US3364981A - Die casting machine - Google Patents

Die casting machine Download PDF

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US3364981A
US3364981A US44272565A US3364981A US 3364981 A US3364981 A US 3364981A US 44272565 A US44272565 A US 44272565A US 3364981 A US3364981 A US 3364981A
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dies
die
metal
nozzle
conduit
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Perrella Guido
Francois M Picker
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Dynacast Ltd
Dynacast International Ltd
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Dynacast International Ltd
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B22CASTING; POWDER METALLURGY
    • B22DCASTING OF METALS; CASTING OF OTHER SUBSTANCES BY THE SAME PROCESSES OR DEVICES
    • B22D17/00Pressure die casting or injection die casting, i.e. casting in which the metal is forced into a mould under high pressure
    • B22D17/02Hot chamber machines, i.e. with heated press chamber in which metal is melted
    • B22D17/04Plunger machines

Description

Jan. 23, 1968 G. PERRELLA ETAL 3,364,981
DIE CASTING MACHINE v Filed- Maroh 25, 1965 10 Sheets-Sheet l 1968 I G. PERRELLA ETAL I 3,
DIE CASTING MACHINE Filed March 25, 1965 10 Sheet's-Sheef 1968 I G. PERRELLA ETAL 3,364,981
DIE CASTING MACHINE Filed March 25, 1965 10 Sheets-Sheet :5
l I l I J I Jan. 23, 1968 G. PERRELLA ETAL 3,364,981
DIE CASTING MACHIIiE Filed March 25, 1965 1O Sheets-Sheet 4 Jan. 23, 1968 G. PERRELLA ETAL DIE CASTING MACHINE 1O Sheets-Sheet F;-
Filed March 25, 1965 G. PEQRELLA ETAL DIE CASTING MACHINE 1O Shee tsSheet 6 Filed March 25, 1965 Jan. 23, 1968 G. PERRELLA ETAL 3,364,981 7 DIE CASTING MACHINE l0 Sheets-$heet 7 Filed March, 25, 1965 .lli.
G. PERRELLA ETAL Jan. 23, 1968 DIE CASTING MACHINE l0 Sheets-Sheet 8 Filed March 25, 1965 1968 G. PERRELLA ETAL 3,364,981
DIE CASTING MACHINE Filed March 25, 1965 10 Sheets- Sheet a ZOO 23, 1968 G. PERRELLA ETAL 7 3,
DIE CASTING MACHINE Filed March 25, 1965 10 Sheets-Sheet l0 United States Patent 3,364,981 DIE CASTING MACHINE Guido Perrella, Montreal, Quebec, and Francois M. Picker, St. Bruno, Quebec, Canada, assignors to Dynacast Limited, a corporation of Canada Filed Mar. 25, 1965. Ser. No. 442,725 33 Claims. (Cl. 164-318) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A high speed automatic die casting machine having a plurality of cooperating dies and cores slidably arranged in guideways. A gooseneck pivotally mounted and immersed in a melting pot having an injection nozzle arranged therewith for forcing the molten metal into the dies for making miniature die castings with a check valve arranged with the gooseneck to prevent the flow of metal back into the melting pot.
This invention relates to a machine for producing metal castings and in particular to a machine that will produce relatively flaw-free castings at a rate approaching 5,000 per hour depending on the size of casting required.
Die casting machines of the prior art have, until recent years, had a relatively low production rateusually in the region of ten to twenty castings per minute. This may be credited to rather inefficient operation of the dies used in known machines as well as other related parts. For example, most machines concerned with castings of miniature to medium size use a goosene-ck type of injector for the delivery of metal from a furnace or heated pot to the cavity of the dies. It is normal in such machines to use a piston pump and a delivery conduit having intake and exhaust ports which cooperate with the piston in delivering the metal to the dies. However, it is a common fault among known machines, especially where miniature castings are concerned, that when the piston is on its intake stroke so as to bring more metal into delivery position (or immediately following a shot of metal before the intake stroke), the metal remaining in the conduit from the previous stroke drains back into the furnace or pot a sufficient distance to allow a substantial amount of air to enter the conduit via the nozzle. When the next stroke of the piston takes place an excess amount of this air is blown into the die cavity resulting in bubbles and pitting in the finished casting. This is most undesirable in small castings such as zipper sliders and the like. Furthermore, excessive air in the conduit can cause extra wear on the piston itself due to the fact that the air is compressible. Therefore, the larger the amount of air, the greater the stroke of the piston must be in relation so as to overcome the air cushion in delivering the metal to the dies.
A further problem with machines of the prior art is that their methods of mounting dies have been rather complex and require a substantial amount of time for changing from one set of dies to another. Furthermore, metal ingots or bars are usually dropped into the furnace or pot which immediately varies the temperature of the metal bath whereby the machines remain inoperative until the new metal is melted and the proper operative temperature in the pot is reached.
In the present invention we have obtained an extremely high production rate that has approached 80 castings per minute. This rate is due to a novel and eiiicient gooseneck injector and pump which incorporate valve means that reduces by a substantial amount the back draining of molten metal in the delivery conduit so that an eX- tremely high grade of casting is the result. These castings have shown a substantial decrease of bubbles and pitting.
According to the invention, a machine for producing metal castings comprises a frame having mounted thereon a furnace or melting pot for melting and retaining metal for the castings; a main plate secured to the frame with a guide unit of cruciform configuration mounted thereon, the guide unit having a central opening therein; at least a pair of dies slidably mounted for reciprocal action in the guide for operative movement toward and away from each other and the central opening in the guide; a pressure injector on the main plate for delivering metal from the furnace to the dies, the injector including pump means and a delivery conduit; a nozzle detachably secured to one end of the conduit; and a passageway in said dies for the admission of metal therein from said conduit and nozzle when the dies are in their closed position; the injector being pivotally mounted on the main plate so that the conduit and nozzle may be directed to open and closed positions relative to said guide and whereby the nozzle may be moved into and out of operative engagement with the passageway in said dies; the injector also including valve means adapted for immersion in said metal which includes an intake port and check ball cooperating with the pump means and conduit to allow passage of the metal from the container into said conduit; nozzle and dies; means for preheating and automatically feeding metal bars into the furnace so that irregular temperature variation of molten metal in the furnace is avoided; the valve means inhibiting draining of the metal from the conduit into the furnace thereby substantially lowering the amount of air admitted into the nozzle, and conduit to provide a relatively flaw-free casting.
Further advantages of the casting machine forming the present invention will be apparent from the following description and appended drawings in which:
FIGURE 1 is a perspective View of the casting machine and its control console and castings receiver;
FIGURE 2 is a side elevation of the machine, sectioned, metal;
FIGURE 3 is a front elevation view of the main plate showing operative positions of the dies and their related integers;
FIGURE 4 is a sectional view taken along the line 4-4 of FIGURE 3 showing the gooseneck injector in relation to the dies and furnace;
FIGURE 5 is a side elevation of the mechanism shown in FIGURE 3;
FIGURE 6 is a rear elevation of the mechanism shown in FIGURE 3;
FIGURE 7 is a perspective view of the cruciform guide unit;
FIGURE 8 is a sectional view the line 88 of FIGURE 7;
FIGURE 9 is a sectional view taken along the lines 9-9 of FIGURE 6;
FIGURE 10 shows elements of the pump means;
FIGURE 11 is a schematically drawn sectional view of the lower region of the gooseneck; and
FIGURE 12 shows the electrical control for the machine.
partially showing the furnacecontainer for the casting of the guide taken along General construction Referring to FIGURES 1 and 2 of the drawings, the casting machine 1 includes a frame enclosed by a cabinet A to which is secured a main plate B having mounted thereon the die mechanisms and related parts. Plate B is sloped approximately 30 from the vertical, as shown, and to the rear of the plate B there is pivotally mounted the gooseneck injector C. The lower end of the latter is immersed in the melting pot D which hereinafter will be referred to as a furnace. FIGURE 1 also shows a casting receiver E and an electric control console F.
The furnace D comprises a pot 2 having a bottom wall 4 and side walls 6 and 8. There is also provided a top cover plate 10 and heating elements 12, the latter being secured to the walls of the pot as illustrated. The material used in the casting operation can be any suitable, low melting, high strength metal or alloy such as zamac which is a zinc alloy containing approximately 98% zinc and which provides castings requiring a minimum of trim- :ming and polishing during finishing operations. The metal usually is in the form of blocks or ingots 16 and these are automatically lowered into the pot 2 through a chimney 14. The lowering of the ingot 16 is effected automatically as the metal is needed and the concentration of heat in the chimney 14 serves to preheat the ingot 16 thereby avoiding any irregular variation in the temperature of the bath of molten metal in the pot 2. The mechanism for lowering the ingots 16 is shown at G in FIGURE 1 and it may comprise any commercially available feeding unit such as those used in the printing trade. A detailed description will therefore not be given for the unit G but it will be sufficient to say that the upper end of an ingot 16 is hung on a hook that is connected by a chain or the like to a rocket wheel. This is governed by a dog or dogs that are connected to a float resting in the bath of metal in the furnace D. As the level of the bath (and the float) goes down, the dogs are released momentarily from the rocket wheel so that the ingot 16 is lowered.
Die mechanism and guide FIGURES 3 and 4 show a pair of dies 20, 22 and a pair of cores 24, 26 mounted for reciprocal action in a unitary guide 28 of cruciform con-figuration. Each die and core is driven identically so it will be considered sufficient to describe only die and its guide 28 together with its associated integers.
Referring to FIGURES 3, 7, and 8 thecruciform guide 28 is detachably secured to the main plate B by a plurality of bolts 30 so that-it can quickly be removed and replaced. Each branch 29 of the guide 28 includes a channel 32 in which the shank of a core 20 or a die 24 is slidably mounted. The top walls 34 of the die branches 29 are cut away as at 36 to allow room for conduits 38 to be connected to the shanks of the dies 20, the conduits 38 circulating a coolant such as water through the shanks from a manifold 40 on the plate B (FIGURE 3), details of which will presently be described.
It will be appreciated that in order to reduce the amount of flashing on a casting, it is of prime importance that the dies 20 and 22 be in perfect registry with one another when they are brought together to receive a shot of metal from the injector. However, due to variations in temperature between the dies, their shanks 42 and the guide 28, it is not feasible to provide the shanks 42 with little or no clearance in the guide 28 to arrive at the required registry because binding of the elements will result. There is provided therefore in the present invention a clearance between the shanks 42 of the dies 20, 22 and the walls of the guide channels 32 of a sufficient amount to prevent binding. To ensure, in addition, the proper registry of the dies-20, 22 the plates 37 in the bottom of the guide branches 29 include pressure pads that bear upwardly Lever arm 44 is also provided adjacent roll pin 48 with a wrist pin 56 and is thereby connected to an anchor pin 58 by means of a pair of connecting links 60 and 62 connecting wrist pin 56 and anchor pin 58 together.
4 It is to be noted that each anchor pin 58 is pivotally mounted to the inner end of a core 63 in an adjustable sleeve 64 that provides a micronic control over the in and out travel of each of the dies and cores. The outer end of core 63 (FIGURE 4) receives a knurled knob 66 for effecting the said adjustment. As shown in FIGURES 7 3 and 4, the adjustable sleeves 64 of the micronic controls together with cylinders 54 are attached to the main plate B by a mechanism mounting block 68 which, in turn, is detachably secured to the main plate B by bolts 70 and it is in sockets 72 of each block 68 that the adjustable sleeves 64 of the dies and cores are threaded.
As shown, the outer end of each core 63 extendsbeyond the associated block 68 and is capped with the knob 66 by a stud and self-locking nut 65, knob 66 being marked with one thousandth inch graduation which may be read against a fixed point on a collar spacer 67 dis posed between the underside. of the knob 66 andthe block 68. Knob 66 is also provided with a tongue 69 that engages a slot 71 in the outer rim of the collar 64, as shown in FIGURE 4. Therefore, when an adjustment is to be made, lock nut is loosened; sleeve 64 is screwed into or out of the block 68 a desired amount thereby bringing the associated die and its linking elements to the desired position. Following, lock nut 65 is tightened which effects a binding action onto the threads of the sleeve 64 through the knob 66, spacer 67 and block 68 so as to lock the complete unit.
matic cylinders 54 are pivotally mounted between the blocks 68 and main plate B in each instance by a lower bushing 74 and an upper bushing 76, respectively. Each cylinder 54 is governed and actuated by a four-way fluid valve 78. The closed position of the die shanks 42 and their associated linkage is shown on the left side of FIG- URE 3. When die 20 (or a core) is in its closed position, lever arm 44 and its associated connecting links 60 and 62 are in alignment with the die 20 and the adjustment sleeve 64 of the dies micronic travel control. However, when the four-way valve 78 actuates cylinder 54 so as to open the die 20, piston rod 52 is drawn into its cylinder 54 whereby link 50 and pin 48 pull the lever arm 44, wrist pin '56, and connecting links 60 and 62 into an open position shown in .phantom line 0 on the right side of FIGURE 3, lever arm 44 pivoting about pin 46 and links 60 and 62 pivoting anchor pin 58. The angle of the arm 44 and links 60, 62 in relation to the die shank 42is in the region of 35 to 40. When the cruciform guide 28 is to be removed from the plate B, however, pins 46 are withdrawn from each shank 42 and anchor links 60, 62 are swung out to about 5060 from alignment as shown in phantom line on the left side of FIGURE 3. It will be noted that fluid cylinder 54 pivots about its bushings 74, 76 during this operation, such movement taking place to a lesser degree during normal opening and closing oper ation of the dies and cores due to the pivotal arc taken by the links 60 and 62 about the anchor pin'58.
'It will be noted from FIGURE 4 that a substantial portion of lever arm 44 extends into a channel formed in the outer end of the die shank 42, and this portion of the arm 44 must be removed from the area of the shank 42 to facilitate removal of the guide 28 from the plate B. It will be noted that each shank 42 (for example on core 24) has its associated pin 46 held in place by a circlip 47. Now, in order to remove the guide 28for a change of dies of other routine maintenance it is necessary only to remove the circlips 47 from each pin 46; withdraw the pins 46 from the shanks 42 and lever arms 44; retract the piston rod 52 of each pneumatic cylinder 54 to the removal position (shown in phantom line on the left side of FIGURE 3) so that the loose ends of each lever arm 44 is clear of the shanks 42, which necessitates pivoting each cylinder about its bushings 74, 76;
and removing the four bolts 30 from the guide 28 where-' It has been found that a complete die change can be accomplished in approximately five to six minutes.
The valves 78 and other fiuid valves to be described are supplied with fluid (in this case air) from conduits 80 in a perimeter manifold 82. This manifold may be fed from a compressor (not shown) in any well known manner.
Goose neck and injector Referring now to FIGURES 4, 5, 6, and 9 of the drawings, the injector mechanism 84 includes what is known in the art as a goose neck which in the above figures is indicated generally at 86 and it includes pump means 88; valve means 90; a delivery conduit 92; and a nozzle 94. Pump 88 is mounted in a cage 96 of the goose neck 86 and this cage is rockable about pivot points 98 by means of a fluid cylinder 100 so that the nozzle 94 on conduit 92 may be brought into or out of operative engagement or open and closed positions with the rear face of the dies 20, 22. FIGURE 4 shows the nozzle 94 in the closed position and the open position of the lower end of the cage is indicated by phantom line 102.
In FIGURES 5, 6, and 9 there is shown a plurality of fastening blocks, 184, 165, and 166, bolted to the rear face of the main plate B. These blocks mount threaded cones 107, 108, and 109 by means of which there is pivotally mounted the lower ends of a pair of adjusting arms 110 and 112 which have their upper ends resiliently and adjustably connected to the main plate B. The upper end connections of each arm 110 and 112 may be comrehended more clearly from FIGURE 4, and the following description which, although detailed with respect to one arm only, is applicable to both the arms 110 and 112 as their integers are identical. To the upper end of arm 110 there is fastened a collar bolt 114 that is threaded into one end of a sleeve 116, the other end thereof receiving an adjusting screw 118 threaded in from the front of plate B. It will be seen that sleeve 116 and screw 118 are positioned in a counterbored socket 128 having an annular shoulder 122. Screw 118 is provided with a collar washer 124- which bears against shoulder 122 thereby to prevent the screw 118 from pulling through socket 120 from the force of a spring 126 surrounding the sleeve 116. Spring 126 bears at one end against a retainer ring 128 on the sleeve 116 and at the other end against a positioning collar 130 affixed to the rear face of main plate B. Collar washer 124 also serves as a fulcrum for drawing the upper ends of arms 110 and 112 closer to the plate B by threading the screws 118 further into sleeve 116. The purpose of such adjustment will presently be described.
Now adjacent their above-mentioned pivotal connections to the blocks 104 and 106, each arm 110 and 112 is provided with a yoke 132 and a shaft 134 is pivotally mounted in the yoke 132 by bearings 135 (FIGURE 9). It will be noted that shaft 134 is bored to provide a passageway 136 for circulation therethrough of a coolant such as water. Onto this shaft 134 is mounted the goose neck 86 by means of ears or flanges 138 and 140, the latter being made fast on the shaft 134 by pins 137 each engaging a section of a peripheral groove 139 on the shaft 134. Therefore, the goose neck 86 is pivotally mounted in the bearings 135 of the adjusting arms 110 and 112.
Adjacent the upper margin of the plate B, there is secured to the rear face thereof a block 142 having an opening 144 extending therethrough. As shown in FIG- URE 4 block 142 is provided with studs 146 on its side edges and to these studs head portions of collar bolts 148 are secured, the bolts extending through the plate B and being fastened therein by nuts 150. The fluid cylinder 100 is mounted on the block 142 by collar bolts 154 and is provided with a piston rod 156 which extends through the block opening 144 to terminate in a pivotal connection 158 with the upper end of a lever arm 160 integral with and extending upwardly from the top of the cage 96 of the goose neck 86. It will be appreciated that the cylinder is pivotally mounted for up and down as well as sideways movement with respect to the upper end of the arm 160. Cylinder 152 is governed and actuated by a fluid valve 162 (FIGURE 3) and it will be appreciated that actuation of the cylinder causes its piston rod 156 to rock the goose neck 86 about its pivotal mounting in the bearings 135 thereby shifting the nozzle 94 into and out of engagement with the rear face of the dies 20 and 22.
It will be noted from FIGURE 4 that the dies 20 and 22 are provided with a passageway 164 to allow the introduction of molten metal from the conduit 92 and nozzle 94 into the interior or cavity 166 of the dies. It is, of course, of extreme importance that when the dies 20 and 22 are brought together and the nozzle 94 is brought into closing engagement with the passageway 164 in the dies that the nozzle and'pasageway should be in perfect alignment with one another, whereby the delivery of a shot of metal will be properly placed in the cavity 166. The alignment of these integers is set by the adjusting arms 110 and 112 on which the goose neck 86 is pivotally mounted. As shown in FIGURES 5 and 6, the centre line of the shaft 134 is set out a substantial distance from the centre line to the shaft 108 which is a terminal pivot point for the lower ends of the arms 110 and 112. It will be appreciated, therefore, that by turning screws 118 into their associated sleeves 116, the upper terminal ends of said arms 110 and'112 will pivot about their common shaft 108, thereby raising upwardly the goose neck mounting shaft 132.
This provides a means of adjusting the alignment of the nozzle 94 and dies passageway 164 which can be effected from the front of the machine 1 by its operator. To effect proper alignment, the operator merely places one die 20 in its closed position and, with the goose neck 86 in closed position having the nozzle 94 resting against the die, the screws 118 are individually adjusted so as to bring the nozzle into direct alignment with the portion of the passageway 164 on the closed die 20. Turning in both screws 118 effects raising of the nozzle; turning them out together causes lowering; and turning each screw 118 independently efiects a movement of the nozzle 94 to the left or right of the passageway 164.
Goose neck pump The cage portion 96 of the goose neck serves to enclose some of the main elements of the pump means 88 that are illustrated in FIGURE 10 and which comprise a shirt of sleeve 170, a cylinder 172 a piston or plunger 174 adapted to be reciprocated in the cylinder 172, a push rod 176 that threadably engages the upper end of the plunger 174 and a connecting rod 178 having at its lower end a caged or pivotal mounting in the upper end of push rod 176, its upper end being adapted for operative engagement with a pneumatic cylinder 181 It will be seen generally from FIGURES 4, 6, and in detail from FIGURE 11, that cylinder 172 is threadably connected to the lower end of the sleeve and the latter is mounted in the cage 96. The lower peripheral edge of the cylinder 172 is chamfered as at 169 so as to rest on a shoulder seat 171 (of matching angle) in the lower region of the goose neck. Now the upper end of the cage 96, shown as 168 in FIGURE 4, is bored to receive the upper portion of the sleeve 170 which extends above the top of the upper end 168 of the cage 96 as shown. Air cylinder 180 is provided with a flange 181 which engages the upper extended portion of the sleeve 171i and flange 181 is drawn down onto the top of sleeve 170 by bolts 184 passing through the flange 181 and being screwed into the upper portion 168 of the cage 96. A clearance 182 is maintained between the flange 181 and the cage 96 as shown in FIGURE 4 so that pressure of the flange 181 always bears against the sleeve 170 and not the cage 96.
The bolts 184 are provided with frusto-conical spring washers, such as bellville washers, 186 that are alternately inverted in stacked position to provide a resilient and high pressure mounting. It will be appreciated that screw- 2 ing down the bolts 184 exerts pressure through the walls of the sleeve 17% down onto the seat 171 in the lower end of the goose neck 86.
Cylinder 180, and the associated pump means 88, are actuated by an air valve 188 (FIGURE 3 It is to be noted from FIGURE 11 that the plunger 174 is greater in length than its associated cylinder 172. This is of prime significance because continued reciprocal action of the plunger 174 will cause only even wear on the cylinder 172. When actuated by the cylinder 180, plunger 174 is driven into a chamber 189 formed in the lower region of the goose neck 86 and which is connected to the valve means 90 by a passageway 191.
Goose neck valve In view of the fact that the delivery conduit 92 is at right angles to the chamber 189 and passageway 191, FIGURE 11 has been somewhat schematically drawn to more easily illustrate these portions of the goose neck 86 and the relation of the nozzle 94 with the dies 20 and 22.
In the introduction to the present disclosure it was pointed out that the main plate B was angularly mounted on the frame of the machine 1. Although this is not initially apparent from FIGURE 4, a close perusal of this drawing shows that the lower region of the conduit 92 is,
' in fact, vertically disposed in relation to the surface 200 of the molten metal in the furnace D. Referring to FIG- URE 11, the lower terminal end of the conduit 92 is directly above and spaced closely adjacent valve means 90 in a second chamber 193 that is connected to the plunger chamber 189 by the passageway 191 as above mentioned. Valve means 90 comprises a ball check 192 that rests by gravity in a collar 194 of a valve seat 196 that is threaded into, or otherwise secured to, the lower end of goose neck 86 as shown. Valve seat 196 also includes a port 190 that provides communication between the passageway 191, conduit 92 and plunger chamber 189 and the metal in the furnace D, this port 190 being opened or closed only by vertical movement of the valve.
It has been mentioned earlier in the present disclosure that the function of valve means 90 is to inhibit substantial back drainage of molten metal downwardly from the nozzle 94 towards the chamber 193 and the furnace D. When the chambers and passageways in the system of the goose neck 86 are full of molten metal, cylinder 180 is actuated to swing the nozzle into closing engagement with the rear of the dies 21), 22. Thereafter the cylinder 181) is actuated which drives plunger 174 down into its adjacent chamber 191, forcing the ball check onto its seat 196 to close the port 190 and simultaneously driving metal up in the conduit 92, out the nozzle 94, and into the die cavity 166 through the passageway. Immediately following the shot, and before drawing the goose neck 86 away from the dies, the cylinder 180 is again actuated to lift the plunger 174 on an intake stroke which creates a vacuum in the plunger chamber 189 and passageway 191, drawing in metal from furnace D through port 190 whereby ball check 192 immediately is lifted off its seat 196 and rises to close off the lower terminal end of conduit 92 to inhibit the above-mentioned back drainage of metal. In this described shot stroke and intake stroke, only a small amount of air is drawn into the conduit 92 through the nozzle 94, where the level of the metal remains roughly at the elevation indicated at'188. On the next shot stroke, the procedure is repeated, that is the plunger 174, on the downstroke, simultaneously forces the ball check 192 down onto its seat 196 to close port 190 and effect the shot of the metal.
It was not abnormal for casting machines of the prior art to' draw air into the conduit which exceeded A liter through the nozzle 94 because there is such a large tem-' perature change at the nozzle 94 where it contacts the dies that, if back drainage was completely prohibited, freezing troller indicated generally at 234 of the metal at the outer terminal end of the nozzle 94 would take place and a proper shot would not follow.
The temperature of the dies 20, 22 are maintained in the region of 350 to 400 F. to provide a quick forming of the casting. Zamac, in a molten state, will begin to freeze around 750 F. Obviously, when the nozzle 94 is in abutting relation with the dies 20, 22, there is a tendency for the colder surface of the dies to absorb heat from the nozzle 94. Now to ensure that the contact of these tools does not drain away an amount of heat that will bring about freezing of the metal in the end of the nozzle 94, the latter is wrapped with a heating coil 202 that is thermostatically controlled from the console F. Hot drainage is, therefore, compensated by the coil 202 which can be maintained at a given temperature within a 2 latitude drift. 7
It will also be seen from FIGURE 4 that an air line 204 is mounted on the conduit 92 and which terminates in a jet 206. After the casting has been formed in the cavity 166 of the dies 20, 22, the latter are actuated to their open blows the casting (which is thinly held by flashing to a core 24) into the castings receiver E (FlGURE l).
Manifolds The pneumatic valves 78 for actuating the cylinders 54; valve 162 for operating goose neck cylinder and the valve 188 for actuating the pump cylinder 180 are supplied with shown) is connected to the manifold 8t) at inlet 208 (FIG- URE 6) and pressure is applied in the direction of arrows 210 and 212 (FIGURE 3) so as to supply the manifolds on each side of the plate B. The air enters the valves via inlet conduits 214 (FIGURE 216 to an exhaust manifold 82. 7
There is also provided three separate cooling circuits for the machine, 1; A coolant is pumped into a junction box 218 (FIGURE 6) of the manifold 40 (FIGURE 3) from which the die shanks 42 are cooled by conduits A second circuit cools the goose neck 86 and adjusting arms and 112 by an inlet tube 220 and a coolant exhaust tube 222.
A third circuit cools the main plate B via inlet and outlet conduits 224 and 226 and passageways indicated generally at 228 in the plate B itself. 7
Electric control operating the above-mentioned valves are stacked'in the console F and they are sequentially actuated by a conwhich comprises a shaft 236 on which are mounted a plurality of cams 238, one for each switch 232. Each cam 23-8 consists of a multiplate lobe that can be adjusted to open or close the time log between the actuation of The cam shaft 236 is rotated by a small motor 240 through a reduction gear box 242, the speed of the motor 7 240 being variable through a control knob 244 connected to any known type of variable control such as a rheostat (not shown). FIGURE 3 shows a control switch 246 mounted beneath a block 68 and having an actuating rod position and a blast or air from the jet 206 air from a manifold 811. An air line (not 3) and leaves via conduits 7 each successive switch 232..
248. Each die and core is provided with a switch 246 and these are so wired in the electric circuit that, if any one switch 246 is not closed by the linkage of its associated die or core (via rod 248), the machine automatically will stop. This prevents closing of the dies if a piece of casting or the like is liable to jam the machine. Moreover, each switch 246 incorporates a warning light 250 in its circuit and these are mounted on the console F in full view of the operator as shown in FIGURE 12.
The machine 1 can be operated manually and, as shown in FIGURE 12, each die 20, 22 and core 24, 26 is provided with a manual control switch 252 for their respective valves, the switches being mounted on the console adjacent each warning light 250. There is also provided a manual air blast switch 254, and a pair of switches 256 controlling manually the pump air cylinder 180. In order to effect a shot manually, both switches must be pressed at the same time so as to prevent an operator from actuating a shot with one hand while, at the same time, standing in front of the machine.
A knob 258 controls the temperature of the coil 202 and, therefore, the heat of the nozzle 94, while the temperature of the furnace D is governed by a further control 260 having an indicator dial 262. Manual or automatic control is set by a selector switch 264, the arrangement being such that, when power is switched on, all the pneumatic valves 78, 162, and 188 are closed so that there is no pressure on their associated cylinders whereby the tools can be moved to various positions for adjustment. In this idle position, the goose neck 86 is in its open position so that the nozzle 94 is away from the dies 20, 22. The console F also includes a timer (not shown) which can be set so as to automatically switch on the heating elements in the furnace D a predetermined time prior to the starting of the machine. For instance, the time can be set for 5 oclock so that by 8 oclock the metal in the furnace D is ready for use.
Sequence of operation The selector switch 264 is set to automatic control and the speed control is adjusted. Line power is switched on and the following operational sequence occurs, keeping in mind that the machine 1 is initially in the idle position:
(a) Valves 78 are actuated which operate cylinder 54 to close the dies 26 and 22;
(b) Valves 78 are actuated to operate cylinders 54 to effect closing of the cores 24, 26;
(c) Actuation of valve 162 now operates cylinder 100 to swing goose neck 86 about pivot points 98, thereby bringing nozzle 94 into closed position with dies 21), 22;
(d) Air valve 188 is actuated causing cylinder 180 to drive plunger 174 down thereby pressing ball check 192 onto its seat 196 sealing shut the port 190, and effecting an injection or shot of metal into the die cavity 166;
(e) Valve 188 is again actuated to operate cylinder 180 thereby raising plunger 174, causing ball check 192 to raise off its seat 196 to close the lower terminal end of conduit 92 allowing inflow of metal through port 190 into chambers 189;
(f) Valve 162 is actuated to operate cylinder 100 thereby pivoting goose neck 86 to its open position 102 and retracting nozzle 94 from dies 20, 22;
g) One of the valves 78 is operated to actuate its cylinder 54 so as to retract the lower core 26;
(h) Two valves 78 are actuated so as to open both the dies 24?, 22 by means of cylinders 54;
(i) Remaining valve 78 operates its cylinder 54 to retract upper core 24; and
(j) Air jet 206 blows finished casting into the receiver bin E (FIGURE 1) and the machine is then at its idle point referred to above.
In conclusion, it will be appreciated that the die casting machine of the present invention provides for the rapid production (up to 80 strokes per minute) of miniature castings with high flexibility due to the small amount of 10 time required for changing of the dies and which is fully automatic in operation. Moreover, the micrometric adjustment of the dies 20, 22 by means of the sleeve 64 from the outside of the machine makes critical adjustment much simpler to carry out.
Of prime importance, is the fact that the valve means in the goose neck 86 practically eliminates any possibility of having air bubbles in the nozzles and die cavities 166 which could result in badly pitted castings. Further, removal of the cones 107, 108, and 109 from the fastening blocks 104 and 106 (FIGURE 9) allows rapid changing of the goose neck from the main plate B. In addition, by removing the bolts 184 and spring washers 186, the sleeve 170, plunger 174 and its cylinder 172 can quickly be removed from the goose neck cage 96 without cooling or removing the goose neck from the machine.
Also, the central opening in the plate B allows the rapid adjustment of the nozzle in relation to the dies and the nozzle can be changed from the outside of the machine without cooling or removing the goose neck.
While there is shown and described an embodiment which the invention may assume in practice, it will be understood that this embodiment is merely for the purpose of illustration and description, and that other forms can be devised with the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.
We claim:
1. A machine for producing metal castings comprising a frame,
a container having heating means mounted on said frame for melting and retaining metal for said castings, a unitary guide mounted on said main frame and having a central opening therein,
said guide having a plurality of co-planar guideways which converge on said central opening, at least a pair of dies and cores separately and slidably mounted for reciprocal movement in said guideways,
a pressure injector on said main frame for delivering metal from the container to the dies,
said injector including a plunger and a delivery conduit,
a nozzle detachably secured to one end of said conduit,
and a passageway in said dies for the admission of metal therein from said conduit and nozzle when said dies are in their closed position,
another passageway arranged in said injector extending from said plunger to the other end of said delivery conduit,
valve means arranged at one end of said passageway opposite the last mentioned end of said delivery conduit which is adapted for immersion in said metal to permit passage of the metal from said container into said delivery conduit and through said nozzle to said dies and cores,
means for pivotally mounting said injector on said main frame whereby said conduit and nozzle may be directed to open and closed positions relative to said guide and dies and whereby said nozzle may be moved into and out of operative engagement with the passageway in said dies,
said valve means inhibiting draining of the metal from the conduit into said container thereby substantially lowering admission of air into said nozzle and conduit to provide a relatively flaw-free casting.
2. A machine according to claim 1 wherein said heating means comprises a furnace mounted on said frame and having a chimney thereon,
means for automatically lowering ingots of said metal through said chimney into said furnace, said chimney being adapted to concentrate heat escaping therethrough from said furnace thereby to preheat the metal ingot 3. A machine according to claim 1 but wherein said guide is of unitary construction and of cruciform con- 1 1 figuration and having slidably mounted therein, the dies and cores of said machine.
4. A machine according to claim 3 wherein said guide includes pressure pads in the lower face thereof adapted to maintain said dies in proper registry with one another.
5. A machine according to claim 1 including automatic control means for actuation of said dies for the operation of said dies, cores, and injector.
6. A machine according to claim 1 including means for adjusting from the front of the machine, the nozzle in relation to the dies.
7. The combination as defined in claim 1, including means mounted on said frame into and through which a cooling agent is introduced for cooling the dies and other parts of the machine.
8. The combination as defined in claim 1, including a housing member,
a goose neck,
a sleeve mounted in said housing member and being adapted to retain pump means in said housing member,
said valve means being positioned in the lower region of said housing member,
a first chamber adjacent said pump means,
a second chamber adjacent said valve means and a passageway connecting said chamber,
said conduit extending from said valve means and terminating at one end of said goose neck,
said nozzle connected to said goose neck at the outer terminal end of said conduit,
and a port in said valve adapted to admit metal into said chambers and said goose neck,
said pump means being adapted upon actuation in one direction to eifect closing of said conduit by said valve means and to draw in the metal through the port and upon actuation in another direction to open said conduit and close said port by said valve means, and effect an injection of said metal through said conduit and nozzle.
9. The combination as defined in claim 1 including means for actuating and adjusting the movement of said die and core parts relative to one another,
a linkage arrangement including a lever arm having the inner end thereof pivotally connected to the respective dies and cores,
adjustable means arranged directly opposite and in alignment with the respective dies having the inner end thereof pivotally attached to the outer end of said lever arm,
micrometric control means arranged with each adjustable means for moving and adjusting the respective adjustable means relative to their respective dies and cores, and
a pneumatic cylinder having the piston rod thereof pivotally connected to said lever arm intermediate the length thereof at a point between said adjustable member and its respective dies and cores.
10. In a die casting machine of the class described,
a supporting member,
a guide block mounted on said supporting member having an opening arranged centrally therein,
two pairs of opposed guideways arranged in the said guide block with one pair arranged at ninety degrees to the other pair so as to provide substantially a cruciform configuration,
each of said guideways communicating with the central opening in said guide block,
a movable die part arranged in each of the opposed guideways of one pair and a movable core part arranged in each of the opposed guideways of the other pair,
means for actuating each of said core parts and said die parts toward and away from each other so that the inner opposed ends of said die parts and core parts meet and cooperate with one another in the central 7 opening in said guide block, means for automatically delivering and introducing a casting metal into said central opening and intoand between the die parts therein when they are moved to their protracted position, means arranged adjacent said supporting member for melting and retaining molten metal for the castings, and means for ejecting a cast article from between the die and core parts when the same are moved to their retracted position.
11. The combination as defined in claim 10, wherein the means for actuating each of the die parts and core parts includes means for adjusting the movement of each of said die and core parts relative to one another in the respective guideways and into the central opening in said guide block. 7
12. The combination as defined in claim 10, wherein the means for delivering and introducing casting metal into the cavities between the die and core parts consists of an injection nozzle arranged on the upper end of a gooseneck,
means for moving said gooseneck so that the nozzle carried thereby is adapted to move axially into the central opening in said guide block centrally thereof into communication with the die parts therein,
said gooseneck being pivotally attached to saidsupporting member so as to be movable relative thereto, means for actuating said gooseneck together with an injection nozzle carried thereby, and
means for delivering a casting material to and through said gooseneck to the injection nozzle.
13. The combination as defined in claim 11, wherein the means for actuating and adjusting the movement of said die and core parts relative to one another in the respective guideways and into the central opening in said block comprises a linkage arrangement including a lever arm having the inner end thereof pivotally connected to the respective die and core parts,
an adjustable member mounted on said supporting member directly opposite and in alignment with the respective die and core parts having the inner end thereof pivotally attached to the outer end of said lever arm,
micrometric control means arranged with each adjustable member for moving and adjusting the respective members relative to their respective die and core parts, and t a pneumatic cylinder mounted on said supporting member having the piston rod thereof pivotally connected to said lever arm intermediate the length thereof at a point between said adjustable member and its respective die and core part.
14. The combination as defined in claim 10, including an injector pump,
a cage,
a goose neck,
a sleeve mounted in said cage and being adapted to retain pump means in said cage,
a valve in the lower region of said cage,
a first chamber adjacent said pump means,
a second chamber adjacent said valve means and a passageway connecting said chamber,
a conduit extending from said valve means and terminating at one end of said goose neck,
a nozzle connected to said goose neck at the outer terminal end of said conduit,
and a port in said valve adapted to admit metal into said chambers and said goose neck,
said pump means being adapted upon actuation in one direction to effect closing of said conduit by said 7 valve means and to draw in the metal through the port and upon actuation in another direction to open said conduit and close said port by said valve means,
13 and effect an injection of said metal through said conduit and nozzle.
15. The combination as defined in claim 10, including means arranged around and on said supporting member into and through which a cooling agent is introduced for cooling the dies and other parts of the machine.
16. The combination as defined in claim 10, wherein the heating means comprises a furnace mounted adjacent said supporting member and having a chimney thereon, and means for automatically lowering ingots of the metal through said chimney into said furnace, said chimney being so constructed and arranged as to concentrate heat escaping therethrough from said furnace so as to preheat the metal ingot.
17. The combination as defined in claim 10, wherein the means for actuating each of said core parts and die parts and the means for automatically delivering and introducing a casting metal into the die parts are automatically controlled and all in timed relation relative to one another.
18. A die and core guide for a die casting machine comprising a body portion having a plurality of branches extending therefrom to provide said guide with a cruciform configuration,
each of said branches comprising a channellike passageway adapted to receive a die or core and comprising side walls, a top wall, and a 'bottom wall,
a plate secured to the lower face of said guide and including resilient means adapted to apply pressure to the lower surfaces of dies in the said channel thereby to keep said dies in registry with one another when said dies are brought together in face contacting relation, and
means on said guide for fastening the latter to a die casting machine.
19. A die and core guide assembly for a die casting machine of the class described comprising a body member having two pairs of opposed gnideways arranged therein with one pair arranged at substantially ninety degrees to the other pair so as to provide substantially a cruciform configuration, each of said gnideways communicating with a central opening in said body member,
a movable die part arranged in each of the opposed gnideways of one pair and a movable core part arranged in each of the opposed gnideways of the other pair, each of said guideways having side walls, a top wall and a bottom wall,
said bottom wall comprising a plate secured to the lower side of said body member having resilient means arranged therewith at least opposite each of said gnideways in which the die parts are positioned and which are adapted to apply pressure to the lower sides of die parts in said gnideways so as to maintain the die parts in registry with one another when said die parts are moved to contacting position, and
means for attaching said body member to a die casting machine.
29. The combination as defined in claim 19 including means arranged on the outer ends of each of said die and core parts to which actuating means are adapted to be connected for moving said die and core parts in the respective gnideways.
21. A die casting machine comprising a frame,
a furnace pot mounted on said frame for retaining and melting metal for said castings,
a die and core guide detachably secured to said frame having a central opening therein,
said guide having a plurality of co-planar gnideways which converge on said central opening, at least a pair of dies and cores separately and slidably mounted for reciprocal movement in said guideways,
means for reciprocating the dies in said guide,
a goose neck pump on said frame including an injector plunger,
a delivery conduit having a nozzle arranged on one end thereof and valve means arranged at the other end of said conduit for immersion in said pot and to cooperate with said plunger and conduit for injection of metal from said pot to said dies,
a passageway arranged between said plunger and said valve means,
a passage in said dies for receiving metal from said nozzle,
said goose neck being pivotally mounted to said frame whereby said conduit and nozzle may be brought into and out of operative engagement with said dies, and
adjusting means on said goose neck for aligning said nozzle and die passage.
22. A die casting machine according to claim 21 wherein said furnace pot includes a chimney thereon to concentrate escape of heat from said metal, and
means for automatically lowering bars of said metal through said chimney into said pot, the concentration of heat in said chimney serving to preheat said bar of metal.
23. A die casting machine comprising a frame,
a furnace pot mounted on said frame for retaining and melting metal for said castings,
guide means mounted on said frame including a pair of dies slidably mounted therein,
means for reciprocating the dies in said guide means,
a goose neck pump mounted on said frame adapted to deliver metal from said pot to said dies, and
including an injector plunger,
a pump chamber associated with said plunger,
a delivery conduit,
a valve chamber arranged at one end of said delivery conduit,
an intake valve disposed in the lower end of said goose neck opposite said chamber,
a nozzle on the other end of said conduit adapted to engage said dies for transmitting molten metal therein, and
a passageway interconnecting said pump and valve chambers,
said goose neck being pivotally mounted on said frame whereby said nozzle may be directed into and out of operative engagement with said dies.
24. A die casting machine comprising a frame,
a furnace pot mounted thereon for melting casting metal,
a base plate having an opening therethrough mounted on said frame,
a die guide detachably secured to the front face of said base plate and including an aperture therein in registry with said opening in said base plate,
a plurality of dies slidably mounted in said guide,
pneumatic means for reciprocating said dies into closing engagement with one another in the aperture of said guide and for withdrawing said dies into the confines of said guide,
a goose neck pump on the rear face of said base plate and including a delivery conduit, an injector plunger and valve means cooperating with said plunger for pumping metal into said conduit from said pot, one end of said delivery conduit having a nozzle thereon positioned in said base plate opening so as to engage an adjacent surface of said dies, the latter including a cavity therein and a passage for receiving metal from said conduit and nozzle,
said goose neck being pivotally mounted, substantially intermediate its length, to the rear face of said base plate whereby said conduit and nozzle may i be pivoted into and out of operative engagement with said dies,
a pair of adjusting members pivotally connected at one end to said goose neck on each side thereof and at their other ends to the front face of said base plate, said adjusting members, when actuated, effecting lateral and vertical movement to said nozzle in said base plate opening whereby said nozzle and die cavity passage may be aligned, and
a plurality of passageways formed in said base plate for circulation therethrough of a coolant.
25. A die casting machine comprising a frame,
a furnace pot on said frame for melting and retaining casting metal therein,
a base plate on said frame through,
v a goose neck pump pivotally mounted on said base plate and including valve means adapted to be immersed in said casting metal,
a delivery conduit having a nozzle thereon disposed within the opening of said base plate and an injector plunger for pumping metal from said furnace through said nozzle,
a unitary die guide detachably secured to the front face of said base plate and having a central aperture therein in registry with the opening in said base plate, said guide having a plurality of die body channels extending radially from said aperture in cruciform configuration,
a plurality of dies slidably disposed in said channels,
means on said base plate for reciprocating said dies to an inoperative position within said channels and to an operative position where said dies abut one another in face to face relation in said aperture over said base opening, and
said dies including a passage for receiving metal from said delivery conduit and nozzle.
26. A die casting machine according to claim 25 wherein said die reciprocating means comprises a pneumatic having an opening therecylinder for each die pivotally secured to said base plate,
.a link and pin connection between each said cylinder and each die for operation thereof, and
wherein a coolant is circulated through said die bodies in said die guide.
27. A die casting machine according to claim 26 including a plurality of adjusting cones mounted on said base plate each in alignment with an adjacent channel of said die guide,
said cones being pivotally secured at one end to the link and pin connections of said dies whereby reciprocal travel of the latter may be controllable. 28. A die casting machine according to claim 25 wherein the channels of said die guide include resilient pressure pads in the lower walls thereof adapted to apply upward pressure on said die bodies to retain the opposing faces of said dies in registry with one another.
29. A die casting machine comprising a frame,
a furnace pot mounted on said frame for melting and retaining casting metal therein,
a base plate having an opening therethrough mounted on said frame,
a die guide detachably secured to the front face of said base plate and including an aperture therein in registry with said base plate opening,
a plurality of dies slidably mounted in said guide and 7 means for reciprocating said dies into closing engagement with one another in the aperture of said guide,
said dies including a cavity therein and a passage communicating with the base plate opening for receiving casting metal into said cavity, and
a goose neck pump on the rear face of said base plate 15 for pumping molten metal from said furnace pot to said die passage and cavity, said goose neck comprising a substantially cage-like housing pivotally secured inter.- mediate its length to said rear face of the base plate, the lower end of said housing adapted to be immersed in said molten metal,
an intake port and control valve therefor in said lower end,
an arm projecting upwardly and angularly away from said lower end of the housing and including a de livery conduit therein having at one end an inlet adjacent said valve and at the other end a nozzle disposed within said base plate opening to operatively engage the passage in said dies,
a cylinder seated in the lower end of said housing,
a plunger slidably mounted in said cylinder, 7
means on said housing for reciprocating said plunger in the cylinder,
a pump chamber in the housing adjacent the lower end of said cylinder and plunger, and
a passageway in the lower end of said housing interconnecting said plunger chamber with said intake port and control valve, the latter being responsive to said plunger whereby, when said plunger is drawn upward in said cylinder the intake port is opened to allow 'inflow of metal and, when said plunger is forced downwardly into said pump chamber, said intake port will be closed by the valve to allow said metal to be pumped through said nozzle and into said dies, and
means for rocking said goose neck about its pivotal mounting whereby said nozzle is brought into and out of engagement with said dies.
30. A die casting machine according to claim 29 wherein the temperature of said dies is controlled by a coolant and the temperature of said nozzle is controlled by heating means to provide rapid forming of said casting.
31. A die casting machine according to claim 29 where in said plunger reciprocating means comprises a push rod connected to th Upper end of said plunger and a pneumatic cylinder operatively connected to the upper end of said push rod,
a sleeve in said housing surrounding said push rod and being connected to the upper end of said plunger cylinder, the upper end of said sleeve protruding above the upper end of said housing,
said plunger cylinder being freely positioned in said housing and having its lower end abutting said housing in face to face relation coaxially of said vpump chamber, and
a flange plate detachably and resiliently mounted on the upper end of said housing and engaging said upper end of the sleeve therein whereby a clamping force thereon is transmitted to said plunger cylinder to seat the latter in said housing. a
32. A die casting machine according to claim 31 wherein the length of said plunger is greater than its associated cylinder to provide constant wear through the length of the wall therein.
plunger is drawn upwardly, the ball check will be lifted off said valve seat by incoming metal and will close said conduit inlet and, upon downward action of said plunger, said ball check will be forced onto said valve seat to close said intake port and open said conduit inlet to a110w passage of metal through said nozz1e to said dies.
Referemes Ciefl UNITED STATES PATENTS Willard 18-19 X Bader 22241 Korsmo 164-318 Cowan 18-30 Wilcoxon 164-320 Madwed 164-318 Morton 164-149 Burkett 103-103 3'. SFENCER QVERHGLSER, Primary Examiner. R. S. ANNEAR, Assistant Examiner.
US44272565 1964-09-29 1965-03-25 Die casting machine Expired - Lifetime US3364981A (en)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3495652A (en) * 1967-02-06 1970-02-17 Dynacast Int Ltd Die casting machine with cruciform die guide and pivotally mounted pot and nozzle
US3595301A (en) * 1968-12-26 1971-07-27 Nat Lead Co Method of making intricate die castings
US3777943A (en) * 1972-04-24 1973-12-11 Diemakers Inc Gooseneck valve arrangement for diecasting machine
US4219068A (en) * 1979-05-30 1980-08-26 Dynacast International Limited Die casting machine
US4261414A (en) * 1979-03-21 1981-04-14 Techmire Ltee. Die casting machine
EP0368573A2 (en) * 1988-11-08 1990-05-16 Electrovert Ltd. Method and apparatus for casting metal alloys with low melting temperatures
EP0406559A2 (en) * 1989-07-06 1991-01-09 Hitchiner Manufacturing Co., Inc. Countergravity casting apparatus and method with magnetically actuated valve to prevent molten metal run-out

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US1352161A (en) * 1915-08-09 1920-09-07 Theodore A Willard Method of forming hard-rubber storage-battery jars
US1903751A (en) * 1930-05-06 1933-04-18 Bader Kaspar Device for feeding the casting pots of linotype and similar machines working with soft metals
US1964324A (en) * 1932-12-22 1934-06-26 Madison Kipp Corp Die casting machine
US2461723A (en) * 1945-05-07 1949-02-15 Ysak Pessell Apparatus for molding wax
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US3209416A (en) * 1962-05-02 1965-10-05 Glen R Morton Vertical vacuum diecasting machine
US3248759A (en) * 1963-03-28 1966-05-03 Dow Chemical Co Apparatus for delivery of predetermined amounts of molten metals to a die casting machine

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1352161A (en) * 1915-08-09 1920-09-07 Theodore A Willard Method of forming hard-rubber storage-battery jars
US1903751A (en) * 1930-05-06 1933-04-18 Bader Kaspar Device for feeding the casting pots of linotype and similar machines working with soft metals
US1964324A (en) * 1932-12-22 1934-06-26 Madison Kipp Corp Die casting machine
US2461723A (en) * 1945-05-07 1949-02-15 Ysak Pessell Apparatus for molding wax
US3068539A (en) * 1960-08-04 1962-12-18 Thompson Ramo Wooldridge Inc High pressure permanent molding
US3209416A (en) * 1962-05-02 1965-10-05 Glen R Morton Vertical vacuum diecasting machine
US3181212A (en) * 1962-05-31 1965-05-04 Automatic Casting Corp Die casting machine
US3248759A (en) * 1963-03-28 1966-05-03 Dow Chemical Co Apparatus for delivery of predetermined amounts of molten metals to a die casting machine

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3495652A (en) * 1967-02-06 1970-02-17 Dynacast Int Ltd Die casting machine with cruciform die guide and pivotally mounted pot and nozzle
US3595301A (en) * 1968-12-26 1971-07-27 Nat Lead Co Method of making intricate die castings
US3777943A (en) * 1972-04-24 1973-12-11 Diemakers Inc Gooseneck valve arrangement for diecasting machine
US4261414A (en) * 1979-03-21 1981-04-14 Techmire Ltee. Die casting machine
US4219068A (en) * 1979-05-30 1980-08-26 Dynacast International Limited Die casting machine
EP0368573A2 (en) * 1988-11-08 1990-05-16 Electrovert Ltd. Method and apparatus for casting metal alloys with low melting temperatures
EP0368573A3 (en) * 1988-11-08 1991-05-29 Electrovert Ltd. Method and apparatus for casting metal alloys with low melting temperatures
EP0406559A2 (en) * 1989-07-06 1991-01-09 Hitchiner Manufacturing Co., Inc. Countergravity casting apparatus and method with magnetically actuated valve to prevent molten metal run-out
EP0406559A3 (en) * 1989-07-06 1991-06-12 Hitchiner Manufacturing Co., Inc. Countergravity casting apparatus and method with magnetically actuated valve to prevent molten metal run-out

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