US3350223A - Plural step method for cleaning the liquid cooling system of an internal combustion engine - Google Patents

Plural step method for cleaning the liquid cooling system of an internal combustion engine Download PDF

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US3350223A
US3350223A US55116766A US3350223A US 3350223 A US3350223 A US 3350223A US 55116766 A US55116766 A US 55116766A US 3350223 A US3350223 A US 3350223A
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engine
valve
wire
system
air
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Jr Robert G Monteath
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Jr Robert G Monteath
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01PCOOLING OF MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; COOLING OF INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01P11/00Component parts, details, or accessories not provided for in, or of interest apart from, groups F01P1/00 - F01P9/00
    • F01P11/06Cleaning; Combating corrosion
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C23COATING METALLIC MATERIAL; COATING MATERIAL WITH METALLIC MATERIAL; CHEMICAL SURFACE TREATMENT; DIFFUSION TREATMENT OF METALLIC MATERIAL; COATING BY VACUUM EVAPORATION, BY SPUTTERING, BY ION IMPLANTATION OR BY CHEMICAL VAPOUR DEPOSITION, IN GENERAL; INHIBITING CORROSION OF METALLIC MATERIAL OR INCRUSTATION IN GENERAL
    • C23GCLEANING OR DEGREASING OF METALLIC MATERIAL BY CHEMICAL METHODS OTHER THAN ELECTROLYSIS
    • C23G3/00Apparatus for cleaning or pickling metallic material
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28GCLEANING OF INTERNAL OR EXTERNAL SURFACES OF HEAT-EXCHANGE OR HEAT-TRANSFER CONDUITS, e.g. WATER TUBES OR BOILERS
    • F28G9/00Cleaning by flushing or washing, e.g. with chemical solvents
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01PCOOLING OF MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; COOLING OF INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01P11/00Component parts, details, or accessories not provided for in, or of interest apart from, groups F01P1/00 - F01P9/00
    • F01P11/06Cleaning; Combating corrosion
    • F01P2011/065Flushing

Description

Oct 3 1967 R. G. MONTEATH, JR 3, 3

PLURAL STEP METHOD FOR CLEANING THE LIQUID COOLING SYSTEM OF AN INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE Original Filed Oct. 21, 1960 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENITOR.

ATTORNEY O t 3 1967 R. G.-MONTEATH, JR 3, 3

PLURAL STEP METHOD FOR CLEANING THE LIQUID COOLING SYSTEM OF AN INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE Original Filed Oct. 21, 1960 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. ROBERT G MONTEATH, JR.

ma r

ATTORNEY O 3 v1967 R. G. MONTEATH, JR 3,35

PLURAL STEP METHOD FOR CLEANING THE LIQUID COOLING SYSTEM OF AN INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE Original Filed Oct. 21, 1960 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR. ROBERT G MONTEATH, JR.

AT TOR NEY SYSTEM O 3 1967 R. G. MONTEATH, JR

. PLURAL STEP METHOD FOR CLEANING THE LIQUID UOOLING OF AN INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE Original Filed Oct. 21, 1960 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 Heater Radiator INVENTOR. ROBERT G MONTE-IATH, JR. BY W ,WYW

ATTORNEY O t 31, 19.67 R. G. MONTEATH, JR 3,

PLURAL STEP METHOD FOR CLEANING THE LIQUID COOLING SYSTEM OF AN INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE Original Filed 001;. 21, 1960 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR. ROBERT G. MONTEATH, JR.

ATTO NEY United States Patent 3,350,223 PLURAL STEP METHOD FOR CLEANING THE LIQUID COOLING SYSTEM OF AN INTER- NAL COMBUSTION ENGINE Robert G. Monteath, Jr., 226 Hilliard Ave., Asheville, NC. 28801 Continuation of application Ser- No. 313,626, Oct. 3, 1963, which is a division of application Ser. No. 64,120, Oct. 21, 1960, now Patent No. 3,115,145. This application May 18, 1966, Ser. No. 551,167

3 Claims. (Cl. 13422) This is a continuation application of application Ser. No. 313,626, filed Oct. 3, 1963, now abandoned, and the latter application is a divisional of application Ser. No. 64,120, filed Oct. 21, 1960, now Patent No. 3,115,145.

This invention relates to a cleaning method and is more particularly concerned with a method of automatically cleaning liquid circulating systems. The present invention is particularly concerned with a method for cleaning the liquid cooling systems of internal combustion engines.

Liquid cooled internal combustion engines usually include an engine block which is hollow to provide a chamber or a plurality of chambers through which a liquid coolant is circulated around the cylinder walls of the engine in order to cool the engine. This liquid coolant is then pumped to a heat exchanger such as a radiator Where the liquid is cooled and recirculated to the engine. The heat exchanger or radiator consists of an assembly of many small interconnecting finned passageways which are usually constructed of a material of high heat conductivity. This assembly is usually located directly in an airstream so that the multiplicity of finned surfaces may dissipate the heat to the air stream.

With time and use, the heat transferring components which make up the cooling system become less and less eliicient due to the deposit of scale and the formation of rust. These accumulations of scale and rust combine to form an insulating blanket on the walls of the cooler passageways within the engine and within the radiator. This insulating blanket may impede or completely block the proper transfer of heat from the engine to the coolant and from the coolant to the radiator and thence to the air stream.

Such accumulations of rust and scale may not be uniform or may not completely blanket the walls and therefore may form spots or areas which cause hot spots, resulting in minor to severe damage to the internal engine parts in the affected areas.

Deposits, if permitted to build up in the engine passageways and the heat exchanger, will result in overheating to a degree suflicient to subject the internal engine parts to temperatures which may be beyond their design limitations and the physical properties of the metal from which they are made. This overheating condition is further aggravated by the fact that the lubricating oils may break down and lubrication will cease, thereby permitting metal to metal contact which may destroy many working parts of the engine. Thus it is seen that periodic cleaning of the entire cooling system with the removal of rust and scale is most desirable.

Briefly, the method of the present invention is carried out with an apparatus which includes a compact unit which may be moved from place to place and is employed for automatically cleaning the cooling system of an internal combustion engine. The device or apparatus includes a hot solution tank which has heating elements for heating a hot, usually caustic, solution to a predetermined. temperature. A pump, connected to the tank, circulates the hot solution past a check valve to a reciprocating valve. The reciprocating valve has two pipes which are respectively connected to the top of the engine and the top of the radiator of the automobile. By reciprocating the reciprocating valve, the hot solution may be directed alternately into the radiator and into the engine. A discharge conduit is also connected to the reciprocating valve so that when the hot solution is directed through one of the connections to the cooling system, the other connection will be connected with the discharge conduit. The discharge conduit leads to a valve which is adapted to direct the discharge end to the hot solution tank or discharge to a drain leading from the machine.

Air and cold Water are also connected to the system between the check valve and the reciprocating valve, both passing through electrically controlled valves. A by-pass valve is also provided so that the pressure of the hot solution may be regulated as desired. A similar regulator valve is provided for the air. Control means are connected to various electrical components for automatically actuating the control elements so that once started, the device of the present invention will operate automatically until it is automatically cut 01f after properly cleaning the cooling system.

The process of the present invention includes the steps of introducing air and clean water alternately in one direction and the other into the cooling system whereby loose scale and rust are removed from the cooling system and directed to admin. Thereafter, only the air is directed through the cooling system so as to remove substantially all of the coolant from the system and prevent unnecessary contamination of the hot solution which is later used. Next, the hot solution is circulated alternately, in one direction and the other, through the cooling system and the pressure differential of the cooling system is read so as to determine when the cooling system has been adequately cleansed. Thereafter, the hot solution is blown out of the system and back into its tank, and cold water and air are again introduced into the cooling system so as to remove all residual amounts of the solution.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a process for cleaning cooling systems which is efficient and requires a minimum of labor and time.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a method for cleaning an internal combustion engine cooling system wherein the necessity for removing from the mounting therefor the radiator of the internal combustion engine is obviated.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a method of cleaning a cooling system of an internal com-' bustion engine which will simultaneously clean the engine block, the radiator, the heater, and any auxiliary components such as the cooling system of the automatic transmission and the torque converter.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a method for cleaning a cooling system of an internal combustion engine which will reduce the amount of down time for the equipment.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a method for cleaning a cooling system wherein it is automatically determined when the system is adequately cleaned.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a method of cleaning a cooling system in such a manner as to reduce the likelihood of damaging the radiator, gaskets and finishes.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a method for cleaning cooling systems which will effectivlely clean the system with a minimum amount of materia Another object of the present invention is to provide a method for cleaning a cooling system which will alternately heat and cool the cooling surfaces of the cooling system so as to expand and contract the metals thereof and thereby tend to remove the adhered rust and scale.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a fully automatic process for cleaning a cooling system.

Other objects, features and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein like characters of reference designate corresponding parts throughout the several views, and wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a cleaning device constructed in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a rear view of the machine shown in FIG. 1, casing thereof being shown as partially broken away to reveal the interior of the cleaning device.

FIG. 3 is a cross sectional view taken along line 33 in FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a cross sectional view taken along line 44 in FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a schematic diagram having the piping arrangement of the device illustrated in FIG. 1 connected in typical fashion to the engine block, heater and radiator of an automobile.

FIG. 6 is a graph showing a typical cycle of the device shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 7 is a wiring diagram of the machine shown in FIG. 1.

Referring now in detail to the embodiment chosen for the purpose of illustrating the present invention, it being understood that, in its broader aspects, the present invention is not limited to the exact details depicted in the drawings, numeral 10 denotes the casing or housing of the cleaning device which is preferably supported on casters 11 so that it may be moved from place to place and arranged over drains in the floor of a shop. In more detail, the casing includes a rectangular box shaped member having a base 12 mounted on the casters 11, a back 13, a front 14, sides 15 and 16, and top 17, all formed of sheet metal.

As seen in FIG. 1, the forward portion of the top includes, in its forward portion, a hinged cover plate 18 provided with louvers 19 and a recesed portion 20, the recessed portion 20 containing a latch (not shown) for securing the cover plate 18 in place. Rearwardly of the cover plate is an upwardly and rearwardly inclined panel plate 21 provided with ends 22 and a top 23. On the panel plate 21 are mounted the various gauges and control valves as will more fully be described hereinafter.

Below the cover plate 18 is a hot solution tank 24 defined by a vertically disposed centrally located partition 25, extending between sides 15 and 16, and by front14 and sides 15 and 16. Preferably, the tank 24 is insulated by insulating material, such as insulation 26 and 27, over the inner surface of which are walls, such as walls 28 and 29, forming the inner surface of tank 24. Partition is essentially parallel to and about the same height as the front 14.

Between the front 14 and the partition 25 is a second and shorter partition 30 which also extends between sides 15 and 16 along bottom 12. Thus is formed a settling tank 31 within the hot solution tank 24. A screen or filter 32 is arranged over the upper end of settling tank 31, preferably at an angle with respect to the horizontal. Spaced stiffening ribs such as rib 33 fix the partition 30 in place.

Spaced above the bottom 12 within tank 24 and supported between wall 29 and partition 30 is a fire box 34, one side of which is appropriately drilled to provide staggered recesses which receive the ends of the fire wall heating tubes 35. The fire wall heating tubes 35 extend horizontally in a transverse direction, parallel to partitions 25 and 30, the other ends of tubes 35 being supported by side 16 and enclosed by louver 36 on side 16.

Communicating with the interior of fire box 34, through partition 25 and wall 29, is a conventional fuel nozzle 37 having a blower 38 driven by motor 39. The nozzle 37, blower 38 and motor 39 are supported by a brace 40 extending up from bottom 12. Above the motor 39 is a 4 fuel tank 41 mounted on partition 25, the tank 41 feeding fuel, such as fuel oil, via a fuel valve 42 and a thermostatic valve 43, through tube 44 to nozzle 37. The thermostatic valve 43 includes a thermostat 45 which projects through partition 25 and wall 29 into the hot solution tank 24.

It will therefore be seen that I have provided a means for heating the solution in the hot solution tank 24 wherein the feed of fuel from tank 41 is regulated by the thermostat 45, the air for combustion being supplied to the nozzle 37 by blower 38, the fuel being burned in fire box 34, and the hot gases being discharged via tubes 35 and louver 36 to the atmosphere.

, As best seen in FIG. 3, a pipe 50 which projects through partition 25 and wall 29 communicates with tank 24 at its lower portion, the pipe 50 being connected to the intake of a centrifugal pump 51 which is driven by a motor 52 supported by bottom 12. The pump 51 discharges via discharge pipe 53 to a T connection 54. As best seen in FIG. 5, one pipe 56 leads from the T connection 55, via a non-return or check valve 57 to a second T connection 58 and pipe 59 to a four-way valve 60.

The T connection 58 is provided with a third pipe 61 having at its outer end a coupling 62 by which a hose 63 from a water pipe of a building may be connected and disconnected to the system of the present invention. In pipe 61 is a solenoid controlled valve 64 having a solenoid 65. The arrangement is such that when valve 64 is opened, water is urged by line pressure from hose 63, via valve 64 and pipe 61, through T connection 58 and pipe 59 into the four-way valve 60, check valve 57 preventing the water from traveling back through pipe 56. On the other hand, when valve 64 is closed and pump 51 is actuated, hot solution from tank 24 is pumped by pump 51 via pipes 50 and 53, through the connection 54, pipe 56, check valve 57, the connection 58 and pipe 59 into four-way valve 60.

At the bend in pipe 59 is an elbow connection 66 through which projects an air nozzle 67. The nozzle 67 is connected to one end of a compressed air tube 68, the other end of which is provided with a nipple 69 for connection with an external air line 70 leading from a compressor (not shown). In air tube 68 is a T connection 71, a needle valve 72 and a solenoid operated control valve 73, all in series in that order from the nipple 69. The control valve 73 is provided with a solenoid 74. Between the valves 72 and 73 is a pressure gauge 75.

At the T connection 71 an air tube 76 leads past conventional air filters and lubricators 77 to a branch connection 78, and branch tubes 79 and 80 lead respectively from branch connection 78 to the solenoid controlled double acting air cylinders 81 and 82.

Air cylinder 81 includes a solenoid actuated control valve 83 and is pivotally mounted on a bracket 84 supported from partition 25. The piston of air cylinder 81 is connected to a piston rod 85 having at its outer end a clevis 86, the clevis 86 being pivotally connected to a lever 87 which actuates valve 60. Similarly, air cylinder 82 is provided with a control valve 88 on bracket 89, the bracket 89 being supported from bottom 12. The piston rod 90 of air cylinder 82 is connected by a clevis 91 to a lever 92 which controls a valve 93 which will be discussed in more detail later.

The four way valve 60 is so constructed that pipe 59, in one position of the valve 60, communicates with a pipe connected to valve 60 and, in another position, communicates with a pipe 101 connected to valve 60. A discharge pipe 102 is also connected to four way valve 60 so that in one position, as fluid from pipe 59 is directed to pipe 100, the discharge pipe 102 is connected to pipe 101. Conversely, when the valve 60 is shifted and pipe 59 communicates with pipe 101, pipe 100 communicates with pipe 102.

The discharge pipe 102 leads to the two way valve 93 where the fluid in pipe 102 may be selectively directed to a drain pipe 104 or to a hot solution return pipe 105. The hot solution return pipe 105 passes through partition and wall 29, and through partition to terminate in a T connection 106 disposed horizontally in the tank 31. The drain pipe 104 passes through the bottom 12 to terminate 'therebeneath.

Referring now to the T connection 54, it will be seen in FIGS. 3 and 5 that a cross connect pipe 107 having a regulator or by-pass valve 108 leads from the T connection 54 to a T connection 109 of pipe 102. Thus, when pump 51 is operating, the pressure and volume of the hot solution pumped via pipe 56 to valve 60 may be regulated by the opening through valve 108.

The device of the present invention is so constructed that the handle 110 for valve 108 projects through panel plate 21. Arranged above the handle 110 is a pressure gauge 111 which leads to pipe 56 between T connection 54 and check valve 57. Thus, the pressure of the hot solution may be read as the valve 108 is adjusted by handle 110. Likewise, the valve 72 is provided with a handle 112 which is arranged on panel plate 21 below the pressure gauge which is also mounted on panel plate 21. Another pressure gauge 113 is connected to the pipe 102 and is also mounted on panel plate 21. The pressure gauge 113 indicates the back pressure on the system.

It will be observed in FIG. 5 that the pipes and 101 are adapted to be connected to flexible hoses 115 and 116, respectively, the flexible hoses 115, 116 extending externally of the casing 100 through back -13. The hoses 115 and 116 are adapted to be connected to an engine block 117 and a radiator 118 of say an automobile engine by removing the coupling between the engine and radiator.

Electrical circuit Referring now to the wiring diagram of FIG. 7, the device of the present invention is adapted to be connected to a single phase 220 volt line with the ground wire 200, a hot wire 201 and a hot wire 202. Between wires 200 and 201 is a volt potential, and between wires 200 and 202 is a 110 volt potential, which between wires 201 and 202 is a 220 volt potential. A wire 203, leading from wire 201, and the ground wire 200 pass through a toggle switch 204 which, when closed, supplies current via wires 205 and 206 to the motor 39 and a constant spark ignition 207 in parallel with each other, the current passing through the switch 208 of thermostat 45. Thus, as soon as the toggle switch 204 is closed, fuel is fed to the nozzle 37 and ignited by igniter 207, thereby commencing the heating of the hot solution in tank 24.

Current is also supplied through toggle switch 204 to wires 210 and 211, wire 210- forming-a hot main bus. Wire 211 leads to a normally open on switch 213 connected in series with a normally closed off switch 214, a normally closed switch 215 of cycle completion relay R1 having a coil 216 and the coil 217 of a relay R2 to wire 210. The closing of the on switch 213, therefore, supplies current to coil 217 which closes a switch 218 to supply current from switch 214 via wires 219, high pressure cut-off switch 220 and wire 221 through timer T1 to bus 210. This starts timer T1 and energizes the primary coil of a transformer 222 in parallel with timer T1, the secondary coil of which is connected via wire 223 to the center tap of the double acting solenoid 83 of cylinder 81 operating the four way valve 60. The ends of the solenoid connect to the respective poles of switches 224 and 225 6 of the timer T1.

Preferably timer T1 is a 15 second timer whereby each 15 seconds, switches 224 and 225 are altered, with switch 224 closing as switch 225 is opened. This causes current to be supplied alternately to the two coils of solenoid 83 whereby air is supplied first to one side and then to the I other side of the piston within cylinder 81 to thereby shift valve 60 each 15 seconds (or some other predetermined time). It is therefore seen that so long as the machine is a functioning, valve 60 is oscillated.

The energizing of coil 217 of relay R2 also closes a switch 230 which is a hold-down switch jumping the on switch 213. Thus, switch 213 need only be momentarily closed to energize relay R2 until off switch 214 is open.

From wire 221, a wire 231 leads to the rotor or distributor arm 232 of a stepping relay R3 having twelve commutator poles (numbered for convenience 1 through 12). Each impulse fed to the coil 233 will step or index arm 232 from one pole to the next. With the arm 232 at pole 1, a circuit is made via wire 234 and normally closed switch 235 to energize coil 233, the circuit being made through wire 236 and wire 237 to wire 210. This steps arm 232 to pole 2 where a circuit is made via wire 238 to start the timer T2, the circuit being completed by wire 239 and wire 237 to bus 210.

Timer T2 is preferably a five minute del-ay timer which actuates its switch 240 at the end of five minutes, switch 240 normally being in the position shown in FIG. 7. Wire 238 also leads to switch 240, and in its unactuated position a circuit is made via wire 241 through solenoid 64 to wire 210, thereby energizing solenoid 64 for a period of five minutes to open valve 63 and introduce water through pipes 61 and 59 into valve 60. In parallel with solenoid 64, between wires 241 and 210, is a relay coil 242 of relay R4, which upon being energized from wire 241 via wire 243 shifts its switch 244 from the position shown in FIG. 7 and supplies current via wire 243 across switch 244 through solenoid 74 to wire 210. Thus, simultaneously with the energizing of water solenoid 64, the air solenoid 74 is energized.

At the end of five minutes, timer T2 shifts switch 240 which supplies current from wire 238 via wire 245 to pulse the relay coil 233. This shifts arm 232 to pole 3 of relay R3, thereby deenergizing to stop and reset timer T2. The shifting of switch 240 and the almost simultaneous deenergizing of wire 238, of course, terminates current to water solenoid 64, relay 242 and air solenoid 74. Thus, the flow of water to valve 60 is terminated. The flow of air, however, is not terminated since switch 244 returns to its original position and current is continued to air solenoid 74, via wire 246, switch 247, wire 248, and switch 244.

It will be observed that switch 247 is associated with timer T3 and when unactuated is in the position shown in FIG. 7. With the arm 232 resting on pole 3 of relay R3, timer T3 is energized via wires 246, 249 and 237. Timer T3 is preferably a one minute timer which maintains air solenoid 74 energized for one minute after the water solenoid 64 has been deenergized. After a period of one minute, timer T3 shifts switch 247, thereby breaking the circuit to air solenoid 74 and making a circuit from wire 246 via wire 250 and wire 234 to pulse relay coil 233 of relay R3. This causes arm 232 to shift to pole 4 of relay R3 which interrupts current via wire 246 to timer T3 causing the timer to stop and reset.

With the arm 232 on pole 4 of relay R3, current is supplied via wire 251 to energize simultaneously the primary coil of a transformer 252 and the coil 253 of a relay R5, the primary coil of transformer 252 and coil 253 being in parallel and both being connected to wire 210. The secondary coil of transformer 252 is in a closed circuit, including wires 254 and 255 to energize the drain closed side of solenoid 88 for actuating the air cylinder 82 to position valve 93 in a position to direct the return flow from valve 60' and pipe 102 to pipe 105. This, of course, directs the return fluid into the settling tank 31.

Simultaneously with the energization of transformer 252, the energization of coil 253 of relay R3 closes switch 256 to make a circuit via wires 251 and 257 to pulse relay 233. This shifts relay arm 232 of relay R3 to pole 5.

With relay arm 232 resting on pole 5 of the relay R3, wire 260 supplies current through timer T4 via wire 261 to wires 236 and 237 to wire 210. This starts timer T4 which may be set to operate from 0 to 60 minutes, de-

7 pending upon how long it is desired to pass the hot solution through the engine to be cleaned. Wire 260 also supplies current via switch 262 and wire 263 through the coil 264 of relay R6 to wire 210. This energizes coil 264 and 257 to pulse the coil 233 of relay R3. This shifts arm 232 to pole 6 of relay R3. The shifting of switch 262 breaks the circuit to relay coil 264 of relay R6 and hence switches 265 and 266 open, deenergizing motor 52 and stopping pump 51.

With arm 232 resting on pole 6 of relay R3, current is supplied via wire 270 to wire 246 and the operation described for when arm 232 was resting on pole 3 of relay R3 is repeated, introducing air for one minute to blow the hot solution from the engine back into the settling tank 31. At the end of one minute, coil 233 is pulsed as described for the operation of the pole 3 situation, and the relay coil 233 steps the arm 232 to pole 7 of relay R3.

At pole 7 wire 271 provides a circuit through coil 272 of relay R7 to wire 210 and through the primary coil of transformer 273 in parallel therewith. The secondary coil of transformer 273 is in a closed circuit with the drain opening portion of solenoid 88 and hence causes a shifting of the valve 93 to align pipes 102 and 104 for discharge of fluid from the machine. The energizing of coil 272 of relay R3 causes switch 274 to close, thereby making a circuit from wire 271 to wire 257, thereby causing pulsing of coil 233 to index arm 232 to pole 8, thereby deenergizing the circuit through wire 271. At pole 8, Wire 275 leads to pole 2 and wire 238. This causes the simultaneous introduction of air and water to valve 60 for a period of five minutes as described for the operation of the pole 2 situation. At the end of the period determined by timer T2, the actuation of switch 240 will cause pulsing of relay coil 233 and a shifting of arm 232 to pole 9, thereby shutting off the water to valve 60.

At pole 9, wire 276 interconnects pole 9 to poles 6 and 3 for the one minute air blast as described above for the pole 3 situation. At the termination of one minute, timer T3 actuates switch 241, resulting in a termination of the air to valve 60 and a pulsing of relay coil 233 to shift arm 233 to poles 10 and 11 successively and then to pole 12, the poles 10 and 11 being interconnected to each other and to wire 277 for pulsing coil 233.

When arm 232 reaches pole 12 of relay R3, current is supplied via wire 278 through the normally closed switch 279 (connected to the on switch 213) to energize coil 216 of relay R1. This opens switch 215, thereby deenergizing the coil 217 of relay R2 to open switches 218 and 230. The opening of switch 218 deenergizes the entire timing circuit while the opening switch 230 breaks the hold-down circuit which made a circuit to relay coil 217. Thus, the on switch 213 is again effective to repeat the cycle heretofore described. At pole 12, the arm 233 is automatically returned to pole 1 because it does not latch in place and therefore the circuit is ready for a subsequent cycle.

Operation summary From the foregoing detail description, the operation is readily apparent. The machine is made ready by connecting it to a source of compressed air, water under pressure and a single phase 220 volt circuit. Of course, it will be understood that if only a 110 volt motor 52 is employed, a 110 volt circuit may be employed simply by connecting wires 202 and 200 together. In normal use, however, the wires 200, 201 and 202 are connected to the three leads of the circuit. The source of compressed air .is connected to nipple 69 and the water under pressure is connected via hose ,63 to nipple 62.

The tank 24 is then filled with a solution of water and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or other alkali. There are many trade name alkali chemicals on the market for cleaning radiators and hence these products may be substituted for the lye solution recommended. Since the instructions accompanying the various trade name alkali chemicals vary, it is sufficient to state that the instructions on the label should be followed in preparing an alkali solution for the tank 24. I prefer to employ an Oakite Rust Stopper M" for the alkali.

Of course, before operation is commenced, the fuel .should be added to tank 41 and the valve 42 opened.

Next the automobile having the engine cooling system to 'be cleaned is driven into close proximity with my device and the top hose between the radiator and engine block removed. The thermostat of the cooling system is also removed from the lower hose and the lower hose replaced. Thereafter, hoses and 116 are connected to the nipples of the engine block and radiator from which the top hose was removed.

During this period of connecting my device to the automobile, it may be found desirable to close the toggle switch 204, thereby supplying current for the actuation of the heater to heat the alkali cleaning solution in tank 24. When the hot solution has reached a predetermined temperature, the blower 38 for the heater will shut off. The temperature may also be read on an appropriate dial thermometer 300 on the panel plate 21. Preferably thermostat 45 should be set for about F.

When the predetermined temperature of said 180 F. has been reached by the cleaning or alkali solution in tank 24, the on switch 213 may be depressed. This sets in motion the cycle described above for the electrical circuit. Reference to FIG. 6 will provide a ready understanding of the operations automatically accomplished. When the on switch 213 is closed, and throughout the cycle, the air cycle 81 cycles the pulsating or four way valve 60 so that the fluids fed to valve 60 via pipe 59 will be first passed from valve 60 through hose 115 and then through hose 116, as the fluid returns to the valve 60 through the other hose 1-15 or 116 after having passed through the engine block 117, the heater and the radiator 118 of the automobile.

From FIG. 6 it will be understood that air, via nozzle 67, and water, via pipe 61 and pipe 59, are simultaneously introduced to the pulsating valve 60 for distribution in one direction or the other for a predetermined period, say five minutes. Usually air pressure of about 40 pounds per square inch is sufficient for all automobiles and of about 100 psi. for large equipment, such as trucks.

The handle 112 of valve 72 is employed to regulate the air pressure as read on gauge 75.

The circulation of water and air through the cooling system of the automobile tends to free loose scale and rust and to cool the engine and radiator down to about room temperature since most engine cooling systems are hot because the automobile has been driven to the location where the cleaning takes place, The rapid cooling causes shrinking of the metal so that the scale and rust tend to sluif off while the pulsation in opposite directions of air and water tend to remove this slulfed off solid material in one direction or the other.

After a five minute period has elapsed, the water is cut off by the closing of valve 64; however, the air continues for an additional one minute so that substantially all of the water is blown from the cooling system.

A thirty second cycle (i.e. 15 seconds in one position and 15 seconds in the other position) should be a sufficient dwell that the air removes most of the water from the automobile cooling system and tends to dry the interior of the cooling system. One of the purposes of this one minute blow is to prevent the dilution of the hot alkali solution when it is introduced into the system.

After the one minute blow, the pump 51 is automatically started and the by-pass valve 108 manipulated by handle 110 until about 15 p.s.i. solution pressure as read on gauge 111 is achieved. This should provide about 100 gallons per minute flow of hot solution through pipe 59.

The timer T4 is preset for say about 15 minutes run of the hot alkali cleaning solution which likewise is directed in one direction and then in the other by valve 60. Of course, with heavy equipment and more severely rusted or corroded cooling systems, the timer T5 should be set for greater time. As the hot solution strikes the rust and scale, it heats the interior more quickly, creating a thermal shock on the rust and scale as well as attacking the rust and scale by chemical action. Usually, by the time the hot solution has been flowing for sufiicient time to clean a cooling system, this may be readily detected by the drop in pressure from 15 p.s.i. to about 5 to 7 p.s.i.

It will be remembered that during the period the water was flowing through the cooling system, the valve 93 was open to drain the water through pipe 104 and out of the device. After the one minute blow, the valve 93, however, is shifted so that all the hot solution is directed to the settling tank 31.

When the hot solution completes its cycle, pump 51 is automatically shut off and air introduced to valve 60 for one minute discharge the hot solution in the cooling system to the settling tank 31 whence it travels through the filter 32 into the tank 24 for reheating and recirculation. Usually one hundred automobiles may be cleaned with a single tank of alkali cleaning solution, since no dilution of the solution takes place and only the hard to remove scale and rust is reacted with the solution. Also, the solid particles of rust and scale are deposited in the settling tank and may be periodically removed.

Thereafter, the valve 93 is shifted to drain pipe 104 and cool water and air introduced for five minutes. This again rapidly cools the cooling system, creating another mild thermal shock as the engine is cooled. This is followed by an air blow of about one minute to discharge the water from the cooling system.

The hoses 115 and 116 are then disconnected; a new thermostat installed in the automobile; water, rust inhibitor and/ or antifreeze added; and the top hose between the engine and radiator reinstalled.

All of this procedure should sonsume less than one hour and in many instances less than forty-five minutes.

It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that many variations may be made in the embodiment chosen for the purpose of illustrating the present invention without departing from the scope thereof as defined by the appended claims.

What is claimed as invention is:

1. A process for cleaning the liquid cooling system of an internal combustion engine comprising the steps of:

(1) passing a mixture of water under pressure and air under pressure alternately through the radiator and engine and out of said engine, and through said engine and said radiator and out of said radiator,

(2) passing air under pressure alternately through said radiator and said engine and out of said engine, and through said engine and said radiator and out of said radiator, to remove any liquid present from said cooling system,

(3) passing a cleaning solution at an elevated temperature and pressure from a storage tank alternately through said radiator and said engine back to said storage tank, and through said engine and said radiator back to said tank,

(4) passing air under pressure alternately through said radiator and said engine to said storage tank, and through said engine and said radiator to said storage tank, to transfer the cleaning solution from said cooling system to said storage tank,

(5) passing a mixture of water under pressure and air under pressure alternately through said radiator and said engine and out of said engine, and through said engine and said radiator and out of said radiator, and

(6) passing air under pressure alternately through said radiator and said engine and out of said engine, and through said engine and said radiator and out of said radiator to remove any liquid present from said cooling system.

2. A process as claimed in claim .1 and further including the step of cleaning said cleaning solution in said storage tank during step (3).

3. A process as claimed in claim 1 and further including the step of heating said cleaning solution in said storage tank.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,189,950 2/1940 Gump l3429 2,222,516 11/1940 Powell et al 134-17 2,254,980 9/1941 Simmons 134-22 2,259,644 10/ 1941 Kling 134-22 2,835,234 5/1958 Rasch et al l3422 JOSEPH SCOVRONEK, Acting Primary Examiner.

J. ZATARGA, Assistant Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. A PROCESS FOR CLEANING THE LIQUID COOLING SYSTEM OF AN INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE COMPRISING THE STEPS OF: (1) PASSING A MIXTURE OF WATER UNDER PRESSURE AND AIR UNDER PRESSURE ALTERNATELY THROUGH THE RADIATOR AND ENGINE AND OUT OF SAID ENGINE, AND THROUGH SAID ENGINE AND SAID RADIATOR AND OUT OF SAID RADIATOR, (2) PASSING AIR UNDER PRESSURE ALTERNATELY THROUGH SAID RADIATOR AND SAID ENGINE AND OUT OF SAID ENGINE, AND THROUGH SAID ENGINE AND SAID RADIATOR AND OUT OF SAID RADIATOR, TO REMOVE ANY LIQUID PRESENTS FROM SAID COOLING SYSTEM, (3) PASSING A CLEANING SOLUTION AT AN ELEVATED TEMPERATURE AND PRESSURE FROM A STORAGE TANK ALTERNATELY THROUGH SAID RADIATOR AND SAID ENGINE BACK TO SAID STORAGE TANK, AND THROUGH SAID ENGINE AND SAID RADIATOR BACK TO SAID TANK, (4) PASSING AIR UNDER PRESSURE ALTERNATELY THROUGH SAID RADIATOR AND SAID ENGINE TO SAID STORAGE TANK, AND THROUGH SAID ENGINE AND SAID RADIATOR TO SAID STORAGE TANK, TO TRANSFER THE CLEANING SOLUTION FROM SAID COOLING SYSTEM TO SAID STORAGE TANK, (5) PASSING A MIXTURE OF WATER UNDER PRESSURE AND AIR UNDER PRESSURE ALTERNATELY THROUGH SAID RADIATOR AND SAID ENGINE AND OUT OF SAID ENGINE, AND THROUGH SAID ENGINE AND SAID RADIATOR AND OUT OF SAID RADIATOR, AND (6) PASSING AIR UNDER PRESSURE ALTERNATELY THROUGH SAID RADIATOR AND SAID ENGINE AND OUT OF SAID ENGINE, AND THROUGH SAID ENGINE AND SAID RADIATOR AND OUT OF SAID RADIATOR TO REMOVE ANY LIQUID PRESENT FROM SAID COOLING SYSTEM.
US3350223A 1966-05-18 1966-05-18 Plural step method for cleaning the liquid cooling system of an internal combustion engine Expired - Lifetime US3350223A (en)

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Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3549420A (en) * 1967-11-09 1970-12-22 Purex Corp Ltd Method for cleaning process equipment
EP0094910A1 (en) * 1982-05-17 1983-11-23 Emil Bader Method and apparatus for cleaning heat exchangers
US4840223A (en) * 1986-11-04 1989-06-20 Solv-X Inventions Ltd. Power back scrubbing and flushing system for cooling systems
US5941257A (en) * 1997-09-12 1999-08-24 Eastman Kodak Company Method for two-phase flow hydrodynamic cleaning for piping systems
WO2005010454A2 (en) * 2003-07-25 2005-02-03 Romeo Lambasa Cleaning agent, device and process for removing scale
US20050199270A1 (en) * 2004-03-12 2005-09-15 John Watt Mobile flushing unit and process

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2189950A (en) * 1938-11-05 1940-02-13 George M Gump Coil cleaning method
US2222516A (en) * 1937-07-21 1940-11-19 William T Powell Method and apparatus for cleaning fluid circulating systems
US2254980A (en) * 1937-05-03 1941-09-02 Clyde E Simmons Method of cleaning tubes and the like
US2259644A (en) * 1938-07-12 1941-10-21 Louis A Kling Removing deposit from hot water piping
US2835234A (en) * 1955-05-06 1958-05-20 Carl H Rasch Device for improved cleaning and analysis of engine cooling systems

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2254980A (en) * 1937-05-03 1941-09-02 Clyde E Simmons Method of cleaning tubes and the like
US2222516A (en) * 1937-07-21 1940-11-19 William T Powell Method and apparatus for cleaning fluid circulating systems
US2259644A (en) * 1938-07-12 1941-10-21 Louis A Kling Removing deposit from hot water piping
US2189950A (en) * 1938-11-05 1940-02-13 George M Gump Coil cleaning method
US2835234A (en) * 1955-05-06 1958-05-20 Carl H Rasch Device for improved cleaning and analysis of engine cooling systems

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3549420A (en) * 1967-11-09 1970-12-22 Purex Corp Ltd Method for cleaning process equipment
EP0094910A1 (en) * 1982-05-17 1983-11-23 Emil Bader Method and apparatus for cleaning heat exchangers
US4840223A (en) * 1986-11-04 1989-06-20 Solv-X Inventions Ltd. Power back scrubbing and flushing system for cooling systems
US5941257A (en) * 1997-09-12 1999-08-24 Eastman Kodak Company Method for two-phase flow hydrodynamic cleaning for piping systems
WO2005010454A2 (en) * 2003-07-25 2005-02-03 Romeo Lambasa Cleaning agent, device and process for removing scale
WO2005010454A3 (en) * 2003-07-25 2005-05-19 Romeo Lambasa Cleaning agent, device and process for removing scale
US20050199270A1 (en) * 2004-03-12 2005-09-15 John Watt Mobile flushing unit and process
US20050199271A1 (en) * 2004-03-12 2005-09-15 John Watt Mobile flushing unit and process
US7198052B2 (en) * 2004-03-12 2007-04-03 General Electric Company Mobile flushing unit and process
US7252095B2 (en) 2004-03-12 2007-08-07 General Electric Company Mobile flushing unit and process
US7305998B2 (en) 2004-03-12 2007-12-11 General Electric Company Mobile flushing unit and process

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