means 94 and is substantially U-shaped in cross section and has an end 102 disposed over the outlet end 96 of the conduit 95. The flame shield 101 has an angular portion 103, FIG- URE 12, provided with an opening 104 through which a small heater flame 105 can issue when a certain amount of fuel is supplied to the pilot burner means 93 in a man ner similar to the system 50 of this invention.

A tang 106 is carved from the flame shield 102 and is disposed over the outlet end 96 of the conduit 95 in the manner illustrated in FIGURES l1 and 12 to provide a turbulence causing means at the outlet end 96 of the conduit 95 in the manner similar to the tang 31 previously described.

The substantially horizontally disposed straight portion 107 of the flame shield 101 has a pluralit of elongated slots 108 provided therein intermediate the ends 102 and 109 of the flame shield 101.

A pair of ears 110 extend from the end 109 of the flame shield 101 and respectively have transverse apertures 111 provided therein to receive the temperature sensing bulb 47 previously described, the upper ear in FIGURE 10 having a tang 112 against which the end 48 of the temperature sensing bulb 47 can abut.

The lower ear 110 in FIGURE l has an angularly bent portion 113 provided with a threaded bore therein and in which a threaded member 114 can be assembled therewith and abut against a reduced portion 115 of the temperature sensing bulb 47 to hold the same in assembled relation relative to the pilot burner means 93.

The pilot burner means 10 can be provided with the fastening screw 114 instead of the slit means 46 thereof and the pilot burner means 93 of this invention can be provided with the slit 46 in the flange 113 thereof in lieu of the threaded member 114, if desired.

When an increased flow of fuel is directed to the conduit 95 in a manner similar to that provided by the system 50 of this invention, it can be seen that the standby flame 105 thereof increases in length in the manner illustrated in FIGURE 13, while part of the flame 116 begins to move to the right and issue through the slots 108. Thus, it can be seen that the standby flame 1.05 has increased in size in FIGURE 13 to a position to ignite fuel at a main Burner means long before the flame sensing bulb 47 is activated by the heater flame 117 for the purpose previously described.

Therefore, it can be seen that improved pilot 'burner system means are provided by this invention as well as improved pilot burner means wherein the parts are relatively few and simple to manufacture and can be assembled together in a simple and economical manner to provide a rugged pilot burner means adapted to effectively control the operation of a main burner means or the like.

Thus, it can be seen that the pilot burners of this invention can be easily mounted adjacent the main burner because of the increased standby flame for ignition purposes whereas the heater flame detector will be disposed remote from the main burner and not be affected thereby whereby the problem of locating the pilot burner to pro vide good ignition is greatly alleviated by this invention.

Accordingly, this invention not only provides an improved pilot burner system means but also this invention provides improved parts for such a system means or the like.

While the form of the invention now prefer-red has been disclosed as required by the statutes, other forms may be used, all coming within the scope of the claims which follow.

What is claimed is:

1. In a fuel control system, a pilot burner means having conduit means for receiving fuel and being provided with an outlet end for the issuing of said fuel to produce a flame means at said outlet end, a flame shield means carried by said pilot burner means and having opposed end means interconnected together by a deflector portion thereof, one of said opposed end means cooperating with said outlet end to define an opening means for said flame means to produce a small standby flame when a small amount of fuel is directed to said conduit means, said first opening means being defined by said one end means in such a manner that said first opening means is in direct flame flow alignment with said outlet end of said conduit means whereby the natural flow of fuel from said outlet end of said conduit means is not redirected by said flame shield before the same reaches said first opening means, the other of said opposed end means cooperating with said outlet end to define another opening means for said flame means to produce a large heater flame when a certain increased amount of fuel is directed to said conduit means, said deflector portion of said flame shield means being so constructed and arranged that said increased flow of fuel causes said flame means to partially impinge thereagainst and be deflected thereby to said other opening means to produce said heater flame while the remaining portion of said flame means passes through said first-named opening means to produce a larger standby flame of a size suflicient for ignition purposes.

2. In a fuel control system as set forth in claim 1, said pilot burner means carrying a heater flame detector adjacent said other opening means.

3. In a fuel control system as set forth in claim 2, said heater flame detector comprising a temperature sensing bulb.

4. In a fuel control system as set forth in claim 1, a main burner means disposed adjacent said pilot burner means to have fuel issuing therefrom ignited by said larger standby flame at first-named opening means.

5. In a fuel control system as set forth in claim 4, means responsive to said heater flame adapted to cause said fuel to issue from said main burner means.

6. In a fuel control system as set forth in claim 5, said pilot burner means being positioned so that said heater flame isdisposed remote from said main burner means.

7. In a fuel control system as set forth in claim 5, said means responsive to said heater flame comprises a safety valve means in a fuel supply line leading to said main burner means, said safety valve means only opening when said heater flame is produced at said other opening means of said pilot burner means.

8. In a fuel control system as set forth in claim 1, said pilot burner means having said outlet end of said conduit means facing substantially vertically upwardly and having said deflector portion thereof disposed substantially in a horizontal plane.

9. A pilot burner means comprising a conduit means for receiving fuel and being provided with an outlet end for the issuing of said fuel to produce a flame means at said outlet end, and a flame shield means carried by said pilot burner means and having opposed end means interconnected together by a deflector portion thereof, one of said opposed end means cooperating with said outlet end to define an opening means for said flame means to produce a small standby flame when a small amount of fuel is directed to said conduit means, said first opening means being defined by said one end means in such a manner that said first opening means is in direct flame flow alignment with said outlet end of said conduit means whereby the natural flow of fuel from said outlet end of said conduit means is not redirected by said flame shield before the same reaches said first opening means, the other of said opposed end means cooperating with said outlet end to define another opening means for said flame means to produce a large heater flame when a certain increased amount of fuel is directed to said conduit means, said deflector portion of said flame shield means being so constructed and arranged that said increased flow of fuel causes said flame means to partially impinge thereagainst and be deflected thereby to said other opening means to produce said heater flame while the remainin portion of said flame means passes through said first-named opening means to produce a larger standby flame for ignition purposes.

10. A pilot burner means as set forth in claim 9 wherein said outlet end of said conduit means and said deflector portion of said flame shield means are disposed at substantially a right angle relative to each other.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,146,823 9/1964 Loveland 158-113 3,159,203 12/1964 Zulian 158-113 3,233,830 2/1966 Branson et a1 23668 JAMES W. WESTHAVER, Primary Examiner.

US61611467 1964-12-02 1967-02-14 Pilot burner means or the like Expired - Lifetime US3405999A (en)

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US415410A US3308871A (en) 1964-12-02 1964-12-02 Pilot burner means or the like
US61611467 US3405999A (en) 1964-12-02 1967-02-14 Pilot burner means or the like

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Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3689193A (en) * 1971-04-13 1972-09-05 Robertshaw Controls Co Mounting means for a condition responsive means and method of mounting the same
US3816060A (en) * 1973-04-23 1974-06-11 Intertherm Safety pilot enclosure having flame-diverting air inlet
US3825398A (en) * 1973-06-15 1974-07-23 Robertshaw Controls Co Plural rate burner with flame enhancement
US3844704A (en) * 1973-08-17 1974-10-29 Mere Ind Inc Burner and ignition system
US3870458A (en) * 1973-09-26 1975-03-11 Robertshaw Controls Co Plural rate burner with deflection of high rate flame against flame sensing element
US3937439A (en) * 1973-11-14 1976-02-10 Robertshaw Controls Company Thermally operated valve utilizing gas adsorbent material
US4413975A (en) * 1982-04-09 1983-11-08 Essex Group, Inc. Combination control with high/low pilot gas flow
US6129542A (en) * 1999-05-21 2000-10-10 Gas Research Institute Dual mode pilot burner
WO2010006378A1 (en) * 2008-07-18 2010-01-21 Invensys Controls Australia Pty Ltd Micro-pilot for gas appliance
US20110168284A1 (en) * 2010-01-14 2011-07-14 Invensys Controls Australia Pty Ltd. System and Method to Reduce Standby Energy Loss in a Gas Burning Appliance and Components for Use Therewith
US8196552B2 (en) 2008-07-18 2012-06-12 Invensys Controls Australia Pty. Ltd. System and method to reduce standby energy loss in a gas burning appliance

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US3376862A (en) * 1965-10-23 1968-04-09 Robertshaw Controls Co Double burner fuel control system
US4298336A (en) * 1979-09-10 1981-11-03 Robertshaw Controls Company Pilot burner ignition means and method of making the same
AT386884B (en) * 1985-10-01 1988-10-25 Vaillant Gmbh Ignition burner
AT396030B (en) * 1986-07-31 1993-05-25 Vaillant Gmbh Mounting for a temperature sensor which is assigned to the ignition flame of a gas burner
AT390317B (en) * 1986-07-31 1990-04-25 Vaillant Gmbh Bracket for one of the temperature sensors associated with the flame of a gas burner
US5039300A (en) * 1990-03-12 1991-08-13 Robertshaw Controls Company Pilot burner construction and method of making the same
US5275555A (en) * 1992-08-14 1994-01-04 Goodridge Mark S Holding and covering a gas pilot
US20120276488A1 (en) * 2011-04-29 2012-11-01 Virag Tibor M Flame deflector for a water heater pilot burner

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US3146823A (en) * 1961-03-27 1964-09-01 Honeywell Regulator Co Pilot burner generator
US3159203A (en) * 1961-08-11 1964-12-01 Robertshaw Controls Co Pilot burner
US3233830A (en) * 1962-06-15 1966-02-08 Robertshaw Controls Co Burner valve construction

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US1679298A (en) * 1927-04-05 1928-07-31 Silas M Evans Gas burner
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US3233830A (en) * 1962-06-15 1966-02-08 Robertshaw Controls Co Burner valve construction

Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3689193A (en) * 1971-04-13 1972-09-05 Robertshaw Controls Co Mounting means for a condition responsive means and method of mounting the same
US3816060A (en) * 1973-04-23 1974-06-11 Intertherm Safety pilot enclosure having flame-diverting air inlet
US3825398A (en) * 1973-06-15 1974-07-23 Robertshaw Controls Co Plural rate burner with flame enhancement
US3844704A (en) * 1973-08-17 1974-10-29 Mere Ind Inc Burner and ignition system
US3870458A (en) * 1973-09-26 1975-03-11 Robertshaw Controls Co Plural rate burner with deflection of high rate flame against flame sensing element
US3937439A (en) * 1973-11-14 1976-02-10 Robertshaw Controls Company Thermally operated valve utilizing gas adsorbent material
US4413975A (en) * 1982-04-09 1983-11-08 Essex Group, Inc. Combination control with high/low pilot gas flow
US6129542A (en) * 1999-05-21 2000-10-10 Gas Research Institute Dual mode pilot burner
WO2010006378A1 (en) * 2008-07-18 2010-01-21 Invensys Controls Australia Pty Ltd Micro-pilot for gas appliance
US20100015559A1 (en) * 2008-07-18 2010-01-21 Invensys Controls Australia Pty Ltd. Micro-Pilot For Gas Appliance
US8196552B2 (en) 2008-07-18 2012-06-12 Invensys Controls Australia Pty. Ltd. System and method to reduce standby energy loss in a gas burning appliance
US8454352B2 (en) 2008-07-18 2013-06-04 Invensys Controls Australia Pty Ltd. Micro-pilot for gas appliance
AU2009270341B2 (en) * 2008-07-18 2014-03-13 Invensys Controls Australia Pty Ltd Micro-pilot for gas appliance
US20110168284A1 (en) * 2010-01-14 2011-07-14 Invensys Controls Australia Pty Ltd. System and Method to Reduce Standby Energy Loss in a Gas Burning Appliance and Components for Use Therewith
US10502455B2 (en) 2010-01-14 2019-12-10 Invensys Controls Australia Pty Ltd. System and method to reduce standby energy loss in a gas burning appliance and components for use therewith

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
US3308871A (en) 1967-03-14
FR1455692A (en) 1966-10-14
DE1529097A1 (en) 1969-12-04
GB1115999A (en) 1968-06-06

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