US3342325A - Lint removers - Google Patents

Lint removers Download PDF

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US3342325A
US3342325A US562406A US56240666A US3342325A US 3342325 A US3342325 A US 3342325A US 562406 A US562406 A US 562406A US 56240666 A US56240666 A US 56240666A US 3342325 A US3342325 A US 3342325A
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adhesive
lint
wound
roller
spool
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Donald F Dreher
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Donald F Dreher
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L25/00Miscellaneous cleaning devices
    • A47L25/005Miscellaneous cleaning devices using adhesive or tacky surfaces to remove dirt, e.g. lint removers

Description

2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR. DON D F. DREHEFZ D. F. DREHER LINT REMOVERS Sept. 19, 1
Original Filed Aug. 28, 1963 D. F. DREHER Sept. 19, 1967 LIN'I REMOVERS 2 Sheets-Sheet Original Filed Aug. 28, 1965 United States Patent 3,342,325 LINT REMOVERS Donald F. Dreher, R0. Box 56, East Brookfield, Mass. 01515 Continuation of application Ser. No. 305,231, Aug.
28, 1963. This application July 1, 1966, Ser. No.
12 Claims. (Cl. 206-52) This application is a continuation of application Serial No. 305,231, filed Aug. 28, 1963, now abandoned.
This invention relates to line removers of the ever-tacky or pressure-sensitve adhesve type. More particularly, it relates to tacky-sur-faced spools or rollers, each comprising a series of sequentially usable convolutions wound upon and supported by a cylindrical axial element, together with means for packaging and pivotally bearing the adhesive spool.
Lint removers of the character described usually comprise a length of pressure sensitive masking tape wound upon a core which is end-capped and mechancially bearinged in a handle fixture. My invention diifers markedly from such products as are presently manufactured in the following important respects:
The lint pick-up performance and the dirt-carrying capacity of the adhesive mass are sizably increased by radical alteration in physical characteristics of the adhesive composition, which is designed to meet the specific requirements of this type of product.
In its preferred form, the adhesive spool is spirally wound in staggered multiple layers. Thus each ply of adhesive mass and carrier web is a segment of tape unto itself and removable in one piece simply by unwinding it. When the outer segment is so removed, the next succeeding adhesive layer is exposed in full width and exact circumference without the users having had to cut or tear off the discarded outer segment.
New and novel means are provided for pivotally bearing the rotatable element, eliminating the need for a handled fixture and permitting functional enclosure within a simple package which protects the adhesive spool throughout its useful life, permits its being carried in handbag or suitcase or placed in a drawer, and shields the adhesive surface from troublesome, wasteful and undesirable contact with other articles or with a surface against which it may be laid.
Except for having provided rotable means and wraparound protective plastic sheeting, the latter being relatively ineffectual as a protector due to its moderate stiffness and plastic memory which exert sufficient force to permit tangential disengagement from the adhesive surface, the capability of which will have been impaired by lint or other matter picked up by it, the similarly-purposed products presently on the market evidence neglect of the significance of the types of product improvement to which my attention has been directed.
Therefore, the major and all-inclusive object of the invention made by me and described herein is to develop maximal performance, utility and convenience in a product of the character described.
In order to accomplish such desirable ends, a primary objective is to develop adhesive compositions which are best suited to the specialized purposes of this type of product.
Another object is to make the products handling and use more convenient.
A further object is to reduce its manufacturing cost.
Still another object is to simplify its packaging, and to render this element functionally purposeful throughout the useful life of the product.
Another object is to shroud the exposed sticky ends of the adhesive spool, and thus eliminate an inherently troublesome feature of wound pressure sensitive articles in general.
A still further object is to make the product conveniently totable.
A still further object of the instant invention is to expand the useful application of the principles herein outlined into product use areas not presently exploited or served.
Methods by which these and corollary objectives may be achieved will be understood more readily by reference to the several drawings, in which FIGURE 1 is an exploded perspective showing the individual elements which comprise one preferred form of the invention.
FIGURE 2 is a view in perspective showing the adhesive spool assembly pivotally held by thumb and second finger of ones hand, which position into dimples formed coaxially in the closure plugs.
FIGURE 3 is a sectioned View showing an end portion of a larger dimensioned and especially-purposed product of similar character.
FIGURE 4 is a perspective view of an improved protective wrapper.
FIGURE 5 is a perspective view showing a straightwound roll with its adhesive layer outwardly exposable in situ.
FIGURE 6 is a perspective view showing a wound roll of pressure sensitive adhesive laminate with a flow-restraining membrane attached to each end face.
FIGURE 7 is a perspective view showing a stack of sheeted pressure sensitive adhesive laminate with flowrestraining membranes attached to two of its trimmed sides.
Referring now to FIGURE 1, an adhesive-surfaced spool 1 with a plurality of Web-borne adhesive layers 2, spirally interwound 3 one upon the other around a supporting cylindrical core or tube 4 into the ends of which are pressed closure plugs 5, 6, is insertable as so assembled into the outer sleeve 7, which with the closure plugs 5, 6, forms a neat and serviceable package and protective enclosure for the ever-tacky adhesive element 1. The closure plugs 5, 6, are slightly larger in diameter than the adhesive spool 1 when new and fully wound. Bearing upon the inner wall of the sleeve 7, and with all the named elements having a common central axis, the closure plugs 5, 6, center the adhesive spool 1 within the cylindrical enclosure and thus prevent contact between the adhesive surface and the inner wall of the sleeve 7.
It is preferable than one or the other, or both, of the closure plugs 5, 6, either frictionally or by spring seizure, may be held in proper endwise position so as to achieve a stable package and to prevent unintentional exposure of the adhesive element.
A number of modifications of this packaging concept will be apparent, e.g., that one end of the outer sleeve 7 could be closed, instead of both ends being open as shown in the form herein described. The open ends are preferred, however, since this design permits ejection of the adhesive spool and closure plug assembly simply by pressing against one of the closure plugs. Additionally, by eliminating the need for an external shoulder or a frictioned grasping appurtenance, it minimizes the overall length of the package. This latter factor is significant when viewed in the light of one of the objects of the instant invention, which is to provide a product of the character described for sale as a cosmetic item and so sized as to be conveniently carryable in miladys handbag. For such use, the product herein described has especial utility since it is very effective in removing face powder from many ladies garments.
The closure plugs 5, 6, are dimpled at 8, permitting the adhesive spool assembly to be held between ones thurnb' and second finger in the manner indicated in FIGURE 2. in which position the adhesive spool 1 may be pressed against a surface such as fabric and rolled by frictional contact as the adhesive spool assembly is propelled by thumb and finger, thus picking up lint, powder, hair and whatever other objects may be disengaged from their anchorage in the fabric by contact with the pressure sensitive mass on the outer surface of the adhesive spool 1.
FIGURE 2 also shows one of the pennant-shaped ends 9 of the outermost spiral-wound layer lifted, ready to be peeled away from and thus exposing the next underlying adhesive surface. It should be noted that in this type of construction the peeling of the outer layer is started simply by lifting the point 10 of the spiral-wound segment, from which point 10 the peeling leads around the roll helix fashion, and that by unwinding this relatively narrow segment all of the previously exposed surface will have been removed. The equivalent operation on a straight-wound roll from which a single convolution is to be removed entails lifting the leading edge across its full Width before peeling around to the starting point, where one must cut or tear off the discardable segment and attempt to match the exact starting point in order to achieve full circumferential exposure of fresh adhesive surface Without wastage of unnecessarily removed adhesive web. Even in products in which the straight-wound rolls are slashed or segmentally cross-perforated, the problem of lifting the leading end remains a somewhat difficult and tedious operation, which is aggravated disproportionately as the width of the peeled segment is increased.
Thus the spiral winding construction not only simplifies removal of the outer layer, but permits practical application and use of larger-dimensioned units. Additionally, since each layer is separable independently in a single and continuous segment, and neither cutting nor the need for tearing is involved, the substrate or carrier web for the adhesive mass may comprise a relatively untearable material, thus broadening the range of usable substrates to include various films, which may be used instead of paper. It also will be apparent that the spiral winding technique permits confluent winding of the total adhesive spool including its supporting core 4, its plurality of substrate-carried adhesive mass layers 2 and such external wrapping as might be desired. Thus significant economies in manufacture are achievable by such means.
It is preferable that the opposite surfaces of the adhesive-bearing substrate be differentially attracted to the adhesive layer. This is not necessarily essential, however, since if both surfaces are identically and effectively re lease-coated following the practice established in wound transfer tape used for pressure sensitive strip gumming in the graphic arts, unwinding invariably results in adhesive exposure regardless of the original winding whether it were inside or outside. This element is of some significance when using the spiral-winding technique wherein an inside wind permits wider latitude particularly with respect to the winding of additional plies following contact with the driving belt. Combination of these two desirable elements, viz: differential surface attraction for the adhesive mass and inside winding, involves application of the adhesive to the lower-afiinitied surface of the substrate contemporaneously with the winding operation. Whenever only a single layer of transferable mass is to be included, the graphic arts process referred to above is directly applicable.
FIGURE shows a straight-wound roll 17 incorporating the transfer technique wherein the substrate 18 is wound with the adhesive layer 2 on its inner surface, thereafter being peelable from the wound roll and exposing the outer face of the adhesive layer 2 immediately thereunder.
FIGURES 3 and 4 show several modifications of the previously described assembly of elements, those which are common being similarly part-numbered. These modifications stem from factors involved in adapting this type of product to certain specialized applications in which larger dimensioned units are indicated and in which a handled accessory would be more convenient, e.g., for use on carpeting or furniture. Although originally intended for large dimensioned units, each of the modifications herein described is applicable to smaller units and should indeed be so applied whenever prudence dictates.
The first of these modifications is reduction in the relative outside diameter of the pivotal end plug 11 so that it will not overextend that of the core 4. This permits use of the device on relatively non-cushionable fiat surfaces such as carpeting 12. The end plug 11 may be dimpled at 8 for use as a finger bearing socket whenever desired and practical dimensionally, or it may be bored at 13 to serve as a mechanical bearing supported on spindle or yoke.
The second modification concerns sealing the ends of the adhesive spool to render them nontacky and/or to restrict spew or cold flow of the adhesive composition at the exposed edges of the several layers 2. In FIGURE 3 such end seals 14 comprise precut discs of polyethylene heat-sealably attached to the exposed ends of the spool, the overhanging film flaring out 15 as it comes into contact with the carpeting 12. In order to resist flow-out of the adhesive composition from within its wound entrapment, which is a highly desirable end in itself and applicable advantageously to many pressure sensitive adhesive products including both those which are wound and laminates which are sheeted and subject to stacked pressure, it is important that the applied sealing element become adhesively anchored to the exposed edges of the substrate or carrier web in sufficient strength to resist the internal pressure of the adhesive mass from whatever source such pressure may develop, whether it be due to wound tension, linear shrinkage of the substrate, cubical expansion of the adhesive mass or compression of stacked sheets. Since pressure sensitive adhesives incline toward cold-flow tendencies, it is advisable to seal such exposed edges immediately after winding or sheeting, or at least before any exudation will have occurred.
FIGURES 6 and 7 illustrate application of the edge sealing technique to pressure sensitive adhesive laminates, FIGURE 6 showing a wound roll 19 and FIGURE 7 a sheeted stack 20 of such material, wherein the laminate comprises a three-element combination in which the adhesive layer 2 is sandwiched between a base member 21 such as a strippable liner 22.. Membranous seals 14 are attached to the end faces 23 of the roll 19 and to the trimmed sides 24 of the stack 20, being those surfaces having edge exposure of the adhesive layers 2, the attachment in each case following the hereinabove teaching wherein the sealing element 14 is reliably anchored to the trimmed edges of the non-adhesive members 21, 22 by disparate adhesive means and wherein the anchorage in cooperation with the sealing element 14 occludes the adhesive composition 2 and prevents flowable contact with contiguous convolutions or sheets of laminate.
As indicated above, containment may be accomplished by heat-seal application of a film such as polyethylene or by application of paper or other substrate suitably coated and/or attachable to the surface. Similarly eifective results may be achieved by direct application of certain hot-melt, solvent solution, emulsion or dispersion compositions. Since the applied seal should resist such internal pressures as may develop within the adhesive mass, its tensile strength as well as its adherence to the substrate must be adequate if spew is to be confined within the membrane 14 and prevented from contacting the next adjacent adhesive mass layers. In the case of sheeted stocks in particular and as well in certain wound products, the attached seal 25 should be strippable at the point of final use so that individual sheets or convolutions may be free of the connecting anchorage of the seal. For such application it is important that the bond between seal and substrate be separable when the right type and amount of stripping force is applied in its removal. When adapted to the adhesive spool as shown in FIGURE 3, the seal 14 may be so composed as to permit release from each substrate as it is unwound, or the seal may be calculably minimized and/or embrittled so that its adhering sections break and are removed as succeeding layers are unwound.
Additionally, the use of such seals as vapor transmis- Sion barriers may contribute importantly to the stability of many types of product to which the technique is applicable. Variation in moisture content in Wound rolls of paper, water-sensitive films and gum med paper, for example, could be eliminated or rendered insignificant by application of strippable elements to the roll ends. Similarly, prevention of the loss of retained solvent and/or volatile plasticizers in a wide range of product could be achieved simply and at minimal expense by use of the technique herein described. Although not limited thereto, pressure sensitive attachment of vapor-barriering seals of the character described is ideally suited to this application. An additional advantage gained by coextensive adhesional attachment of such a seal is its entrainment of slitting chaff, dirt and other undesirable and insecurely attached particles, all of which are removed when the protective seal is stripped away.
The third modification as shown in FIGURE 4 concerns the use of a protective wrap-around plastic sheeting element 16, similar in purpose to those currently used in the manner previously described except that in my invention the film sheeting 16 is preformed so as to hug the adhesive spool, thus utilizing advantageously its plas tic memory and spring-like capability. For this purpose any number of plastic film sheetings are suitable, the physical characteristics of which may be exampled by minimally-plasticized cellulose acetate.
In certain applications it may be advantageous to release-coat the inner face of the protective wrapper to facilitate its separation from the adhesive. Although the adhesive strength of compositions best suited to lint pickup devices is relatively low, some of the more gelatinous and toothy compositions which are later discussed in this disclosure could make use of a siliconed inner face of the wrapper desirable. It also will be apparent that a release-coated paper could function effectively as a wrapper, except that means should be provided for its anchorage in protective position without reliance upon its affinity for the rollers adhesive surface.
Giving attention now to the pressure sensitive adhesive composition to which prior references have been made and which constitutes one of the more important objects of the instant invention, it should first be stated that virtually any pressure sensitive adhesive composition by its very nature will adhere to lint and to other types of matter desirably disengageable from fabrics and the like, and thus is capable of demonstration. Although industrial masking and packaging tapes have been and are being used quite universally for this purpose, realistic evaluation will bear out the fact that they were designed and formulated to meet highly critical and specialized demands which are wholly unrelated to the peculiar and specific requirements of lint removers.
The "basic characteristics desirable in an adhesive to be used in an article of the character herein described may best be understood by observing the behavior of industrial tapes in general when applied to lint remover spools or rollers. Due to the relative firmness of the adhesive composition, lint particles and other matter picked up by contact with the adhesive cannot imbed into the adhesive mass and thus stand proudly and high above the surface. So standing, each such particle tends to prevent contact between other particles and the adhesive surface which surrounds the original particle. Thus each adhered particle tends to block out and so to render adhesively ineffectual a relatively large area when contrasted with its own actual size. The result of this phenomenon is that such an adhesive surface quickly loses 6 its pickup capability and disproportionately to that part of its area which actually is covered by the entrained particles per se. Another consequence of firmness in the adhesive composition, havin little capacity to be deformed by light pressure, is that it cannot reach down into depressions as occur in woven fabrics and from such depressions or tiny pockets extract finely particled matter such as ladies face powder.
Although subject to technical differentiation, adhesive firmness tends to correlate with resistance to cold flow, the latter also being an essential characteristic of stablywound industrial tapes but in diametric conflict with that which is desirable in a lint remover since it further discourages imbedment of foreign particles into the adhesive mass by preventing its cold flow from enveloping such particles. This phenomenon occurs more as a function of time and thus affects recovery of an impaired adhesive surface during intervals of nonuse.
The next attribute of industrial-purposed pressure sensitive tapes which I find distressing when applied to lint removers is that their adhesive strength is much too great. It is a misapprehension indeed that great pulling force is required to pick up a miscellany of things such as lint, powder, fuzz and hair. This misappraisal may stem from the difficulties one often encounters in attempting to brush such matter from nappy fabrics. Additionally, certain delicate fabrics, such as those which often are used in ladies blouses, and some brushed or nappy materials, will not tolerate the use of great adhesive force against them.
Comparative requirements differ in still another cate gory. This concerns the time interval of contact between the adhesive and an opposing surface or object. Few, if any, pressure sensitive products contact any surface as briefly; thus problems of staining, plasticizer mignation, offset, markoif, edge residue and long-term exposure to destructive elements need be given little if any consideration.
From these observations it reasonably may be deduced that the characteristics desirable and advantageous in an .adhesive composition designed for use in lint removers should include softness, cold flow and low adhesion. Happily this combination of characteristics is not diflicult to obtain since all three may be achieved by high plasticizer content. Given further relief as indicated above with respect to the contact interval, the named desirable characteristics may be maximize-d safely by generous over-plasticizing, even to the point of developing a soft gelatinous mass, which perhaps best describes the ideal pick-up element for the purpose herein intended. Such an adhesive composition might best be termed contact sensitive, which designation will hereinafter be used.
In order further to aid one skilled in the art to practice the methods involved in this invention and thus produce the finished product described herein, I may mention that the adhesive mass may consist satisfactorily of a medium molecular weight polyisobutylene (known in the trade as Vistanex), e.g., of the order of 80,000 to 120,000 mol. Wt., combined with a compatible but relatively impotent plasticizer such as amber petrolatum of soft consistency, the plasticizer content in this example preferably ranging sizably upward from a minimal 150 parts (based upon parts of polymer), and advisedly an antioxidant and/or processing stabilizer. So selected and used in the manner indicate-d, plasticizer serves dually as softener and extender. The capacity of polyisobutylene to absorb par-affinic hydrocarbons is so great that extending may be carried to virtually any degree of softness as may best suit the requirements of the subject product. Although each additional increment of plasticizer beyond a certain level reduces absolute adhesive strength, it increases tooth and wet grab of the composition. Thus when used in copious quantity, e.g., from 300 to 500 parts, the resultant aggressiveness may need to be modified. This may be accomplished by addition of paraffin or other tack-discouraging wax, soaps or other emulsifying agents, vegetable-sourced 67 detackifiers exampled by castor oil and a numer of its derivatives, certain partially compatible silicones, or by other means known to and utilized by those skilled in the art. The choice of detackifying modifier should be based insofar as prudent upon its having the least capacity to negate the achieved softness of the composition. Thus the incorporation of fillers, hardeners and cold-flow-inhibiting additives would be less desirable.
The exemplary substances mentioned above, their physical consistencies and indicated proportions should be considered in structure instead of finite or limiting. Higher or lower molecular weights of the polymer, for example, may be used predictably and purposefully to a given end. Lower molecular weights demand and tolerate less softening, higher weights contrariwise. Normal preference for contact sensitive compositions for the herein-intended purposes would tend to be the higher molecular weights due to both physical and economic factors. The preference for a relatively impotent plasticizer is influenced by similar reasoning. The essence of the teaching herein contained is the change in concept from pressure sensitive to contact sensitive adhesive compositions for use in applications exampled by that of the instant invention.
The determination of optimal thickness of each adhesive layer is influenced by a number of factors. Since deformability of a single layer of adhesive mass is a function of its depth, a generous application will outperform a scanty one; but when considering a plurality of adhesive layers, each over-wrapping those beneath, the deformability of the outer layer is increased by the cushioning which underlies it. In order to maximize such cushioning, if indeed it be desirable so to enhance the outer wraps while accepting diminishing performance of those which lie nearer the supporting core, the separating substrate or carrier web for each adhesive layer should be as flexible as possible. Although cushioning beneath the innermost layer could improve its eflicacy, it would :be diflicult to justify the additional cost. A more practical solution would be to increase the adhesive thickness the lesser-cushioned winds, which the spiral-winding technique permits since each wrap is independent. Assuming that adequate net deformability of each adhesive layer is provided, such factor including its supporting cushion, and a specified crosssectional area outside the supporting core is to be occupied with alternating layers of adhesive and substrate, a reduction in caliper of each wind will increase the permissable number of such windings and provide the user with additional fresh pickup surfaces. Thus an increase in the volumetric proportion of substrate to adhesive could be advantageous to the consumer.
Finally, except of overall cost considerations, the use for which a particular product is intended will influence determination of optimal thickness of the adhesive layer, and similarly its composition. Insofar as seizure and imbedment of foreign materials into the adhesive mass is concerned, the size of such particles should influence the choice. Seemingly contrary to an earlier reference to it, a finely particled substance such as ladies face powder would demand little in adhesive depth, in which instance an increase in available fresh surface area would be more advantageous to the user, assuming that there be adequate net surface deformability to contact such particles as are lodged in depressions in the woven fabric. At the opposite extreme, a product intended for use on carpeting should have a maximal adhesive deposit since it should be capable of seizing larger and often heavier objects such as sand, and bits of metal, glass or wood. A product designed primarily to pick up hair and fibers need be only median in caliper. Lovers of certain domestic animals such as longhaired cats and fleecy dogs will find such product incalculable in value and utility.
In general, adhesive thicknesses of the order of .002 to .006 inch may be considered optimal for commercial manufacture and general utility. In certain light-duty applications, e.g., the pickup of dust or powder from relatively 8 smooth surfaces, lesser amounts may be effective. Additionally, when thinner masses are laid, softer and more toothy compositions often may be used. Heavier deposits tend to yield diminishing additional returns.
From the foregoing it will be apparent that I have developed a new and novel article of manufacture which can be of considerable utility, and which is greatly improved over the prior art and importantly differentiated therefrom.
Even though there has been repetitious emphasis upon spiral winding of the subject products, many of the teachings contained herein are applicable to other forms in which this type of article may be manufactured and utilized advantageously, whether similarly or differently purposed.
It is to be understood that the use of materials and combinations other than those named, mechanical modifications and functional variations may be effected without departing from the scope of the novel concepts of the present invention.
I claim as my invention:
1. A lint pickup roller comprising a cylindrical support and a plurality of lengths of substrate having ever-tacky adhesive on one surface thereof, said lengths being superposed upon said support, said adhesive having one face outwardly exposable while on the roller, and each said length forming a helix with its opposite edges substantially abuttingly juxtaposed and in offset relationship to contiguous windings.
2. A lint pickup roller as defined in claim 1, wherein said support comprises a helically wound core.
3. A lint pickup roller as defined in claim 1, wherein said adhesive was initially adhered to the inner surface of said substrate and is transferable therefrom to the surface immediately beneath the adhesive.
4. A lint pickup roller as claimed in claim 1, including, and in combination, a protective shield consisting of a sheet of springable material in the form of a cylindrical member preformedly lesser radiused than, and expandable around, said roller, said shield having a circumference greater than that of said roller and adapted thereby to being overlapped to provide full protection for the exposable face of said adhesive, the inner surface of said shield preferably being treated and having reduced affinity for said adhesive.
5. A lint pickup roller as claimed in claim 1, wherein said ever-tacky adhesive is a polyisobutylene adhesive containing as the plasticizer from 150 to 500 parts of solid petrolatum of soft consistency to each parts of polyisobutylene when the latter has a medium molecular weight.
6. In an article of manufacture of the type described herein, including an asesmbly of layers of ever-tacky adhesive composition separated by supporting sheet material, in which said assembly has a trimmed face at which adhesive layers are exposed, wherein the improvement comprises a membrane covering said trimmed face of said assembly and attached to the edges of said supporting sheet material at said face by adhesive means disparate from said ever-tacky adhesive composition, and adapted, in cooperation with said membrane, to restraining facial exudation of said adhesive composition.
7. In a lint pickup roller of the type presenting an exposed surface of ever-tacky adhesive when in use and which is capable of picking up lint, said roller including a cylindrical member on which convolutions of tape are provided which tape carries a layer of said ever-tacky adhesive, wherein the improvement comprises a structure having alternate layers of tape and adhesive in which said tape is positioned outwardly from the adhesive layer initially carried thereby, the inner face of said tape being separable from the adhesive layer, which layer has a preferential affinity for the surface directly beneath it in the roller and to which it is thereby transferable, whereby all of the peripherally-exposable adhesive layer will be protectively overwrapped by said carrier tape, which overwrapped carrier tape when removed from the roller will expose the adhesive layer initially carried by said tape.
8. A lint pickup roller as claimed in claim 7, wherein said ever-tacky adhesive is a polyisobutylene adhesive containing as the plasticizer from 150 to 500 parts of solid petrolatum of soft consistency to each 100' parts of polyisobutylene.
9. A lint pickup roller as defined in claim 1, having a bearing means at each end that carries a coaxial socket contoured in each of said bearing means, said coaxial sockets being adapted comfortably to receive thumb and finger of a persons hand as pivots between and upon which said roller can be rotated when pressed against a surface to be delinted and rolled along said surface.
10. In a lint pickup roller of the type adapted to present a peripheral surface of ever-tacky adhesive character and having a bearing means at each end, wherein the improvement comprises coaxial sockets contoured in said bearing means, said coaxial sockets being adapted comfortably to receive a thumb and a finger of a persons hand as pivots between and upon which said roller can 'be rotated when pressed against a surface to be delinted and rolled along said surface, said bearing at each end of the roller projecting radially outwardly beyond the peripheral surface of the ever-tacky adhesive on the roller, and a removable tubular protective shield extending over said roller with its inner periphery engaging said bearing means and with the ever-tacky adhesive surface located in spaced relation to the inner surface of the shield.
11. A lint pickup roller as claimed in claim 10, wherein said ever-tacky adhesive was initially adhered to the inner surface of a tape extending around said roller and is transferable therefrom to the surface immediately underlying the adhesive while the tape is removable therefrom to expose the adhesive.
12. In a lint pickup device of the type described herein, including a layer of ever-tacky adhesive composition wherein the improvement comprises a polyisobutylene contact-sensitive adhesive containing as a plasticizer from 150 to 500 parts of solid petrolatum of soft consistency to each 100 parts of polyisobutylene of medium molecular weight, said adhesive having a soft gelatinous character, an excessive tooth and a substantially lower adhesive strength than adhesives of the type used in pressure-sensitive masking tape, whereby said adhesive composition has unusual afiinity for lint, hair and similar materials.
References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,070,940 8/1913 Bauer 206-59 1,805,426 5/ 1931 Vanatta.
1,864,877 6/1932 White 206-52 2,119,163 5/1938 Herrmann 206-59 2,170,147 8/1939 Lane.
2,191,704 2/ 1940 Bennett 206-51 2,200,721 5/1940 Marinsky et al. 242-173 2,401,842 6/ 1946 Slater 206-52 X 2,423,962 7/ 1947 Clark et al.
2,624,060 1/ 1953 McKenzie 15-104 2,693,610 11/1954 Hensley 15-104 2,746,696 5/ 1956 Tierney 242-173 3,030,696 4/1962 Serwer 15-230.11 3,115,246 12/1963 Wicklund 206-59 FOREIGN PATENTS 158,600 9/ 1954 Australia.
THERON E. CONDON, Primary Examiner.
M. L. RICE, Assistant Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. A LINT PICKUP ROLLER COMPRISING A CYLINDRICAL SUPPORT AND A PLURALITY OF LENGTHS OF SUBSTRATE HAVING EVER-TACKY ADHESIVE ON ONE SURFACE THEREOF, SAID LENGTHS BEING SUPERPOSED UPON SAID SUPPORT, SAID ADHESIVE HAVING ONE FACE OUTWARDLY EXPOSABLE WHILE ON THE ROLLER, AND EACH SAID LENGTH FORMING A HELIX WITH ITS OPPOSITE EDGES SUBSTANTIALLY ABUTTINGLY JUXTAPOSED AND IN OFFSET RELATIONSHIP TO CONTIGUOUS WINDINGS.
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Cited By (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3417418A (en) * 1966-07-06 1968-12-24 Lincrusta Adhesive-coated cleaning roller
US3421170A (en) * 1967-06-20 1969-01-14 Frank S Thomas Jr Jacketed roller-type lint remover
US3480982A (en) * 1967-11-24 1969-12-02 Arthur C Saunders Guide apparatus for cleaning gun barrels
FR2061192A5 (en) * 1969-09-10 1971-06-18 Roth Eric
US3742547A (en) * 1971-07-01 1973-07-03 M Sohmer Lint sweeper
EP0829222A1 (en) * 1996-09-13 1998-03-18 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Web material comprising a tackifier
US5763038A (en) * 1997-02-25 1998-06-09 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Progressively perforated tape roll
US5878457A (en) * 1997-02-25 1999-03-09 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Coreless lint-removing tape roll
US5940921A (en) * 1997-02-25 1999-08-24 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Applicator for a coreless tape roll
US20030088928A1 (en) * 2001-10-18 2003-05-15 Akihito Shizuno Adhesive roll cleaner
US20030165650A1 (en) * 2001-03-06 2003-09-04 Takayuki Hirota Roll type adhesive cleaner and method for producing the same
US20030167583A1 (en) * 2002-02-28 2003-09-11 Akihito Shizuno Adhesive roll cleaner
US20040058116A1 (en) * 2002-09-25 2004-03-25 Nitto Denko Corporation Tacky dust cleaner
US6746974B1 (en) * 1999-03-10 2004-06-08 3M Innovative Properties Company Web material comprising a tackifier
US20040134003A1 (en) * 2003-01-09 2004-07-15 Helmac Products Corporation Adhesive roller
US20040148726A1 (en) * 2003-02-04 2004-08-05 Edward Chelednik Paint roller
US20050074572A1 (en) * 2003-10-01 2005-04-07 3M Innovative Properties Company Debris removal tape and method of using same
US20060040080A1 (en) * 2002-12-26 2006-02-23 Kao Corporation Adhesive roll cleaner
US20070136966A1 (en) * 2005-12-15 2007-06-21 3M Innovative Properties Company Lint remover
WO2013011525A1 (en) * 2011-07-18 2013-01-24 Bhushan Fani Fibrous handy cleaner for devices
US8904588B2 (en) 2012-12-19 2014-12-09 Stanley Taub Cleaning device
AT14361U3 (en) * 2015-05-04 2016-01-15 Fidel Gmeiner Gmbh & Co Kg Lint roller

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US1805426A (en) * 1929-06-20 1931-05-12 Fred L Vanatta Chalk line spool
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US2119163A (en) * 1933-07-15 1938-05-31 Kalle & Co Ag Roll of adhesive strip
US2170147A (en) * 1937-01-21 1939-08-22 John D Lane Package of gummed bands or stickers
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US2200721A (en) * 1939-06-01 1940-05-14 Marinsky Davis Thread spool and the method of constructing the same
US2401842A (en) * 1944-01-10 1946-06-11 Charles F Slater Rotary cleaner roll and container therefor
US2423962A (en) * 1944-01-01 1947-07-15 Homer T Clark Lint remover
US2624060A (en) * 1946-05-17 1953-01-06 Thomas R Mckenzie Rotary adhesive roll fabric cleaning device
US2693610A (en) * 1951-07-11 1954-11-09 Jr Robert K Hensley Lint removing implement
US2746696A (en) * 1953-12-11 1956-05-22 Minnesota Mining & Mfg Adhesive tape supply roll
US3030696A (en) * 1958-02-24 1962-04-24 Serwer Harry Paint applying roller and method of making a cover therefor
US3115246A (en) * 1960-09-19 1963-12-24 Minnesota Mining & Mfg Core for pressure-sensitive adhesive tape

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US1070940A (en) * 1913-08-19 Bauer & Black Gauze-bandage roll.
US1805426A (en) * 1929-06-20 1931-05-12 Fred L Vanatta Chalk line spool
US1864877A (en) * 1930-12-15 1932-06-28 Marie Russell White Combined spool and container for adhesive tapes
US2119163A (en) * 1933-07-15 1938-05-31 Kalle & Co Ag Roll of adhesive strip
US2191704A (en) * 1935-03-26 1940-02-27 Bennett Arthur Transfer adhesive process and product
US2170147A (en) * 1937-01-21 1939-08-22 John D Lane Package of gummed bands or stickers
US2200721A (en) * 1939-06-01 1940-05-14 Marinsky Davis Thread spool and the method of constructing the same
US2423962A (en) * 1944-01-01 1947-07-15 Homer T Clark Lint remover
US2401842A (en) * 1944-01-10 1946-06-11 Charles F Slater Rotary cleaner roll and container therefor
US2624060A (en) * 1946-05-17 1953-01-06 Thomas R Mckenzie Rotary adhesive roll fabric cleaning device
US2693610A (en) * 1951-07-11 1954-11-09 Jr Robert K Hensley Lint removing implement
US2746696A (en) * 1953-12-11 1956-05-22 Minnesota Mining & Mfg Adhesive tape supply roll
US3030696A (en) * 1958-02-24 1962-04-24 Serwer Harry Paint applying roller and method of making a cover therefor
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Cited By (28)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3417418A (en) * 1966-07-06 1968-12-24 Lincrusta Adhesive-coated cleaning roller
US3421170A (en) * 1967-06-20 1969-01-14 Frank S Thomas Jr Jacketed roller-type lint remover
US3480982A (en) * 1967-11-24 1969-12-02 Arthur C Saunders Guide apparatus for cleaning gun barrels
FR2061192A5 (en) * 1969-09-10 1971-06-18 Roth Eric
US3742547A (en) * 1971-07-01 1973-07-03 M Sohmer Lint sweeper
EP0829222A1 (en) * 1996-09-13 1998-03-18 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Web material comprising a tackifier
WO1998010692A1 (en) * 1996-09-13 1998-03-19 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Web material comprising a tackifier
US5763038A (en) * 1997-02-25 1998-06-09 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Progressively perforated tape roll
US5878457A (en) * 1997-02-25 1999-03-09 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Coreless lint-removing tape roll
US5940921A (en) * 1997-02-25 1999-08-24 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Applicator for a coreless tape roll
US6746974B1 (en) * 1999-03-10 2004-06-08 3M Innovative Properties Company Web material comprising a tackifier
US20030165650A1 (en) * 2001-03-06 2003-09-04 Takayuki Hirota Roll type adhesive cleaner and method for producing the same
US20070104916A1 (en) * 2001-03-06 2007-05-10 Kao Corporation Roll type adhesive cleaner and method for making the same
US20030088928A1 (en) * 2001-10-18 2003-05-15 Akihito Shizuno Adhesive roll cleaner
US20030167583A1 (en) * 2002-02-28 2003-09-11 Akihito Shizuno Adhesive roll cleaner
US7137165B2 (en) * 2002-02-28 2006-11-21 Kao Corporation Adhesive roll cleaner
US20040058116A1 (en) * 2002-09-25 2004-03-25 Nitto Denko Corporation Tacky dust cleaner
CN1303937C (en) * 2002-09-25 2007-03-14 日东电工株式会社 Viscous dust remover
US7413786B2 (en) * 2002-12-26 2008-08-19 Kao Corporation Adhesive roll cleaner
US20060040080A1 (en) * 2002-12-26 2006-02-23 Kao Corporation Adhesive roll cleaner
US20040134003A1 (en) * 2003-01-09 2004-07-15 Helmac Products Corporation Adhesive roller
US6907639B2 (en) 2003-02-04 2005-06-21 Frank's Creative Idea's, Inc. Paint roller
US20040148726A1 (en) * 2003-02-04 2004-08-05 Edward Chelednik Paint roller
US20050074572A1 (en) * 2003-10-01 2005-04-07 3M Innovative Properties Company Debris removal tape and method of using same
US20070136966A1 (en) * 2005-12-15 2007-06-21 3M Innovative Properties Company Lint remover
WO2013011525A1 (en) * 2011-07-18 2013-01-24 Bhushan Fani Fibrous handy cleaner for devices
US8904588B2 (en) 2012-12-19 2014-12-09 Stanley Taub Cleaning device
AT14361U3 (en) * 2015-05-04 2016-01-15 Fidel Gmeiner Gmbh & Co Kg Lint roller

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