US3372695A - Method of overcoming incontinence - Google Patents

Method of overcoming incontinence Download PDF

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Publication number
US3372695A
US3372695A US45123065A US3372695A US 3372695 A US3372695 A US 3372695A US 45123065 A US45123065 A US 45123065A US 3372695 A US3372695 A US 3372695A
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Prior art keywords
plug
incontinence
stem
urethra
tube
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Expired - Lifetime
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Beliveau Maurice
Ferdinand A Rocchi
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PROSIT SERVICE CORP
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PROSIT SERVICE CORP
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/0004Closure means for urethra or rectum, i.e. anti-incontinence devices or support slings against pelvic prolapse
    • A61F2/0022Closure means for urethra or rectum, i.e. anti-incontinence devices or support slings against pelvic prolapse placed deep in the body opening
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S128/00Surgery
    • Y10S128/25Artificial sphincters and devices for controlling urinary incontinence

Description

March 12, 1968 M. BELIVEAU ET AL METHOD OF OVERCOMING INCONTINENCE Filed April 27, 1965 INVENTORS MAURICE BEL/VEAU FERDINAND A. ROCCH/ jaw/w ATTORNEY United States Patent Ofilice 3,372,695 Patented Mar. 12, 1968 3,372,695 METHOD OF OVERCOMING INCONTINENCE Maurice Beliveau, Poughkeepsie, and Ferdinand A. Rocchi, Wappingers Falls, N.Y., assignors to Prosit Service Corporation, Wappingers Falls, N.Y.

Filed Apr. 27, 1965, Ser. No. 451,230 1 Claim. (Cl. 128-1) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A plug for insertion in the urethra to overcome incontinence of urination comprising an elongated stem of a length substantially greater than its thickness and width having a retainer member fixedly secured to the stem at one end thereof and projecting beyond said end of the stem. The retainer member has portions which are flexible and which extend away from each other from the stem. The plug is adapted to be inserted within the urethra with the retainer member extending into and engaging the walls of the bladder to retain the stem in position in the urethra. A fine cord may be attached to the other end of the stem and extend to the outer end of the urethra. The cord serves to properly position the stem in the urethra and to remove the plug from the urethra.

The present invention relates to an incontinence plug, and more particularly to a plug for insertion in the urethra to overcome incontinence of urination.

One urinary problem that many people have is the inability to control the flow of urine or urinary incontinence. One way of handling this problem heretofore used was by means of a catheter which drained into a bottle carried by the user. However, this treatment is not only uncomfortable for the user, but the drainage bottle becomes odoriferous and obnoxious. Therefore, it would be desirable to have a manner for overcoming this problem which permits the person to control urination in the normal manner.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a medical instrument which would permit a person with urinary incontinence to control urination in the normal manner.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a plug for insertion in the urethra to permit a person with urinary incontinence to control the flow of urine in a normal manner.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a urinary incontinence control plug which can be easily inserted and removed from the urethra and which can -be used without any discomfort to the user.

Other objects will appear hereinafter.

For the purpose of illustrating the invention, there is shown in the drawings forms which are presently preferred; it being understood, however, that this invention is not limited to the precise arrangements and instrumentalities shown.

FIGURE 1 is a side elevational view of one form of the incontinence plug of the present invention.

FIGURE 2 is a side elevational view of another form of the incontinence plug of the present invention.

FIGURE 3 is a side elevational view of the incontinence plug of FIGURE 2 in folded condition.

' of FIGURE 3.

FIGURE 5 is a side elevational view of still another form of the incontinence plug of the present invention.

FIGURE 6 is a side elevational view of a further modification of the incontinence plug of the present invention.

FIGURE 7 is a side elevational view, partially in section, of an insertion tool for the incontinence plugs of the present invention.

FIGURE 8 is a sectional view taken along line 88 of FIGURE 7.

FIGURE 9 is a side elevational view, partially in section, of a modification of the insertion tool.

FIGURE 10 is a sectional view taken along line 10-10 of FIGURE 9.

The present invention is based on the fact that urinary incontinence often results from the persons inability to contract the urethra sphincter muscle sufiiciently to completely close the urethra and thereby completely stop the flow of urine. However, many of such persons can partially contract the urethra sphincter muscle. Therefore, the present invention in general comprises a plug which is inserted and retained in the urethra and is of a diameter slightly smaller than the inner diameter of the urethra. Thus, when the urethra sphincter muscle is relaxed, urine can flow through the urethra around the plug. However, the plug fills the urethra sufliciently so that only a partial contraction of the urethra sphincter muscle is necessary to stop the flow of the urine. This permits the person to normally control the flow of the urine.

Referring initially to FIGURE 1, an incontinence plug of the present invention is generally designated as 10. Plug 10 comprises a stem 12, a retainer ring 14 integral with one end of the stem 12, and a fine cord 16 secured to and extending from the other end of the stem. The entire plug 10 is made of a material which is inert to urine and which does not irritate the human membrane. Such materials include such plastics as polymers or copolymers of tetrafluoroethylene, trifiuorochloroethylene or polyamide or a wire coated with one of these plastics, or such urine-resistant metals as stainless steel and chromium plated metals. The stem 12 is approximately 2 inches in length and of a diameter between A inch to inch. The diameter of the stem can vary depending on the internal diameter of the urethra in which the plug is to be inserted, and the amount the person can contract his or her sphincter muscle. The length of the stem 12 may vary depending on the length of the users sphincter muscle. The retainer ring may be of a diameter between 1 and 2 inches, and the cord 16 is of a length long enough to extend out of the urethra.

To use the incontinence plug 10 of the present invention, the user flattens the retainer ring 14 to the form of a substantially straight extension of the stem 12. The plug 10 is then inserted into the urethra with the end of the flattened retainer ring 14 being inserted first. The plug 10 is inserted up the urethra until the retainer ring 14 enters the bladder. When the retainer ring 14 is entirely within the bladder, it expands under its inherent resiliency back to its ring shape. By pulling outwardly on the cord 16, the retainer ring 14 is seated against the wall of the bladder at the entrance to the urethra. The stem 12 is then positioned in the urethra and extends through the urethra sphincter muscle. The incontinence plug is then in position to perform the function described above to permit the user to control the flow of urine in a natural manner.

Referring to FIGURE 2, a modification of the incontinence plug of the present invention is generally designated as 18. Incontinence plug 18 comprises a stem 26, a retainer ring 22 integral with one end of the stem 20, and a cord 24 secured to and extending from the other end of the stem 20. As shown in FIGURE 4, the retainer ring 22 is D-shaped in transverse cross section with the fiat surface 26 of the retainer ring forming the internal circurn- 'ference of the ring. A tip 28 projects radially from the outer surface of the retainer ring 22 diametrically opposite the stem 20. The tip 28 is of the same diameter as the stem and has a fiat end. The plug 18 is made of the same material and is of the same dimensions as the incontinence plug 10 of FIGURE 1. The incontinence plug 18 is used in the same manner described above with regard to the incontinence plug 10 of FIGURE 1. However, when the retainer ring 22 of the incontinence plug 18 is flattened to permit insertion of the plug, the D-shape of the retainer ring permits the retainer ring to be completely flattened to the form of a rod-like extension of the stem 26 as shown in FIGURES 3 and 4. This provides for greater ease of inserting the incontinence plug 18.

Referring to FIGURE 5, still another modification of the incontinence plug of the present invention is generally designated as 30. Incontinence plug 30 comprises a stem 32 having a diametrically extending hole 34 therethrough adjacent one end thereof. A retainer ring 36 extends through the hole 34 in the stem 32. Retainer ring 36 had a cut 38 therecross to provide a pair of ends for inserting the retainer ring through the hole 34. After the retainer ring 36 is inserted through the hole 34 in the stem 32, the ends of the retainer ring are bonded together to secure the retainer ring to the stem. A cord 40 is secured to the stem 32 and extends from the other end of the stem. The incontinence plug 30 is made of the same materials and is of the same dimensions as the incontinence plug 10 of FIGURE 1. Also, the incontinence plug 30 is used in the same manner as described above with regard to the incontinence plug 10 of FIGURE 1.

Referring to FIGURE 6, a further modification of the incontinence plug of the present invention is generally designated as 42. Incontinence plug 42 comprises a stem 44 and a pair of retainer arms 46 and 48 integral with and projecting from one end of the stem 44. The retainer arms 46 and 48 are curved and extend away from each other. A cord 50 is secured to the stem 44 and extends from the other end of the stem. The incontinence plug 42 is made of the same material as that of the incontinence plug 10 of FIGURE 1. The dimensions of the incontinence plug 44 are similar to those of the incontinence plug 10 with the distance between the ends of the retainer arms 46 and 48 being substantially equal to the diameter of the retainer ring 14 of the incontinence plug 10. The incontinence plug 42 is used in the same manner as described above with the retainer arms 46 and 48 being compressed together for insertion of the plug 42.

FIGURE 7 shows an insertion tool, generally designated as 52 which can be used for inserting any of the incontinence plugs of the present invention. Insertion tool 52 comprises an elongated tube 54 of a fairly rigid but flexible material, such as rubber or plastic. Tube 54 is open at both ends-and has an internal diameter greater than the external diameter of the stern of the incontinence plug.

A pair of handle rings 56 may be secured to the back end .of the tube 54 on diametrically opposite sides of the tube. .An elongated plunger rod 58 extends into the back end of the tube 54 and is slidable within the tube. Plunger rod '58 may be made of the same material as the tube 54 but is preferably slightly more rigid than the tube 54. The

plunger rod 58 has a passage 66 extending longitudinally therethrough from end to end. A handle ring 62 may be secured to the back end of the plunger rod 68.

In the use of the insertion tool 52, the plunger rod 58 is pulled out of the tube 54 until the front end of the rod 18 spread inwardly from the front end of the tube. An incontinence plug, for example the incontinence plug 10, is inserted in the front end of the tube 54 with the end of the cord 16 being inserted first. The cord 16 is threaded completely through the passage in the plunger rod 58. By pulling on the end of the cord 16 which extends beyond the back end of the plunger rod 58, the stem 12 of the incontinence plug 10 is pulled into contact with the inner end of the plunger rod 58. If the stem 12 is smaller in diameter than the passage 60 in the plunger rod 58, the stem can be pulled into the passage 60 until the folded retainer ring 14 abuts against the front end of the plunger end. The incontinence plug 16 is inserted into the tube 54- until it is entirely within the tube.

With the incontinence plug inserted completely within the tool 52, the front end of the tube 54 is inserted into the urethra until the front end of the tube is at or adjacent the bladder. The plunger rod 58 is then pushed into the tube 54 so that the front end of the plunger rod pushes against either the stem or the retainer ring of the incontinence plug and forces the retainer ring out of the tube 54 and into the bladder. As previously described, as the retainer ring enters the bladder, it expands to its ring shape. The insertion tool 52 is then pulled out of the urethra leaving the incontinence plug behind and seated in the urethra.

If it becomes desirable to remove the incontinence plug from the urethra, the insertion tool 52 can be used for this purpose. This is achieved by inserting the end of the cord, which extends out of the urethra, into the front end of the tube 54 and threading the cord through the tube 54. The front end of the tube 54 is inserted into the urethra until it reaches the stern of the incontinence plug. By pulling on the cord, the stem of the incontinence plug is guided into the tube 54 as the tube 54 is further inserted in the urethra. When the end of the tube 54 reaches the bladder, pulling on the cord pulls the retainer ring into the tube 54. The insertion tool 52 is then removed from the urethra carrying the incontinence plug with it.

Referring to FIG. 9, a modification of the insertion tool is generally designated as 64. Insertion tool 64 comprises an elongated tube 66 identical to the tube 54 of the insertion tool 52 shown in FIGURE 7. A pair of handle rings 68 may be secured to the back end of the tube 66. An elongated, solid plunger rod 70 is inserted in the tube 66. A handle ring 72 may be secured to the back end of the plunger rod 76. Insertion tool 64 is used in substantially the same manner as previously described within regard to the insertion tool 52 of FIGURE 7. However, insertion tool 64 is preferably used with either an incontinence plug that does not have a cord, or with an incontinence plug having a stem of relatively large diameter. By making the diameter of the plunger rod 70 slightly smaller than the internal diameter of the tube 66, there is provided a clearance between the plunger rod and the tube through which the cord of the incontinence plug can pass.

The present invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from the spirit or essential attributes thereof and, accordingly reference should be made to the appended claim, rather than to the foregoing specification as indicated the scope of the invention.

We claim:

1. A method of overcoming incontinence of urination caused by the inability to contract the urethra sphincter muscle sufficiently to completely close the urethra comprising the step of inserting into the urethra a plug having an elongated stern of a thickness slightly less than the inner diameter of the urethra and a retainer member fixedly secured to said stem at one end of the stem and projectmg beyond said one end of the stern, said retainer member having portions which are flexible and which extend away from each other from the stem, said plug being inserted 2,649,086 7 8/1953 Sluijter 128-1 into the urethra until the stem extends within the sphincter 2,649,854 8/ 1953 Salm 128-1 muscle and the retainer member extends into the bladder 759,342 5/ 1904 Brunig 128-130 and engages the walls of the bladder to retain the stern 2,176,559 10/1939 Meckstroth 128-130 Within the urethra. 5 3,256,878 6/1966 Schwartz et a1. 128-130 References Cited OTHER REFERENCES Stein: Contraceptive Met ods, pp. 1311-1314 of UNITED STATES PATENTS JAMA for April 8, 1939 2,338,135 1/1944 Schrnitz 128-127 2,376,193 5/1945 Salvin 128-127 10 RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examiner.

Examiner.

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Cited By (44)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3492990A (en) * 1967-06-15 1970-02-03 Robert E Clarke Combination contraceptive device and inserter
US3554184A (en) * 1968-04-17 1971-01-12 Henry N Habib Pubo-vaginal incontinence device
US3765417A (en) * 1971-02-24 1973-10-16 Kimberly Clark Co Arcuate tampon applicator
US4026281A (en) * 1973-10-12 1977-05-31 Ortho Pharmaceutical Corporation Method and apparatus for inserting an intrauterine contraceptive device
US4209010A (en) * 1978-07-26 1980-06-24 The Kendall Company Artificial sphincter
US4210131A (en) * 1978-07-26 1980-07-01 The Kendall Company Artificial sphincter with collection bag
US4210132A (en) * 1978-07-26 1980-07-01 The Kendall Company Artificial sphincter
US4248224A (en) * 1978-08-01 1981-02-03 Jones James W Double venous cannula
US4553533A (en) * 1983-11-08 1985-11-19 Leighton Stephen B Intra-urethral prosthetic sphincter valve
US4865030A (en) * 1987-01-21 1989-09-12 American Medical Systems, Inc. Apparatus for removal of objects from body passages
US4909785A (en) * 1986-03-25 1990-03-20 American Medical Systems, Inc. Method for valving body fluids
US5013292A (en) * 1989-02-24 1991-05-07 R. Laborie Medical Corporation Surgical correction of female urinary stress incontinence and kit therefor
US5088980A (en) * 1990-05-31 1992-02-18 The United States Of America As Represented By The Department Of Health And Human Services Intra-urethral valve with integral spring
US5112344A (en) * 1988-10-04 1992-05-12 Petros Peter E Surgical instrument and method of utilization of such
US5267953A (en) * 1986-04-23 1993-12-07 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Curved tampon applicator and a process for forming the applicator and for assembling an absorbent tampon into said applicator
US5417226A (en) * 1994-06-09 1995-05-23 Juma; Saad Female anti-incontinence device
US5497542A (en) * 1993-12-27 1996-03-12 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Method of assembling an inner tube into an outer tube
US5513659A (en) * 1994-10-24 1996-05-07 Iotek, Inc. Incontinence device
FR2754443A1 (en) * 1996-10-11 1998-04-17 Heaumon Francis Incontinence obturation catheter for urethra
US5785640A (en) * 1996-05-23 1998-07-28 Kresch; Arnold J. Method for treating female incontinence
WO2001067986A1 (en) * 2000-03-10 2001-09-20 Conticare Medical, Inc. Female incontinence prevention device
US20020077526A1 (en) * 1999-06-09 2002-06-20 Kammerer Gene W. Surgical instrument and method for treating female urinary incontinence
US6475139B1 (en) * 1999-06-09 2002-11-05 Ethicon, Inc. Visually-directed surgical instrument and method for treating female urinary incontinence
US20020188169A1 (en) * 1999-06-09 2002-12-12 Kammerer Gene W. Surgical instrument and method for treating female urinary incontinence
US20030100954A1 (en) * 2000-04-20 2003-05-29 Barbara Schuldt-Hempe Implant
US20030114866A1 (en) * 2001-10-04 2003-06-19 Ulf Ulmsten Mesh for pelvic floor repair
US20030176762A1 (en) * 2000-03-09 2003-09-18 Kammerer Gene W. Surgical instrument and method for treating organ prolapse conditions
US20030220538A1 (en) * 2002-03-01 2003-11-27 Bernard Jacquetin Method and apparatus for treating pelvic organ prolapses in female patients
US6739341B2 (en) 2002-05-15 2004-05-25 Conticare Medical, Inc. Incontinence device insertion kit
US20040220613A1 (en) * 2001-12-20 2004-11-04 Peter Petros Surgical instrument
US20050004471A1 (en) * 2000-08-25 2005-01-06 Neoseed Technology Llc. Prostate visualization device and methods of use
WO2005046539A1 (en) 2003-11-11 2005-05-26 Conticare Medical, Inc. Incontinence device insertion kit
US6932759B2 (en) 1999-06-09 2005-08-23 Gene W. Kammerer Surgical instrument and method for treating female urinary incontinence
US20050250978A1 (en) * 2004-05-07 2005-11-10 Ethicon, Inc. Mesh tape with wing-like extensions for treating female urinary incontinence
US20060058575A1 (en) * 2004-09-15 2006-03-16 Vincenza Zaddem System and method for surgical implant placement
US20060058574A1 (en) * 1999-06-09 2006-03-16 Jorg Priewe Method and apparatus for adjusting flexible areal polymer implants
US7094199B2 (en) 2002-07-23 2006-08-22 Sherwood Services Ag Ivs obturator instrument and procedure
US20060196788A1 (en) * 2005-02-02 2006-09-07 Peter Komarnycky Packaging assembly for surgical mesh implants
US20060293555A1 (en) * 2005-06-28 2006-12-28 Sherwood Services Ag Illuminated IVS tunneling device
US20100324357A1 (en) * 2008-12-05 2010-12-23 Chu Michael S H Insertion Device and Method for Delivery of a Mesh Carrier
US20110106108A1 (en) * 2009-11-03 2011-05-05 Boston Scientific Scimed Inc. Device and method for delivery of mesh-based devices
US20120277658A1 (en) * 2009-01-19 2012-11-01 Cornell University Urethral catheterless radical prostatectomy
US8316651B2 (en) 2005-07-30 2012-11-27 Bruker Biospin Gmbh Superconducting magnet system with radiation shield disposed between the cryogenic fluid tank and a refrigerator
WO2016005824A1 (en) 2014-07-09 2016-01-14 Ovitigalage Saliya Ovitigala Intra-urethral device for the treatment of urinary incontinence of females

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US2391343A (en) * 1942-01-29 1945-12-18 Popper Otto Vaginal obturator
US2338135A (en) * 1942-03-18 1944-01-04 Jr William L Schmitz Diaphragm pessary introducer
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Cited By (73)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3492990A (en) * 1967-06-15 1970-02-03 Robert E Clarke Combination contraceptive device and inserter
US3554184A (en) * 1968-04-17 1971-01-12 Henry N Habib Pubo-vaginal incontinence device
US3765417A (en) * 1971-02-24 1973-10-16 Kimberly Clark Co Arcuate tampon applicator
US4026281A (en) * 1973-10-12 1977-05-31 Ortho Pharmaceutical Corporation Method and apparatus for inserting an intrauterine contraceptive device
US4210132A (en) * 1978-07-26 1980-07-01 The Kendall Company Artificial sphincter
US4209010A (en) * 1978-07-26 1980-06-24 The Kendall Company Artificial sphincter
US4210131A (en) * 1978-07-26 1980-07-01 The Kendall Company Artificial sphincter with collection bag
US4248224A (en) * 1978-08-01 1981-02-03 Jones James W Double venous cannula
US4553533A (en) * 1983-11-08 1985-11-19 Leighton Stephen B Intra-urethral prosthetic sphincter valve
US4909785A (en) * 1986-03-25 1990-03-20 American Medical Systems, Inc. Method for valving body fluids
US5267953A (en) * 1986-04-23 1993-12-07 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Curved tampon applicator and a process for forming the applicator and for assembling an absorbent tampon into said applicator
US4865030A (en) * 1987-01-21 1989-09-12 American Medical Systems, Inc. Apparatus for removal of objects from body passages
US5112344A (en) * 1988-10-04 1992-05-12 Petros Peter E Surgical instrument and method of utilization of such
US5013292A (en) * 1989-02-24 1991-05-07 R. Laborie Medical Corporation Surgical correction of female urinary stress incontinence and kit therefor
US5088980A (en) * 1990-05-31 1992-02-18 The United States Of America As Represented By The Department Of Health And Human Services Intra-urethral valve with integral spring
US5519930A (en) * 1993-12-27 1996-05-28 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Apparatus and method of assembling an inner tube into an outer tube
US5497542A (en) * 1993-12-27 1996-03-12 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Method of assembling an inner tube into an outer tube
US5417226A (en) * 1994-06-09 1995-05-23 Juma; Saad Female anti-incontinence device
US5513659A (en) * 1994-10-24 1996-05-07 Iotek, Inc. Incontinence device
US5785640A (en) * 1996-05-23 1998-07-28 Kresch; Arnold J. Method for treating female incontinence
FR2754443A1 (en) * 1996-10-11 1998-04-17 Heaumon Francis Incontinence obturation catheter for urethra
US7121997B2 (en) 1999-06-09 2006-10-17 Ethicon, Inc. Surgical instrument and method for treating female urinary incontinence
US20020077526A1 (en) * 1999-06-09 2002-06-20 Kammerer Gene W. Surgical instrument and method for treating female urinary incontinence
US6475139B1 (en) * 1999-06-09 2002-11-05 Ethicon, Inc. Visually-directed surgical instrument and method for treating female urinary incontinence
US7083637B1 (en) 1999-06-09 2006-08-01 Tannhauser Robert J Method and apparatus for adjusting flexible areal polymer implants
US20030023138A1 (en) * 1999-06-09 2003-01-30 Luscombe Brian H. Surgical instrument and method for treating female urinary incontinence
US20060058574A1 (en) * 1999-06-09 2006-03-16 Jorg Priewe Method and apparatus for adjusting flexible areal polymer implants
US7226407B2 (en) 1999-06-09 2007-06-05 Ethicon, Inc. Surgical instrument and method for treating female urinary incontinence
US7547316B2 (en) 1999-06-09 2009-06-16 Ethicon, Inc. Method and apparatus for adjusting flexible areal polymer implants
US6932759B2 (en) 1999-06-09 2005-08-23 Gene W. Kammerer Surgical instrument and method for treating female urinary incontinence
US6908425B2 (en) 1999-06-09 2005-06-21 Ethicon Inc. Surgical instrument and method for treating female urinary incontinence
US20020188169A1 (en) * 1999-06-09 2002-12-12 Kammerer Gene W. Surgical instrument and method for treating female urinary incontinence
US20030176762A1 (en) * 2000-03-09 2003-09-18 Kammerer Gene W. Surgical instrument and method for treating organ prolapse conditions
US20040267088A1 (en) * 2000-03-09 2004-12-30 Kammerer Gene W Surgical instrument and method for treating organ prolapse conditions
US7131943B2 (en) 2000-03-09 2006-11-07 Ethicon, Inc. Surgical instrument and method for treating organ prolapse conditions
USRE39626E1 (en) * 2000-03-10 2007-05-15 Consert, Llc Female incontinence prevention device
WO2001067986A1 (en) * 2000-03-10 2001-09-20 Conticare Medical, Inc. Female incontinence prevention device
JP2003526449A (en) * 2000-03-10 2003-09-09 コンチケア メディカル、インコーポレイテッド Incontinence protection device of women
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